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Rayman

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Rayman

Rayman Legends headed to PS4, Xbox One next year


More versions for people to sadly ignore
Nov 12
// Jordan Devore
In February 2014, Ubisoft will bring Rayman Legends to Xbox One and PlayStation 4. Remember when this was going to be a Wii U exclusive? At this rate, my memory has nearly been wiped clean. The news originated from an earning...
Reviews photo
Reviews

The best and worst games of the week


Review Round-up: Week ending 11/9
Nov 09
// Wesley Ruscher
November is here and the holidays are just around the corner. And while most of this year's major blockbusters have already hit, as we gear up for the inevitable onslaught of the next generation, there are still some surprise...

Review: Rayman Fiesta Run

Nov 07 // Chris Carter
Rayman Fiesta Run (Android, iOS [reviewed on an iPhone 5])Developer: UbisoftPublisher: UbisoftRelease Date: November 7, 2013MSRP: $1.99 It's not hard to grasp the concept of Fiesta Run -- you start a level, Rayman runs automatically, you jump around and avoid obstacles until you reach the end, then you repeat the process. Just like Jungle Run, your goal is to collect 100 Lums (coins, essentially) in each level, which earns you a star rating dependent on how many you grabbed. After collecting all 100, you'll unlock a new, more difficult rendition of the stage, but otherwise, stars are used to unlock spaces on a "track" similar to Final Fantasy X's sphere grid (but without the option to choose your path). If you want access to a new level, you'll need to do well enough to fill the track -- a stark departure from Jungle Run, which simply allowed you to continue on at will. What this "track" system does is essentially gate progress until you've performed at a certain level. While it isn't a major issue early in the game, later on it becomes more of a problem, and unlocking everything requires you to get full perfects throughout. If every single level was a joy to play it would be fine, but since a few are devoid of life, playing them over and over to earn the right to get to the good stuff can be frustrating. [embed]264879:51196:0[/embed] Then you add a light microtransaction system to the mix, allowing you to purchase extra Lums to unlock new cosmetic content and power-ups. It's never as much of a nuisance as the gated level system is, but it's there, and feels out of place compared to the in-app-purchase-free launch of Jungle Run (which has since added IAPs, funnily enough). But while this scheme can weigh down the fun at times, the good news is Fiesta Run is still enjoyable overall. All of the core gameplay is preserved from the original, in the sense that it feels less like a soulless "endless runner," and more like a legitimate platformer that happens to have an auto-run system. It uses a simple control scheme that just works, and should provide hours of entertainment to even the most staunch touch-screen haters. Fiesta Run isn't really a difficult or deep game in any sense, unless you're going for a perfect 100 score on every level. At that point it becomes insanely difficult, as you go for run after run, missing that one tiny Lum up in the corner somewhere, forcing you to do the entire level over again until you get it right. It's an odd design for sure, especially since an increasing amount of games let you keep your progress after revising a level to encourage completion. For the most part, the game reuses assets from its counterparts (in a good way), but each stage makes an effort to mix things up to the point where it doesn't get too stale. Once you pick up more abilities such as the hover power and the punch attack, levels open up a bit more as well beyond a "Point A to B" course. Though the actual stylistic themes change quite often, the soundtrack employs the same few tunes over and over, leading me to mute-city occasionally. Rayman Fiesta Run flirts with the concept of unacceptable microtransactions, but thankfully, there's still a ton of bang for your buck here if you can deal with the progression requirements. With a wonderful set of visuals and an even better control scheme, Rayman fans have a lot to be excited about.
Rayman Fiesta Run photo
A fiesta and a siesta
Rayman Jungle Run was a perfect example of how to adapt a console game to a touch interface. It gorgeously preserved the sharp visuals from its console counterpart, and best of all -- it used a control scheme that actually wo...

