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Review: Her Story

Jun 29 // Laura Kate Dale
Her Story (PC [reviewed], iOS) Developer: Sam BarlowPublisher: Sam BarlowMSRP: $5.99Released: June 24, 2015 From the first set of clips tagged murder, I had several options of which narrative thread to pull at first. Did I want to look for clips related to the victim's name first? Maybe I should try to track down the name of the person accused of the crime? Perhaps I wanted to go in a completely different direction and try to find references to the murder weapon on the database. Right from the start, several different avenues opened up and the number of narrative options to explore only expanded as I went deeper into the case. You can't organize clips you find chronologically or watch them in order without re-searching for them, meaning that a lot of the work of piecing the narrative together is down to you as the player. There's an in game application that will show you which pieces of the case you've watched and which you have not, but it's up to you to keep track of where each statement falls in the timeline of police interviews and how their placement fits together. Much of the mechanical challenge in the game comes from piecing the story together in a way that draws conclusions you're personally satisfied with. At around two hours in, I had seen enough that the game offered to let me see the credits roll, but I personally wanted to know much more of what was happening and ended up playing for around six hours on and off before I was truly satisfied with my understanding of the events. Others I know felt they knew everything they needed within half an hour. In terms of pacing, Her Story lasts however long you want it to in regards to narrative. Any time you feel the game is ready to end, you can draw your conclusions and walk away. Ultimately, Her Story is a really inventive way of exploring a narrative with an impressive number of twists and turns. Every time I thought I understood what was happening, a clip would become unearthed that turned my understanding of the case on its head. The story was personal, uplifting, dark, twisted, insightful, and unnerving all at once. I know we get a lot of talk of narrative-focused adventures as "not games," but this is a narrative that undoubtedly benefits from its open-ended interactive nature. If this isn't a perfect example of how video game interactivity can enhance a narrative, I don't know what is. Being able to unearth these twists out of order, rushing to understand what you've found, and bouncing tonally back and forth across a series of interviews truly is the perfect way to experience this skillfully crafted narrative. It's not a typical structure for a game, but the mechanics really do work in the context of the narrative. If you like the idea of an open-ended '90s murder mystery with no guarantee you'll find a solid answer to its mysteries, then I can't recommend this highly enough. Her Story is a spectacular video game, and one of the most gripping personal narratives I've experienced in some time. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
Her Story review photo
Let's solve a mid-'90s murder
Her Story is certainly not what you would call a traditional video game. Set entirely on a police computer database in the English town of Portsmouth, it breaks a lot of new ground in terms of blending its narrative and gamep...

Batmod photo
Batmod

Batman: Arkham Knight mod lets you play as 10 extra characters


Forget DLC
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
While the PC version of Arkham Knight was busted enough Warner Bros. stopped selling it on Steam (probably wouldn't have happened if Steam didn't just start allowing refunds), some users are making the best of a bad situatio...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Sup Holmes gets high on life with Ben Shostak


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
Jun 28
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Shows over folks!...
This is Unreal photo
This is Unreal

Mario looks shiny and new in Unreal 4


Princess is in another castle
Jun 28
// Jed Whitaker
This fan-made mod of Mario in Unreal Engine 4 looks fantastic, and makes me want another 3D Super Mario game stat. I'm actually really surprised that Nintendo didn't announce at least some DLC for Super Mario 3D World&n...
It gets better photo
It gets better

Batman: Arkham Knight PC gets status update, new patch


Console graphics obtained!
Jun 28
// Jed Whitaker
Rocksteady has posted the following update on the Steam Community for PC version of Batman: Arkham Knight, which you can read below. Basically, they've acknowledged all the problems people were having and already release...
Troops vs Women photo
Troops vs Women

Murder women in SJW Riot: Troops vs Women - in Video Game


'Terrorising men, just for being men'
Jun 27
// Jed Whitaker
An Indiegogo campaign for a new game called SJW Riot: Troops vs Women - in Video Game, in which social justice warriors -- who are apparently only women -- have "lost their mind, again, and are terrorising men" according to t...
Shantae: Risky's Revenge photo
Shantae: Risky's Revenge

Shantae: Risky's Revenge - Director's Cut is better than the original


Now on PS4 this week
Jun 27
// Chris Carter
Let's take a little trip down memory lane, shall we? Back in 2002, WayForward released the original Shantae for the Game Boy Color. It wasn't a massive hit, but it quickly became a cult classic, and eventually lead to th...
Mighty Switch Force! photo
Mighty Switch Force!

