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Dungeons and Dragons

Neverwinter release photo
Neverwinter release

Neverwinter out on June 20, first expansion revealed


The expansion is green!
Jun 06
// Joshua Derocher
You should go play Neverwinter -- it's awesome. Right now it's in open beta, but on June 20 it will be officially released. Part of this release includes a new end-game area that will combine "PvE, PvP and dungeon delving int...
Dungeons and Dragons photo
Dungeons and Dragons

Chronicles of Mystara trailer showcases the Dwarf


No magic? No problem
May 24
// Chris Carter
Dungeons and Dragons: Chronicles of Mystara is coming soon for the PS3, Xbox 360, Wii U, and PC, and you can get a closer look at the Dwarf character in the trailer above. As his description suggests, the Dwarf is a front-li...
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DeNA's next two games are G.I. Joe and Dungeons & Dragons


Give him the stick!
May 24
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
DeNA is continuing their partnership with Hasbro by releasing two new titles: G.I. Joe Battleground and Dungeons & Dragons Arena of War. G.I. Joe I expect will be much like the Transformers game where you collect and bat...
Videogames are evil photo
Videogames are evil

Dungeons & Dragons destroys peoples lives


It's evil I tells ya
Apr 20
// Taylor Stein
Crazy alert: radical TV preacher Pat Robertson is at it again. In a new video aimed at warning the world of hidden evils, Robertson asserts that Dungeons & Dragons is a "demonic" videogame. In previous discussions throug...
Neverwinter photo
Neverwinter

Neverwinter goes into open beta on April 30


With one more closed beta event on the way
Apr 05
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Apparently a lot of you like Neverwinter, the upcoming free-to-play MMORPG. Seriously, we ran out of closed beta codes for the game within minutes! Well for those of you who missed the special closed beta weekend events, you...
Chronicles of Mystara photo
Chronicles of Mystara

PAX: Capcom breathes new life into D&D arcade classics


A nostalgic four-player romp
Mar 22
// Fraser Brown
Capcom announced today at PAX that Dungeons & Dragons: Tower of Doom and Shadow over Mystara, its sequel, would be getting remastered into an HD double-pack for modern platforms. These two four-player arcade brawler...

Here are 5,000 Beta Weekend 3 codes for Neverwinter!

Mar 21 // mrandydixon
[embed]249271:47689:0[/embed] Neverwinter key redemption instructions: Go to www.playneverwinter.com For new accounts: Create your account information and submitFor existing accounts: Login to your account Enter your key here - https://my.perfectworld.com/nw/redeemkey Download the game client here - http://nw.perfectworld.com/download Install and play! Once you've put in some time with the game, be sure to share your experience in the comments below! And if you like what you see, check out the Neverwinter Founders Packs! Have fun! Note - Codes not redeemable in the following regions: China, Egypt, Russia, Hong Kong, North and South Korea, Macao, Taiwan, and Vietnam.
Neverwinter BW3 keys photo
Grab a key for the upcoming D&D MMO, courtesy of Dtoid!
[Update: Codes expired! Hope you had fun!] Destructoid has partnered with our friends at Perfect World to bring you 5,000 codes for this weekend's leg of the Neverwinter beta! Set in The Forgotten Realms campaign for Dungeons...

Here are 2,000 beta codes for the D&D MMO Neverwinter!

Mar 07 // mrandydixon
Neverwinter key redemption instructions: Go to www.playneverwinter.com For new accounts: Create your account information and submitFor existing accounts: Login to your account Enter your key here - https://my.perfectworld.com/nw/redeemkey Download the game client here - http://nw.perfectworld.com/download Install and play! Once you've put in some time with the game, be sure to share your experience in the comments below! Have fun! Note - Codes not redeemable in the following regions: China, Egypt, Russia, Hong Kong, North and South Korea, Macao, Taiwan, and Vietnam.
Neverwinter beta keys photo
Grab a key for Beta Weekend 2, courtesy of Dtoid!
[Update 2: We're giving away five more on Twitter this Saturday, March 9. After that, you'll have to wait for Beta Weekend 3!] [Update: They're gone! Boy, that was fast. Follow us on Twitter; we might get more!] Destructoid h...

