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Xbox One photo
Xbox One

Microsoft plans to integrate PC to Xbox streaming


They already announced Xbox to PC
Jul 29
// Mike Cosimano
In an interview with The Verge, Xbox head Phil Spencer spoke to the possibility of streaming games from your PC to your Xbox One. The just-launched Windows 10 comes packaged with Xbox One to PC streaming functionali...
Steam Hardware photo
Steam Hardware

Steam Hardware's early stock is sold out


November 10 release date for the rest
Jun 30
// Joe Parlock
Were you hoping to get your hands on one of those early release versions of the Steam Controller, the Steam Link, or a Steam Machine when they come out in October? Well bad news, they’re all sold out. If you pre-order t...

Review: AVerMedia Live Gamer EXTREME

Jun 29 // Jed Whitaker
Product: Live Gamer EXTREMEManufacturer: AVerMediaMSRP: $179.99 1080p, 60fps is the holy grail of console games these days and the Live Gamer EXTREME (LGX) handles those specs without issue. Footage looks exactly as intended by the game's developers. The LGX also has all the frills you'd expect a capture device to have such as HDMI input and output, its own recording software, but also includes some things I've never seen on other cards. Included in the box is an HDMI cable, a component cable, a 3.5mm cable, and a PS3 cable. The latter cable can be used to connect directly to a PS3 instead of connecting it with component cables, a feature only on the LGX, though I'm not sure how useful it is as it seems gamers and game publishers have mostly moved on from the previous generation. A component cable adapter is also included for capturing legacy consoles.  The included 3.5mm cable can be used to connect an external audio input source to be mixed into streams and captures alongside a 3.5mm microphone jack. Personally I opt to go with USB microphones, as they tend to offer a better sound quality overall, but for those on a tighter budget, a 3.5mm microphone might be a better fit as they are typically less expensive. The purpose of the 3.5mm jacks is to allow the LGX to be used in place of an external audio mixer, though most streaming software allows you to do this already. Also in the box is a manual, the Rec 2 -- AVerMedia's own capture and streaming software -- and a three-month subscription to the streaming software XSplit. I could go on for days about the various streaming software out there, but currently there is no one true winner. Rec 2 is pretty simple and great for beginners, allowing for picture in picture and layout designs with ease, while XSplit has more options and advanced features but runs a monthly fee. I personally use OBS, as it is free and covers most of my needs, though sometimes I still use Rec 2 or XSplit if they have a specific feature I need at the time.  The main feature that the LGX touts is ultra-low latency uncompressed video, meaning you see the game as intended with no real lag or delay between what you'd see on your TV. In my pseudo-scientific tests, I shot 240fps footage with my iPhone of my computer screen versus my TV screen with Mario Kart 8's timer on the screen, and found that AVerMedia's claim of under 0.05 seconds of latency is true. On average, it seemed be around 0.04 seconds, sometimes going up to .08 at worst and .02 at best. The latency is better than any previous capture device I've used and allows me to play off my computer screen instead of switching inputs, as I use a single-screen setup with my desktop in the living room connected to my TV. This allows me to react to my onscreen follower and subscriber alert without having an impact on my gameplay.  Also included is the ability to print your own cover image for branding and vanity purposes. It doesn't serve much purpose, in my opinion, but you can easily make what you'd like with the included cover creator software. I personally suggest a Red Bull can overlaid onto an image of Destiny for the coolest of covers. Overall, AVerMedia has made the Live Gamer EXTREME the capture device to beat. It is more feature rich than competitors at the same price point, and no other device has offered the minimal latency. [This review is based on retail hardware provided by the manufacturer.]
AVerMedia LGX review photo
Live streamer's delight
I've been making gaming videos and streaming for what seems like forever, and I've gone through my fair share of capture devices. My original card only did 720p and 30fps, required hard drives setup in a RAID, and only captur...