Mighty Switch Force! is out on PC this week, and it plays great


$8.99 until July 2
Jun 27
// Chris Carter
If you haven't played the fantastic Mighty Switch Force! yet, now would be a good time to start. WayForward has just released the game on PC, and it's the most complete version to date, while also sporting the same gorge...

Beyond Earth & Civilization titles 81% off in Weekend Deals

Jun 27 // Dealzon
Civy Deals Use Code: GET23P-ERCENT-OFFGMG Civilization: Beyond Earth (Steam) — $15.40  (list price $50) Civilization V (Steam) — $5.77  (list price $30) Civilization IV: Complete (Steam) — $5.77  (list price $30) Civilization III Complete (Steam) — $0.96  (list price $5) Xbox One + Free Game + $50 (Saturday Only) Update: AC Unity now included for free in the bundles below. Xbox One Halo MCC Bundle + 2 Free Games + $50 Promo — $349 Xbox One 1TB Halo MCC Bundle + 2 Free Games + $50 Promo — $399 Recent Releases s06/25: Total War Attila: The Last Roman (Steam) — $9.95  (list price $15) 06/23: Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward — $29.99  (list price $40) 06/23: Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition (Steam) — $16.49  (list price $25) 06/23: Batman: Arkham Knight (PS4) — $49.99  (list price $60) 06/23: Batman: Arkham Knight (Steam) — $32.99  (list price $60) <- ehhhh maybe wait? 06/23: Evolve Hunting Season 2 (Steam) — $19.25  (list price $25) 06/09: Europa Universalis IV: Common Sense (Steam) — $10.49  (list price $15) Upcoming Releases 07/21: F1 2015 (Steam) — $35.49  (list price $55) 11/06: Call of Duty: Black Ops 3 (Steam) — $51.49  (list price $60) TBA: Trine 3: The Artifacts of Power — $18.69  (list price $22) TBA: Guild Wars 2: Heart Of Thorns + 2 Steam Games — $44.99  (list price $50) PC Game Deals Mac Game Store Super Summer Sale Use Code: PCGAMES5OFF Borderlands 2 Complete Edition Bundle (Steam) — $14.24  (list price $60) Daedalic Comedy Bundle (Steam) — $11.39  (list price $80) Broforce (Steam) — $11.39  (list price $15) Blackguards Franchise Pack (Steam) — $11.24  (list price $75) Star Wars Starter Pack (Steam) — $4.14  (list price $70) <- KOTOR, Jedi Knight I & II, etc. Games Republic Summer Blockbuster Sale Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin (Steam) — $26.79  (list price $40) Dark Souls: Prepare to Die Edition (Steam) — $4.99  (list price $20) DLGamer Hot Deals Ultra Street Fighter IV (Steam) — $15  (list price $30) Sid Meier's Civilization V: Complete Edition (Steam) — $12.50  (list price $50) Borderlands 2: Game of the Year Edition (Steam) — $10  (list price $40) XCOM: Enemy Unknown The Complete Edition (Steam) — $9.99  (list price $50) More PC Games Killing Floor 2 (Steam) — $25.49  (list price $30) Cities: Skylines Deluxe Edition (Steam) — $17.95  (list price $40) Football Manager 2015 (Steam) — $17  (list price $50) Cities: Skylines (Steam) — $14.49  (list price $30) <- cool beans. Alien: Isolation (Steam) — $12.50  (list price $50) World of Diving (Steam) — $9.24  (list price $20) Lost Planet 3 (Steam) — $6.25  (list price $25) Remember Me (Steam) — $6  (list price $30) Valkyria Chronicles (Steam) — $5  (list price $20) <- get it Console Game Deals $50 PlayStation Network Code (Digital Delivery) — $45  (list price $50) Bloodborne (PS4) — $39.99  (list price $60) The Order: 1886 (PS4) — $19.99  (list price $40) <- maybe  at this price? Final Fantasy Type-0 HD - Pre-owned (PS4, Xbox One) — $19.99  (list price $40) Gran Turismo 6 (PS3) — $14.99  (list price $30) Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag + AC Rogue (PS3) — $14.99  (list price $60) Xbox Live Gold 3 Month (Digital Code) — $14.95  (list price $25) Battlefield 4 (Xbox One) — $11.99  (list price $30) Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare (Xbox One) — $11.99  (list price $40) Laptop Deals 15.4" MacBook Pro, i7-4870HQ, 16GB, 512GB SSD — $2,049  (list $2,499) <- only $2k, you peasants. 14" Lenovo Y40-80, i7-5500U, Radeon R9, 16GB, 512GB SSD — $849  (list 1,600) 15.6" Asus, i7-4720HQ, 12GB, GTX 950M — $749  (list $1,000) Game deals from Dealzon. Sales from certain retailers help support Destructoid.
Weekend Deals photo
Facing Gandhi's wrath
Steam's Summer Sale is behind us but the the Summer PC gaming discounts continues on, especially on Civilization titles. This weekend GMG launched a wave of discounts on this year's Civilization Beyond Earth, drops to on...

