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Overlord

New Overlord photo
New Overlord

Overlord: Fellowship of Evil still looks fairly meh


The trailer is kind of amusing though
Aug 10
// Chris Carter
This new Overlord: Fellowship of Evil trailer highlights some of the co-operative elements of the game, as well as the trolly "kill each other" mechanics similar to Magicka. Yes, it's still a Gauntlet-like romp, and any...
Overlord spinoff photo
Overlord spinoff

Codemasters: 'You might be pleasantly surprised' by the new Overlord


It's going to be a hard sell
Jul 23
// Jordan Devore
I don't know where I was on April 23, but I missed the first footage of Overlord: Fellowship of Evil. Until today, I was under the impression the new game was going to be Overlord III. Damn. Codemasters has a Q&A up on it...
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Overlord

Codemasters confirms Overlord: Fellowship of Evil with a meh trailer


Hitting PC, PS4, and Xbox One this year
Apr 23
// Chris Carter
Codemasters has just announced a brand new chapter in the Overlord Saga after a six-year hiatus -- Fellowship of Evil. It's set to arrive on the PC, PS4, and Xbox One later this year for $19.99 as a digital download. Rh...
Overlord photo
Overlord

Codemasters drops another Overlord III tease


Evil always finds a way
Apr 23
// Vikki Blake
Those sexy beasts at Codemasters have dangled another Overlord III teaser in our faces. It's less than three minutes long, but the new trailer -- entitled "Previously on Overlord" -- brings newbies up to speed with the happe...

Overlord III photo
Overlord III

Codemasters teases Overlord III


UK Studio teases sequel
Mar 20
// Laura Kate Dale
Written by Tomb Raider's Rhianna Pratchett, Overlord and Overlord II were a pair of last-generation action adventure games in which you played a huge hulking armor-clad warrior in control of an army of small minions. If ...
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Deals

Humble Weekly Sale bundles Overlord and DiRT


Codemasters
Jan 30
// Jordan Devore
Codemasters is the latest publisher to participate in a Humble Weekly Sale and it's another one worth recommending if for no other reason than Overlord (and DiRT!). Name your price for the first Overlord and its Raising Hell ...
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Overlord II 'Battle Rock Nemesis' DLC out today


Jul 29
// Jim Sterling
If you loved Overlord II, then let it be known that Codemasters has released the first downloadable content on Xbox Live and PlayStation Network, available for your downloading pleasure on both systems today. "Battle Roc...

