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Half-Life

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FARTY THING

This is one incredible Gordon Freeman statue


He's even holding the alien farty thing!
Jan 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Gaming Heads latest in their Valve toy line-up is the one and only Gordon Freeman from the Half-Life series. The 1/4 scale figure comes in at 20 inches tall, and features the voiceless hero with his iconic crowbar and the ali...
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Here's what Half-Life looked like a year before release


Look at those derpy faces!
Jan 09
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Half-Life, one of the most loved series in existence. It's a wonderful game, but do you want to know how it looked like in its Alpha state? Well here you go! The first video here shows off some tech stuff, while the second v...
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Revisit Jurassic Park in this Half-Life 2 mod


We have a T. Rex!
Jan 03
// Chris Carter
My wife and I are huge fans of Jurassic Park, and watch it as much as humanly possible. Sadly, games related to the IP haven't really been all that strong since the 16-bit era, but it doesn't take much to get me to at least ...
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Untold riches: The brilliance of Half-Life's barnacles


Dec 27
// Hamish Todd
Hamish Todd is a game designer and journalist. His article on Castlevania's medusa heads just made the longlist for the games journalism prize. You can find out about his game, Music of the Spheres, here. Some of the most fun...
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NECA is making Half-Life 2 Gravity Gun replicas


Aw yeah
Dec 18
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Loved NECA's Portal gun replicas? Well you'll have another gun to add to your arsenal come Spring 2013 as the toy company is working on creating Gravity Gun replicas from Half-Life 2. NECA will only be making a limited amount...
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The DTOID Show: Mass Effect 4, Source 2, & Adam Sessler


Plus: Stop cursing on the cyberwebs, CoDBloppers!
Nov 12
// Max Scoville
Hey gang! We're back with another steaming pile of gaming news for your brain-holes! A new Mass Effect game is in the works, and the exciting part is that it's gonna be running Frostbite 2. Black Ops II comes out tomorro...

Review: Black Mesa

Sep 23 // Joshua Derocher
Black Mesa (PC)Developer: Black Mesa Modification TeamRelease: September 14, 2012MSRP: Free I started playing Black Mesa expecting a completely faithful recreation of Half-Life. I was expecting the same level design and puzzles. What I found instead was something that felt very familiar, but it was also very fresh. Now, I know that there are some people out there who might think that it's crazy to try and alter anything to do with Half-Life, but don't run away screaming just yet. Black Mesa does an amazing job of retelling the story. The levels are the same, you start at the same point, and you end at the same point. If I were to sit down and tell you how I played the game and what I did, it probably wouldn't sound too different, as the same essence is here. It's like watching a remake of a movie. Even if two people watched different versions of the same movie, they still have the same experience overall. [embed]235479:45170[/embed] The above image is a top-down comparison of the the level "Inbound." They both have little crossroads, and some brownish-red stuff, but they look very different. The Source engine is capable of creating much bigger levels than the old engine ever could, and the developers wanted to incorporate that into the new Black Mesa Complex. It feels like a massive place now. Hallways are longer, rooms are bigger with higher ceilings, and outside areas are vast and expansive. It's not just empty space, either -- areas have been filled with extra rooms, more weapon stashes, and more bad guys to fight. While some things have been expanded on, other have been streamlined such as the level "On a Rail". This level is shorter and it require much less backtracking. The puzzle solutions are also a little bit different, too. Anyone who was hoping to blast through this because of how well they know Half-Life might have to stop and think for a bit here and there. I'm not going to dive into anything that could spoil the game for you, but I will say that the changes are well done and they fit the spirit of the original. Black Mesa has a lot to live up to, and it does an admirable job. The graphics look great, but the seven years in development make it look somewhat dated. The new voice acting sounds way better than the old digitized voice clips. Excluding a couple of moments where the frame rate dropped down drastically, the gameplay is otherwise smooth. At one point late in the game, it's almost unplayable for half a minute. Another annoying thing is the way jumping works: they tried to correct the insane old-school jumping mechanics by replacing it with a different (yet equally insane) method of jumping where you always have to press crouch and jump at the same time in order to get around.  If you have never played Half-Life, you owe it to yourself to check out Black Mesa. It's a faithful recreation of an amazing game. You'll get the feeling and story of the original, but you won't have to try and play a 13-year-old shooter to do so. If you have played Half-Life before, you should still go play Black Mesa. It's a fresh take on a classic that's the closest thing you'll get to feeling like you're playing Half-Life for the first time again. No matter what level of experience you have with Half-Life, this is worth playing. It's a brilliant tribute to one of the greatest videogames ever made, and it's also a good game in its own right.
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Half-Life is a great game, but it's been over ten years since its release. What if Half-Life were made in 2007 instead of 1999? Black Mesa is a re-imaging of Half-Life using Source, the engine powering Half-Life 2. ...