Uncle Jack photo
Uncle Jack

Let We Happy Few's Uncle Jack tuck you into bed tonight


Definitely not creepy
Jun 26
// Darren Nakamura
It's getting late. Have you applied the minty paste to the exposed part of your skeleton? If so, let good old Uncle Jack read you a bedtime story. It will be fun! You won't have nightmares. Probably. One of the neat things a...
Ink photo
Ink

Ink is like Super Meat Boy if Meat Boy's blood were a rainbow


And if the environment were invisible
Jun 26
// Darren Nakamura
Today is a good day to celebrate rainbows, eh? I mean, every day is a good day to celebrate rainbows, and even if that weren't the case, I'd still highlight Super 91 Studios' Ink. It started as an entry to Ludum Dare 32, who...
Dad Beat Dads photo
Dad Beat Dads

Belated Father's Day: Throw babies in Dad Beat Dads


My dad could beat up your dad
Jun 26
// Darren Nakamura
True story: my dad used to be quite the brawler. At a stocky 5'5" (165 cm), he was often underestimated. What he lacks in height and reach he makes up for in tenacity. What I'm trying to say is that I'm pretty sure my dad co...

Willy Chyr's Relativity is Escher art come to life

Jun 26 // Jordan Devore
I only got to play around in one world, but there are others, each with a different theme or pattern. One was straight out of House of Stairs. Their designs make a lot of sense once you know that Chyr does, among other things, installation art. It shows. Relativity is somehow his first game. He has something cool in mind for how those worlds connect, but wouldn't say any more about the transitions. I'm curious to see how everything ties together, assuming I don't get totally lost.
Relativity preview photo
Walk on walls
When you jump off a ledge in Willy Chyr's Relativity, you can keep falling. Forever. The abstract world, made up of floating platforms and puzzle rooms, loops. Why climb a huge flight of stairs when you can just "fall" to the...

Warframe photo
Warframe

Unlike some games, Warframe has free emotes


;)
Jun 26
// Jordan Devore
This week's Destiny snafu is a case study in the making. There was a backlash against the collector's edition of an upcoming expansion, The Taken King, for locking content behind a way-too-steep price tag. Bungie came back wi...
Battlefront alpha photo
Battlefront alpha

Star Wars Battlefront alpha invites are going out


Check your inbox
Jun 26
// Jordan Devore
DICE has been emailing invites to the Star Wars Battlefront alpha on Origin. Well, more accurately, these are invites to apply for the alpha (which can be done here). No guarantees you'll get in, as "space in the Closed Alpha...
Toukiden photo
Toukiden

Toukiden: Kiwami is now on Steam but it's $60


I still love those demon designs
Jun 26
// Jordan Devore
Omega Force's action-RPG about hunting Oni has come to Steam. Great news! There are few if any games like this available on PC. But because it's Koei Tecmo, Toukiden: Kiwami costs $59.99. This is an expanded version of Toukid...
New SteamOS photo
New SteamOS

New SteamOS 'brewmaster' now available to download


Unless you're on AMD hardware
Jun 26
// Patrick Hancock
SteamOS, Valve's answer to Linux gaming, has been rather quiet recently. SteamOS is releasing later this year, and it looks like Valve just took the next big step towards achieving that goal. A brand new version of SteamOS, c...
Bombshell photo
Bombshell

3D Realms' female-led Bombshell gets a new trailer


Old school
Jun 26
// Chris Carter
3D Realms just shared its E3 gameplay trailer for the upcoming Bombshell project, and man does it look cheesy as all hell. Whether that's a good or a bad thing by the time the game hits I don't know, but for now you can...

