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PAX photo
PAX

The Costume Quest 2 PAX Collector's Challenge sounds fun


It wouldn't be PAX without buttons
Aug 26
// Jordan Devore
Midnight City is hosting a Costume Quest 2 'Trick or Treat' Collector's Challenge at PAX Prime later this week and it's going to be worth setting some time aside for if you're looking to score swag. Essentially, you'll need t...
Multiplayer photo
Multiplayer

Double Fine picks up goofy multiplayer brawler Gang Beasts


Coming to Steam Early Access next week
Aug 18
// Jordan Devore
Gang Beasts is hardly new at this point, but we've been given another opportunity to talk about it now that it's a part of the Double Fine Presents line. I'll take it. The funny multiplayer brawler will be playable later thi...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

Double Fine embarks on new publishing venture


Sounds (double) fine to me
Jul 24
// Brittany Vincent
Double Fine Productions has decided to point its talents in the direction of helping indie game studios with publishing and marketing. In an interview with Tim Schafer, it was revealed that although Double Fine won't be a pub...
Maniac Mansion photo
Maniac Mansion

Ron Gilbert releases original design document of Maniac Mansion


Meanwhile, I can't contain my excitement
Jul 22
// Brittany Vincent
I absolutely love the SCUMM period of Lucasfilm Games (later LucasArts) development and this document gives insight into the game that started it all. It's interesting to see that although the Edison family stayed much the sa...
Grim Fandango photo
Grim Fandango

Grim Fandango is headed back to PC in all its remastered glory


I can't wait to dive back in
Jul 09
// Brittany Vincent
It seems like it should have been a no-brainer, given the game's original success as a PC adventure games, but the remastered version of Grim Fandango has just been confirmed for PC as well. Additionally, it'll be headed ...
Broken Age photo
Broken Age

You can play Broken Age now on your iPad


Now's the best time to check it out
Jun 12
// Brittany Vincent
Double Fine's latest adventure game Broken Age has made its way to the iPad, and it's just as gorgeous as a mobile game as it was upon its original release. It's split up into two releases, and right now, you can catch Broke...
Grim Fandango remaster photo
Grim Fandango remaster

Yes! Grim Fandango remaster for PS4 and Vita!


Yesssssssssssssssssss!
Jun 09
// Steven Hansen
I always complain about how hard it is to find a copy of Grim Fandango, which I desperately need to play. Well, Grim Fandango is getting a PS4 and Vita exclusive remaster. Of all the remasters, reboots, remakes shown off thus far at E3, this is by far the best.  Thanks you based Schafer.