Rayman photo
Rayman

Rayman: Fiesta Run dated for November 7, 2013


Yes please
Oct 24
// Abel Girmay
Can the best iOS game around (sorry Infinity Blade) be topped by its sequel? If the Rayman series' recent streak is any indicator, then yes. Rayman: Fiesta Run releases on November 7, 2013 on iOS, Google Play, and Amazon's A...
Ubisoft photo
Ubisoft

Rayman Legends, Splinter Cell didn't hit sales targets


The bad news keeps on coming
Oct 16
// Jordan Devore
I wanted Rayman Legends to sell well. Most of us did, hopefully. It's an already terrific game that looks even better when put up against some of the other stuff Ubisoft releases. During an earnings call, Ubisoft CFO Alain Ma...
PS Plus free game photo
PS Plus free game

Rayman Origins for Vita is this week's PS Plus bonus


And Europe shows us how it's done
Sep 23
// Jordan Devore
As a person whose heart isn't made of pure ice, I'm quite fond of Rayman Origins. It would have been a real treat for the newly-released Rayman Legends to be offered in the PlayStation Plus' Instant Game Collection, but it's ...
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Rayman Fiesta Run coming to iOS, Android, and Windows 8


The sequel to the best mobile game of 2012
Sep 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Rayman Jungle Run was fantastic, and was even Apple's Game of the Year no less. So it's no surprise that a sequel is on the way in the form of Rayman Fiesta Run, coming later this year for iPad, iPhone, Android, and Windows ...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Rayman Legends' missing Vita levels to be added via patch


But no time frame on when it'll happen
Sep 05
// Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft has been under fire lately from the handheld crowd when it was discovered that the PS Vita release of Rayman Legends was missing several levels that were included with the console versions of the game. So, when t...
Rayman Legends Wii  U photo
Rayman Legends Wii U

Rayman Legends is exclusive to the Wii U in Japan


Haha, what?
Aug 30
// Chris Carter
It feels like forever ago when console fans young and old were arguing over Ubisoft's decision to delay the Wii U version of Rayman Legends to port it to other consoles. But here we are on the eve of Legends' release, and it'...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Rayman Legends launch trailer sounds like woah


So soon
Aug 28
// Brett Makedonski
Rayman Legends is pretty great, so sayeth Jim Sterling, local authority on this sort of thing. So is this launch trailer, which shows off the gorgeous platforming action, and up to a quartet of characters moving to the ...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Legend of live-action Rayman


NIGHTMARES
Aug 28
// Tony Ponce
So this is a thing. Corridor Digital made a new SFX-driven action short based on Rayman Legends. Every role is played by a live actor save for Rayman. And Rayman is... ... uhhhhh... ... my God. It is a monster. The Legend of Rayman [YouTube]