Review: Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward

Jun 26 // Chris Carter
Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward (PC, PS3, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: Square EnixPublisher: Square EnixMSRP: $39.99 ($12.99 per month)Released: June 19, 2015 (Early Access), June 23, 2015 The "40 hours" of questing claim by Square Enix for the main story (levels 50-60) is accurate, but there's a caveat. You'll have to do a combination of sidequests, daily hunt marks (which can be done solo), and dungeons to push through some gaps, particularly in the middle levels. A few portions can be off-putting sometimes in terms of pacing, especially since the sidequests aren't nearly as good as the main story questline. Having said that, there wasn't any point, even the aforementioned lows, where I stopped having fun. There's just so much to do at this juncture of Final Fantasy XIV. I would frequently stop to do world hunts, which respawn every few hours or so in each area. They're even more fun now once you've unlocked flight for that particular zone, and all of the old hunts still exist too, albeit with smaller rewards for kills. You could hunt all day if you wanted to. I'd visit my new apartment in my friend's beachfront property villa in the Mist, and see what was going on with their new workshop -- a feature that lets you build Free Company (guild) airships in Heavensward, which go on expeditions for more items, similar to Retainer quests. Although I don't craft in any MMO I play, I hung out with a group of crafters and chatted for hours about the new crafter meta and theories, which are insanely deep. For those who aren't aware, each crafting and gathering class has its own miniature storyline, and crafters in particular now have a even more complicated method of creating new high quality items. Crafting was always like a puzzle, allowing players to learn the best rotations for creating the best items, but now, there's an "endgame" for the profession, featuring "company crafting" in guilds to help build airships, and more complicated patterns that will fetch big gains on the auction house. Flying makes gathering nodes more fun, which is a big improvement on the 2.0 system -- and more nuanced with new gathering abilities. I also took a break and started a Dark Knight, Astrologian, and Machinist, which are all new jobs in Heavensward. Although there's a debate going on regarding the latter's low damage output, I've grouped and played all of them, and each brings something unique to the table. The Dark Knight is really fun to tank with, as he can drop his "Grit" stance (having it on lets you take less damage) on occasion, which unlocks a whole host of damage-dealing abilities. [embed]294750:59242:0[/embed] As a general rule you always want to be doing your core job and tanking with Grit, but when you need that extra push, the Dark Knight is ready and willing, and feels far more engaging than the existing Warrior. The Astrologian sacrifices a bit of firepower (compared to the White Mage and Scholar) but makes up for it with a variety of different healing tricks, and the Machinist is one of the most complicated DPS classes in the game. They are all worthwhile additions, and each role (tank, healer, ranged DPS) fits perfectly in the current meta. By the time I was done with the story and hit level 60, I had played far more than 40 hours. While there are some predictable plot points and far too much Final Fantasy grandstanding, I have to say I enjoyed it as a whole. I really dig the dragon theme that permeates throughout the expansion (they commit to it), and I was satisfied with the conclusion, especially the final boss, which Final Fantasy fans will love. The epilogue also does its job of sufficiently teasing all of the upcoming free content updates, so I'm pumped to see where this goes. The dungeons are all par for the course, which again, is a theme with this expansion. Every dungeon, including the three level 60 ones at the end, have the same linear design that is crafted to prevent you from speedrunning them. Gone are the labyrinthine paths of some low-level dungeons, as well as the tricks of the trade of the vanilla endgame areas; the structure is basically the same every time. Thankfully, the boss fights are spectacular, and nearly every zone features an encounter that has something I've never seen before. Without spoiling it, my favorite dungeon has a fight where a bird flies up into the air, and causes the entire battlefield to fill with fog, forcing you to find his shadow before he comes back down. Another hilariously tasks players with picking up totems and placing them in certain areas to prevent a boss from casting a ritual that ties his health to them. Every fight is intuitive so you won't be scratching your head going "how does this work?" but you will have to actually try. It's a good balance, even if I wish some of the dungeons were a bit more open. The two Primals (Ravana and Bismarck) are worthy additions to the game, and both have EX (extreme) versions that will test your might at level 60. Ravana is an awesome fight that I refer to as "the ninja bug," and it basically feels like how Titan should have been, with a circular arena that you can fall off of. Bismarck on the other hand is like nothing else in Final Fantasy XIV, featuring the titular whale flying right next to a floating rock that the party is standing on. Players will have to hook him with harpoons (you can shout "call me Ishmael" while doing it) and whale on the whale's weak point temporarily. I feel like Ravana is faster-paced and more fun, but again, Bismarck is unique. Currently the endgame consists of gathering law tomes (obtained by high-level dungeons and hunts), buying item level i170 gear, and upgrading them to i180 by way of items from seals. Bismarck EX will net you i175 weapons, and Ravana earns you i190. You have two weeks to fully upgrade your left and right-side gear to face the first part of the Alexander raid, who will debut at that time (with the tougher "Savage" difficulty unlocking two weeks after that). Said raids will be even better thanks to the new loot systems, which can give a raid leader more control over who gets what (finally). With everything there is to do in the game though, it doesn't feel like a grind to get to that point. Did I mention Heavensward was beautiful? I'm pretty sure I have often, but I'll do it again just to drive the point home. It looks fantastic, from the snowy landscape of Ishgard to the Souls-esque Dravanian Hinterlands, complete with lush plains and hellish mountains filled with fiery depths. I would often stop just to admire the scenery, which is even easier thanks to flying mounts. Every time I visit an old content area I long for the chance to use a flying mount, but alas, it's only available in new zones. Specifically regarding the PS4 version, it's starting to feel the sting of the more open areas a bit, particularly when it comes to longer load times (which can be a pain while zoning in for hunts) and some slowdown. I should mention that said slowdown never becomes unplayable, even with 50 other players slashing away at the same world hunt target. It can just get a bit sluggish is all. My view is partially colored by the fact that the new Direct X 11 version on PC looks gorgeous and runs smoothly. Down the line you have new storylines to look forward to, as well as the aforementioned Alexander raid, more 24-player casual raids (which aren't currently in yet), a new PVP map, and a new multi-part relic weapon quest that will debut next month for all jobs. None of this was factored into this review, but it's something to be aware of -- based on its past track record, Square Enix will continue to evolve the game and make it better. Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward is more A Realm Reborn, which is a fine thing to strive for in my book. Whether you're the type of player who enjoys crafting, endgame content, or role-playing, there's so much to do here for people of all skill levels it's insane. While I fizzled out a bit after completing the main story in 2.5, Heavensward has rekindled my flame. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Heavensward review photo
Par for the heavens
When our story began last week, I was a level 53 Paladin, soldiering through the new content for Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward. I stand before you now as a level 60, having played everything that's currently available. My opinion on the expansion hasn't changed much, which is a good thing.