Costume Quest 2 isn't for the hardcore, but it's for the hardcorn

Jun 02 // Brett Makedonski
This time around, the action's set to pick up almost immediately after the original's add-on Grubbins on Ice ended. While the timeline's a bit fuzzy at this point, one thing is evident, and it's that Reynold and Wren are eager to get back to what they love most - Trick or Treatin'. Beyond that, Rice was hesitant to reveal anything about the narrative, giving the frustratingly boilerplate "We're not talking about that yet." The demo took place in the game's first area, a bayou that segues into a French Quarter part of town. It was a sample size that was adequate to show off what it has to offer, and it was all so wonderfully Costume Quest. The bayou had a kid that wanted us to find pieces for a pterodactyl costume. The French Quarter was filled with bustling NPCs that were itching to assign sidequests as jazz music filled the air. Houses by the swamp had doorbells that were begging to be rang -- some occupied by adults that were dishing out candy, others by Grubbins looking to ambush our pint-sized protagonists. Upon being attacked, we got a look at how the combat system has been altered. While Double Fine's touting Costume Quest 2 as having a "deeper and juicier" battle system, don't expect that to translate to increased difficulty. One of the defining traits of Costume Quest that made it so beloved was its accessibility, and that hasn't changed -- it's just gotten tweaked a bit to make things more interesting. One of the biggest moves was lending itself toward making combat more action-oriented. Now, when attacked, a perfectly-timed button press will result in increased defense and a counter-attack. Likewise, when on the offensive, the original had prompts flash on-screen that needed to be executed. Costume Quest 2 utilizes a system reminiscent of Super Mario RPG where coordinating a button press to the exact moment a strike lands will result in extra damage. It's not the most revolutionary of upgrades, but it makes combat feel more involved than ever before. Of the many costumes that are sure to be on display in the full game (which is coming to PC, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PS4, PS3, Wii U, Mac, and Linux), we were only shown three. Two of those were a clown that has some truly bizarre animations, and a superhero. The third was a humorous salute to the unplayable candy corn costume in the first game. This time, you can wear it into battle, but it does absolutely nothing, effectively reducing the team size from three to two. Rice commented that the nod is for players looking for an extra challenge, and those that complete the whole game with the corn costume in the party will unlock an Achievement called "Hardcorn Mode." Truth be told, that feat probably won't be all that difficult to achieve. Even though health doesn't automatically replenish after every fight in this installment, there are water fountains located around each map that fill your party's HP up. When I asked Rice if these would be a pain to get to between encounters, he didn't think so, but that he always wants to try to get one more fight in before retreating to a fountain. However, maybe the most welcomed modification of all has to do with the traversal of the locales. In the original, only the robot was able to zoom around thanks to the use of rollerblades, leading most to play with that costume equipped at all times. Now, rollerblades are always available by default, making getting around much more convenient. That's probably a good thing too, because according to Rice, the maps are going to be bigger and more involved than in Costume Quest. For all the changes that are going into Costume Quest 2, honestly, the biggest takeaway might be that it still feels so much like Costume Quest. That's a revelation that any fan of the original will be elated to hear. And, if you fall into that category, Costume Quest 2 has probably already won your heart and your sweet tooth.
Costume Quest 2 preview photo
Mo' candy, mo' problems
If there's one thing that the folks at Double Fine aren't known for, it's being pigeon-holed into making the same game. In fact, almost all of its titles are wildly different from one another. From the likes of Brüt...

Day of the Tentacle photo
Day of the Tentacle

Watch Tim Schafer play through Day of the Tentacle after a 10-year lull


Yes, I squeed like a little girl
May 14
// Brittany Vincent
This glorious video before us is a Let's Play of Tim Schafer himself playing Day of the Tentacle. The 40-minute video features Tim narrating a playthrough and sharing little tidbits of information regarding production, voice...
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I hope the final boss is the Gibson
Max recently sat down with Brandon Dillon of Double Fine, Programmer and Project Lead on Hack 'N' Slash. Brandon walked us through a demonstration of the game, which allows players to manipulate the actual code of the game with the protagonist's USB sword, and we all learn some lessons in critical thinking.

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Max interviews the creator of this dark future
Max sat down with Sam Farmer, the creator of Last Life. Being developed in association with Double Fine, Last Life is a point-and-click adventure game set in a cyber-noir future, where death doesn't always mean the end. Check out the Kickstarter for this game here.

Hack N Slash PAX photo
Hack N Slash PAX

I hacked a bush in Double Fine's Hack N Slash


Take that, stupid bush
Apr 14
// Patrick Hancock
With a name like Hack N Slash, it’s easy to assume exactly what’s in the package and dismiss it. Then people hear it’s from Double Fine and expectations immediately change for the better, as they should. Hac...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

Double Fine drops a 90s themed Hack 'n' Slash trailer


Coming soon to Steam Early Access
Apr 13
// Chris Carter
Double Fine's Hack 'n' Slash, which is similar to Zelda with a hacking mechanic involved, is looking pretty great so far. Here to help the wait is a new trailer from the developer, which is themed like a 90s commercial ...