Review: Overlord: Minions

Jul 12 // Jim Sterling
Overlord: Minions (DS)Developer: Climax StudiosPublisher: CodemastersReleased: June 23, 2009MSRP: $29.99 Overlord: Minions is cuter and more cartoony than most Overlord games, as players take the role of a rather adorable dark master. Aided as always by Gnarl, players have to take down an emerging new threat known as The Kindred, who are meddling with ancient relics that are connected in some way to long-extinct Dragons that used to roam the world. Unlike other games, where players command Minions to do their bidding, this DS spin-off is all about taking direct control of the cackling little gremlins. Players will command a "special farces unit" comprised of one of each Minion type. Giblet is the brown fighter, with a high HP value, strong attacks, and power to push heavy blocks. Stench is the green assassin who can make himself invisible, survive poisonous areas and (sigh) fart out flammable clouds. Blaze, the red minion, specializes in throwing fireballs and can pass through flame, while the blue Zap walks in water, heals fellow minions, and can directly attack spectral enemies. Overlord: Minions predominantly takes the form of a puzzle game where players use the unique attributes of their team to get past obstacles and progress through the level. Sometimes stages require the use of only two or three minions, while others will require all four creatures. Though the puzzles never get particularly challenging, they're rather clever and it can be quite satisfying to clear a stage. The game is controlled entirely by the stylus, and it sadly suffers as previous touchscreen-only games like Phantom Hourglass have. Trying to make the stylus do absolutely everything simply doesn't work as well as developers hope it will. The control method, while perfect for a limited number of tasks, is too unwieldy for multiple responsibilities and the game frequently gets confused. Trying to get Zap to heal other minions is a nightmare, since moving the stylus will either make him do what you want or just walk around aimlessly. Getting Minions into the correct place and making them do the right thing in any situation sometimes feels like a game of luck. It's made worse by the fact that the minions themselves are thoroughly stupid. They'll wander into trouble if you let them, and if you're sweeping the entire team, stragglers have no problem walking into fire or poison, even if it hurts them, and they'll regularly get stuck on a corner or otherwise trail so far behind that they stop following the unit and wait for you to manually make them catch up. As seems par for the course with Overlord games, the problems are quite tragic because they hold back what is otherwise a great game. Minions is full of cool ideas, especially the boss battles. While the first few boss fights are frustrating affairs, some of the later ones really put the emphasis on making the minions fight as a team. It's also quite impressive how much mileage was squeezed out of a limited set of ideas, as the game continues to feel fresh despite the simplicity of the puzzles. Minions looks relatively decent for a DS game, with simple 3D models and backgrounds. The cutscenes, which are hand-drawn still images, look really good, although the "story" could use quite a lot of work, as could the humor, which generally revolves around fart and burp jokes. The sounds are all rather simple, and the music isn't all that varied, but what there is of it is pretty solid stuff. Ultimately, Overlord: Minions is a game for puzzle fans who have a high tolerance for frustrating design. It's a great game that sometimes fights with players due to its loose and sometimes confused stylus control, but the game's fun-factor and satisfying puzzling gameplay overrides the annoyances to create a pretty good little portable title. Fans of the series could stand to lose a few bucks on this one. Due to the relatively short campaign and lack of replay value, you might want to hold off buying it at full price.  Score: 7.0 -- Good (7s are solid games that definitely have an audience. Might lack replay value, could be too short or there are some hard-to-ignore faults, but the experience is fun.)
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Codemasters definitely pushed the boat out with its Overlord franchise this summer. Following the surprising success of the original game, this year saw three games in the series release simultaneously: Overlord II on the Xbo...