Battleborn demo video photo
Battleborn demo video

Watch 23 minutes of Battleborn footage from E3


Dibs on Miko
Jun 26
// Darren Nakamura
Jordan got some hands-on time with Battleborn at E3, and while his write up does a good job of laying down the basics, sometimes it's helpful to see a video in order to really get how a game plays. Now us poor, decrepit non-...
Batman: Arkham Knight photo
Batman: Arkham Knight

Rocksteady co-founder 'totally supports' Steam delisting Batman: Arkham Knight


Rocksteady "working like crazy" to fix the issues
Jun 26
// Vikki Blake
Rocksteady co-founder and game director, Sefton Hill, supports Warner Bros.' decision to pull the borked PC version of Batman: Arkham Knight from sale. In a tweet late last night, Hill also added that the studio's "best ...
Free Steam weekend photo
Free Steam weekend

A bunch of Total War games are free to play this weekend


Have a favorite?
Jun 25
// Jordan Devore
My goodness, Creative Assembly's tactical Total War series has been around for 15 years now. There's a sale for the occasion, naturally, but it goes further than that: Shogun: Total War and Medieval: Total War have landed on ...
Portal 2 mod photo
Portal 2 mod

Portal Stories: Mel is an intriguing new Portal adventure


Free mod for Portal 2 owners
Jun 25
// Jordan Devore
It's been a while since I've thought about Portal 2, but the time is right. Portal Stories: Mel is out now on Steam, free to anyone who owns the core game. This is a standalone mod with its own voiced storyline, soundtrack, a...