Batman: Arkham Knight photo
Batman: Arkham Knight

Batman: Arkham Knight's minimum specs tweaked overnight


Holy graphic cards, Batman!
Jun 23
// Vikki Blake
The minimum spec requirements to run Batman: Arkham Knight on PC have been updated overnight. As gamers attempting to play Batman: Arkham Knight on PC continue to experience problems, it has now been acknowledged that AMD gra...
AMD Dual Fiji GPU photo
AMD Dual Fiji GPU

AMD introduces dual Fiji GPU card


All the fancy water you could want
Jun 16
// Darren Nakamura
The PC gaming show at E3 2015 is the first of its kind, and it came about in large part due to AMD's financial support. So early on there was what amounted to a drawn-out advertisement for AMD products. Later on, AMD CEO Lisa...
 photo
Mmmmm colors....
Our friends at Accessory Power have an ENHANCE GX-M1 High Precision 6-Button Optical Gaming Mouse to give away to one of our lucky readers! She's definitely a looker to boot! For a chance at winning, just leave a comment belo...

Corsair's Bulldog PC: Liquid-cooled, 4K living room gaming

Jun 02 // Steven Hansen
The entry level Bulldog kit is $400. This will not get you 4K gaming, of course. You get the chassis, Mini-ITX motherboard, CPU cooler, and power supply. Where you go from there is up to you. You add CPU, RAM, hard drive, and graphics card. Maybe you want 32GB of DDR4 and a liquid-cooled Titan X. If you have a 4K TV I assume you can afford it, despite assurances that 4K TVs like the monster set we demoed on are now "affordable" at $1,800, or the same price as my weekend trip to the ER for a badly broken finger (yes, typing one handed is slow. Wiping lefty is also uncomfortable.) If you're going from scratch and buying everything fresh, you're looking at anywhere from $939 to $2249 (on the high, liquid-cooled Titan X end) to put together a nice little living room PC. If you're interested in dropping a liquid-cooled GPU solution into some other non-dog-shaped computer, perhaps your own, that's possible too. Corsair is selling the GPU liquid-cooler in a separate kit that will support all current and upcoming AMD and Nvidia graphics cards. Corsair also announced the Lapdog, which is not a laptop, but rather a big old tray you can set on your lap. It has a giant mouse pad area and Corsair's mechanical gaming keyboards can dock with its powered USB hub (go ahead and charge your phone from it, too). It's wired, which is a weird compromise between living room form factor and PC gaming precision. Also $90 (or $200 with a keyboard packed in). I like living room PC gaming. I have a nice, old tower hooked up to the aforementioned 30-inch living room television. I don't notice the noise, whether I'm playing a new game on high settings or just using it mainline Dinosaurs on Netflix. Usually I just use a controller, or the wireless mouse and keyboard sitting on the coffee table. That's me. Poor, simple me. Corsair's cool tech might be for you, though.
Bulldog and Lapdog photo
Also, Lapdog keyboard shell
The Witcher 3 looks nice in 4K. This is neither something unexpected nor something my six-year-old, 30-inch living room television would be able to teach me. But I visited with computer hardware and peripheral developer Corsa...

Virtual reality photo
Virtual reality

You'll need about $1,500 to go all in with Oculus Rift


Still no price for the actual unit
May 27
// Robert Summa
While we're still waiting for a final price on the retail version of the Oculus Rift, the company's CEO Brendan Iribe said that users will need to pony up about $1,500 for both a computer that will run the device and the actu...
Hardware photo
Hardware

AMD's angry at Nvidia because of Geralt's fabulous hair


There's just too much blast processing
May 21
// Joe Parlock
Oh hey, it’s that thing that happens every time a new major release comes out. AMD and Nvidia are trading blows yet again about the performance problems some have reported in beard-cultivating simulator The Witcher 3: W...
Steam hardware photo
Steam hardware

Steam now lists Steam Machines and other hardware


These things sure are pricey
Mar 05
// Jordan Devore
In its push to expand the "Steam universe," Valve has added store listings for Steam Machines as well as the finalized Steam Controller and also Steam Link, a PC-to-TV streaming device. All of this stuff will become available...
BassPULSE contest photo
They glow in the dark, just like Rudolph's nose
[Update: Contest over! Winner is Morty.] Our friends at Accessory Power have just shipped us a set of awesome GOgroove BassPULSE speakers to give away to one lucky Dtoider! As is evident by the header, these bad boys do indee...

