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Double Fine

Review: Broken Age: Act 2

Apr 27 // Caitlin Cooke
Broken Age (PC)Developers: Double Fine ProductionsPublisher: Double Fine ProductionsReleased: April 28, 2015 MSRP: PS4, PS Vita, PC, Mac, Linux, Ouya: $25 / iOS and Android: $15 Broken Age is very much designed and intended to be played as one game, not chopped up into two parts. If you've managed to hold out this long to play both acts together, rest assured that you've done yourself a favor. The second act gets straight to business, dumping the player into some heavy plot points right off the bat. The game’s challenging puzzle logic also comes through in full force with no time to ramp -- progressing in the game relies heavily on prior knowledge of the landscape and characters. I asked for more puzzle complexion in my review of Broken Age: Act 1, and boy did I get it. The puzzles are of the same kindred as the first act -- difficult to piece together at first, with a dash of trial and error mixed in. However, this time around the obstacles are far more difficult and obtuse, requiring deep creative thinking, but more often than not bordering on the “impossible to solve without help” realm. I found myself pondering puzzles for long periods of time until eventually giving up, clicking through every possible option as a last resort. Where the first part of Broken Age had more environmental exploration and shorter, more gratifying puzzles, the second act tends to lean on more long-term challenging puzzles. Puzzle solutions from the first portion of the second act were used throughout almost the entirety of the game -- much of my time was spent drawing out diagrams on post-its and endlessly referencing them. The ability to switch between stories is still present, which comes in handy when stuck on a puzzle or in need of a change of scenery. However, during certain parts of the game some puzzles require information from the other side of the story. This caught me off guard at first but was less annoying once it became obvious that this would be a theme throughout the latter half of the game. The bar from Broken Age: Act 1 is definitely met if not exceeded in Act 2 in terms of the visuals, nostalgia, and clever dialogue. However, the setting in the second act is practically the same as the first half of the game, with the exception of a few minor changes. Although I adore the characters in Broken Age and was happy to see them again throughout the second act, I had hoped to experience new scenery and perhaps new characters. The story in Act 2 goes in a strange direction, and feels rushed -- especially compared to the first act, which has an even progression and was much more cohesive. Conversations are had between characters that lay plot points out on the table very quickly, and in an uninventive way. It seems a tad thrown together, and I would have preferred to discover the plot through means of gameplay instead of having it explained via single lines of conversation. Unfortunately, by the end of the game I was also left with with a lot of unanswered questions. Since it had taken a year for this second installment to make it to us, I had expected a little more on that front. Broken Age: Act 1 was so perfect that perhaps my expectations were inflated when playing through the second half. However, despite the challenges Broken Age is still very much a beautiful game with a heartwarming story. The puzzles, as frustrating as they are, come from a place of creative invention that defines the point-and-click genre. I choose to treasure its high points-- the charming characters, ingenious dialogue, and silly childlike whimsy. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher. This reviewer also backed the game's Kickstarter campaign.]
Broken Age 2 review photo
Mostly worth the wait
[Disclosure: I backed the Kickstarter. A review copy was used for this verdict.] Three years since the launch of the infamous Double Fine Adventure campaign and a year after Act 1’s much-anticipated release, Broken Ag...

Broken Age photo
Broken Age

Broken Age Act 2 will be ready for you on April 28

If I'm reincarnated as a tree, I want to look like this
Mar 25
// Jordan Devore
Double Fine has settled on April 28, 2015 as the release date for Broken Age Act 2 on PC and Broken Age (both acts) on PS4 and PS Vita. European console players have to wait a day. There's Cross-Buy on PlayStation, and saves ...