Review: Rayman Legends

Aug 27 // Jim Sterling
Rayman Legends (PC, PS3, PS Vita, Xbox 360 [reviewed], Wii U)Developer: Ubisoft MontpellierPublisher: UbisoftReleased: September 3, 2013 (NA) / August 30, 2013 (EU)MSRP: $59.99 Rayman Legends has a slight story hinged around its rambunctious world, but it's disposable at best. This time around, the Teensies are held captive thanks to the machinations of five nefarious traitors, the Dark Teensies. The world is being swallowed by nightmares, and it's up to Rayman -- along with Globox and a growing army of playable allies -- to save the day. The platforming action remains largely unchanged from Origins, with up to four players able to jump, punch, glide and stomp their way through intricately designed levels. Perhaps moreso than last time, precision is everything, as just one ill-timed jump can cause players to miss a secret or meet an untimely end. When you hit the zone and make a perfect run through a level, the results are exhilarating and the visuals take on something akin to poetry. When you screw up, you feel terrible. Once again, each stage is littered with Lums to collect, Teensies to rescue, and secret doors to uncover with a sharp eye and well-timed jumps.  [embed]260818:50241:0[/embed] At times, the need for precision can lead to awkwardness, as even the slightest undesired nudge of the analog stick can make the difference between a character sprinting up a wall gracefully and running dumbfounded on the spot. There are also several times where either clairvoyance or trial-and-error are needed to predict a sudden trap -- and you can always spot these moments because a checkpoint has been cheekily placed before each one. These occurrences can be a little frustrating, especially because when it works, it works so well, and failure to achieve that elegance in platforming is most unfulfilling.  Still, it works perfectly most of the time, and it's a satisfying experience that fails to ever get old. A new highlight are the musical stages, rhythmic levels unlocked once a world has been beaten. Players are encouraged to rush headlong, timing their jumps and attacks to the tune of a song -- usually a recognizable pop tune given a cute reworking. Charging through a stage while "Black Betty" plays -- complete with enemies singing backup vocals -- is simply inspired stuff.  The musical levels are but one example of the variety to be found in Legends. Not content to simply provide endless platforming levels, Legends will provide quasi-stealth sections, with players having to avoid searchlights in underwater bases, toss in some shooting gameplay with magically-powered fist projectiles, or have players manipulating the environment with the help of Murfy the Fairy.  In what was clearly included for the Wii U's sake, various stages involve using Murfy to pull platforms, cut ropes, or tilt entire rooms. A Wii U copy of the game was not provided for review, but Murfy's actions will be controlled on the GamePad screen using touch controls. As with everything, timing is essential, as players will be required to pull, push, and snip things at just the right moment -- and sometimes judge when not to interact with an object at all, lest it be a nasty trick to box you in.  On the provided Xbox 360 copy, this gameplay is rendered down to its basest functions -- press a button when near an interactive object, and Murfy will automatically do what you need to him to do. It's a simplistic system that feels somewhat pointless on any other machine than the Wii U, but given my feeling that Murfy's entire inclusion was little more than a meaningless tech demo anyway, I'm not exactly distraught by the reduced emphasis -- not least for the fact that some levels can move so fast, I'd rather be pressing a single button than messing about with touchscreens.  There are also boss stages, replacing the mosquito-mounted flying levels from Origins. This change was, I feel, slightly for the worse, as the mosquito levels were amazing fun and the bosses are all comparatively mundane and formulaic. They still have their fun moments, and are hilariously designed, but I can't say I found them particularly exciting.  The meat of Legends is contained in five distinct worlds, each brimming with personality and packing memorable levels and the occasional stunning setpiece. It really says a lot that a humble 2D game, through the power of pacing and engaging art direction, can be just as jawdropping as any CryEngine-powered visual overdose. Moments in Legends are built on thrills that can go toe-to-toe with far less humble, immeasurably more extravagant titles.  It'll take you maybe around six hours to complete the five main worlds, but there's plenty of content beyond simply that. As well as the need to replay stages to collect Teensies and unlock more playable characters, a whole host of rebuilt levels from Rayman Origins are included, as well as special challenge stages that change each day, and record scores online to crown a single winner. Beaten stages can be "invaded" with new monsters and subsequent rewards, and there's also a fun 2D football game for multiple players.  As rewards for beating stages with enough Lums, players can unlock Lucky Cards which, when scratched, either award a free Teensie, more Lums, an Origin level, or a Creature. Creatures are displayed in their own little gallery, and give out Lums on a daily basis. Collecting Lums is required to unlock all the playable characters, so it's well worth building up one's menagerie -- as if the silly designs of the Creatures themselves weren't encouragement enough. Lucky Cards must be scratched to reveal winning panels -- another Wii U contrivance, haphazardly performed using twin analog sticks on other consoles.  It goes without saying that the visual design of Rayman Legends is absolutely beautiful. The cartoon style of Origins has been given a facelift, with extra detail, shading, and subtle 3D elements. The added touches make for a handpainted quality, animated with fluid flawlessness, and exuding the kind of rich color scheme that truly pops on an HDTV. Things are more detailed, but avoid the visual clutter that could have been had as a result.  Similarly, the audio is top notch, with amusing sound effects and an impeccable soundtrack. The music is as energetic as ever, and the aforementioned musical stages are a delight for the ears. If anything can be said of Rayman Legends, it's that nobody was asleep at the wheel when it came to the presentation of the whole package.  Rayman Legends is occasionally flustering, and sometimes seems to demand more than a conventional controller is capable of. The surprisingly slapdash jury-rigging of Wii U features on other systems is glaring in its inelegance, too. However, we're still left with an impressively designed platformer that proves itself a worthy followup to Rayman Origins, making a few notable omissions, but adding some excellent new ideas of its own.  Charming, funny, and only sometimes exasperating, Rayman Legends is the kind of game that makes this industry a better place for its existence. 
Rayman Legends photo
Bam-A-Lam
Rayman Origins was an undeniable treasure when it was released in 2011. A masterclass in platform game design, wrapped in a beautiful artistic style and incredible soundtrack, Origins was proof that the mascot platformer can ...