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The DTOID Show: Halo, Revengeance, Half Life 3, & DmC


Sep 21
// Max Scoville
Hey everybody! I'm back from my travels in the far east to host another fine episode of The Destructoid Show. Today we talk about a random rumor about Half Life 3 being open world, Tara runs down what's new in Halo 4, Metal G...
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Rumor: Half-Life 3 is open world, coming after 2013


Quests and NPCs alleged
Sep 20
// Jim Sterling
An ANONYMOUS SOURCE has told Journaldugamer that Valve's highly anticipated Half-Life 3 will take a dramatic break from the traditional linear progress featured in past games. According to the latest gossip, Gordon Freem...

Impressions: Black Mesa is awesome

Sep 15 // Joshua Derocher
While the new visuals are nice, the worst thing about the old game is the sound. When people talk to you, it sounds like they are trapped in a digitized static machine on a planet filled with static monsters. It's pretty bad. Now the dialog is clean and rerecorded. The delivery and inflection matches the original so well that it's uncanny. The gameplay is updated slightly as well. I would have never noticed if I hadn't gone back and played the old game right before playing the remake. It's just enough subtle tweaking to make the controls feel fresh. Old shooters just have this weird feeling where you feel more like a floating camera and less like you are walking around in the world. Black Mesa feels like a modern game. Don't read into this as they changed everything and made it totally different. It's true to what the game is and it doesn't change how Half-Life plays; it just changes how it feels. I'm guessing that 80% of the people who play this won't even notice any difference in the controls.   The only flaw I've noticed so far is that the loading times can be very slow at points. It's not game breaking, but it is annoying. Hopefully this is something that can be addressed in the future. You can grab the game for yourself for free right here. Black Mesa has also been Greenlit on Steam, so it might be available soon from there as well. Stay tuned for a full review early next week!
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Black Mesa is now available, I am playing it, and I can tell you that it's awesome. It is an amazing recreation of the original Half-Life with updated graphics and sounds. We'll have a review up soon. In the meantime, here's...

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Time to bash some headcrabs: Black Mesa is now available


Sep 14
// Allistair Pinsof
Black Mesa, the long awaited and long delayed Half-Life fan remake done in the Source engine is now freely available on the developer's website. Don't worry, I checked and it's not a link to a Rick Astley video. I can't belie...

Black Mesa will come out September 14, world is ending

Sep 02 // Allistair Pinsof
Here's some footage of the game that leaked last month. Can't wait! [embed]234240:44927:0[/embed]
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The President of the United States of America: "Good evening, men and women of America. At 5:42 PST, today, our elite crew of internet lurkers spotted a post from Black Mesa Source Project Leader Carlos Montero on the mod's o...

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DTOID Extra: LEAP's motion-control makes Kinect look dumb


Jul 18
// Max Scoville
The LEAP is essentially a precision Kinect that senses various types of gestures in a 3D space, and can be used for a whole ton of stuff besides Fruit Ninja and dance games. The video on the LEAP's website makes it look...
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Pitchford: Duke Nukem Forever is exactly like Half-Life 2


Jul 17
// Jim Sterling
Most reasonable gamers would consider Duke Nukem Forever, on its own, is a big enough insult to the industry. Gearbox CEO Randy Pitchford, however, has decided to take the mockery further by comparing it to one of the most be...
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Rumor: Half-Life 2: Episode 3 artwork leaked


Jun 28
// Jim Sterling
A wave of new Half-Life 2: Episode 3 chatter has been triggered for the millionth time this year, now thanks to the Facebook page of fan site Valve Time. The page posted what it claims to be official artwork for the upcoming ...