Goliath eliminates the repetition found in survival games

Jun 25 // Zack Furniss
In a hands-off session with Whalebox, I got to see some of the mechanics setting Goliath apart from other survival games. Playing as a 1930s fighter pilot who finds himself in a bizarre coalescence of time periods and alternate worlds, you're as likely to find a pyramid as you are a spaceship. Or lizard people. Or spacecrafts. Oh, and you have a fancy robot arm. The arm's purpose isn't solely to make your anachronistic character look dorky; this limb serves as your axe, pick, or other resource gathering tool that you would have to create in another game. Since you start out with it, dying is less heartbreaking since you won't have to gather rocks and logs just to build tools to begin your process anew. You won't have to wait long until you can build one of the titular Goliaths. I was told that you can access the first one, the Wood Goliath, within ten minutes of starting. Whalebox wants you to get right into the fray, since you can't fight in human form. Since the denizens of the wild may find you to be a delectable treat, it's usually wise to stay in your Goliath. If it's ever destroyed, you get about 80% of your materials back so it isn't too much of a grind to get it back up and running. If you need to get out to craft or forage, you can set it on autopilot to let it fend for itself. There seem to be plenty of options as far as Goliaths go, too. You can choose from three on the fly, but there are fifteen variants of the wood, iron, stone, and crystal types. You earn these variants via achievements; for example, using long-ranged weapons often can earn you a sniper Goliath. You can also draw on them to create your own custom designs, provided you find the right berries to create paint.  The stone type was my favorite out of what was shown in the demo. There's a temperature gauge whenever you reach extreme climates, and the stone Goliath acclimates to these rapid shifts in heat. When in snow, it covers your rocky exterior and you gain a defensive bonus whereas fiery surroundings give you a magma form with flame damage. Combining all of this with head, torso, arm, and leg slots to customize means I'll be spending most of my time trying to look fashionable. We went through a few basic quests in the beginning that showed how strange this world could be. The first one that we saw was given to the player by a self-aware robot who wanted his pet robot bird back. After tracking down the bird, we learned that he had found a group of real birds and thought he belonged among their number. After that, we saw various factions, including the fantasy-esque Forest Folk (read: fox people), a group of religious robots who worship their creator, and some lizard people. You can build reputation with these groups by doing tasks for them that start simple but become complicated. Since everyone that you meet was also warped into this new world, no one trusts each other. By aligning yourself with a faction you can earn special Goliaths, but midway through the game the opposing groups find themselves in an all-out war. You had better be confident in your choice by then. Though the world is procedurally-generated, it's broken up into fifty levels called shards. They're not very large, which eliminates the need for fast travel. Since this is more structured than an average survival game, death isn't permanent. When I asked them how death would work, they had one of my favorite ideas I've heard re: video games in awhile. They're not sure if they can get this to work yet, but they want several years to pass if your character dies. When you come back, faction dynamics will change and the world will look different. Everything you knew before has been altered in some way. Cool! The story will have multiple endings and will be written by an Eisner-nominated comics writer. Though they only showed the fighter pilot, Whalebox plans on having more characters so that players can identify with what they see on-screen. They mentioned a female medieval knight who has been masquerading as male. The more options the better, as there is going to be both co-op and player versus player modes. Four-player co-op will function similarly to Borderlands, where you can drop in and out of a friend's game and get credit for completing your own quests. While the team is undecided as to how many players the versus mode will support, they are going to let you bring your own customized Goliath. A "Capture the Human" mode was also mentioned as a possibility. While Goliath sounds enormously ambitious, even the early state in which I saw it showed promise. A survival action-RPG with a focused story mode, limited repetition, and customizable giant robots is right up my alley. It'll be coming out Q1 2016 for PC, Mac, and Linux. Consoles are an eventual possibility.
Goliath preview photo
This time your arm is the tool
Survival games like Don't Starve can provide some of the best moments in gaming. The early hours of trying to fathom how this new world works, the slow strengthening of self until you gain confidence, and the s...