NVIDIA photo
NVIDIA

Class action lawsuit filed against NVIDIA over GTX 970 card


When keeping it not real goes wrong
Feb 21
// Robert Summa
For those unfamiliar with the plight of the PC master race, there has been an ongoing debacle surrounding NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 970 video card. Users have been complaining that the advertised performance hasn't been up to snuf...
Speaker coupon photo
Speaker coupon

PSA: Enjoy $10 off some awesome speakers courtesy of Dtoid


They glow in the dark!
Feb 02
// mrandydixon
Destructoid has partnered with our friends at Accessory Power to offer a $10 off coupon for the GOgroove BassPULSE speakers! Now through Thursday, just click this link and enter the code DTOIDRBP at checkout and violà! You just saved yourself $10. As I mentioned, this deal only runs through Thursday, so grab 'em while they're red hot!
NVIDIA GTX 970 issues photo
NVIDIA GTX 970 issues

NVIDIA has no plans to address GTX 970 memory woes


When grandma started acting like this we had to put her in a home
Jan 31
// Jason Faulkner
NVIDIA continues to shit the bed concerning the controversy around its GeForce GTX 970 video card. The company claims due to a miscommunication between the engineering and the media teams, it mistakenly marketed the GTX 970 ...
Steam Controller photo
Steam Controller

Final Steam Controller design to be revealed at GDC


The 'Steam Machine' name is dead too, apparently.
Jan 08
// Mike Cosimano
In an interview with GameSpot at CES 2015, Origin PC CEO Kevin Wasielewski confirmed the final version of Valve's Steam Controller will be shown to the public at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco this March...
Giant computer  photo
Giant computer

This huge laptop is as much a 'laptop' as my German shepherd is a lapdog


Mechanical keyboard clad gaming laptop
Jan 05
// Steven Hansen
My dog Hook (see him here) isn't one of those big dogs who fancies himself a lapdop, for which my hairy-enough wardrobe is thankful. He is too heavy, and my lap, stomach, back, chest, shoulders are usually occupied by the cat...
Logitech contest photo
These things are amazing
[Update: Contest over!] Destructoid has once again partnered with our friends at Logitech, and this time we're giving away two G910 Orion Spark RGB mechanical keyboards to lucky readers! If you've never used a mechanical keyb...

