hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

Point and click

AR-K–Chapter 2 photo
AR-K–Chapter 2

AR-K–Chapter 2 is a sequel to a game I bet you didn't play


Well, maybe you did, I don't know
Jul 14
// Brittany Vincent
AR-K –Chapter 2: The Girl Who Wasn’t There- is the sequel to point-and-click adventure game AR-K –Chapter 1-. I'm willing to bet you haven't played it, but the brainchild of Gato Salvaje Studio is now availa...
Grim Fandango photo
Grim Fandango

Grim Fandango is headed back to PC in all its remastered glory


I can't wait to dive back in
Jul 09
// Brittany Vincent
It seems like it should have been a no-brainer, given the game's original success as a PC adventure games, but the remastered version of Grim Fandango has just been confirmed for PC as well. Additionally, it'll be headed ...
Ouch photo
Ouch

This Gods Will Be Watching trailer made me wince


Not your average point-and-click
Jul 02
// Jordan Devore
I'll go out on a limb here and suggest that we're not going to feel good about ourselves after playing Deconstructeam's point-and-click thriller Gods Will Be Watching. The game is out July 24 for Windows, Mac, and Linux on S...
The Golden Wake photo
The Golden Wake

It's back to the 1920s in The Golden Wake


Wadjet Eye is publishing this point-and-click adventure game.
Jun 26
// Alasdair Duncan
The 1920s is another one of those time periods, rich in history but still passed over as a setting for videogames. The Golden Wake is a new point-'n'-click adventure game from genre specialist Wadjet Eye set in Miami that sp...
Tormentum photo
Tormentum

Tormentum sure looks like a messed up adventure game


Well, that's me not sleeping easy tonight...
Jun 18
// Alasdair Duncan
It seems that both horror and adventure games are in rude health in 2014, so it's no surprise to see a game combine the two. The trailer above is for Tormentum, a new indie point-and-click game from developer OhNoo that has ...
Broken Age photo
Broken Age

You can play Broken Age now on your iPad


Now's the best time to check it out
Jun 12
// Brittany Vincent
Double Fine's latest adventure game Broken Age has made its way to the iPad, and it's just as gorgeous as a mobile game as it was upon its original release. It's split up into two releases, and right now, you can catch Broke...
No Wave photo
No Wave

No Wave is a point-and-click game set in NY's music scene


Sonic Youth and Swans on the soundtrack? Win!
May 14
// Alasdair Duncan
Aside from videogames, music is my other big passion in life, whether it's just listening to it, going to gigs or reading about various bands or periods in music history. So when I got a message from the developers of No Wave...
 photo
Max interviews the creator of this dark future
Max sat down with Sam Farmer, the creator of Last Life. Being developed in association with Double Fine, Last Life is a point-and-click adventure game set in a cyber-noir future, where death doesn't always mean the end. Check out the Kickstarter for this game here.

Kentucky Route Zero photo
Kentucky Route Zero

Kentucky Route Zero: Act III is out now


Tricksy stealth releases
May 06
// Brett Makedonski
We've had to wait a little while, but Kentucky Route Zero: Act III is finally available for download. It's been close to a year since the second part of the five act story launched, notwithstanding the release of the muc...
Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

I hope The Eldritch Cases: Dagon is Lovecraft done right


Innsmouth, Dr. Herbet West, Dagon... all the ingredients are there
Apr 25
// Alasdair Duncan
It's been quite a while since a game did the Cthulhu mythos, created by HP Lovecraft, really well. Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth was an inspired but uneven game and that came out in 2005. The Eldritch Cases: Dag...
The Walking Dead photo
The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead is finally headed to PlayStation 4


I'm not really surprised, but good news!
Apr 22
// Brittany Vincent
It's been some time since The Walking Dead shambled into our hearts, but there's still reason to revisit Telltale's zombie opus, especially since it looks as though the Game of the Year Edition is coming for PlayStation 4 own...
Inspire Me photo
Inspire Me

Rewrite history in the point-and-click game Inspire Me


Beethoven didn't come up with those tunes himself, y'know?!?
Apr 22
// Alasdair Duncan
When will kids learn -- you just don't mess around with time machines. Honestly, it's like the kids of 2040 have never seen Back to the Future. At least, young Kelvin, the main character in Inspire Me, clearly hasn't: he's b...