Review: Overlord II

Jul 02 // Jim Sterling
Overlord II (PC, PS3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Triumph StudiosPublisher: CodemastersReleased: June 23, 2009MSRP: $59.99At the end of Overlord's one and only expansion, Raising Hell, the original Overlord was dragged into the fiery pit to suffer the fate that all evil rulers must eventually face. In his absence, the forces of evil have been scattered and the world has been slowly cleansed of magic by a new ruling body, The Empire. Gnarl and the Minions eventually find a a worthy successor to the evil throne, a shunned "witch boy" in the snowy town of Nordburg. After the "Overlad" has his first clash with The Empire, he is taken to The Netherworld and instructed in the ways of Overlording, so that he can reclaim the world and rule it in his own dark image. The story, written by Rhianna Pratchett, has a few high points, especially the end twist, but it has to be said that most of the humor misses the mark. Pratchett is a decent fantasy writer, but isn't very funny, and while there are a few laughs to be had, there just isn't enough humor befitting such a darkly comic world as Overlord's. It doesn't help that the cutscenes seem disjointed and glitchy, with character voice samples sometimes even talking over each other and sounds cutting out entirely. As with the last game, players get to control a gang of vicious Minions who will do his bidding. Overlord II keeps the control scheme of the last title, which basically does as good a job as it can with the complex controls, but still gets muddled and confused all too regularly. Controlling the minions and the camera with the right stick is a hassle, and it's difficult to juggle the game's four different Minion classes, each of which have their own specific uses in battle. Putting the issues aside for a second, it has to be said that Triumph Studios has not rested on its laurels when crafting Overlord II. While the game could have gotten away with simply providing more of the last game, this sequel comes up with some impressively inventive ideas and has made the game feel so much more interactive than before. Siege weapons and ships can now be controlled after Minions are sent to power them, and each class of Minion gets its own unique mount at points in the game, which have special bonus effects for your horde. There is a lot more to do this time around, but sadly, for every new addition, there seems to be a new problem.Ships are a pain to control, not helped by the fact that reversing them doesn't invert the controls for some reason. Siege weapons are more fun, but it can be difficult to get catapults to hit targets properly, and the ballista machines are simply boring to use, lacking the sense of power and destruction that they should. Still, the mounts are a great addition, with the Red Minions' Salamanders being especially fun to control. The only real problem with them is the section where you have to manually steer green minions around a circular wall to keep an elevator going up. Whoever designed that section needs to be executed.  Also joining the host of features is Minion possession and Minion disguises, where The Overlord can take over the body of one of his cackling servants or dress them up like enemies at key points in the game. While options as a Minion are limited, being able to disguise and infiltrate is good fun, especially due to the fact that a disguised Minion really couldn't pass as an Imperial guard, but the moronic enemies think that your Minions are just "short." One of the biggest additions to the sequel is the "Destruction or Domination" system. Whereas the last game allowed the Overlord to be good or evil, this game focuses more on being either a slave driver or a merciless destroyer. The Overlord has the power to drain innocent bystanders of life or control their minds and turn them into loyal servants. As the game progresses, players will take control of towns and get the option to either slaughter the population or completely enslave it. Unfortunately, in order to totally take control, players need to dominate or destroy 100/100 villagers. What should be a fun and empowering sub-game turns into a rather boring and dull experience, especially when you have one villager left and are looking for a needle in a haystack. Perhaps if it were easier to find villagers that had not yet been Dominated, either via the map or via other Dominated villagers hunting them down for you, this could have been a great addition. What we instead have is a very cool idea that seems awkwardly sandwiched in, possibly rushed out of the gate before it was given time to be worked out properly. This sense of being "not quite worked out properly" is Overlord II's biggest problem. At its heart, the game is brilliant and incredibly fun, but it's full of so many missed opportunities and ideas that are fantastic, yet poorly implemented, that the game is stuffed to the gills with utter frustration. When the game works, it's great, but it frequently doesn't want to succeed. Minions regularly don't do what one wants them to, leading the player giving up and doing it themselves. The Overlord shouldn't be the one smashing boxes open because the Minions are just clipping around it. Dominating villagers is cool, but they follow you around and block your path, leading to you having to murder them anyway just to get free. We won't even talk about the framerate issues and weird graphical bugs that haunt the game at every turn.Despite all these numerous and blatant faults, however, Overlord II is still a bloody good laugh. Using the Minions to hunt for spells, health, mana and Minion upgrades is always fun, as is acquiring three Mistresses and getting to boink them. The game also lets players get more attached to Minions if they wish, with the ability to resurrect any favorites that get killed. Sadly, the repeated resurrection animation for every single Minion brought back to life gets very boring very quickly. The attachment players feel to Minions also adds to the frustration a little, since Minions are still, at the end of the day, dispensable, and they will frequently die, if not by the hand of enemies, then by jumping in water or simply disappearing for no reason. The game deserves praise for some inventive boss battles (except for the excruciatingly horrible final one). Timing the attacks of Minions and working out some of the rather cool puzzles to take out enemies leads to some inventive gameplay and a few of the more interesting bosses I've tackled in a long time. The game impresses in its ability to play like the first game, yet still feel completely different in execution. I've been incredibly harsh in this review, but it's only because I love the Overlord series so much and want it to be better. At its heart, Overlord II is a game that could deserve a review score of nine or even ten. Sadly, the problems cannot be ignored and the game is let down severely by problems that never should have been there. Rather than iron out the faults of the original, Overlord II seems simply to have added even more, and there isn't really an excuse. Yet, I still love the game, no matter how many times I curse its horrible elements. Despite badly implemented features and bugs (one of which was the game crashing just after I completed the game), Overlord II is a blast to play and well worth the time and irritation of series fans. The game is as charming and fun as it always was, and looks far better than the last one to boot. There's a huge amount to do as well, from customizing your Overlord's equipment and leveling up Minions, to hunting for items, completing sidequests and trying to get all three mistresses in bed at the same time. Overlord II is essentially a superb game trapped in the shell of a badly made one. If you liked the first game, then this is worth a purchase. Fans of the original will be prepared for the game's less savory moments and will be more than happy to struggle through for the end result. The ride is incredibly bumpy, but ultimately worth it. Score: 7.0 -- Good (7s are solid games that definitely have an audience. Might lack replay value, could be too short or there are some hard-to-ignore faults, but the experience is fun.)
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Overlord was one of my favorite games of 2007. Its unique gameplay, evil-minded focus and silly sense of humor outshone the technical issues and awkward controls to create a fun and memorable title that proudly sits among my ...