Review: Escape Goat 2

Apr 08 // Ben Pack
Escape Goat 2 (PC)Developer: MagicalTimeBeanPublisher: Double FineRelease: March 24, 2014Price: $9.99 Escape Goat is a 2D action puzzle game similar to Lode Runner. In it, you play a goat who must escape a magical castle by solving puzzles and platforming to reach the exit in each level. Why they didn’t call it Goat Escape is beyond me, but this works too. As the titular goat, your controls are simple -- just jumping and dashing -- but where the real interesting mechanics come in are with a little mouse buddy you have with you. The castle is set up with a hub world which leads to many smaller worlds, each with their own unique puzzle mechanic changing how your mouse interacts. One of the most important aspects of a good puzzle game is a solid difficulty curve. Great puzzlers like Braid and Picross hook a player early with interesting and easy-to-use mechanics, and then crank up the difficulty by the end so it feels like you, the player, are making real accomplishments. Escape Goat has one of the best curves in recent memory. There is very little in terms of a tutorial, giving players a real sense of discovery and mastery over the controls. And since each of the sub worlds has a different mechanic, every level feels fresh and it never feels like they are overusing any tricks. Aside from the great curve of difficulty, the presentation of the game is great. There is an overarching stained-glass aesthetic to the hub world that’s cool, and the artwork of the levels are beautiful. The sound is perhaps one of the best aspects of Escape Goat. Keeping with the castle theme, the effects are very reminiscent of Castlevania in an odd way, but it works. The soundtrack is fantastic too -- the theme is consistent but the music in each of the individual zones are beautiful on their own. Where Escape excels are in the puzzles, but the platforming leaves a lot to be desired. Many levels, especially the later ones, put as much as an emphasis on jumping and traversing as figuring out what you need to do to beat the level. The problem is that the platforming isn’t great. I wish the controls on the goat were tighter, which is a sentence I never thought I was going to write. Being able to look at a level and figure out exactly what you have to do to solve it is super fun, but then when you fail to pull off a jump because your goat doesn’t behave how you think it would can get very frustrating. Even worse are the wasted runs due to one small mistake -- forcing you to restart the entire puzzle. There really isn’t a ton to Escape Goat 2 on the surface. In fact, you can complete the main “story” levels in about 90 minutes. Aside from some of the last stages, these aren’t even that challenging -- where the real difficulties come from are the 50+ bonus levels you start to unlock towards the end that really push your knowledge of the game. You can spend easily another few hours on these levels, though many of them are frustrating because they rely just as heavily on platforming as they do on puzzle solving. Escape Goat 2 isn’t the best puzzle game of the year. It’s not even the best goat game of the year. But for the price, it’s worth picking up if you find yourself craving a pleasant-enough puzzler.
Escape Goat 2 photo
This goat's not G.O.A.T.
Escape Goat 2 is not a goat simulator. No, this is another goat game. I know it’s confusing. Sometimes two seemingly identical properties come out of nowhere. Armageddon came out two months after Deep Impact, moviegoers...

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Escape Goat 2 released as Tim Schafer tries to take credit


The man can ham as few men can
Mar 24
// Conrad Zimmerman
Are you ready to laugh? Double Fine has released this video to promote the launch of Escape Goat 2 today on Windows, Mac and Linux PCs, and I suspect it's the funniest thing I'm going to see today. Watch what happens wh...

Double Fine's Hack 'N' Slash is like Zelda, but you hack the game

Mar 19 // Steven Hansen
Your elf adventurer's sword is a hack sword. Anything in the environment with a port can be hacked, just jam your sword in it. Project lead Brandon Dillon ran through a demo made for GDC to show off the increasing level of complexity. Because it gets complex. Like Zelda, this game has rocks to be pushed. A rock with a port, however, you can jam your sword in and change certain values that cause it to function differently than is typical. If you set the movement space negative, for instance, you'll find "pushing" the blocks actually turns into a pull, at least functionally speaking. In that sense, it's as much a puzzle game as an action game, and there are sometimes multiple solutions or extraneous options to wade through. There was a guard with a hack port on his back. If you can get around him and hack him, you can change a few different values. Take his movement speed down to zero, and he can't much bother you. Set it negative and it's like you have a functionally enforceable restraining order because he'll be running away from you. There's also a Third Eye Hat that basically reveals a live debug view of the game and you can see things like hit boxes, enemy vision cones, treasure chest contents, and more. Sometimes you'll find actual game files as books and can rewrite larger swaths of code. The bomb in Hack 'N' Slash, rather than breaking things, will make objects without ports hackable. At one point a boss key surrounded by immovable rocks without ports. Using a bomb on them lets you go to an alternate world of sorts that builds a intuitive and functional architecture to explain how that object functions in the environment. There, you can change whatever you want -- even turn all normal rocks into hackable rocks to clear the way. That's where things got way too complicated for me, but this is a Double Fine game, so you'll have the trademark wit, writing, and a nice art style to help ease you in. And you'll start off doing smaller tasks like changing variables as the game builds up your knowledge to the point where you can interact with more complex clips of code.
Preview: Hack 'N' Slash photo
Hacker? I hardly even know her!
Borne out of Double Fine's yearly Amnesia Fortnight game jam, Hack 'N' Slash (as well as Spacebase DF-9) is getting a full release this summer. The top down action adventure game may look like a Legend of Zelda clone, but tha...