Gods Will Be Watching stressed me the hell out

Apr 14 // Patrick Hancock
[embed]273248:53398:0[/embed] Gods Will Be Watching began as a game jam game, but the reception was so good that the developers, all five of them, decided to expand the concept into a full game. Players are put into an unfavorable scenario with the simple task to handle it. The scenario at PAX was in some sort of hi-tech facility, where my team of brigands had already captured 4 hostages, and a SWAT team-like force was bearing down on us. I had to buy enough time so my buddy could hack the entire system in order to escape. The hostages proved a big problem to tackle. When clicking on the hostages, I had a myriad of options including to calm them down, shout at them, kick them, or kill them. If I was too mean to them, they could try to commit suicide. If I was too lax, they would take advantage and mutiny. I never did find the right middle ground, since my first attempt was very brief as the SWAT team killed us, and the second time each and every hostage tried to run out, leaving me with no collateral. Keeping the SWAT team at bay was a matter of using one of my other cohorts to either fire at them or to negotiate. Either one would help postpone their march, buying me more time to finish the hack. Another ally could charge up his hack boost, and it could be unleashed once it got to an acceptable percentage. He could also display another screen on a camera, allowing me to keep an eye on how close the SWAT team actually was to the room. You have to be an awesome juggler to succeed at Gods Will Be Watching. If you get too caught up with one thing, say, the hostages, another will come and bite you in the butt (like the SWAT team). Scenarios are very tense, making it very easy to lose concentration and blow an entire scenario. It’s also a game that will test players’ ethics and resolve, making it a game that’s also incredibly enjoyable to just watch and see how certain people react to certain scenarios. Gods Will Be Watching will be out in June for PC. You can play the original game jam game here.
 photo
I thought I was a nice person...
I have found myself both playing and looking forward to more and more “point-and-click” games in the past few years than ever before. I didn’t grow up with games like Day of the Tentacle or the Monkey Island...

Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

Welcome to The Weird Story of Waldermar the Warlock


Ah alliteration, a headline writer's best friend
Apr 14
// Alasdair Duncan
When a developer emails you and says "Well, yet another Kickstarter," you have to smile. At least Paco at Spanish indie studio enComblot has a sense of humor about the state of crowdfunding. His team is currently working on ...
Dead Synchronicity photo
Dead Synchronicity

There are eight days left to fund Dead Synchronicity


Here's a new teaser trailer to whet the appetite
Apr 03
// Alasdair Duncan
It was the end of March when I saw Dead Synchronicity on Kickstarter, a great-looking science-fiction adventure game with heavy horror and dystopic themes. I've played the demo which is built on the alpha version of the game...
Tex Murphy photo
Tex Murphy

Tex Murphy: Tesla Effect is now available for pre-order


Celebrate by watching poor old Tex get beaten up
Apr 03
// Alasdair Duncan
The fact that a new Tex Murphy game is just a few weeks away makes me really happy; it might not kick off a rebirth of the full-motion video adventure game genre but darn, it feels good to have Tex back in 2014. If you're ke...
Dead Synchronicity photo
Dead Synchronicity

Dead Synchronicity is great-looking sci-fi adventure game


Spanish developer Fictiorama is doing well in its Kickstarter campaign
Mar 25
// Alasdair Duncan
I think it's fair to say Kickstarter has given point-'n'-click adventure games a boost, not that the genre really needed it. Dead Synchronicity is a new adventure game from Spanish developer Fictiorama Studios which tells th...
The Walking Dead photo
The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead Season 2 Episode 2 is out on March 4


'A House Divided' out next Tuesday for PC, Mac, and PS3, later for other platforms
Feb 27
// Darren Nakamura
It feels like it has been way too long since "All That Remains," which was the first episode in Season Two of Telltale's award-winning adventure The Walking Dead series. In reality, it has only been a couple months, and we c...
Gods Will Be Watching photo
Gods Will Be Watching

Gods Will Be Watching coming to Steam, GOG in June


I hope none are watching me in the bathroom
Feb 26
// Alasdair Duncan
Last year we heard that Devlover Digital would be publishing the tense, point-and-click game Gods Will Be Watching from Spanish developer Deconstructeam. If you've been waiting for the full release then, it's still a few mon...
Zero Escape woes photo
Zero Escape woes

Zero Escape not profitable in Japan, trilogy end on hold


No reward for the virtuous
Feb 13
// Steven Hansen
999: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors' success in the West was enough to birth a sequel, Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward. That sequel ends on a cliffhanger and it doesn't look like it will be resolved any time soon. Ser...