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Overlord II devs on DLC and screaming mothers


Jun 29
// Jim Sterling
I've been playing Overlord II all weekend and loving it, despite a number of issues. That's why I'm all for some extra content, which Triumph Studios is planning to announce in the near future. When asked about any future DLC...
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Pratchett says gaming is still lacking in writing


Jun 27
// Matthew Razak
“I’m not sure why there’s this constant desire to keep rooting around in Hollywood’s action-movie scrapheap.”With those words to That VideoGame Blog Rhianna Pratchett perfectly summed up what I s...
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Overlord II is out, celebrate with some wallpapers


Jun 25
// Jim Sterling
Three hot looking Overlord games are out, and my review copies should be arriving today. To celebrate, Codemasters has released a bunch of rather cool wallpapers, commemorating the release of Overlord II, Overlord: Minions an...
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Overlord II tries to offend as many people as possible


Jun 15
// Jim Sterling
The latest issue of Game Informer has a feature called "Beyond Polygons," which collects a number of stories from within the studios working on a few big-name titles. Among them as Triumph Studios, and since I'm a b...
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Overlord II welcomes us to the Minionstry of Information


Jun 09
// Jim Sterling
Overlord II is almost upon us, and Codemasters has helpfully eased us back into the fun-packed world of evil tyranny by producing some helpful "Minionstry of Information" videos. These handy guides will give you a r...
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Club Seals, wear them as hats. That's cool with PETA


Jun 06
// Matthew Razak
You know the folks at PETA get angry over the strangest stuff sometimes. That would be fine if they kept it consistent, but it appears that they're absolutely fine with baby seals being clubbed to death and then having their ...

E3 09: Hands-on with Overlord Dark Legend

Jun 04 // Conrad Zimmerman
Overlord: Dark Legend is a prequel of sorts for Overlord II. The Overlord, a dark child who never quite fit in with his family is taken by the minions to be trained in the dark art of being an evil despot. The game follows the adolescence of the Overlord as he receives his training and prepares for the times ahead.It visually looks decent for a Wii title. Nothing spectacular but nothing I can complain about where the console is concerned. The story seems interesting -- it, too, is written by Rhianna Pratchett -- but I can't help but feel like they wrote a tale about a youthful Overlord simply because they were developing a game for the family-friendly Wii.My real beef with it comes in the manner it controls. Specifically, the way you move the minions. Since there's no second analog to allow you to sweep minions around the landscape, the game uses a point-and-click interface. You click where you want minions to go and they go there, sort of. They seemed to get caught up on environmental objects and things that it seemed they should interact with they would have nothing to do with.More than anything, it's a shame because a big part of the fun of playing Overlord is the ability to just move a horde of minions over the landscape in a wave of chaos and destruction. Having to give them more specific instructions is uncomfortable and there's no way to just get them to run around.I was originally looking forward to bringing Destructoid the review of Overlord: Dark Legend, but this control scheme has me dreading the experience. I guess we'll find out when the game releases for Wii simultaneously with its PS3 and 360 brethren on June 23rd.
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While I was out at the Codemasters booth playing Overlord 2, I figured I had absolutely no good reason not to check out its cousin for Wii, Overlord Dark Legend. I'd had so much fun with the first one that I was in really goo...