Review: Cosmochoria

Jun 25 // Patrick Hancock
Cosmochoria (Linux, Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Nate SchmoldPublisher: 30/30Released: April 27, 2015MSRP: $9.99  When Cosmochoria begins, the player is plopped into an unknown point in space with a few seeds and a gun. From there, they are tasked with restoring planets using seeds to bring some color and harmony back to the universe. Along the way, the player uncovers secrets about the history of the universe and destroys some evil beasts that come to ruin the party. The backstory isn't exactly rich with details or particularly interesting, but it does help build the universe. The game is a bit of a mix between a tower defense and a twin-stick shooter. It's a very unique combination, and honestly I'm not sure that description does it much justice. As the player flies around to different planets, they must plant seeds to restore the planet back to life. The bigger the planet, the more seeds needed. A player must first tend to the seed to plant it, which makes them immobile for a short time. Then, it takes some time for the seed to fully bloom. Once a seed blooms, it drops more seeds for exponential seed gains (players will never run out of seeds). After enough seeds have bloomed on a planet, it becomes restored! This does two things: the planet now has a "health pool" that it can transfer to the player to heal them up, and it brings the game one step closer to the next boss fight. The latter is not explicitly stated, but from my experience is true. Naturally, enemies come to chop off the player's green thumb. Luckily, the player can use a resource called Bricks to create towers and defend the planets. In addition, there's always the trusty gun to ward off foes. Ammo is unlimited, but Bricks are not. Bricks are occasionally dropped by enemies and are far scarcer resource than seeds. Towers are the standard fare of rapid-fire, fireballs, shields, and close-ranged.  [embed]293752:59233:0[/embed] While playing, I heavily favored gunplay over towers, especially once I unlocked the shotgun. When I was building towers, it was generally because I felt guilty for having so many Bricks saved up or because I expected a boss fight to break out. The bosses are quite the mixed bag. A handful of them act in very similar ways, but the game does change them up often enough to keep the players on their toes. Towards the mid-point of the game, I had no idea what to expect from any upcoming boss fight. In some cases towers were quite useful, whereas in others they were borderline useless. The final boss fight, while fittingly grand in scale, can be confusing because it forces the player to use a weapon they may have never tried before. For anyone stuck like I was: your weapon during the final boss fight can be charged, so charge it. The common enemies have interesting behaviors, but there are not enough different types. Towards the latter half, everything starts to feel like it's on auto-pilot. Plant seeds, kill the same enemies, move on. It got to the point where I could predict what was going to happen and when. Enemy spawning felt way too formulaic instead of being organic.  Cosmochoria is not meant to be completed in a single life, but it isn't what would be considered a "rogulike," "roguelite," or even a "rogue-lighter-that-lite." Killing foes rewards red crystals, which can be used in between playthroughs to purchase upgrades. Things like life, speed, starting seeds, and new weapons can all be purchased and have various prices. While it is probably technically possible to complete the game with the starting stats and equipment, it's very unlikely. Plus, it would be a slow and painful process. The increase in efficiency after getting a new weapon is huge and dramatically improves the experience. The early-goings can get a bit dull, since even a skilled player has to take their time killing enemies and bosses at the slow pace the starting weapon achieves. My second run lasted for a couple of hours, but I didn't make tremendous progress. New characters can also be unlocked, but not through spending crystals. They need to be found, usually through completing mini-objectives, during the game. They do have slight differences. For example, the ninja character becomes intangible while planting seeds. This is an incredibly neat mechanic, though enemies still know where the player is and will often just hover above and hurt them as soon as they become tangible again. Regardless, it still has its uses and is better than the starting character (but not as naked). In addition to upgrades, players can find artifacts to modify the way the game is played. The modifiers vary wildly in what they do and are completely optional. Some make the game harder, like only refilling jetpack fuel with kills, while others do the opposite, like removing certain types of enemies completely. It's a great way to spice up the core gameplay with mini-objectives of finding artifacts and to customize Cosmochoria to the player's liking.  The game saves the player's progress after each boss fight, though towers and location of planets do not stay between lives. The amount of planets restored is saved, but they are in different locations and different sizes. In addition, all planted towers are removed between lives, which further discouraged me from planting them in the first place.  The art and music are both wonderful, making the time spent in Cosmochoria memorable. The art is downright adorable in every way. Colors pop, which has a huge impact when restoring planets. Players can really see their progress in that regard. What once was a drab and lifeless husk of a planet becomes a bountiful and beautiful one,giving the player a real sense of accomplishment. Cosmochoria is a great way to explore space, but falls short in some aspects of its design. The core mechanics are great, but the latter half feels too repetitive, and there's not much real incentive to replay the game, despite there being many new things to uncover. It is certainly worth the time invested into it, though it may not have players screaming for more. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Cosmochoria review photo
In space, no one can hear you plant
When I first played Cosmochoria at PAX, I had to be pulled away from the demo station because of an appointment. The game's blend of calming gardening mixed with tower defense and space spelunking really jived with me. A...

Awesomenauts photo
Awesomenauts

Awesomenauts has a new 'free for everyone' character coming


Rocco the bird
Jun 25
// Chris Carter
It's been a while since I've booted up Awesomenauts, but I think I'll be doing just that when the newest character hits the roster. His name is Rocco, and he's a bird with a bow. He also has chicken feet, which makes him...