D&D MMO Neverwinter plays like a good action-RPG

Feb 07 // Joshua Derocher
Neverwinter  (PC)Developer: Cryptic StudiosPublisher: Perfect World EntertainmentReleases: Early 2013 The biggest thing that makes Neverwinter stand out from other MMOs is its tiny abilities bar on the bottom of the screen. It works a lot like the abilities system from a typical action-RPG game and it's easily usable with keys like Q, E, and R. You'll only have to reach up to 1 and 2 to use your daily powers, which won't be too often. A total of eleven abilities can be hot-keyed, and that includes the mouse buttons. The abilities you decide to map can be swapped out at just about any time, not unlike, say, Diablo III. The combat is almost identical to a hack-n-slash role-playing game. Imagine if Diablo III and EverQuest had a baby: combat works by clicking a lot while pointing at monsters and dodging out of the way of their attacks. It isn't anything new, but it's a nice point of differentiation for an MMO. It's very responsive and I noticed only minimal impact from lag -- even in this early beta version. The foundry system of player-created content from Cryptic's other games like Star Trek Online will be making its way into Neverwinter. Players will be able to make their own quests and they are easily accessed from a bulletin board in-game. Any user-created content can be rated so you don't have to worry about wading through piles of garbage to find anything worthwhile. It won't cost anything to access the Foundry, but it will have to be unlocked in the game somehow. Cryptic will have more details on this later. At launch, there will be five classes that are based on Fourth Edition D&D class archetypes: Trickster Rogue, Great Weapon Fighter, Guardian Fighter, Control Wizard, and Devoted Cleric. There are plans to add more classes after release, and there's no word yet on if any of these will cost money to unlock. The developers did say that they don't want to lock content out from anyone, but things like unique races might be offered to premium players. I'm sure some of you are wondering what makes this different from Dungeons & Dragons Online. Well, it plays a lot differently for one thing. DDO is a classically-structured MMO that is strongly based on the 3.5 edition of D&D's rules, which is a long way of saying that it's slower paced and a lot like EverQuest and World of Warcraft. Neverwinter is based on new rules for D&D and it's built as an action game. Plus it's based on the more well-known Forgotten Realms as opposed to the Eberron setting and is being designed as a free-to-play game from the ground up. I like DDO, but I can see some people switching over to Neverwinter because it has more engaging combat. Of course, they are both free, so no one really has to choose one over the other.  I've enjoyed what I've played so far and am looking forward to diving into the beta over the coming weeks. The MMO space needs some diversity in what's available, and while Neverwinter doesn't stray too far from the familiar questing formula, it does offer entertaining combat, and having fun -- if still familiar -- gameplay is sometimes all it takes to make a good game.
Neverwinter hands-on photo
Impressions of the Neverwinter beta
There are a lot of massively-multiplayer online games on the market today, many of which are still very similar to World of Warcraft. While the graphics, setting, and characters may change, the core gameplay often feels the s...