The 'geek' question: hobbyist vs. intellectual

Jun 20 // Ryan Perez
Gamer? My theory is that hobbyist geeks (gamers like us) tend to force a relation between themselves and scientific minds because both parties can sometimes live reclusive and socially awkward lifestyles, and also because intellectuals are generally admired by society during their adult years, whereas gamers are still usually seen as lazy and indolent. Because of the former, the temptation to adopt the latter is more prevalent. Albert Einstein used to piss his pants because he was too busy solving an equation, whereas I pissed myself because I was too busy wearing down that 2+ million HP boss. Score! We're so much alike! This is obviously something not exclusive to geek lifestyles. Plenty of people constantly associate themselves with other sources of admiration, whether or not they have a direct connection to that source. The truest form of this could be considered nationalism -- feeling a sense of pride for the accomplishments of individuals sharing your national identity and/or country of origin. If a term for this kind of behavior exists, I don't know it, so I'm just going to make one up for the sake of this study: Michael-Phelps-ism. It actually rolls right off the tongue, when you say it quickly. So the Michael-Phelps-ism regarding gamers/comic lovers and science geeks carries a rather obvious distinction. A hobbyist geek is someone who typically adopts pastimes and means of entertainment that are not only manageable without any sort of social interaction but also sometimes encourage it. The term "single player" is difficult to find in other avenues besides gaming. This is why the general public will often shy away from these hobbies (at least for now), no matter how fun they are. Plenty of evidence exists to back up the assumption that these hobbies can and will become mainstream eventually, but for the sake of this study, let us all agree that we're still the minority here. An intellectual geek, on the other hand, is someone who dedicates the majority of their personal time to study within one or several scholarly and scientific fields. Yes, this lifestyle often doesn't require anything past solitude as well, and sometimes encourages it, but we must not forget that it's easy to be a gamer, whereas it takes a lot of hard work to be a genius. Just because they have one or two things in common does not make them directly linked to each other. To sink down to my natural level here, I have a penis that works fairly well, but I'm not going to even pretend I could handle being a porn star, even if we have the same equipment. Therefore, I humbly tip my hat to the Bob McHawks and Richard McCrackins of the world and openly admit that they can do what I cannot. Just because I'm American doesn't mean I get to pat myself on the back for World War II. I may be ambidextrous, but that doesn't mean I can feel gratification over any of Shigeru Miyamoto's accomplishments. You get the idea. This was his reaction after Hamza and Niero invited me to join Dtoid. You'd think that would be enough, right? To many of you out there, I'm stating something as obvious as "birds fly, fish swim." But because hobbyists find a lot of comfort and validation in relating the effort it takes to play a game to the effort it takes to learn differential calculus, as well as the lifestyles associated with them, people will often ignore common sense to protect their reassuring views. Since critical thinking and deductive reasoning shatter these views, and since I love ruining people's blissful assumptions about life, I figured I'd take this a step further and gather some hard evidence. As stated before, I proposed two questions to the people at E3, be they exhibitors or attendees. The first set of questions were basic trivia that any typical gamers would know. Some examples: - In the popular puzzle game Portal, what are the two colors that your portals appear in? - What is the name of the main protagonist in Metal Gear Solid for the original PlayStation? - What is the common term for the diving suit-clad behemoths in the game BioShock? I know, these questions make you smack your forehead. You have to remember, though, that to know them requires us to be somewhat steeped in gaming culture -- especially if we've never played these games before. So anyone who doesn't really care about gaming (i.e. our parents), won't know what the hell a "Big Daddy" is ... besides some mothers, but that's a different story. On the flip side, however, I also asked these same people basic trivia that anyone mildly knowledgeable in the sciences would know. These are questions that the average person might forget by the time they exited high school but that an intellectual would know due to their learned lifestyle and the proximity of their peers. Examples are: - What is Newton's third law of motion? - What is the measure of acceleration of Earth's gravity? - What does the acronym "DNA" stand for, and what are the names of its four nucleotides? I know, some of you are smacking your foreheads again. But I must remind you that, while some of us gamers have retained