Review: Logitech G910 Orion Spark

Nov 23 // Darren Nakamura
G910 Orion SparkManufacturer: LogitechMSRP: $179.99 Logitech has been making gaming keyboards for a while now, but the G910 Orion Spark is the first to use the specially engineered Romer-G mechanical switches for the keys. These are tactile switches -- they require a minimum applied force before they will begin to depress -- but the actuation distance is lower than that of its closest competitors, which theoretically improves actuation speed. A more obvious design element are the facets found on the keys. More angular than standard keys, the intent is to keep the user's fingers centered over the keys in order to decrease unintentional key presses. Almost all of the keys at least have inclines on the right and left sides, but each key within three spaces of WASD also has a lip on the top side. I could not detect a noticeable improvement in accuracy due to these facets, but they do feel like they can help keep fingers from sliding around unintentionally. Among the three-faceted keys on the G910 are the nine custom G keys: G1 through G5 run down the left side of the keyboard and G6 through G9 span across the top of the F1 through F4 keys. Fully programmable, these keys are meant to take the place of additional functions that are usually assigned to keys furthers from WASD, or to use as macros in place of multiple key presses. The keys along the left side took some getting used to, because I could typically hit the CTRL key without looking just by finding the bottom-leftmost key on the keyboard. With G5 in that place, I mistakenly hit it a few times when trying to quickly copy and paste outside of a game. It is not a huge deal, but it requires a bit of reprogramming, either of muscle memory or of the G5 key itself. [embed]284169:56422:0[/embed] The last design innovation of the Romer-G switch worth noting is that it is built to allow the most light through, allowing the LED underneath to really shine (so to speak). The G910 comes with four lighting modes, each boasting millions of colors. The first lighting mode is Freestyle, which simply allows the user to assign any color to any key at will. For regular use, I just go with this, with all of the keys set to a dark green. The Zones mode groups certain keys together and lights each group individually. WASD is its own group, lit up while the rest of the letter keys are dark, the G keys are a group, the F keys are a group, the number keys are a group, the arrow keys are a group, and the keys to the right and left of the space bar are a group. This could be used to quickly find important keys and re-center for those who look down and move all around the keyboard. The Commands mode seems more functional for learning a new game or keeping track of games that use a lot of key commands. Upon loading the Logitech software, common games are detected and their profiles loaded. When playing a particular game, only those keys that have a function are lit; useless keys are unlit. Some of the newer releases were not automatically added (for example, Civilization V was detected but Civilization: Beyond Earth was not), but profiles can be manually created for any new games. The last lighting mode, Effects, is simultaneously the silliest and the prettiest. Different visual effects can be applied, including a rainbow wave, a slow illumination and delumination, a random key twinkling, and lighting that shows up and slowly fades after a particular key has been pressed. They are neat to play around with, but they are far from functional. Another use for the lighting is to help visualize the heat map, which is probably the most useful feature for the average gamer. Before starting up a gaming session, the user can initiate key press recording. This part of the software keeps track of the play session, counting how many times each key is pressed. The reason this is useful is that it provides a visual for which keys are used and to what extent. For instance, if the Y key is used more frequently than the T key, it would make sense to switch the mapping in order to decrease the travel distance of the finger between WASD and the desired function. In extreme cases, it can help to move a game function from a key that requires the player to look at the keyboard to one that is easily touch-typed. The one major downside to the heat map is that the key recording seemed to take a significant chunk of my CPU process, slowing down the game I was playing while it was active. My rig is getting on in its years, so newer systems may not be affected like this. Along the top of the unit is a simple docking area for a phone or a tablet. This is not a true docking station with any sort of electronic connection, but it is meant to be used for games with second screen capability or along with the Logitech companion app ARX Control. This app can be used to quickly launch games, monitor vital system statistics, remotely control audio and video, and easily remap the G keys. The app's functionality is not necessary for the operation of the G910, but it is a cool free addition.  Overall, the G910 Orion Spark is a fine product. Though most non-competitive players will not notice a huge difference in performance, it is clear that a lot of work went into engineering it specifically for gaming. The keys have a nice tactile feel without being too clicky and loud. The lighting modes run the gamut between form and function. The key press heat map can help improve players of all skill levels. For those willing and able to plunk down the cash, the G910 Orion Spark is a great gaming keyboard. [This review is based on a retail unit of the keyboard provided by the manufacturer.]
Logitech G910 Orion Spark photo
Reaching for the stars
In high-level competition, every little advantage counts. It is why Olympic swimmers shave their bodies before a race, why pre-med students fight tooth-and-nail for every half point on every test, and why gaming keyboards exi...