Review: Crimson Shroud

Dec 14 // Chris Carter
Crimson Shroud (3DS eShop)Developer: Level-5, Nex EntertainmentPublisher: Level-5Released: December 13, 2012MSRP: $7.99 The legendary Yasumi Matsuno, who worked on such treasured games as Ogre Battle 64, Final Fantasy Tactics, and Vagrant Story, is at the helm as both the writer and director of Crimson Shroud. Given the pedigree alone, it's bound to turn some heads -- especially for old-school JRPG fans. This isn't your cookie-cutter JRPG, however -- dice rolling is paramount in Crimson Shroud. No, I don't mean the secret number-crunching machinations that go on behind the scenes in many RPGs that determine damage and stats; I mean there is literal dice rolling, complete with D20s and everything. The game doesn't half-ass this Dungeons and Dragons feel either: during most of your journey, the characters and enemies even have little figurine bottoms on them, and the dialogue often reads like a dungeon master is deciding your fate. Little touches like these make the game feel like it has a smaller production value for sure, but it adds a ton of charm, and offers an experience most other games gloss over. Story-wise, Matsuno compared the ambition of the narrative to a "short story," which I would say is apt. You're presented with three characters, Giauque (the kinda sorta main character), Frea (the mysterious member of the Qish race), and Lippi (Giauque's close friend and confidant), and the crux of it basically deals with their hunt for the fabled "Crimson Shroud" -- an item of extreme power. You'll progress through the game using a map on the game's bottom screen, and like D&D, pitfalls, traps, and encounters could occur at any moment, in addition to the peppering of story sequences here and there. Normally I'm not a fan of static story sequences without voice acting, but it absolutely fits the "dungeon master" narrative style here, and given the low scale of the game, it makes sense. If you don't buy into the lore, a number of these story sequences are optional, and are enacted by selecting the "reminisce" option at key points. Basically, how much backstory you get is mostly dependent on your personal interest for it, which is a nice touch for people who just want to enjoy the RPG side of things. Just like classic pen-and-paper RPGs, you'll find a number of events that bring you at a crossroads, and leave you at the fate of the dice to decide whether or not you dodge a trap, for instance. Naturally, given that Crimson Shroud unabashedly pays homage to these types of games, there's lots of reading involved. That's okay though, because special credit should go to the writers and the translation team, as they do a great job keeping you enthralled. Again, you know where your loyalties lie when it comes to these types of experiences, and if this doesn't sound appetizing, I'd be weary of plunking down the price of entry for this. Surprisingly though, even when you look further than dice rolling, Crimson Shroud touts one of the most complex RPG battle systems I've seen in recent memory, due to the fact that layers of strategy are present in nearly every facet of the mechanics. There are elemental chains, elemental counters, optional dice rolling power-ups that let you test chance, mechanics such as the ability to skip turns and make your next turn quicker, and more. Since combat is set up like a typical JRPG (think Final Fantasy), it'll be easy to pick up, but still difficult to master. Do you buff yourself, or an ailing party member? Do you spread out your elemental abilities, or attempt to chain them in succession? You'll constantly be asking yourself these questions as you stop and thinking during some of the game's harder fights, which is a welcome change from the blazing action combat systems found in other RPGs. All of the game's controls are wonderfully designed, allowing you to take advantage of either the touch screen or the d-pad and face buttons (yes!) -- even for actions like dice rolling. There are no character levels in Crimson Shroud, as your performance is entirely dependent on your skills and items. While I don't normally like this design in lengthier RPGs, it lends itself very well to a shorter, bite-sized affair, eliminating the need to grind (unless you decide to grind for items). You may find yourself begging for a level grind though, as some of the encounters in this game are tough, and will require you to actually learn the game's intricacies. In one particular instance, I struggled pretty early on against a giant Minotaur, and almost directly after the confrontation, I encountered that same Minotaur in zombie form -- only this time, he could leech health. I ran into a number of issues, namely the fact that two of my three party members were geared to use dark abilities -- which the zombie Minotaur resisted. After a 15-minute fight where he was leeching health faster than I could deal damage, I loaded my last save file. After that, I tried to keep my item elements diversified a bit, and I didn't run into too much trouble -- save for a few more lessons in tactics. Crimson Shroud lasts around seven hours, but given the aforementioned tough and lengthy battles, it could end up taking a lot more time to complete. After you're done, there's a New Game+ option that allows you to retain your gear, and increases the difficulty of the game. For the price, this little $7.99 package is quite a bang for your buck. Although there are a number of hang-ups, and the audience is decidedly niche, Crimson Shroud is an incredibly unique game that will satisfy table-top fans everywhere. While I didn't get into the story as much as Matsuno probably hoped I would, I had a great time hanging out with Giauque and crew in this incredibly well-crafted RPG.
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Digital D&D dice rolling
The Guild01 collection is a very special project that I'm glad we could be a part of. Although the last game in the set isn't slated for a release out of Japan, the mere fact that Level-5 decided to take a chance with any of ...