Double Fine photo
Double Fine

A Double Fine ... sequel? Costume Quest 2 announced


How many games are in production at the studio, again?
Mar 10
// Jordan Devore
Double Fine's turn-based role-playing game Costume Quest is getting a sequel for PC and consoles by way of publisher Midnight City, the two companies announced today. Moving on up! Protagonists Wren and Reynold return for th...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

Fans are bringing an unused Double Fine pitch to life


BAD GOLF 2! BAD GOLF 2!
Feb 24
// Jordan Devore
While it may not have been my favorite concept for a game out of Amnesia Fortnight 2014, the pitch itself for Bad Golf 2 was among the best. It was literally just Double Fine's Patrick Hackett chanting "Bad Golf 2!" four time...
Broken Age photo
Lessons were learned after the successful Kickstarter campaign
I think the question that most people asked themselves when they finished Broken Age Act I was "Okay, so when am I going to get to play Act II?" The more pressing concern was "Will there be an Act II?" but thankfully Double F...

Double Fine photo
Double Fine

These are the four winning games of Amnesia Fortnight


Pitching games isn't easy
Feb 18
// Jordan Devore
Before Double Fine's Amnesia Fortnight, "The only way [other people] would become project lead was if I died, and I didn't want to die. Or be killed," said CEO Tim Schafer. The game jam is back this year and as voted by peop...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

Vote on potential Double Fine games in Amnesia Fortnight


It's back, now with more Pendleton Ward
Feb 06
// Jordan Devore
Double Fine is hosting another Amnesia Fortnight game jam over the next two weeks, giving fans a chance to support the company financially and voice their opinion about which prototypes should move forward into full producti...

Very Quick Tips: Broken Age Episode One

Jan 28 // Chris Carter
[Second spoiler warning, ho!] Vella: Like many adventure games, you can double-click the sides of each map to "fast travel" to the next screen or walk faster. Pressing "I" will bring up your inventory (the key can be re-mapped). Using both of these will save you time. In order to get the grandpa to give up the goods at the beginning, go grab a cupcake, use it on him, then ask to "split it" with him. When you reach the clouds, you'll need to ultimately put three golden eggs in the baskets on the left area of the screen. You'll get one by putting cloud shoes on the ladder you obtain from the character on the right screen.The next egg you can just grab after talking to Jack Black's character -- to reach him, put a fruit from the top area in the left area's basket. The next golden egg is trickier -- you'll have to fall on the character that's stuck in the tree by jumping into the northern-most cloud pit on purpose. Then you're free to grab the blue egg, and switch it for the golden one with the blue bird in the central hub. To enter the ceremony in the second village, you'll need to talk to the guards first to get their holy tear gas gun. It's kind of ambiguous since you need to select a certain option to get the object. Go to the chum bucket in town and fill up the gun, then use it on the maidens. To solve the guard's riddle, you'll need an item in the cloud village. Backtrack if you need to. To defeat Mog Chothra, you'll have to blow out his legs three times, get grabbed on purpose, put the ladder in his mouth, then aim the laser at it. Shay: Shay's story is considerably easier (and shorter), but there are still a few confusing parts. At one point, you'll to venture out in space outside of the airlock, and break free of your suit's limitations. Take the can of compressed air and use it on your suit, then cut the cord with the knife found in the kitchen, and use the whipped cream gun found in the ice cream room. The controls are on the top left of the area found in space. In order to set course for Prima Doom, you have to attempt to go to the Cozy Cluster, then alter the star chart below the ladder manually with the crochet needle. If need be, you can use this picture for reference as you have the game windowed.
Broken Age tips photo
Solutions to select puzzles
Double Fine just released part one of Broken Age to Kickstarter backers this week, and it's a big deal for multiple reasons. Not only is the game highly anticipated, but the Kickstarter itself was full of fanfare and con...