Ubi at PAX photo
Ubi at PAX

Ubisoft bringing six games and new competition to PAX


What are you looking forward to?
Aug 26
// Brett Makedonski
PAX Prime is just a mere four days away. Where has the time gone? As people flock to the Emerald City by the tens of thousands, companies are revealing their plans for the convention. Today, Ubisoft announced that it's showca...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Rayman Legends takes on Kill Bill with 'Gloo Gloo'


Musical level featuring The 5.6.7.8.'s
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
Every time I see another one of these musical levels from Rayman Legends, I curse the fact that the game isn't coming out until early next month. Here's what happens when The 5.6.7.8.'s "Woo Hoo" gets introduced to the world...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Rayman Legends Wii U to feature Mario and Luigi costumes


A neat little extra
Aug 07
// Chris Carter
During today's Nintendo Direct, Satoru Iwata confirmed that Rayman Legends will feature exclusive Mario and Luigi costumes for Rayman and Globox. This is basically Nintendo's answer to the platform specific costumes of Splint...
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Ubisoft announcing a new next-gen title at gamescom


Plus they're bringing their rest of the lineup to the German show
Aug 01
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Sure, Ubisoft is skipping their usual gamescom press conference this year, but that doesn't mean they're going to have a light lineup at the show. In fact, Ubisoft will be unveiling a new next-gen game! On top of that, they'l...
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Rayman Legends is coming to PC hooraaaaay!


Ubisoft gets a bingo on its multiplat scorecard
Jul 25
// Jim Sterling
Ubisoft has announced that Rayman Legends will be coming to PC on September 3 in North America, joining its sister versions on Wii U, PS3, Xbox 360, and PS Vita. Anybody preordering the digital version on PC will also get Ray...
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The DTOID Show: Seaman, Strider, & Adam Sessler!


Together, at last.
Jul 19
// Tara Long
Howdy, folks! Max is off in Hawaii being attacked by giant birds this week, so I got television's Adam Sessler to take his place on today's show. For the record, his hosting skills are impeccable but his drawings c...

Wii U delay brought way more content to Rayman Legends

Jul 17 // Steven Hansen
Rayman Legends (Wii U, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PlayStation Vita) Developer: Ubisoft Montpellier Publisher: Ubisoft Release: September 3, 2013 "When we look at it now, honestly, the delay was a good thing," lead game designer Emile Morel said. "Right now, I don't see what more we could add to it." Seems all these recent months spent weren't idly wasted on thumb twiddling, because Legends is bloated with great content. The Invasion levels are a mixture of existing assets. Legends is separated into different, self-contained worlds, each meant to "feel like an adventure," and provide some of the cohesion and framing its predecessor lacked. In the Invasion levels, the disparate worlds collide in an unholy union. Each main level has its own Invasion level that will unlock at various points in the game when it can be assumed your skills are up to snuff; for example, an early Invasion level might not unlock until you clear a more challenging world. Each Invasion has a 60-second time limit in which to save three Teensies that are strapped to bottle rockets at the end of the level. If your seconds start spilling over, Teensies start getting astronomical with a punctuality that Nicholas Cage would admire. 60 seconds. These challenging, fast-paced levels seem to be a nice analog for some of my favorite Origins levels, the rhythmic chest chasing levels. They require deft timing. Things get complicated in harder Invasion levels when Dark Rayman begins tailing you and you have to avoid him without sacrificing momentum or timing. As for the remastered Origins levels, "some of the levels we changed them almost entirely," associate producer Greg Hermittant noted. I played a few of the early ones which were much intact, save for the aesthetic boost with Legends' look and lighting, and the addition of Teensies to save scattered throughout the levels. Apparently some Murfy functionality was even added to some of the remastered Origins levels. "When they asked me what's the best version," Morel said, "pick the system you like to play on." Indeed, the main dividing factor in the Rayman Legends experience comes down to whether you want to use a touchscreen or not. While I find the touch screen functional to be novel, I also find it slows the game down more than the traditional controls, in which Murfy is mapped to a face button and will automatically go approximately where he should be. "We wanted to make sure when players start a level with Murfy they wouldn't groan and want a more classical level," Morel explained. "We want to keep the rhythm of Rayman." Using Murfy with the Xbox controller was relatively painless. "You have one more button to press, but you can play very fast." Having to occasionally watch out and direct Murfy definitely added a new wrinkle that I could sort of appreciate as I got into the groove and worked the extra layer into my strategy (I did all the speed runs in Origins), though I'm still hard pressed to say the addition is entirely wanted.  The 3D bosses at the end of each world also add a small, but welcomed layer to the experience. At the end of the newly shown off Fiesta de los Muertos -- which you play much through after having been transformed into a chicken -- you fight a giant, 3D luchador who menacingly sits behind the field of play and tries to squash you with his fist. Legends is the biggest Rayman ever and I'm beyond excited to play it to death.
New Rayman Legends stuff photo
More, more, more: That's how Rayman Legends likes it
Rayman Legends is finally almost here. The delay of the Wii U version after the announcement of PS3, 360, and Vita ports seems worlds away, but I'm finally about to embark on the evolution of the gorgeous, 2D platforming good...