Tim Schafer open to revisiting Psychonauts

Mar 13 // Laura Kate Dale
With that out of the way, we got Tim to chat a little about his career over the years. First up on the chopping block was a question we had been dying to ask Schafer for a while. Just how did he expect people to get through his obtuse adventure game logic back in the day? I have no idea; people were smarter back then. Playing the games I sometimes wonder that myself. I think, "This puzzle's really hard, how are people supposed to get that?" Part of the reason is that back in the day [...] the thinking was "people are not going to finish this game." Sometimes we thought that. That's why we did the easy mode in Monkey Island 2, but the answer is for most of these puzzle the hints are there if you keep talking to people, if you keep digging down. Most of them are hinted at if you keep exploring all the dialog.  So we made the first half of Broken Age and the first half is always easier than the second half of a game. We were like "this is too easy." We made Grim Fandango and that's too hard. Adventure game fans are hard to please. Next up on our list of questions was one that readers have been trying to get an answer to for a while. Which of Tim's series means the most to him, and which would he most like to revisit? That's a tough question because of course every game is important at the time. There's things people don't expect when they ask me this like Kinect Party -- did you ever play Kinect Party? It was our lowest-selling game of all time. It's a Kinect game where little kids play with their grandparents together and it was really rewarding to see families playing that, it was just so rewarding, you know? The world of Psychonauts is so interesting because you can just keep creating more brains every time you meet somebody and wonder what the world inside their brain looks like. It also feels like the kind of unfinished story of Eddie Briggs [Brutal Legend] would be a great excuse to work with Jack [Black] again. It's hard because of how Grim ended. It was a really rich and full world but I feel like that character had such a complete progression that I feel like he's done with. I don't know if I want to go back down that road with someone who isn't Manny. All the other ones, a lot of them at least like Psychonauts you can just imagine. For Brutal Legend it's kind of already designed because we had to throw away half that game to get it done two years late. It's a lot easier to imagine going forward with that or Psychonauts. A recent hot topic brought sharply into focus by Peter Molyneux's Godus was the effect crowdfunding campaigns can have on audience's faith in developers. From pitching your game to fans for financial investment before development has begun to the pitfalls along the way, with Schafer himself previously facing the firing line from disgruntled Kickstarter backers, we wanted to know if he plans to continue crowdfunding his future projects and what effect he thinks Kickstarter failures have on the reputations of developers. There were so many great things to Kickstarter when it first exploded and we had that rush of not just money but also goodwill too. That love and support from the community told us that people want to play adventure games still and that was really important to us. Because everything's announced at the start of creating your game and not the end like we normally do, it makes more sense to be transparent like we were. That made us vulnerable to a lot of criticism because people could see "oh, the schedule's changing" or "You're doing this thing the way I don't want you to do it." The experiment's not over yet and I'd still call it an experiment, but being that exposed and vulnerable was difficult. There were some good things and toward the end there have been some bad things. My hope was that by being really transparent and showing all the ups and downs of game development, that people who play games would start to understand more of what goes on when making a game. But still, after all this time, it still seems like people get super mad about things that are totally normal. Things like schedules slipping happen on almost every project but people just don't hear about it because we don't usually show people.  I think developers have to learn like publishers had to learn before the warning signs when a game is in trouble and what is just going through the normal ups and downs of development. The question I personally wanted an answer to the most: when is Broken Age: Act 2 coming? Well we're in beta now and we're going to come out this spring. There's not much time left in spring. When's the last day of spring? It's coming out this spring which is very soon. At this point we pushed him on how soon was very soon? We confirmed basically that it's more than three days away still. Well, not this week. I've been playing the Vita version on the plane over here. It's finished, we just want to catch all the bugs. Finally, with all our serious questions out the way, we ended the interview on a slightly lighter note. Yes, you guessed it, we asked him about his favorite butts in videogames. We mainly learned that Tim Schafer rarely thinks about butts when designing a character. Favorite butt in videogames? Are there a lot of butts in videogames? I guess everyone has a butt but you don't often get to see them. I guess in third-person games you're running behind them. I'm now trying to do the interesting task of trying to visualize butts from videogames, they don't usually get a starring role. I'm now seriously worrying I've not been paying enough attention to butts in the games that I've made. Have we ever shown any butts in my games? Yep, you've stumped me with butts. Manny's butt in Grim Fandango is boney; it's basically just a pelvis in a suit.  In Costume Quest actually there was a cat that had a very prominent butt featured, so I guess that butt.
Tim Schafer interview photo
Schafer talks Broken Age, crowdfunding, narrative, and butts
Last night Destructoid attended the videogame BAFTAs in order to do some hard-hitting journalism. Speaking to Tim Schafer, who was in attendance to hand Shadow of Mordor the BAFTA for Best Design, we spent ten minutes discuss...

Documentary photo

The wonderful Double Fine Adventure documentary is going free

Look for episodes on YouTube every Tuesday and Thursday
Mar 03
// Jordan Devore
Folks who helped crowdfund Broken Age have gotten an up-close look at how Double Fine operates thanks to episodic videos chronicling development of the adventure game. With 18 episodes down, 2 Player Productions has produced...
Molyneux Interview photo
Molyneux Interview

Tim Schafer comments on the Molyneux interview

Feels his colleague was treated unfairly by the press
Feb 19
// Rob Morrow
In a YouTube video posted by Double Fine Productions, founder and CEO Tim Schafer provided an update on the current state of the point-and-click adventure Broken Age's second and final act. Schafer also t...
Breaking Psychonauts photo
Breaking Psychonauts

Speedrunner hilariously breaks Psychonauts as its developers watch in horror

'Ooooooh, whoops'
Jan 29
// Jordan Devore
More fun times from Double Fine's Devs Play series. This episode, if you've seen the exceptional Lion King and Doom videos already, is centered on the studio's own baby, Psychonauts. Double Fine founder Tim Schafer and co. f...
Grim Fandango photo
Grim Fandango

Scythe of relief: Grim Fandango's great, celebrate with a trailer

Buenas dŪas, indeed
Jan 27
// Brett Makedonski
Día de Muertos typically comes around at the end of October, but it's a semi-annual event in 2015. That's because adventure classic Grim Fandango releases today, ensuring that you'll pay your respects to both the...