Broken Age photo
Broken Age

Double Fine's Broken Age Act 1 now playable by all


First half of game goes into wide release on Steam
Jan 28
// Conrad Zimmerman
Well, this is it. After a short period during which only the backers of the Double Fine Adventure Kickstarter project had access, Broken Age Act I has now been released on Steam for all to buy and play. As successful as...

Video: We played Broken Age with Tim Schafer

Jan 27 // Bill Zoeker
Here we have the second part of the show; a brief AMA with the legend of adventure games: [embed]269591:52361:0[/embed] In the conclusion, Max lures Tim into hanging out longer with some Brutal Legend action: [embed]269591:52362:0[/embed]  
Broken Age w/ Tim photo
Tim sticks his fingers in our nostalgia veins, as only he could
This past Wednesday, Tim Schafer and Greg Rice of Double Fine Productions brightened our doorstep and hung out in the Dtoid HQ studio. Tim was like a magical woodland creature, exploring the nooks of our office, and majestic...

Review: Broken Age: Act 1

Jan 24 // Caitlin Cooke
Broken Age: Act 1 (PC)Developer: Double Fine ProductionsPublisher: Double Fine ProductionsRelease Date: January 14, 2014 (for backers) / January 28, 2014MSRP: $24.99 (with free update for Act 2) Shay has lived his entire existence on a spaceship designed for toddlers. Day after day he’s coddled by the ship’s “mother,” an overbearingly saccharine computer unwilling to allow him to take care of himself. Mother babies Shay in every way, including knitting sentient pals to keep him company and forcing him to take his daily nutrition paste. Shay’s unending routine consists of completing childlike “missions,” like saving his yarn pals from an ice cream avalanche or a hug-attack, which are designed to keep him occupied throughout his existence. Struggling with his confined life, Shay manages to discover a secret part of the ship and quickly experiences what it means to have real responsibility. Vella wakes up on the last day of her life, preparing to uphold the long-standing tradition of being eaten by a giant abomination named Mog Chothra to keep her village safe. A town that once prided itself on raising fierce monster-fighting warriors, Sugar Bunting now concedes to offering up its finest maidens to Mog Chothra during what they call the “Maiden’s Feast.” While the other maidens are excited to be considered potential meals, Vella can’t help but wonder if there’s another way out. She rises up to fight against her supposed destiny of becoming a delectable treat for Mog Chothra and breaks free to search for a way to defeat the monster before it consumes her town. Both stories are engrossing and highlight a certain childish curiosity that I haven’t felt in a long time. I adored every second wandering through these worlds - the dialogue on all fronts is hilarious and crafty, the story elements thoughtful. Broken Age captures a style that is imaginative and expressive while still maintaining an environment that's easy to interact with. Above all, the art is captivating so much so that at certain points in the game I found myself staring at scenes just to take it in. Almost everything comes to life in Broken Age - characters range from charming to downright ingenious, all with spot-on humor and fantastic voice acting. One of my favorites is a needy spoon who regularly vies for the attention of Shay by shouting things like "It is my honor to be your training spoon today sir, I can't wait to start MISSION NUTRITION!" Puzzles are integrated well into the character’s personalities - I found it amusing to discover what dialogue or actions would make characters give up an item or a piece of information. The game allows for switching between both stories seamlessly, which is not only creative, but a very useful feature. I enjoyed going back and forth regularly because it allowed for me to pace out the stories (for example, not getting too far on one side) and also gave me a chance to escape if a particular puzzle was stumping me. I also felt that Shay’s story involved more interactive gameplay elements while Vella’s focused more on dialogue and riddles, so being able to leave one story and hop to the other gave me a nice break. The format of Broken Age is obviously very reminiscent of the older point-and-click adventure games, however there are a few interesting