Rayman Legends' Kung Foot photo
Rayman Legends' Kung Foot

Kung Foot: Rayman Legends gets great new minigame


Kung Foot: Enter the...foot
Jul 17
// Steven Hansen
Last week, Ubisoft held an event for Rayman Legends, a game that's been a long time coming thanks to a delay on account of incoming multiplatform ports. While I figured we might just about have seen everything we need to know...
Rayman photo
Rayman

Rayman Legends looks phenomenal as always


Shame it's not out yet!
Jun 10
// Jordan Devore
The E3 2013 Ubisoft press conference got off to an unusual start, but it wasn't long before the company made it to Rayman Legends which looks, simply put, phenomenal. We also got a nice CGI trailer that had me wanting anothe...

Rayman Legends is great, but you already knew that

May 30 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
[embed]252858:48458:0[/embed]
Rayman Legends photo
Just get it
There aren't many games out there where you just know you're going to buy it after the second you see it in action. Rayman Legends is one such game, and I've played it on every platform it's coming out for now. Xbox 360, Pla...

Ubisoft E3 photo
Ubisoft E3

Ubisoft's E3 plans include South Park: The Stick of Truth


And all the other games that you expect
May 29
// Brett Makedonski
At the beginning of the month, Ubisoft came out and said that it hadn't forgotten about South Park: The Stick of Truth, despite very little promotion after acquiring the game in the THQ fire-sale. That apparently still holds...
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Rayman Legends coming to PS Vita


Launching alongside console versions
May 28
// Jim Sterling
Ubisoft has confirmed that former Wii U exclusive Rayman Legends will be coming to the PlayStation Vita as well as Xbox 360 and PS3. It'll launch alongside its bigger console brethren in late September.  The Vita alterna...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Rayman Legends trailer goes all Mission: Impossible


Spies like us
May 14
// Brett Makedonski
The newest Rayman Legends trailer might take place under the sea, but that doesn't mean you can expect singing crabs and mermaids. Well, actually, that would have been a reasonable expectation; Rayman does have a t...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Impressions: Rayman Legends Challenge App


App-ology accepted
Apr 26
// Chris Carter
The Rayman Legends fiasco has been interesting, to say the least. Initially, Wii U fans were extremely excited at the prospect of an exclusive Rayman game, that looked to trump the original on paper in nearly every way. Life ...
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Rayman Legends Challenges free on Wii U this week


Ubisoft with the olive branch
Apr 22
// Jim Sterling
Though Wii U owners may still be steamed about the big Rayman Legends delay, Ubisoft's hoping to make up for it on April 25 with the exclusive eShop release of Rayman Legends Challenges -- a free series of levels for Nintendo...
Rayman: Jungle Run photo
Rayman: Jungle Run

Free update for Rayman: Jungle Run brings 20 new levels


A thank you letter to fans
Apr 11
// Abel Girmay
Between a Google Play editor choice award, and winning iOS game of the year, it's been a  pretty good run (no pun intended) for Rayman: Jungle Run. As a thank you to fans, Ubisoft has released a title update -- simultan...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Rayman Legends will have 30 extra levels


Ubisoft Montpellier is making good on its promise of additional content
Apr 10
// Tony Ponce
The Wii U-exclusive Rayman Legends demo coming out this month will contain the full online challenge mode. A nice treat, sure, but that still doesn't change the fact that the game was already finished and should have been out...
Rayman Legends photo
Rayman Legends

Rayman Legends Wii U demo has an exclusive level


Okay then
Apr 10
// Jordan Devore
In a third-party release schedule for Wii U, Nintendo dropped additional details on the impending Rayman Legends demo. Pegged as arriving late this month, the demo will contain the game's full online challenge mode. Acco...

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