this knowledge from our school days (those currently in grade school need not apply), the majority of people in the world require general scientific knowledge in the same sense that someone in New York City requires a car to get to work. If it's not necessary to get on with life at its most basic level, most individuals won't bother giving a shit. If I can't add or subtract in 2012, I'm pretty screwed, but if I can't name every element on the Periodic Table, what concern is that of mine? This fact is only more prevalent when I tally up the results of my E3 experiment. Gamers might know what this is from, but they sure as shit don't know what it means. I asked a total of 193 people one of the 15 questions in both categories. Why 193? Because I was at E3 doing the whole journalism thing -- going to appointments, demoing games, interviewing people, etc. -- thus I didn't have a lot of time to indulge this little experiment of mine. And because 194 can kiss my ass. We're not on good terms. Of the 193 people, 176 of them answered the "hobbyist" question correctly. Oddly enough, the most missed question was the one pertaining to the portal colors ... even though the answer is on the cover of Portal 2. Eh, people are weird. Among those same individuals, only 36 answered the "intellectual" questions correctly. The most commonly missed question of this category: Approximately how old is the planet Earth, according to modern science? Good thing Neil deGrasse Tyson doesn't read gaming blogs. He'd probably be a bit disappointed at that result, especially considering the common geek's love for time travel and planetary matters. So what does all this mean? Well, essentially, they are not us and we are not them. As much as we love to consider ourselves the same as the weird, quirky academic champions who the majority of the world respects, we simply have less in common with them than we like to assume. The necessary fundamentals that make up a gamer and a genius are just too different. It doesn't take smarts to be a gamer, any more than it takes dexterity to be a theoretical physicist. This is also not an asthma inhaler, even though lungs are involved. It's not difficult for one to see how such a misconception can exist, though. Plenty of us gamers are old and passionate enough to have had childhoods where we were constantly criticized and belittled for our geeky hobbies on a regular basis. It only makes sense that plenty would develop the habit of looking at venerated scholars who likely suffered similar childhoods and thinking, "He too was teased yet ended up awesome. I must be as well." Also, at one point, the very nature of science fiction (before it became more mainstream) appealed to the aspiring scientific minds of the future, regarding what they could eventually accomplish and create. So some of what we gamers love today did previously appeal mainly to actual bookworms. Unfortunately, that just doesn't seem to be the case these days. Now, the expected thing for me to do here is go off on anyone who consistently falls into this habit of misguided association. As easy as that would be (plus, I think I sort of already did it at the head of this feature), that's not really the point of this article. Feeling some small sense of pride for other people's accomplishments -- though a bit dishonest -- doesn't really hurt anyone. In fact, most athletes enjoy a good fan club (it usually results in a higher paycheck). No, I'm not here to be a complete dick by calling everyone out on their bullshit; I'm here to be a half-dick by proving that their bullshit is indeed bullshit. I merely wanted to uncover a particular aspect of the gamer/geek identity, and, what the hell, I also wanted to provide a bit more perspective on the constituents of this young and ever-growing industry. My theories are indeed still theories, and there's no way for me to prove exactly why gamers act the way they do most of the time. But I do think I've provided some decent evidence that we're not so much like the inquisitive individuals who we revere so much and a lot more like the basic, average folks whom we attempt to distinguish ourselves from. We just happen to enjoy a relatively unpopular pastime at the moment, that's all. Get rid of the gaming paraphernalia, and you can fill in the blank with anything. Finally, before any of you ask, "If your goal was to affiliate gamers with 'normal' people, then why didn't you ask the general population these same questions?" That wasn't my goal, though I did consider that. I then thought to myself, "Wait a minute, what if the walking accidents at the Pinkberry and Apple Store know the correct answers to the science questions?" A lot of gamers would probably find that rather depressing, including myself. In fact ... if you'll excuse me, I need to go Google whatever the fuck Newton's third law is.
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The one thing that has always bugged me the most about sports is the use of the word "we." As in, "We won!" No, you didn't win, John Sofaturd from Nothingsville, Ohio. You didn't do anything except sit on your ass and obtain ...