Review: Broken Age: Act 1

Jan 24 // Caitlin Cooke
Broken Age: Act 1 (PC)Developer: Double Fine ProductionsPublisher: Double Fine ProductionsRelease Date: January 14, 2014 (for backers) / January 28, 2014MSRP: $24.99 (with free update for Act 2) Shay has lived his entire existence on a spaceship designed for toddlers. Day after day he’s coddled by the ship’s “mother,” an overbearingly saccharine computer unwilling to allow him to take care of himself. Mother babies Shay in every way, including knitting sentient pals to keep him company and forcing him to take his daily nutrition paste. Shay’s unending routine consists of completing childlike “missions,” like saving his yarn pals from an ice cream avalanche or a hug-attack, which are designed to keep him occupied throughout his existence. Struggling with his confined life, Shay manages to discover a secret part of the ship and quickly experiences what it means to have real responsibility. Vella wakes up on the last day of her life, preparing to uphold the long-standing tradition of being eaten by a giant abomination named Mog Chothra to keep her village safe. A town that once prided itself on raising fierce monster-fighting warriors, Sugar Bunting now concedes to offering up its finest maidens to Mog Chothra during what they call the “Maiden’s Feast.” While the other maidens are excited to be considered potential meals, Vella can’t help but wonder if there’s another way out. She rises up to fight against her supposed destiny of becoming a delectable treat for Mog Chothra and breaks free to search for a way to defeat the monster before it consumes her town. Both stories are engrossing and highlight a certain childish curiosity that I haven’t felt in a long time. I adored every second wandering through these worlds - the dialogue on all fronts is hilarious and crafty, the story elements thoughtful. Broken Age captures a style that is imaginative and expressive while still maintaining an environment that's easy to interact with. Above all, the art is captivating so much so that at certain points in the game I found myself staring at scenes just to take it in. Almost everything comes to life in Broken Age - characters range from charming to downright ingenious, all with spot-on humor and fantastic voice acting. One of my favorites is a needy spoon who regularly vies for the attention of Shay by shouting things like "It is my honor to be your training spoon today sir, I can't wait to start MISSION NUTRITION!" Puzzles are integrated well into the character’s personalities - I found it amusing to discover what dialogue or actions would make characters give up an item or a piece of information. The game allows for switching between both stories seamlessly, which is not only creative, but a very useful feature. I enjoyed going back and forth regularly because it allowed for me to pace out the stories (for example, not getting too far on one side) and also gave me a chance to escape if a particular puzzle was stumping me. I also felt that Shay’s story involved more interactive gameplay elements while Vella’s focused more on dialogue and riddles, so being able to leave one story and hop to the other gave me a nice break. The format of Broken Age is obviously very reminiscent of the older point-and-click adventure games, however there are a few interesting camera perspectives and design choices in the game that change up the formula a bit. For example, in one area of the game you can literally fall through clouds if you’re not careful where you step. Another section has the camera angle peering in through a window that’s being cleaned by an adorable spaceship minion. These details seem marginal, but they keep the gameplay fresh and original. I found that the gameplay is so seamlessly integrated with the art that it’s sometimes hard to tell when you’re supposed to be viewing a scene and when you need to take action. For instance, it took me a while to solve one of the first puzzles in the game because the action I needed to take was during what I thought was a cinematic sequence. Although I appreciate that the game never took me out of the moment mentally, it did become frustrating after a while. My solution to this was to whip my mouse around the screen just in case the action circle appeared in future cinematics. Broken Age manages to keep the hand-holding clues to a minimum without completely withholding answers from the player. However, as the game progressed I wasn't entirely clear on what actions I could take. During one puzzle in particular, I had tried to combine and use every item possible to get past what I thought was the obstacle, but really all I had to do was move around it. The puzzles eventually make sense in time and are fairly thoughtful, although some of them could have stood to be a bit harder -- because for the most part, they didn't require a lot of brainpower. In the end this may not be a terrible thing but I would like to see a tad more complication thrown into the mix for Act 2. I haven’t felt this surge of nostalgia and excitement about a game in a long time, and I truly think Broken Age will be looked back fondly as one of the greats. That being said, the first Act is only a few short hours and ended on a nail-biting cliffhanger with no word on how long we’ll be waiting for the rest of the game. In some ways I feel cheated, but in the end it’s the heart of the game that matters - and that certainly isn't broken.
Broken Age review photo
Point-and-click heaven
[Disclosure: I backed the Kickstarter. A review copy was used for this verdict.] The game formerly known as "Double Fine Adventure" has finally made its debut -- or should I say, half-debut. Broken Age: Act 1 is the culmina...