How I learned to stop worrying and love the tabletop RPG

Sep 25 // Sophie Prell
I had played Baldur's Gate on PC when it first came out, in an age of CRT display iMacs with handles embedded in their neon-colored plastic cases. I loved it, but I never realized how much the game was a translation of D&D 2nd edition rules, or that it took place in an official D&D setting. When my friends finally had an opening in their role-playing group, it was decided the next campaign would take place in Forgotten Realms, along the coast, just north of, yes, Baldur's Gate. “Wait a minute,” I said. “They took the game from however long ago and made it into this?” The group looked at me as though I had just asked what inning the Super Bowl was in, and how many free throws the Green Bay Packers needed to beat the Calgary Flames. It was kindly explained to me that the legacy of D&D traces back far, far earlier than any digital video game, and that Baldur's Gate the game was in fact based on Forgotten Realms, not the other way around. I sunk my teeth into Dungeons & Dragons like I never had any of my other hobbies. I read every book on my friend's shelf. I learned all I could about the rules and creatures and magic and items. My first character was a Fey'Ri rogue/sorcerer combo, and to this day I often use her name for avatars or screen names on forums. No luck on the Xbox LIVE gamertag though. Boo. Soon, D&D wasn't enough. I learned there were all manner of role-playing systems, including the often-mocked live-action role-playing game, such as World of Darkness. A professional at Iowa State University and personal friend turned out to be not just an avid player of Vampire: The Masquerade, but the local prince of vampires. He gave me a taste of his Camarilla persona, and I was legitimately terrified. Make fun of LARP-ing all you want, but that shit was scary. I bought my own map, my own books, my own dice. I sketched out characters. I was neck-deep and loving it. The funny thing is, the more absorbed I became in tabletop, the more I recognized the legacy of D&D in modern systems and games. Skyrim may have a collision detection method of combat, but hit points and mana points are still there. Knights of the Old Republic was governed by D&D 3rd edition rules, and it's considered one of the best roleplaying games of all time. Guild Wars 2 is a huge step forward for MMOs, but you're still basically targeting a creature's AC and utilizing abilities, much as you would in a tabletop system. Not only that, but my deeper connection and understanding of tabletop led me to a deeper understanding of gamer and nerd culture. Believe it or not, some nerds just aren't as into video games as you or I. They might prefer pen and paper role-playing, LARP-ing, comic books, or television. If you only have one thing to connect on and the other person doesn't share that interest, you've lost an opportunity to learn and grow. Now that I could talk D&D, I could meet new people and share new interests, learn new things. Getting into tabletop gaming fostered my creativity. Jesse Plumb, the same friend who introduced me to Forgotten Realms revealed that he had been working on his own setting, called StarBlazer. StarBlazer was every sci-fi trope and nerd fantasy come true, slammed together and put together to form a coherent whole. The Empire? They're around. Xenomophs? They've got stats. Grammaton Clerics? They're a base class. Samus' Varia Suit? It's wearable. StarBlazer symbolized the cycle of creativity: It took two things my friend loved, role-playing and nerd culture, and created something fresh, with its own classes, rules, and systems. Dungeons & Dragons likewise took from Tolkien, Lewis Carroll, Poul Anderson, even the Bible and television show Kolchak: The Night Stalker. Now I've tried my hand at creation, with my own base class based on Naked Snake, designed to fit within Pathfinder rules. (Warning: It's incredibly unbalanced, I know. Like I said: first attempt.) But why tell you all this? For one, I hope you can learn as I did to appreciate things you may not have tried before, and seek out those new experiences. We're not just gamers, we're part of a culture, and that culture intersects at so many crossroads and waypoints along the way it behooves you to learn as much as you can. Second, there is a film being made about Gary Gygax and the legacy he created with D&D, and I'd like your eyes turned to them for a moment. The D&D documentary Kickstarter just closed last weekend, and they just barely met their goal. I want to see these men and projects like these supported. I want more people to see Dungeons & Dragons and tabletop role-playing as I have come to see it: as a wonderful influence on even our most modern gaming experiences, one we too often take for granted. I want people to see things the way I've seen them and then be inspired. Are you excited for Bioshock Infinite? Do you love Borderlands 2? Name the game, and it can be translated to the tabletop medium. All you have to do is try. At the very worst, you fail and wasted some of your time. But you did it trying to create something, and it will have given you a new perspective on this little hobby of ours we call gaming. Whether our controllers are handheld constructions or a combination of dice and paper, we're all gamers.
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I love role-playing. I like being a half-elf, half-demon on a bloody rampage; I like being a sci-fi ex-black ops badass on a quest to rescue his daughter; I love being a naughty schoolgir -- wait, sorry -- wrong kind of role-...

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PC release of Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition pushed back


Sep 14
// Jordan Devore
The PC version of Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition was scheduled to release next Tuesday, but it has now been pushed back -- quite a bit back, actually -- to make sure all of the pieces are in place at launch. The new date is ...
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Impressions: DDO: Menace of the Underdark


Jul 30
// Joshua Derocher
Dungeons & Dragons Online (DDO) has been around for over six years now. When it went free to play, the game picked up over a million new players and its revenue increased by 500%. I'd call that successful. It wa...
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WB bringing Lollipop Chainsaw, Witcher 2 and more to PAX


Mar 31
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
It was last PAX East where Lollipop Chainsaw debuted to the masses and it's going to be this PAX East where we get just one more last look before the release this June. The game has come a long way since last PAX and I can't...
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LOTR Online and D&D Online going cloud streaming


Mar 08
// Brett Zeidler
First it was the move to free-to-play that brought throngs of new players to both The Lord of the Rings Online and Dungeons & Dragons Online in the past. What's there left to do? Well, cloud streaming, of course! Starting...
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Could a new Baldur's Gate be on the way?


Feb 29
// Jim Sterling
A new teaser site has crept onto the thing we call the Internet, and it brings sultry promises of new Baldur's Gate content. The site plays music, has a few images, and bears a quote from Alaundo, but the stuff hidden in the ...
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Dungeons & Dragons PC classics are on sale at GOG.com


Feb 21
// Alasdair Duncan
Good Old Games continues to give you a good reason to say goodbye to your well-earned cash by having yet another great value sale. If Dungeons and Dragons-inspired PC classics are your thing, then you can buy one game and get...
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D&D Online going to the Forgotten Realms this Summer


Jan 19
// Fraser Brown
In its six year history, Dungeons & Dragons Online has gone through a significant number of changes, not least of which was the change from a subscription model to free-to-play in 2009. But unlike many other titles in the...
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[Update: Contest closed! Winner is DestroyerTZ for this haiku: Inside this Dungeon Stories beneath the city Dragons are mating] Today's 25 Days of Giving contest has us giving away DRAGONS! Wizards of the Coast rele...

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Update for D & D Online: Eberron Unlimited is Live


Sep 12
// Daniel Starkey
The latest update for Dungeons and Dragons Online: Eberron Unlimited just went live. It boosts the crafting level to 150, allowing players to make Draconic Runestunes, a new magical weapon for all classes. Also included are s...
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E3: Neverwinter defrosts a trailer and some details


Jun 08
// Maurice Tan
Cryptic Studios (City of Heroes, Champions Online, Star Trek Online) has revealed some slivers of information and a trailer for the upcoming multiplayer game Neverwinter. Set in the well-known city in the Forgotten Realms uni...