camera perspectives and design choices in the game that change up the formula a bit. For example, in one area of the game you can literally fall through clouds if you’re not careful where you step. Another section has the camera angle peering in through a window that’s being cleaned by an adorable spaceship minion. These details seem marginal, but they keep the gameplay fresh and original. I found that the gameplay is so seamlessly integrated with the art that it’s sometimes hard to tell when you’re supposed to be viewing a scene and when you need to take action. For instance, it took me a while to solve one of the first puzzles in the game because the action I needed to take was during what I thought was a cinematic sequence. Although I appreciate that the game never took me out of the moment mentally, it did become frustrating after a while. My solution to this was to whip my mouse around the screen just in case the action circle appeared in future cinematics. Broken Age manages to keep the hand-holding clues to a minimum without completely withholding answers from the player. However, as the game progressed I wasn't entirely clear on what actions I could take. During one puzzle in particular, I had tried to combine and use every item possible to get past what I thought was the obstacle, but really all I had to do was move around it. The puzzles eventually make sense in time and are fairly thoughtful, although some of them could have stood to be a bit harder -- because for the most part, they didn't require a lot of brainpower. In the end this may not be a terrible thing but I would like to see a tad more complication thrown into the mix for Act 2. I haven’t felt this surge of nostalgia and excitement about a game in a long time, and I truly think Broken Age will be looked back fondly as one of the greats. That being said, the first Act is only a few short hours and ended on a nail-biting cliffhanger with no word on how long we’ll be waiting for the rest of the game. In some ways I feel cheated, but in the end it’s the heart of the game that matters - and that certainly isn't broken.
Broken Age review photo
Point-and-click heaven
[Disclosure: I backed the Kickstarter. A review copy was used for this verdict.] The game formerly known as "Double Fine Adventure" has finally made its debut -- or should I say, half-debut. Broken Age: Act 1 is the culmina...

Brutal Legend photo
Brutal Legend

Tim Schafer muses on return to the world of Brutal Legend


'I would love to go back there'
Jan 22
// Chris Carter
Brutal Legend's development was marred by a series of unfortunate incidents involving IP rights, but eventually, it hit the market. Sadly, we haven't seen anything indicating that we'd ever get to return to the world, outside...
Broken Age soundtrack photo
Broken Age soundtrack

You can buy Broken Age's soundtrack bundled with the game


Also, you can get Broken Age
Jan 17
// Steven Hansen
Maybe you didn't back Double Fine's famous Broken Age Kickstarter because it had already made more money than you're ever going to make in your life. That's okay. Assuming you still want to play it -- why wouldn't you? -- it...
Broken Age photo
Broken Age

How to enable 'retro' visuals in Broken Age


Feature hidden away in control options
Jan 16
// Conrad Zimmerman
In an homage to the classic adventure games which came before it, Broken Age features a hidden visual mode that gives a sense of what the title might have looked like back in the golden age of the genre. The above video...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

First act of Broken Age hits Steam on January 28


Kickstarter backers can play as of today
Jan 14
// Jordan Devore
It's been a longer-than-expected wait for Double Fine's Broken Age, but it's nearly ready. Well, part of it. The first act of the Kickstarter-funded adventure title releases on January 28, 2014 for Windows, Mac, and Linux, w...
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Broken Age Part One releasing for backers this week


Moment of truth
Jan 12
// Conrad Zimmerman
The most successful videogame Kickstarter in history is about to land in the hands of those who made it happen this coming week. The first part of Double Fine's Broken Age will become available for backers on Tuesday, Ja...

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