Review: Gomo

Dec 18 // Alasdair Duncan
Gomo (PC [reviewed], Mac)Developer: Fishcow StudioPublisher: Daedalic EntertainmentReleased: December 6, 2013MRSP: $7.99/£5.99 Gomo's story is told almost exclusively without dialogue or text, aside from some thought bubbles and gibberish alien speak. This would mean that the story is carried out with non-visual cues but there's not really much to explain; aliens kidnap dog, you get crystal, you give crystal to aliens. It's all very simple but Gomo has a lot going on, just not things that directly affect Gomo himself. [embed]267647:51924:0[/embed] There's a wealth of little background details or scenes that don't flesh the world out in any narrative sense, they just add a little color to what's happening. Like the little guy living in a pipe that's woken up by a spider or the tiny stickman who slides down the snowy mountain in the background, on a sled. None of these even affect Gomo in his quest but they're fun little touches that actually had me laughing at the end. Gomo sticks to point-and-click tradition in that you'll find objects in which to interact with characters and the environment so that you can proceed. What's most noticeable is Gomo's movement -- instead of having full reign of the 2D world, Gomo must be moved to specific points if you want to interact with something. For instance if you had picked up a key for a door, you can't just use the key with the door; you have to move Gomo directly to the door before you unlock it. It slows down how quickly you'll progress but it does lead Gomo to having small, single-screen levels. There's no backtracking or carrying around a bloated inventory of items, so the solution will always be in front of you. However, that streamlined approach leads to some problems that could easily be avoided. Often, Gomo is standing in front of an item he needs to either pick up or interact with. There's no "hotspotting" or way of showing all the objects in the world that Gomo can work with, meaning you're left to move the mouse over everything until you find the relevant item. A late-game puzzle is maddeningly frustrating as the required final item is a small sliver of wire hanging from a ceiling, almost completely unnoticeable until an accidental mouse swipe. Such problems are few and far between, though; Gomo's challenge level is fairly low and most solutions present themselves fairly neatly and practically. There's a couple of times where the answer is simply get the right key for the door, press the button for the elevator, or flick some switches. There's a practicality to a big chunk of the puzzles but there's a few familiar brainteasers that will be familiar to most gamers. Overall the challenge level is geared towards younger gamers; if you rush through the game you can complete Gomo in maybe just over an hour. The story is simple and the characters you meet have a simple charm to them and the pace of the game means you'll be able to whiz through it to see the next kooky scene. Some might find the asking price a bit much for a short adventure but Gomo delivers a simple but fun point-'n'-click experience. 
Gomo photo
This charming but simple adventure game hits the mark
Gomo had a bad dream in which his precious pooch Dingo was kidnapped by an evil force. When he wakes up, he finds that his dog has actually been stolen by an advanced alien race who want Gomo to steal a rare crystal from a ne...

Broken Age photo
Broken Age

Wil Wheaton joins the cast of Double Fine's Broken Age


Meet Curtis the Lumberjack
Dec 07
// Wesley Ruscher
The man who has forever cast a dark stigma on my name, Wil Wheaton, has joined the cast of Double Fine's upcoming point-and-click adventure game Broken Age. Picking up the axe as Cutis the Lumberjack, a character brought bac...
Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

Isometric sci-fi horror game Stasis funded on Kickstarter


Targeting a late 2014 release
Dec 03
// Jordan Devore
With three days remaining in its crowdfunding campaign, Stasis has raised the necessary $100,000 to move forward on Kickstarter. I had completely missed this Windows / Mac project until today, which I feel bad about, now that...
Moebius photo
Moebius

Here are some screenshots and a trailer for Moebius


This adventure game is coming from veteran designer Jane Jensen
Nov 26
// Alasdair Duncan
I've remarked before about how the adventure game genre didn't necessarily need an injection of life but it's no surprise that Kickstarter definitely attracted big names to return to the genre. Moebius is the return to the a...