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Valve: No Half-Life 3 at E3


May 03
// Jim Sterling
Most will likely agree that the whole Half-Life 3 joke has worn a little thin. I am certainly tired of it, and just wish Valve would announce the thing and get it over with. Well, apparently that's not going to happen at E3. ...
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Jimquisition: Cutscenes aren't a failure state


Apr 09
// Jim Sterling
It's become increasingly popular to disparage cutscenes and the games that use them in the past few years. It is argued that interactive art should never force a player to watch a movie and, while there's merit in that, that...
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Free mod Elevator: Source is crazy enough to work


Jan 16
// Jordan Devore
Elevator: Source reminds me of a time back when technical limitations were more constraining, before some of today's popular genres even existed. A team could build a game about inner tubes, or put a banjo-playing man on a b...
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Half-Life movie mock-up posters are Batman-y


Jan 04
// Tony Ponce
Forget Valve, that gang of meanies and tricksters. The fans can do a better job of teasing us with the prospect of things that will never happen without coming across as trolls. Things like, say, a fictional Half-Life movie. ...
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Ever since obsessed fans pulled apart a video of Wheatley at the Spike Videogame Awards, rumors concerning Half-Life 3 have run rampant. While the community is expecting an imminent announcement, Valve writer Chet Faliszek ha...

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Something tells us this Half-Life 3 teaser site is bull


Dec 21
// Jim Sterling
A supposed teaser site for Half-Life 3 appeared today, popping up on a site calling itself Black Aperture. The site displays only a Half-Life 3 logo, and Valve's trademark information, as well as a link to the Orange Box site...
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The DTOID Show: Watch us recap the VGAs!


Dec 12
// Tara Long
Happy Monday, Destructoid! In the event that you were too busy huffing ether to pay attention to the Spike TV VGA's this weekend, Max and I have managed to condense the only important parts (i.e., the trailers) into a simple...
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Valve begins hyping something (HALF-LIFE 3 CONFIRMED OMG)


Dec 12
// Jim Sterling
This past Saturday, Valve released a video featuring Portal 2 antagonist Wheatley. Unsurprisingly, the Internet descended upon it with icepicks and magnifying glasses, ready to take it apart and examine every frame for clues ...
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Garrymon Episode 2: The nightmarish Pokemon spoof returns


Dec 10
// Tony Ponce
It's been almost two years since we saw the first episode of Garrymon, the Pokémon spoof that used Garry's Mod with hilariously creepy results. During that time, creators HyperJerk and Dtoider Jetz had to restart the ...
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That's a real life Gravity Gun you're looking at


Dec 07
// Harry Monogenis
The name Harrison Krix mean anything to you? Well it bloody should, I mean he was the guy that made the new Mr. Destructoid helmet, created kick-ass Portal and Portal 2 guns and a BioShock Big Daddy costume to name a few...
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The DTOID Show: Xenoblade, Minecraft, and... Tetris?


Dec 02
// Tara Long
If you've ever wondered what it looks like when two sick people host a live show together, then look no further. Technical difficulties be damned, today's live taping of The Destructoid Show has explored the boundaries of wh...
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Half-Life 3 shirt spotted covering Valve man's nipples


Dec 02
// Jim Sterling
Everybody, it's time to speculate!  Uber Entertainment marketing man Chandana Ekanayake was able to Tweet a photo from a recent game developer event, showcasing an alleged Valve employee wearing a Half-Life 3 shirt....
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Half-Life: Origins fan film is such a tease


Dec 01
// Tony Ponce
Has anyone gone back to play the original Half-Life lately? Probably doesn't look as good as you remember, does it? YouTuber Infectious Designer decided to create this little video to give the 90s classic a little bit of "li...