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Go club some baby seals: An Overlord II demo is up on XBL


Jun 04
// Jordan Devore
Jeez, that was quick. As previously teased, an Overlord II demo has gone up on Xbox LIVE Marketplace today. To add the file to your Xbox 360's download queue, click here the US version and here for the UK demo.Is the 360 not ...
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E3 09: Hands-on with Overlord 2


Jun 04
// Conrad Zimmerman
I love me some Overlord. I might not love it as much as Jim does but I think it would be a close race as to who has a bigger tent for the upcoming sequel. Now that I've had an opportunity to play it on the show floor at E3, I'm even more excited than ever.Hit the jump and check out why it feels so good to be so bad.
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Overlord II demo coming soon


Jun 03
// Jim Sterling
Overlord II is my jam, which is why I'm bummed that I can't get to check it out at E3. Luckily, our man Conrad Zimmerman is on the case, so stay tuned for our first impressions of the game coming soon. Those impressions can b...
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Overlord II is lording it over these new screens


May 28
// Jim Sterling
The best thing is that I get paid to write headlines like that. Anyway, Overlord II is a matter of weeks away and I am very excited indeed for the sequel to what was quite possibly my favorite game of 2007. With a more evil O...
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Have some Overlord II videos, by all means


May 21
// Jim Sterling
Codemasters' Overlord II is nearly upon us, and I am looking forward to it significantly, thank you very much. In anticipation of the hopefully excellent sequel, two brand new videos have been unleashed. A second developer di...
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Overlord Dark Legend is as dark as it is legendary


May 15
// Jim Sterling
Codemasters is pumping out the Overlord-themed goodies this year, with Overlord II coming to PC, Xbox 360 and PS3, Overlord Minions hitting the DS and Overlord Dark Legend invading the Wii. The latter is one we haven't talked...
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Pre-order Overlord, get Minion figurine, make me jealous


May 12
// Jim Sterling
The life of a reviewer might seem pretty cushy to you lot. Sure, we get free games, but there's a downside that you must consider. First of all, we have to play a bunch of wank like Velvet Assassin, and secondly, we get to mi...
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Overlord II trailer be bringin' the Minions!


May 01
// Jim Sterling
Overlord was one of the coolest games of last year, and the sequel is a matter of months away. To celebrate, here's a fresh new trailer and some screenshots, focusing this time on the most important aspect of the game -- the ...
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Overlord Minions assets for your diabolical pleasure


Apr 06
// Jim Sterling
I love Overlord and I love my DS, so it's hardly surprising that Overlord Minions is one of my most eagerly awaited games of the summer. Being able to take control of the Minions directly is hopefully going to be a lot of fun...
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More Overlord II screens give us excuse to talk about Overlord


Mar 19
// Jim Sterling
Apparently, Codemasters didn't have room in its email to give us more than two screens with yesterday's dev diary, and has provided three more pretty pictures for Overlord fans to gawp at. I don't really mind, however, becaus...
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Overlord II dev diary promises much more evil (also, harems)


Mar 18
// Jim Sterling
I'm probably the biggest Overlord fan on staff, and pretty much fell in love with Codemasters' original title on sight. My only real problem was that the titular Overlord was never really as evil as he was advertised, and you...
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Overlord Dark Legend promotes suicide bombing in such a cute way!


Feb 22
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Overlord Dark Legend takes place before the original Overlord, but the premise remains the same. Take control of Minions and cause havoc across the lands. The Minions are under the control of the Overlord and will do anythin...