Review: The Shivah - Kosher Edition

Nov 23 // Alasdair Duncan
The Shivah - Kosher Edition [PC]Developer: Wadjet Eye GamesPublisher: Wadjet Eye GamesRelease Date: November 21, 2013MRSP: $4.99/£3.99  Rabbi Russell Stone has been having a bad few years; his faith has waned along with the congregation of his New York synagogue. Frustrated, broke, and bitter, his fortunes turn around when a deceased former member of his congregation leaves the Rabbi $10,000 in his will. Stone clearly needs the money but his conscience won't let him just accept it; he needs to find out why this man left him all this money. Needless to say Rabbi Stone and the dead man have history and it's this murky past that will lead Rabbi Stone on a personal journey of potential redemption.  Initially conceived as a competition entry, then updated for general release in 2006, The Shivah is fairly short and simple adventure game. Indeed, it's more of a murder mystery that uses adventure game mechanics to propel the story forward. Although there is an inventory, Rabbi Stone will only accrue a handful of items; there's no combining items to solve puzzles or problems. The real-world, dramatic setting wouldn't quite fit with some of the more fanciful puzzles you would find in some adventure games. [embed]266162:51526:0[/embed] Instead, The Shivah is about sleuthing and dialogue. Rabbi Stone is determined to find out why the dead man has left him this money and it's this determination that gets him involved in a sinister crime syndicate. Progress is made by examining clues and making the correct choices in conversations with the characters Stone will meet. Stone has a special Rabbi Response in dialogue options, which basically means he'll answer a question with a question of his own (amusingly foreshadowed by an anecdote you'll see at the start of the game). Whilst it's an interesting touch, it will come in handy towards the end of the game in a unique conversation which I won't spoil. There's a number of choices during the game that can lead the story in a variety of outcomes. True, most of them are serious black-and-white choices but there's more than one way to end the story, good and bad. What may disappoint gamers is the length of The Shivah -- it will take maybe two hours to complete. However, that short running length stops the story from veering off on tangents. All in all, the story escalates quickly over a few hours of a single evening but The Shivah is about Rabbi Stone's investigation and the renewing of his faith. Whilst the graphics are up to the same standard of previous titles from Wadjet Eye, they're a big improvement over the 2006 edition. The Shivah will run in a low-res window, so it's not going to look great on a big monitor but will look just fine on a laptop. The new music score is low-key, melancholic, and fits the mood of the game and there's a nice treat post-credits where you can listen to some out-takes from the recording sessions. Whilst I'm not familiar at all with the Jewish faith, I didn't feel like that was an impediment to enjoying the story or themes of The Shivah. Whilst clearly a once-proud man, Rabbi Stone has become broken by the whims of the world; when he he receives the money it's his sense of right and wrong that leads him on his path and that's something relateable to everyone. Despite its short length, The Shivah is worth playing for its story and to see how far adventure games have come in the last few years.
The Shivah photo
Remastered adventure game is short but worth your time
Whilst Kickstarter has been abuzz in the last year or so seemingly reviving the point-'n-click adventure genre, Wadjet Eye Games has been quietly and successfully putting out quality adventure games for a number of years now ...

Wadjet Eye photo
Wadjet Eye

Wadjet Eye's debut The Shivah gets a re-release


Shivah: Kosher Edition will be released on November 21
Nov 18
// Alasdair Duncan
Despite enjoying the recent Wadjet Eye Games adventure titles, like Gemeni Rue and Resonance, I didn't know anything about the studio's first game The Shivah until now. First released in 2006, the game is being remastered an...
Greenlight photo
Greenlight

Shadowgate appears on Steam Greenlight


The rebirth of a classic adventure is near
Nov 14
// Audun Sorlie
It looks like Zojoi's upcoming Shadowgate reimagining is shaping up to be something real special. It's not every day you see a true point-and-click adventure, and certainly not one that looks as pretty as this. At the helm o...
Pendleton Ward Broken Age photo
Pendleton Ward Broken Age

Pendleton Ward joins the voice cast of Broken Age


Plays the part of 'the lovable Gus'
Nov 04
// Brett Zeidler
Hot off the heels of Day of the Devs, a video was posted on Double Fine's YouTube account today announcing -- and showing proof! -- that Pendleton Ward (best known as the creator of Adventure Time) will be lending his v...
Kentucky Route Zero sale photo
Kentucky Route Zero sale

Steam who? Kentucky Route Zero half off for 48 hours


Starting....ALREADY!
Jul 23
// Patrick Hancock
Kentucky Route Zero was an option during one of the Summer Steam Sale's "Community Choice" sales, but did you guys choose it? NO! Everyone picked freaking Dragon's Lair. Seriously? Dragon's Lair. What the heck, everyone ...

  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter?
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -