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Dragon Age

DA:I Multiplayer photo
DA:I Multiplayer

People are soloing Dragon Age: Inquisition's multiplayer mode on the max difficulty already

I'll just be weeping in the other room
Jan 03
// Nic Rowen
If you're having trouble with something in a game, never check the forums. It will just rub salt in the wounds. I picked up Dragon Age: Inquisition over the holidays and have been logging some time in the game's multiplayer ...
Origin deals photo
Origin deals

99-cent Battlefield 3 and Inquisition for 33% off in Origin's year-end sale

99 cents more than free
Dec 23
// Dealzon
Origin finally started its "real" winter sale, and deals are fairly decent, especially if you've been eying a PC copy of Dragon Age: Inquisition. The PC download's price finally matches the console versions' Black Friday week...
Deals photo

Dragon Age: Inquisition gets 20% cut on Origin with sitewide coupon

Console somehow still cheaper
Dec 19
// Dealzon
Origin launched a rare sitewide promo code on its storefront today, knocking 20 percent off almost everything in the catalog. (It doesn't work on BioWare points, so don't bother checking.) While there are definitely some excl...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Inquisition gets a multiplayer update, it has wolves in it

Yay free
Dec 17
// Chris Carter
Most of the people I know who bought Dragon Age: Inquisition are still playing it. Proof positive that the lengthy single-player experience isn't dead, and not every game needs to be multiplayer. Wait a minute, Inqu...
Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

Dragon Age: Inquisition launch trailer will make you want to play Dragon Age

Nov 18
// Brett Makedonski
This launch trailer for Dragon Age: Inquisition isn't short on anything. It doesn't skimp on gorgeous shots of the expansive universe. It has plenty of the ferocious winged serpents that adorn the franchise's namesake. ...

Dragon Age: Inquisition, Far Cry 4 & More AAA Weekend Deals

Uh, more time please?
Nov 15
// Dealzon
Deals brought to you by the crew at Dealzon. FYI: sales from certain retailers go toward supporting Destructoid. Next week Tuesday we get two Triple-As from two big publishers: Dragon Age: Inquisition along wit...

Dragon Age: Inquisition deals for Origin & Xbox One (updated for release)

Just stay clear of me Alistair
Nov 13
// Dealzon
Deals brought to you by the crew at Dealzon. FYI: sales from certain retailers go toward supporting Destructoid. On Tuesday, November 18 BioWare's Dragon Age Inquisition makes its debut on all major videogame platforms for th...
EA Access photo
EA Access

EA Access subscribers can get Dragon Age: Inquisition today

Six hour trial
Nov 13
// Chris Carter
Dragon Age: Inquisition ended up being a pretty great game (phew), and starting today EA Access members can play it early. Although it's officially out on November 18th, Access members can play Inquisition for up to six ...
PC Port Inquisition photo
PC Port Inquisition

PC Port Report: Dragon Age: Inquisition

How does Varric's chest hair look on PC?
Nov 11
// Patrick Hancock
The third installment in the Dragon Age franchise is finally here. If you're like me, you are cautiously optimistic with this one after playing Dragon Age II. I'm more of a tactical player, and felt that I was left in th...

Review: Dragon Age: Inquisition

Nov 11 // Chris Carter
Dragon Age: Inquisition (PC, PS3, PS4 [reviewed], Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: BioWarePublisher: Electronic ArtsRelease:  November 18, 2014MSRP: $59.99 Almost immediately it's easy to see that Inquisition takes to heart everything BioWare has learned throughout the development cycle of the first two Dragon Age games. Combat has vastly improved since Origins, but now rather than feeling too twitchy like Dragon Age II, it's a mixture of the two design philosophies and feels just right. Attacks have weight to them, but you can't just go flying through the air like a ninja and launch a thousand attacks a minute -- a style that cheapened any sense of strategy the second game may have had. That tactical feel of Origins is back, and married with the action concepts from DA II. Said compromise also spills into the core story, which is no longer a small-scale tale of one human's struggles in a fortress town. While the initial creation process isn't as detailed as Origins -- it doesn't go all the way down to your socioeconomic status, for instance -- it's a huge upgrade from the previous game. You can choose from a pool of human, elf, dwarf, or Qunari races and pick your class from the start, whether it be a dual-wielding or ranged rogue, one- or two-handed warrior, or a mage. I would have liked more race and background options. The tactical camera is back on all platforms (thank goodness!), and you'll need to get used to it during some of the tougher encounters. Boss fights and even a lot of world-map encounters are legitimately difficult, and you can't just slice your way through everything. Skill building isn't as robust as Origins but there are at least four trees to choose from, all of which have their own set of useful abilities; nothing feels tacked on and everything has a point to it. Customized armor is also back, and again, feels like a mix of the two philosophies. It's streamlined, but allows you to fundamentally change the look of your party and adds a sense of importance to loot and item progression. [embed]283093:56275:0[/embed] If you're completely lost at this point in the story or you're jumping ship to a new platform, Dragon Age Keep has you covered. By logging in to the online tool with an EA account, you can select just about every single detail you wish from the first two games, and apply it to your Inquisition save file. It's insanely detailed, and an innovative way to span multiple platforms and jump through technical hoops. It takes roughly 30 minutes to get everything settled, and bam! -- you're all caught up. Inquisition begins with a bam, too. Within five minutes, you're thrown into a situation involving the zealous Chantry and a worldwide inquisition to stop an encroaching demon threat. Through mysterious circumstances you've been given the power to banish rifts and send demons packing, so naturally you're recruited into the fray and instantly gain some semblance of authority -- seeing as you're the world's last hope and all. Of course, much of your power will have to be earned, and you'll need to grow the inquisition from the ground up. Not everyone, including the infamous Mage and Templar factions, actually respects your authority. You'll have to prove your worth over the course of the game. It's a different feel from the Grey Warden-driven narrative of Origins, as there's an inherent sense of helplessness and confusion that drives your rise to power, which is especially complicated if you play a race that many fear, like the Qunari. The story itself is by-the-books fantasy and less nuanced than Origins, which can get boring at times if you aren't keen on going on more exploration treks, but it does the trick. The writing at times can slip depending on the character (Varric and Dorian are always great), and the first few hours in particular can be painful in terms of deliveries and a weak script. But overall it does a great job of world building, and it's fairly easy to follow throughout. You'll also get to learn a lot more about the world of Dragon Age in general, as you can roam about both Orlais and Ferelden regions with more freedom than ever before. What Inquisition nails is that big-picture feel Origins pulled off so well. This isn't a small-time story you're playing out; the stakes feel real, and you'll meet a wide variety of accompanying characters that make the world worth exploring. It helps that Inquisition is a beautiful game, with an impressive engine that boasts long draw distances and a smooth framerate. You can now see the imperfections of certain people, adding more character to them without a word of dialog. The new codex card and lore art style is also mesmerizing, and draws you into reading more about the world of Dragon Age. But the best part of all is the vast strides BioWare has made in the exploration aspect of the series. Topping even Origins, the new hubs are gigantic, and take hours to completely clear. Progress in the campaign works by gaining "power" points through essentially any action in these hubs, which lets you take on new story missions. It doesn't feel like a gate considering how open Inquisition is in giving out those points. You can also randomly discover optional dungeons, random world events, and special world bosses. That feeling I get from taking a random party into unknown territory is perfected in Inquisition. It cannot be overstated how much Inquisition has to offer in terms of side content. It feels like every five minutes you're stumbling across a new optional quest, along with fresh landmarks to find, camps to set up, shards to locate (that unlock a completely new optional hub zone), animals to poach, resources to gather, puzzles to solve, and more. Better yet, everything contributes to the overall war effort, so you never feel like you're wasting your time. BioWare claims that you need over 100 hours to complete everything, and based on my experience, that number is accurate. Multiplayer (yes, multiplayer) is the cherry on top, because nothing in the campaign feels like it was compromised for its addition. In essence, it's a modified horde mode that operates similar to Uncharted 3's co-op sections. Four players will be able to select from a host of classes, each with their own skills and abilities, and play through a miniature dungeon together. It has that horde feel in terms of fighting wave after wave of enemies, but each stage is an adventure complete with multiple paths, loot to gather, and special doors that can only be opened by certain classes. In that sense, it's not your typical boring "kill kill kill" mode. You'll have a chance to level up each class, earn new gear, and in turn unlock completely new classes down the line. Mechanics like the specialized doors and the simple fact that different roles will grant different advantages will encourage you to experiment outside of your comfort zone. There are three difficulty levels in tow, and if you're up to the challenge you can play with less than four people per run or even go at it solo, but to my knowledge it doesn't scale, so it'll just end up being more difficult. For those of you who are worried, multiplayer does not affect the campaign in any way. There's no silly "play multiplayer to help the galactic front!" nonsense like in Mass Effect 3 -- they are completely separate entities, and you can enjoy one without even touching the other. There is a microtransaction system, but much like Mass Effect 3 I didn't feel compelled to use it. None of this spills over into the campaign, either. Dragon Age: Inquisition not only feels like a fully fledged role-playing adventure, but it's also packed with fun things to do that will keep you busy for weeks. Having played well over 100 hours, I'm still finding things to do, working on my multiplayer characters, and plotting another playthrough to handle things a bit differently. Inquisition is a triumph and proves that despite some missteps along the way, BioWare hasn't lost its touch.
Dragon Age III reviewed photo
Thank the Maker, it's better than Dragon Age II
Dragon Age II felt like a great action game that was outsourced to a lesser developer. It lacked the polish BioWare typically puts into its titles, and almost the entire affair felt like a gigantic step back from everyth...

Free Dragon Age photo
Free Dragon Age

Dragon Age: The Last Court available now, free*

Some jumping through Origin hoops, naturally
Nov 10
// Steven Hansen
Dragon Age: The Last Court is meant to bridge the gap between Dragon Age II and the upcoming Dragon Age: Inquisition. The story-driven, text-based RPG is playable now provided you log in with an Origin ID. ...

CoD Advanced Warfare, Dragon Age Inquisition up to 20% off

Yep, it's another CoD
Nov 01
// Dealzon
Deals brought to you by the crew at Dealzon. FYI: sales from certain retailers go toward supporting Destructoid. If you're a PC gamer questioning why you need to spend the full $59.99 for a purely digital copy of Call of...
Cassandra photo

Get to know Dragon Age: Inquisition's Cassandra

She's a badass tank
Oct 20
// Chris Carter
BioWare has released a new chapter of its character-oriented look at the cast of Dragon Age: Inquisition, and this time, it's Cassandra, voiced by Miranda Raison. You'll get a chance to see her in action, as well as Rai...
Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

You won't need a beast of a PC to play Dragon Age: Inquisition

These specs look pretty modest
Oct 10
// Brett Makedonski
Everyone's itching to get back to Ferelden and save the world from itself in Dragon Age: Inquisition. There's a civil war to end, and dragons just keep destroying everything. But, PC players need to make sure their hardware i...
Free Dragon Age photo
Free Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Origins is free on Origin until Tuesday

DLC not included
Oct 08
// Jordan Devore
Many of you haven't seemed too thrilled with EA's free game offerings on Origin, which is understandable -- they've been hit or miss. This one should prove a bit more compelling. The standard edition of Dragon Age: Origins is...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Get a look a Dragon Age: Inquisition's customization options

Can you make your character look like Brad Pitt?
Sep 30
// Chris Carter
I know a lot of people that are really into creation options in games. Dragon Age Origins was partial to this ideology, as the entire point was to craft a character that you had complete control of. This new video by Bi...

BioWare is working to specifically differentiate Dragon Age: Inquisition from Dragon Age II

Sep 12 // Chris Carter
Speaking to BioWare's Mark Darrah (Executive Producer, Inquisition), and Aaryn Flynn (BioWare Edmonton General Manager), I immediately led with the question "what did you guys learn from Dragon Age II that didn't go over as well as you had hoped?" Darrah fielded this by stating that "we did a lot of experimentation in Dragon Age II. The hero is a reactive hero, as opposed to a hero that causes reactions like the Warden from Origins. I think that lack of clarity made the story more convoluted. It's a story of people as opposed to a story of events, and I think that was a problem for many people." Darrah continued, speaking on the issues with combat in Dragon Age II. "I think that's what got us in trouble with Dragon Age II -- the new story method, and that it was faster and easier gameplay wise. It feels like you're just swinging this sword around and it doesn't weigh anything, whereas combat was more deliberate in Origins. We're fixing that in Inquisition. Combat will have a lot more weight to it than both prior games. We're balancing it towards a more difficulty middle-ground, so that you have to use some of the tools you're given. Maybe you don't have to master the tactical camera, but you'll have to master some aspect of the game and use them together to really master Inquisition." Flynn sounded off as well, stating, "I think we misjudged there with Dragon Age II. People wanted something that they could really master over time. We didn't do that with the sequel." To me, that's good news in terms of where Inquisition is headed. A middle-ground of fun, engaging combat that's maybe a little less clunky than Origins but deeper than Dragon Age II is a great compromise. Another thing that bothered me though about DA II though was the lack of customization of party members and characters, so I pushed on that point. Darrah commented on how they are addressing that in Inquisition, stating, "in the sequel, we removed the ability to equip armor to your followers. That was intended as a way to really make the characters stand out, but we realized that people wanted that element in the game. So in Inquisition we added it back, but still kept that feel of individuality. We didn't want people putting plate mail on every character and having four walking trash cans. In Inquisition if you put armor on Cassandra for instance, she still looks like Cassandra." [embed]279148:55276:0[/embed] Flynn shed some light on the developmental process of both existing games as well. "Origins was a six-year project. There was a big desire to experiment on Dragon Age II after that long development time. A lot of people thought that their ideas weren't heard for the original, so we incorporated some into the sequel. I do think we experimented too much in Dragon Age II. Some of it was too big of a price to pay." Following up, I asked if there was a certain group of people that reacted well to the game. Darrah responded, "yeah, I think what a lot of people had a problem with was that it felt like a different series. Most of the people who loved Dragon Age II didn't play Origins. If you go to the sequel after playing tons of Origins you'll probably wonder how the series could progress that way. That was its biggest sin. It was too many new things." Another big thing that disappointed me in DA II was player choice -- or the lack thereof. I described the scenario in Origins where you've given at least five choices as to what to do with a possessed child. In the sequel there's nothing comparable, and choices are usually limited to two major options. I continued on down that path, asking how BioWare was going to improve on player choice in Inquisition, and got some pretty good answers. Darrah responded, saying, "Yeah the tone icons caused some confusion in Dragon Age II. We meant well with them, but we're backing away from them in the third game. We're using them now sparingly, just to warn players that they're being sarcastic, for instance, or letting them know that they're about to jump in bed with someone. It's not so much to spoil the surprise, but prevent players from reloading the game after accidentally kicking a party member out of the group." The duo also went on to cite Mass Effect's Saren as a great way to ground moral choices in games. On the topic of anchoring morality, Flynn stated, "I think that the lack of clarity in Dragon Age II hurt things a bit. With Origins you had a clear evil, and you could play off that. It's what made Saren such a tragic figure -- you could really see his evil side as well as his clear good side, and that made him more complex. But there was some grey there, just not all grey. That's something we are looking to bring to Inquisition." So how about gameplay? Darrah was on point with the improvements in Inquisition. "You can dye items, and Inquisition will feature the most advanced crafting system we've ever had. The tactical camera is also even better than it was in Origins. Before, you could just pause, give orders, and unpause. Now you can move the camera around a lot better in more advanced ways. The creature inspector tool will give you more information now. There are still synergies and now you can see how to combine them better. Weapons will have hilts and blades. Runes will be more customizable to give you the weapon you want." The romance system is something I always felt that was lacking in either game, and Darrah was excited to tell us how they're changing it. "The affection system was always very gamey, in a bad way. We made it a bit more organic. All your party members can approve or disapprove of your choices. You can't just give them 30 wet loaves of bread to make them fall in love with you. You really have to talk to your companions to romance them rather than game them. There are no meters anymore, you have to have a real conversation." Of course, I had to bring up DLC at some point. People are rightfully wary of EA's influence, and Darrah noted that they are going to mostly going to listen to fan demand to shape post-game support. Although he wasn't able to confirm anything, DLC will likely be comprised of sandboxes -- large new areas that players can wander around and complete a main quest in, but also find sidequests for. There isn't going to be another expansion like Awakening though, sadly. Darrah said that it was "far too much work, and very expensive, as everything has to interact with the original game." Well there you have it. Whether you enjoy Origins or Dragon Age II more, it seems as if elements of both will make their way into Inquisition. From what I've played that's a very good thing, but time will tell if it all pays off when the actual game launches on November 18.
BioWare interview photo
They learned quite a bit from the second iteration
When I entered BioWare's offices and had a chance to speak to the game's Executive Producer and Studio GM, I had one goal in mind -- to find out how Dragon Age: Inquisition was going to be more like Origins, and les...

Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

BioWare: 'We will support Dragon Age: Inquisition's multiplayer far beyond Mass Effect 3'

Free DLC and microtransactions are a part of that
Aug 27
// Chris Carter
During my time with Dragon Age: Inquisition's multiplayer, I had a chance to chat with the team who was responsible, specifically regarding their plans for the future. A BioWare representative confirmed that they would "suppo...

I enjoyed Dragon Age: Inquisition's multiplayer more than I thought

Aug 27 // Chris Carter
Dragon Age: Inquisition (PC [previewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: BioWarePublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: November 18, 2014MSRP: $59.99 So how does it work? Simply put, it's four-player co-op, but with more deliberate map designs that attempt to emulate a quest -- in other words, it's not just a wave-based horde mode that's in every other game these days. Think Uncharted 3's story-like co-op and you'll have a better idea of what I'm talking about. Over the course of a few games we ran with a fairly balanced party of two tanks (Legionnaires), a ranged DPS (Archer), and a support-based caster (Keeper). As a tank it was my job to keep enemies off our team, while the archer picked off targets and the caster dealt damage while keeping up a magic-reducing shield on us. That's not to say that you have to stick to your roles to a tee, as I often ran off doing my own thing while the archer took care of himself. As level one adventurers we only had access to a few abilities, but even with just three powers (things like stuns and charges) and a standard attack combat was engaging and fun. The enemy variety kept things interesting as well, as we constantly had to adapt to faster or more damaging foes with new skills, and we subsequently talked strategy as a team while it was happening. In case you're wondering, combo-based skills are in, and are more fun than ever with other players to coordinate with. It's not just a mindless slog from room to room either, as the dungeon we ran had a more twisted labyrinthine format. During each "run," certain bonus doors can be opened by a lockpick skill (rogues) or by dispelling an enchantment on it (casters) -- these routes often grant you treasure, but can also bypass rooms and lead to shortcuts. It's not required by any means, but having a well balanced team will grant you certain bonuses beyond just spells and ability synergy. Having said that, you don't have to worry about fighting over loot. Just like Diablo III loot is "instanced," so you'll get your fair share of items. Gold works the same way, and I was told that this is clearly the case to influence cooperative play. There is still some form of competition though by way of a scoring system. Any gold you earn can be used to buy new items (like potions), equipment, and craft new characters. As you can tell by the following screen, there's a decent amount of character options to choose from (I'm told around 12 or more will be available at launch). But instead of having static classes that just perform a job, BioWare has made them a little more interesting in Inquisition. Instead of merely having access to certain stats and powers, each "character" will give off a certain aura and personality. For instance the archer might be particularly cheeky, and the Legionnaire gets down to business. You can expect some amount of banter just like the core games, which is a nice feature for multiplayer. If BioWare gates off progress and leans too heavily on its microtransaction system, I don't know if Inquisition's multiplayer will take off. But given that they handled Mass Effect 3's progression systems fairly well, I'm excited to see what the future holds for Dragon Age co-op. The good news is based on what I've seen of the single-player so far, no resources have been "diverted" from the two separate development teams. BioWare said that we can expect multiplayer to ship with several co-op maps, with more to come after launch.
Dragon Age Multiplayer photo
Co-op! Hacking! Slashing! Class warfare!
There have been rumors of a multiplayer component in Dragon Age: Inquisition for quite a while. BioWare has been keeping things under wraps for months after a small hint of its inclusion, and speculation was rampan...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

BioWare states that one complete playthrough of Dragon Age: Inquisition is 150 hours

That's with collecting everything
Aug 13
// Chris Carter
Today at EA's gamescom press conference, BioWare's Aaryn Flynn talked a bit about how long Dragon Age: Inquisition would take to complete. The answer? If you did everything in one playthrough, it would take roughly 150 hours. Sounds like a lot, right? Well let me break that statement down based on my experiences with the game at a recent preview event.

Dragon Age: Inquisition plays like a solid mix of Origins and Dragon Age II

Aug 13 // Chris Carter
Dragon Age: Inquisition (PC [previewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: BioWarePublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: November 18, 2014MSRP: $59.99 I got a chance to play Dragon Age: Inquisition extensively with multiple classes, and one of the areas I encountered was "The Bog" -- the subject of the gamescom demo. During this portion, I played as a Qunari warrior, who happened to be taking advantage of the two-handed skill tree. One of the first things I noticed is that attacks actually had weight to them in Inquisition, as opposed to the floaty feel of Dragon Age II. As executive producer Mark Darrah told me, "faster and easier [combat] got us in trouble in Dragon Age II, so we're moving away from that." The two-handed skillset in Inquisition is ferocious, consisting of abilities like a running charge attack, multiple stuns, and whirlwinds. I was able to answer just about any situation, and close the gap with my dash -- but all of the Warrior's powers felt right within the confines of the class. You can also jump now, which allows you to tactically retreat or gain a better vantage point. There were multiple times where I found a new foothold by way of leaping up to a new location and it felt natural -- like the option had always been there. Of course, the classic tactical camera is back, with all-new improvements in tow for those of you who loved the option in the PC version of Origins. I found myself going back and forth from the satisfying behind-the-back action camera and the tactical view consistently, enjoying both on their own merits. Inside and out, combat has been improved this time around. When asked how much tougher it will be even on normal mode, Darrah responded, "You'll have more tools at your disposal, and you'll have to master at least one of them to get by. Whereas in Dragon Age II you could just wing it, Inquisition will challenge players to master something." In terms of player choice, BioWare notes that it's "going back to the personal story that was originally contained in Origins, while opening up the scale." One of the core faults of Dragon Age II, I felt, was that it had such a small scale and didn't really do much in terms of advancing a personal story. Speaking to the developers, they stated that Inquisition aims to fix those issues, with four playable races and two genders. BioWare informed me that not only will your race and gender affect how people around the world treat you, but it will also change the core story a bit. [embed]279148:55276:0[/embed] Just as your Origins avatar was the Warden, the new Inquisitor position comes with a lot of responsibility, which ramps up over the course of the game. While your authority may be rather tame towards the start, eventually you'll be able to pass judgments on others -- with the choice to make them an agent of the Inquisition, a prisoner, or even execute them yourself. Even with experimenting on select scenarios throughout my gametime, it seemed clear that the story would have an impact on the rest of the world, which is great news for those of you who crave a more open, epic tale. The build I played was on PC, and you could really see that new engine working overtime. As the wind blew and the rain fell in The Bog, trees really twisted and flapped in the breeze, adding to the feel of the environment as you hacked your way through hordes of the undead. As a general rule I'm not a big proponent of visuals over gameplay, but it's nice to know that Inquisition has both bases covered, and has plenty of detail. I was assured again that no areas would be re-used like in Dragon Age II, and everything I saw during my time spent with the demo backed up that claim. BioWare states that the current-generation versions of the game should look roughly the same as the PC build. I also got a chance to test out the new map icon system, which adds a bit more exploration to the mix. In short, many objectives aren't exactly spelled out for you with a conveniently-wrapped Google Map-esque tack like in the past. Instead, select quests will give you a giant circular "gist" icon as I call it, letting you know that your quest is somewhere in the area. It's a nice compromise since the exploration zones are around ten times bigger than any previous zone in the series, so you won't get completely lost -- but you'll have to at least work for it. Dragon Age: Inquisition is shaping up to be a glorious return to most of what made Origins so great. The jury is still out on whether or not BioWare can keep that greatness up throughout the course of the entire adventure, but from what I've played so far, I'm pretty satisfied, and most of my fears have been quelled. There's more Inquisition coverage on the way later this month, including a big announcement that I can't wait to share.
Dragon Age 3 preview photo
This is coming from a big supporter of Origins
I wasn't very happy with Dragon Age II. Whereas Origins was a glorious return to old-school RPG sensibilities, Dragon Age II played like an action game that took place in the same universe. I liked the sequel for di...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

Dragon Age: Inquisition's tactical camera is better than it was in Origins

A welcome return for the essential feature
Aug 07
// Chris Carter
I had a lot of problems with Dragon Age II, but one of my chief complaints was the lack of a tactical camera, which really took a lot of strategy out of major encounters. So when I sat down with the team from Dragon Age: ...
Inquisition combat photo
Inquisition combat

Dragon Age: Inquisition combat makes me want to play Final Fantasy XII

No you have a problem
Jul 29
// Steven Hansen
Let's be fair, a lot of seemingly arbitrary things make me want to replay Final Fantasy XII. A lack of time coupled with a naive hope for an HD re-release always keep me from doing so, leaving me in a perpetual state of want...
Electronic Arts photo
Electronic Arts

EA improves revenue in first quarter of 2014, delays Dragon Age and Battlefield

KOTOR 3 still not in development
Jul 23
// Brittany Vincent
As Electronic Arts' first fiscal quarter came to a close on June 30, the publisher found that it had beaten expectations for profits and revenue. EA credits much of this success to the runaway success of Titanfall. CEO Andrew...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Inquisition pushed to November

The longer I stare at this guy's flesh, the grosser it looks
Jul 22
// Jordan Devore
Battlefield Hardline, and now Dragon Age: Inquisition -- it's delay day at Electronic Arts. BioWare has moved Inquisition from October 7 to November 18 (Nov. 21 in Europe). Considering how stupidly packed with high-profile re...
Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

Dragon Age: Inquisition is just as pretty indoors as out

Snap some necks with thighs of steel
Jul 11
// Steven Hansen
The first part of this walkthrough with creative director Mike Laidlaw managed to get me excited for Inquisition despite not touching previous Dragon Age games. This one, too, looks pretty darn cool, even without bears to freeze. Plus, Dorian's sweet mustache. 
Lemme ride them big lizards
I've liked just about everything I've seen from Dragon Age: Inquisition, which is weird, because historically I've basically avoided the series. Here is literally everything I knew about the previous Dragon Age games go...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

This one area in Dragon Age: Inquisition is bigger than all of Origins

This developer demo is actually getting me excited
Jul 09
// Steven Hansen
So big they've added mounts, from regular old horses to the more exotic.  I never felt the Dragon Age games looked too hot, but BioWare has done a nice job making a more lush world. And then you get attacked by a g...
Dragon Age 3 photo
Dragon Age 3

Leliana re-confirmed to have a part to play in Dragon Age: Inquisition

What part is unknown
Jul 07
// Chris Carter
According to Bioware's official Dragon Age site, Leliana will be returning for Inqusition. Not a whole lot is known in terms of whether or not she will be playable, or just influencing the story, but they are building he...
Sometimes dudes just want to kiss dudes
The most recent character announced for Dragon Age: Inquisition, Dorian, is BioWare's first totally gay party member character. Only male player characters will be able to engage Dorian romantically. As well, Doria...

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