Friday Night Fights photo
Friday Night Fights

Friday Night Fights: That new PC smell


Game with the Dtoid community
Oct 17
// ChillyBilly
Happy Friday! I recently (read: last month) built a new PC to play games on. My old PC was just shy of eight years old and hadn't had a decent upgrade in roughly four years. Needless to say, most of the games I have been want...
 photo

Test your might with the first 4K Ultra HD benchmark from 3DMark


Good luck!
Oct 13
// Dale North
You know that hammer carnival game where you hit the base as hard as you can to test your strength? I feel like every benchmark I try is like that. I hit it with all my might (new hardware, OS tweaks, etc.) and the damned thi...
 photo

Look at this super skinny gaming rig from PiixL, two inches thick


Straps to the back of your TV
Oct 10
// Dale North
I've hid my gaming/media PC rig behind or under my television for years. It's much easier these days with all of the small form factor boxes available.  But I don't care how lovely they make these things; I'm still hidin...
 photo

Project CARS lists supported steering wheels


And even 12K display support
Aug 29
// Dale North
Project CARS wants you to use your existing racing gaming hardware. That's great news for this racing game enthusiast. But they really mean it: wheels, controllers, VR headsets, 4K televisions...hell, even 12K displays. You'l...
Ryse on PC photo
Ryse on PC

Ryse: Son of Rome on PC shows tons of detail, runs at 4K


But you'll need a pretty nice rig
Aug 14
// Dale North
This fall, Xbox One launch game Ryse: Son of Rome comes to the PC with some significant visual upgrades. This morning at gamescom, we met with Crytek's Brian Chambers, senior producer on Ryse, to check out the PC build for the first time. It looks goooood.
Origin PCs photo
Origin PCs

Origin is offering 4K-ready PCs for less than $4K


Which is still a lot of money
Aug 11
// Alasdair Duncan
True story time, kids: On Friday, there was a power outage in my apartment complex and when it was restored a few hours later, my PC refused to boot. I'm hoping it's just the PSU that's blown but my suspicions are that my mot...
Hardware photo
Hardware

MSI unveils WS60, the second lightest workstation ever


Slap a 880m in it and I'll buy it for a dollar
Aug 07
// Brittany Vincent
MSI has unveiled its WS60 ultralight workstation. It features a choice of 1080p or 3K resolution screen, 16GB of DDR3L ram, 128 GB SSD + 1TB hard drives, and the ability to stream 4K video via its Thunderbolt 2 connectors. It...
Logitech photo
Logitech

Here's Logitech's attempt at creating the world's fastest gaming mouse


Call it Algernon and send it flowers
Aug 01
// Brittany Vincent
Logitech has announced its G402 Hyperion Fury gaming mouse that claims to have taken the throne as the worlds fastest gaming mouse. The G402 can reliably track over 500 inches per second and includes Logitech's exclusive Delt...
PC gaming photo
PC gaming

PC gaming hardware market holds lead over consoles


Enthusiasts continue to drop big bucks for big hardware
Jul 17
// Brittany Vincent
The PC gaming hardware market, which consists of personal computers, upgrades, and peripherals used for gaming, is alive and booming in contrast to the general decline in the mainstream PC market. Ted Pollak, Senior Gaming An...
Gaming laptop photo
Gaming laptop

Origin doing razor thin gaming laptops with EVO series


That's 'razor' with an 'o' and not Origin the EA thing and not EVO the tournament
Jul 15
// Steven Hansen
And I thought people referring to Early Access games as "EA" was confusing. Origin -- the PC manufacturer -- debuting its EVO series laptop right after the end of EVO -- the fighting game tournament -- is a good one. Anyway, here's a new $2,000 laptop you should expense if you work for a wealthy company.
Computers photo
Computers

Newegg and iBUYPOWER join forces to unveil custom configurator


♬ Do you want to build a computerrrrrr? ♬
Jul 09
// Brittany Vincent
iBUYPOWER and Newegg have announced that they will be joining forces to offer another venue in which you can build your very own custom PC. Using an intuitive selection system you can easily pick and choose which parts fit yo...
Keyboard and Mouse combo photo
Keyboard and Mouse combo

Roccat's Sova keyboard and mouse combination aids PC couch play


12 hours of battery life and a sliding mousepad
Jun 11
// Chris Carter
This week at E3, hardware maker Roccat unveiled the Sova -- the "first fully realized modular wireless keyboard and mousepad combo." Phew! The unit allows players to game on the couch with a mouse and keyboard comfortably, mo...

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