NY Comic Con: A look at an early build of Overlord: Dark Legend

Feb 08 // Jonathan Holmes
For those that don't know, Overlord: Dark Legend is a prequel to the original Overlord on the 360. Just like the original, Overlod: Dark Legend is about a stereotypical "dungeons and dragons"-style villian parading around the countryside with a horde of minions behind him. You can direct your minions to do your biding for you, as well as control the Overlord himself, all on a quest to establish yourself if the most powerful villian in the land. Now to dispell some rumors: Overlord: Dark Legend does not look like a 360/PS3 game. A few of the guys on the Overlord: Dark Legend team have already claimed that it's the best looking Wii game ever, and that it looks just as good as the original Overlord on the 360, etc. Don't believe the hype; the game doesn't look that good. At times it looks better than The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, at times it looks about the same, but at not time does the game suddenly transform the Wii into a piece of hardware that's capable of pulling off what the 360/PS3 can do. Maybe the final build of the game will have those sorts of magical powers, but I'm not holding my breath. Probably the coolest thing about the game's visuals is the fish-eye lens effect on the game's camera. Not only does it add some flair to the otherwise standard visuals , but it provides the player with a much wider view of the game's environment. Being an action/RTS hybrid, it's important for Overlord: Dark Legend to show you as much of your surroundings as possible. The camera also stays relatively far away from the action most of the time, which like in most Wii games, helps to keep you from seeing how ugly some of the game's textures are. The camera does zoom in for a close up occasionally, like during a new attack where you grab one of your minions and shake them until they become explosive. This move is unique to the Wii version of the game, and requires you to first select a minion, then violently shake the nunchuck; simulating the act of strangling a midget. Shake the nunchuck for too long and you minion will die from the trauma, but shake them just enough and they'll run from you in terror, only to explode a few seconds later. These exploding minions can be used to destroy walls or attack enemies from a distance. I'm told that this is just the first of many new features that will be exclusive to the Wii entry.  Using the pointer on the Wii remote makes it easy to quickly direct your minions. In this early build of the game, there wasn't that much to direct them to do other than attack some sheep, a few giant beetles, and some ninjas. "Ninjas?" I asked Dan, who had yet to tell me much about the game's storyline. "Yeah, ninjas" Dan whispered "they're new for this version of the game as well." He went on to tell me that the game's script, written by "the Discworld guy's daughter" Rhianna Prachett, was to be a lot more in the parody vein than the original game. This time, the Overlord is sort of an "evil Cinderella", a teenage boy who is regularly abused by his evil two brothers (who may end up being his step-brothers in the game's still-evolving script). This abuse leads to brooding and anger; an anger that serves as the perfect motivator to start an evil army of magical killing machines. Along his quest for power, the Overlord will meet a bunch of generally loved characters from Grimm's fairy tales, and find them to be a bunch of jerks. Little Red Riding Hood is apparently something of a two-faced bitch, and Gingerbread men are angry little fuckers who'll see you dead before they let you take a bite out of them. Overlord: Dark Legend was the fourth Wii game I played at the New York Comic Con that would reportedly use "laugh out loud" comedy to win over "casual and hardcore gamers alike" (the other three being House of the Dead: Overkill, MadWorld, and Ready to Rumble: Revolution.) It's great to see comedy becoming a more dominant force in gaming, but it's also a little scary, because nothing is more annoying than a 10-15 hour game that's totally un-funny. At this point, Overlord: Dark Legend could go either way on the comedy front, but when it comes to gameplay, everything is looking pretty solid. The controls are much easier and more fun to use than on the 360, the graphics look good, and the Pikmin-meets-Shrek scenario is well at home on the Wii. I'm not sold yet, but I've got high hopes, which is all you can ask for from a game that's this early in development. 
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One of the more pleasant surprises of New York Comic Con '09 was the appearance of a playable build of Overlord: Dark Legend. When I came upon the game, it was sitting unattended, with no one around to demo it, or no controll...

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Rhianna Pratchett to pen script for Codemaster's new Overlord games


Oct 16
// Nick Chester
Codemasters has announced today that they've tapped Rhianna Pratchett to write the scripts for their upcoming new titles in the Overlord series. This includes Overlord II, Overlord Dark Legend for the Wii, and Overlord Minion...

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