How I learned to stop pining for Half-Life: Episode Three

Sep 30 // Michael Corbisiero
Experience It wasn’t until Half-Life 2 was re-released in The Orange Box, in the Fall of 2007, that I sat down and played through it. I tossed aside my expectations and went in relatively blind, despite hearing good things. I'm glad I did, as I enjoyed it more not knowing what was in store. I still enjoy it, as a recent playthrough revealed, which is impressive, given the age of the game. I had the good fortune of jumping aboard when I did, as Half-Life 2: Episode One picked up right where the ending left off.Rather than sink more time and resources into a large sequel, Valve chose to experiment with an “episodic” format. So rather than wait years for Half-Life 3, we could continue playing through the adventures of the mute with a crowbar, Gordon Freeman. And play, I did. When I arrived at the ending of Half-Life 2: Episode Two and the credits rolled, I was excited. Valve had set the stage for what was sure to be a satisfying conclusion. Suffice to say, the Christmas 2007 release was pushed back indefinitely with no further information. I was initially patient, thinking Valve was hard at work on it. I told myself they couldn’t keep this going for more than a couple years. So I moved on to other games and Half-Life was soon off my mind. Since the game's delay, no further information has been released outside of blips during interviews. I wanted to know more! Why did the studio’s acknowledgment of the game seem to fade out after 2007?It was then I began to notice a hint of the company’s internal workings. Team Fortress 2 continued to see updates and revisions to its gameplay since it was first introduced in 2007. Portal also proved to be a surprising experiment released from the company. Then there were Left 4 Dead and Left 4 Dead 2, both released from Valve within the span of nearly a year. “That’s all fine and dandy,” I said, “But where’s Episode Three?” I couldn’t figure it out. What could have possibly happened? Enlightenment Why do we keep coming back to Episode Three? Why does nearly every interview, news article, and forum thread concerning Valve come back to the next entry in the Half-Life series? Usually, if something is good, we want more of it. Valve has a persistent track record of polished games that lead the pack. They're known for experimenting and taking calculated risks. It’s easy to lose hope in a concept that remains unseen. I knew what direction Episode Three was supposed to head in. I knew it was supposed to be the last of the story arc set in motion. This was going to be as epic as epic could be defined. Perhaps even epic enough to have the term redefined.My concern for the game’s whereabouts didn't come from a place of selfishness, but a place of passion for the series. I can’t speak for everyone, but I suspect that same may be said for them. Regardless, I was wrong, and I soon learned how my frustration and desire to know was nothing more than a bad case of entitlement.  It was something Gabe Newell said during an interview that struck a chord with me.“And so Episode Three is sort of this victim of our willingness to experiment but as soon as we have stuff that we’re ready to talk about, we will.” My discovery of The Final Hours of Half-Life 2 and The Final Hours of Portal 2 further expanded my understanding of the company. Both features helped paint a vivid picture to the trials and tribulations both projects put the company through. Creative Freedom So what did I learn about Valve that changed my stance on Episode Three?Gabe Newell has made a conscious effort to create an environment that consists of collecting intelligent and talented people, giving them a desk that literally has wheels, and setting them loose. This leads to the company's founding principle: non-linear development. Valve does whatever it believes its time is best spent doing. A project starts with a collection of passion and interest. From there, the concept continues to be refined until the company believes it meets their own standards.The company certainly has a lot it could be doing with its time. A Half-Life sequel, additional Portal content, Steam client revisions, Left 4 Dead and Team Fortress 2 updates, a Counter-Strike sequel, and departures from the studio’s lineage, such as Dota 2. There are only so many hours in the day and a limited number of employees - which is why the studio must rely on the collective enthusiasm and passion for a project to help dictate its time. So why has Valve been noticeably quiet about the happenings of the Half-Life series with future installments? Because Half-Life 2 had moments that severely damaged the morale of the company and led to cracks in the company's carefully crafted environment (see: the leaking of an unfinished Half-Life 2 build). The company