Review: Dungeons And Dragons: Daggerdale

Apr 27 // Brad Nicholson
Dungeons And Dragons: Daggerdale (XBLA [Reviewed], PSN)Developer: Bedlam GamesPublisher: AtariReleased: May 24, 2011MSRP: $15.00 This is a game that is afraid to let you act out a story. Instead of weaving its tale through your actions, most of the major plot points are revealed via abrupt and flat cut-scenes adorned with pieces of concept art. Worse, the moment-to-moment story is told via dry bits and pieces of text delivered by cheesy characters who always need you to do something trivial like, say, light torches, escort someone, or kill a mob. During the horrendous climax of the game, there are a few spots where you’re an active participant. But it’s hard to give Bedlam props because these are easily the most underwhelming and underdeveloped spots in the game.  The task at hand is a big deal, though the setup isn't a surprising one. A bad guy named Rezlus is erecting an evil dark spire and gathering an army of goblins, sellswords, and other nasty dudes to his side. You, as one of the four pre-set heroes, are tasked with stopping him from accomplishing his goal of taking over the Dalelands.  The classes are familiar archetypes: there’s the fighter, the cleric, the wizard, and the rogue. Each has several special attacks that separate them from the other, but your fighter or whatever will always be the same as your buddies’ -- these are pre-rolled pugilists; customization outside of equipment has been thrown out the window, and as a result, so has a lot of D&D flair. Each attack (including the standard ranged and melee options) are mapped to buttons in good, natural ways. And while the combat has no fluidity or nuance to speak of, the action does click with me... but only because the loot and grind aspects are good drivers.  Daggerdale counters all good feelings with its assortment of odd design decisions, ranging from the lack of original foes, to the meeting of random and wildly overpowered regular enemies and bosses, to increasingly poor pacing and distribution of garbage loot towards the last three-to-four hours of the six-to-seven hour game. The bugs are the worst. Textures load in constantly as you play, drawing your eyes annoyingly when your glossy balls should be staring down foes instead. Screen tearing is a threat, too. And as if that wasn't enough, there's also disappearing enemies, invincible enemies, enemies that fall through floors, spells that randomly go missing, quest objectives that refuse to appear to disappear, some teleportation oddities, movement issues, and sometimes enemies just... freeze -- it’s weird.  Another couple of stumbling blocks are married to the game’s economy and loot systems, the former of which feels busted. You make money by killing dudes, selling things and breaking barrels, but what you get compared to what stuff costs doesn't line up. Items are mad expensive. Wholesale health potions reliance is also an issue, mainly because merchants carry limited quantities. If you don’t have the concoctions, you simply can’t progress in the later game. It would have been nice, as a fighter, to have something else to lean that wasn't so hard to find for my healing needs. This stuff should be expected from a hack-and-slash, right? The genre is all about, after all, the user having to suckle from the red teat and pick up dropped loot. As a whole though, there’s too much of this brand of archaic design in Daggerdale. The class archetypes are just as dull as the fantasy-ass fantasy story, the fantasy-ass characters, the fantasy-ass levels, the fantasy-ass monsters, and the slow fantasy-ass dice-based gameplay.  In some ways I like how Daggerdale embraces convention. I like old-school RPGs, too. The problem is that this design mentality breeds frustration in the form of overwhelming inventory management, slow combat, and a lot of been-there-seen-that stuff. Daggerdale is a game that needs to offer something, anything, other than loot and grind and it just... doesn’t.  I’d love to note that the co-op element, which allows you to roll with up to three other people in these missions, is some sort of magical savior, but it’s not really. It’s riddled with its own specific bugs and problems, which are the makings of an even worse experience. The balance, which is already kind of broken in single player, is totally defective in co-op as well.  That's not wholly surprising. Daggerdale is a game that takes all its cues from the past, and while that sounds like an okay idea, it isn’t. From UI, to writing, to systems, this feels like an ancient game that was also, tragically, not given enough time in the oven. The loot and action components might click with you at times, but there are just too many technical issues and other problems in the way of this basic, visceral kind of experience.   
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Dungeons and Dragons: Daggerdale is an action-RPG developed by Bedlam Games, the new dudes behind the troubled Scratch: The Ultimate DJ project. This isn’t the kind of pedigree you want from a studio handling a new Dung...


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