Super Dungeon Bros plays like garbage, with humor to match

Jun 25 // Mike Cosimano
Super Dungeon Bros takes place in Rökheim. There are four rock-themed brothers: Axl, the angry one; Freddie, the one who knows no fear; Lars, the one who keeps saying 'love' ad infinitum; and Ozzie AKA Michelangelo From TMNT, But A Rock This Time. I had to look up this information on the provided fact sheet, because the 'bros' are not characters. They have a "thing" and that "thing" is drilled into your skull like a well-placed icepick at an Italian dinner party gone wrong. Here's an example: when the party encounters some enemies, Lars can say "Careful, they've lost that lovin' feeling." This is the patent pending "Bro Banter" system, controlled by the player via the d-pad. Now, imagine hearing this line dozens of times over the course of a single dungeon run. It's a joke that would be right on the edge of amusing...if told once. And that's not even the worst of it! Ozzie's catchphrase is "That's what she said," a phrase I literally have not heard in years. When this was presented to me, I had to check my calendar to make sure I had not been trapped in some kind of 2011-centric time vortex. The Bro Banter system is supposedly reactive -- you can respond to banter from your compatriots with banter of your own, but I never got it to work organically during my play session. I did manage to get a confirmation that more recorded lines would be coming. Although I wouldn't get my hopes up for that, considering the fact that somebody told somebody else that recording a line from everyone's collective middle school experience and putting it in the game was a good idea. Playing the game is on the same level as the writing; it's bad. The characters are floaty and unresponsive, it feels like you're controlling an invisible character pushing the player character around. And the combat is somehow worse. The heavy attacks and the light attacks feel almost indistinguishable. I also found myself struggling with the controls more often than I'd care to admit in mixed company. It's not that the game is complex, it's just flat -- like a can of soda left out in the sun. The enemies feel same-y, both in terms of design and attacks. What separates an ice giant from a small goblin? Not much aside from their health bars. And when the weapons feel so inefficient, that larger health bar can be a real nuisance. Some of the loot in the full game could potentially mitigate this issue, but the game still has fundamental control issues. Maybe it was that 'last day of E3 funk', but the action made me want to take a nap. In order to complete 100% of the game, players will have to spend about 100 hours of their time with Super Dungeon Bros, which feels like a threat. The game plays terribly, and it's not amusing. Yes, it has couch co-op, but so does the excellent Diablo 3 console port. There are funnier games, there are better brawlers, there are more engaging couch multiplayer titles, there are more rewarding dungeon crawlers. Just because Super Dungeon Bros comprises all of those elements doesn't mean any of them work.
Super Dungeon Bros photo
Keep that dungeon locked
Unnecessary negativity is a blight, especially for writers. It can poison the mind and alienate the reader; a cancerous state of mind that serves nobody. Personally, I try and avoid it whenever possible. That mentality does m...

XCOM 2 photo
XCOM 2

XCOM 2's mission gameplay looks gooooood


Uh, yes
Jun 25
// Chris Carter
Want to see what XCOM 2's all about? Check out the latest trailer above, which not only details the entire narrative, but also shows an in-game mission, albeit with a more cinematic touch. From what I can see it's XCOM ...

Warner Bros., stop outsourcing your broken PC releases

Jun 25 // Chris Carter
As a PC gamer since 1989, I'm used to the occasional PC-related issue. I remember installing games on multiple floppy disks, only to have it error out on the last disk, forcing me to start all over again. You thought DRM is bad now? I remember dealing with physical dongles that didn't work, or copies that didn't come with notebooks or materials required to complete the game -- at that point, your only option is to write a letter to the publisher or just buy a new game entirely. It wasn't ideal, but we've made strides since then. At least, some publishers have. For whatever reason, Warner Bros. continues to outsource the PC versions of its major games despite the fact that it pushes them quite heavily, boasting enhanced features that don't actually make it into the final version -- presumably because they weren't given the same amount of care as the console editions. You know what? If WB deems the console business more lucrative and easy to control, so be it, just focus on that, and don't release a half-finished PC port. Or at the very least, wait until the inevitable Game of the Year Edition and release an enhanced PC version then -- one that works. Whatever you decide, I hope you get your act together for Mad Max this September. It seems as if Avalanche Studios is handling the PC version, but for all intents and purposes, we thought that was the case with Arkham Knight all the way up until launch. As it turns out, it had an "external PC development partner," which was revealed to be Iron Galaxy Studios in the game's credits. Play it safe until WB decides to play it smart.
WB photo
We can wait for a working version
Another Warner Bros. PC release, another nightmare for those of you who pre-ordered the game. This just happened with a broken Mortal Kombat X port and it's happening again with Batman: Arkham Knight. While man...

#CrusaderGate photo
#CrusaderGate

Really hilarious #GamerGate joke in Batman: Arkham Knight


Hold onto your sides
Jun 25
// Jed Whitaker
So apparently there is a small jab at #GamerGate -- or is it at everyone? -- in Batman: Arkham Knight. I guess it is pretty funny, right? Especially the part where they allude to a slur for gay people, right guys? Is everyone laughing? I'm not but maybe I like my humor a bit more highbrow. 

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