has since learned it’s best to give a project time to hide from the public eye, as an idea in its infancy can be shattered if subjected to the cruelty of a general audience. What makes the company work, as a whole, is that they don’t have to answer to shareholders looking from the outside of the company and the industry. The head of the company, comparatively, works directly with employees on projects. Can you imagine what we'd have if the company had shareholders and suits dictating its projects? Half-Life 5? A non-existent mod community due to the hampering of “unauthorized use” of the Source engine? Left 4 Dead 4? No hats in Team Fortress 2?Sometimes, the most obvious choice isn’t the right one. But it may very well be. Understanding “That’s all interesting,” you may say, “but what’s wrong with wanting to know more about the next Half-Life game?” There’s nothing wrong with wanting to know more. By nature, we’re curious. It’s when we feel the need to unkindly say that we deserve to know more that a problem arises. Valve does not owe us anything more than what they choose to deliver. Artists and creative folks alike do what they feel is right and continue to work from there. They didn’t sign a contract with their fan-base that agreed to a sequel for every concept produced.Buying a game and enjoying it doesn’t mean that a sequel is in the cards. Fans of Psychonauts (hear, hear) can certainly attest to this. Complaining that a company is off making new things instead of a sequel to a beloved game seems counter-productive.We aren’t entitled to another Half-Life game. If it happens, it’ll be because of the passion from not just the community, but from Valve, the company that created the series in good faith to begin with. I pondered this last thought for a lot of time and this is when a question popped into my mind: Would I be willing to have a development team’s passion sacrificed for the sake of just having a game pushed out the door? Absolutely not. The passion for a project shows in the final product and its absence can be detrimental. See Spider-Man 3: The Game a Generic Tie-In Game, if you have any doubts. Conjecture  “Fair enough,” you say, “but what’s happening, then? I still want to know if Episode Three is on or off!” The company saw potential in the episodic model and viewed it as an opportunity to talk about other stories in the Half-Life universe. Something changed in 2007. From company behavior, word-of-mouth, and past events, here are three speculative answers for the whereabouts of the next Half-Life game. One, Episode Three is proving to be an ambitious project and no deadline has been set to allow the team time to create a product that satisfies the company’s standard.Two, development for the next Half-Life game has been postponed. Ideas are thrown around sparingly and several concepts are brewing. Employees continue to work on other projects until a concept enough people can get behind appears.Three, the development of Episode Three was canned, after proving to be too ambitious for the episodic model. Instead, the focus has been shifted to a larger project for the next Half-Life game, which will take a considerable amount of time to complete. Time Every scenario will eventually lead to the public once again taking the helm of Gordon Freeman. From what I know about the company, Valve will eventually return to the series and get behind a concept they believe in. It’s just a matter of time.  We aren’t entitled to anything from the company. Having been guilty of this myself, I can no longer understand how people can say “I don’t care about that game. Where’s Episode Three?” Regardless of whether or not we're interested in what Valve does outside of the Half-Life series, we can’t say that what they’re doing isn’t productive. We don’t have to like what they do, but, alternatively, they don’t have to do as we say. They choose to pursue these creative endeavors. So what can a fan do in the mean time? Go play another game. Read a book. Watch a movie. Work. Do something productive. Move on with life. Know that Valve is working on projects that they’re passionate about and that it’s fine if they release something that doesn’t belong in the Half-Life franchise. I know that, when the next Half-Life game arrives, it’ll be worth my time. Until then, I’ll make sure I spend it wisely. The thoughts conveyed in the feature above in no way represent the author’s desire to own a gravity gun and propel large objects through his rowdy neighbor’s house.
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In May of 2006, Half-Life 2: Episode Three was announced. It was said that the project would be wrapped up and pushed out just in time for a Christmas 2007 release. I had no idea what Valve Time was. I didn't have much experi...


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