Review: Grim Fandango

Jan 26 // Steven Hansen
Grim Fandango (PS Vita [Reviewed], PC, PS4) Developer: Double Fine Publisher: Double FineReleased: January 27, 2015 MSRP: $14.99 Manny Calavera is a grim reaper, which in this art deco Land of the Dead means he's a travel agent, sending dead souls to their final resting place through a variety of fine travel options. Most prized is the Number Nine, an express train reserved for those who've led sterling lives. Manny isn't one of them, which is why he's working off his sins as a reaper, but a string of bum, low-commission clients has him treading water in this literal limbo.   I've never felt more emotionally connected to a videogame character than when Manny picks up a ceremonial Day of the Dead baguette and sticks the whole thing in his inner jacket pocket. And then another. And then another. And then another. Dios mio. Why is it letting me pick up infinite bread. I need boundaries. Surely all these breads aren't going to show up as individual inventory items I'll have to scroll through--oh, they do. Fine. I made my bread and I'm going to rye in it. I love bread--okay, I knead to stop with the bread. Grim Fandango is so playful, though, it gets me into a good mood. This is a world of travel-agent skeletons, giant cat races, and biting birds that comes off so comfortable you almost wonder why anyone is making miles towards the afterlife. Of course, it's an easier stay for the enterprising Calavera than the poor souls trekking for years on a walking stick. Then again, it's all about the journey. Grim Fandango is stuffed with sharp dialogue and you're encouraged to go through all the options, a bit of quick unlearning needed if you've been on a "he will remember that" diet of choice-heavy adventure games. Nothing feels throwaway, though. It's gags, pertinent information, or, more likely, a mix of both. The economy is impressive. Ancillary characters will reappear over the lengthy journey and it feels like seeing an old friend. It is not massive in the open-world, "you can walk to those mountains" sense, but it manages to feel both full and intimate, like a warm dinner in small, friend-filled kitchen. Tony Plana deserves enormous credit for voicing Manny and making even repeated item description lines feel natural.  About the only thing in Grim Fandango that isn't bleached-bone smooth is its puzzles, which are bound to trip you up eventually. For me it was a mix of my failed lateral thinking (stupidity) and the means of interaction. On the Vita, point-and-click with the touch screen works best in puzzle-solving situations, though I still ran about mostly with traditional controls. One puzzle had me using my scythe and in doing so with the X button, Manny just kept waving it around in the generally correct area. Clicking on what must have been a slightly different spot with the touch controls and opening the UI allowed me to progress. Wildly tapping until the UI pops up is also the best way to take stock of what you can interact with in an area, rather than relying on button clicks and Manny's neck craning towards objects of interest. PS4 users might face an added challenge sans touch controls. On the technical side, I did experience a couple crashes on Vita and one instance of Manny getting locked in place that necessitated a restart, so remember to save often. Figuring out how you're supposed to interact with something probably falls somewhere in between stupidity and means of interaction. Having to replace an item you might have picked up before essentially combining it--without any sort of traditional inventory screen and "combine" option--broke my brain a bit. Luckily the game is 17 years old and you can do a little cheating if your conscience can take it.  The comedic beats Grim Fandango hits in the opening cinematic alone are delightful. Reminds you how rare "funny" is in games. Some adventure game puzzle logic and Glottis' chunky orange polygons aside, it doesn't feel dated. It's well-written, rich, heartfelt, funny, and I'm glad as heck it's readily available for everyone to play. [This review is based on a retail copy of the game provided by the developer.]
Grim Fandango reviewed photo
Spooky scary skeletons send shivers down my spine
Grim Fandango didn't need a remaster as much as it needed a re-release. Many, myself included, have found it difficult to track down a copy to play. We've had an entire digital to getting good, old g...

Grim Fandango  photo
Grim Fandango

Grim Fandango Remastered will be $15

DRM-free on GOG, good for a formerly disappeared game
Jan 13
// Steven Hansen
Grim Fandango Remastered is available for pre-order on a few digital storefronts ahead of its January 27 release. With that comes pricing, hitherto unknown. The remaster of the classic adventure game will be $15. You ca...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

Broken Age to get retail release in Spring 2015

That's (double) fine by me!
Jan 07
// Mike Cosimano
Today, Double Fine and Nordic Games announced a retail version of Broken Age, the Tim Schafer-led adventure game funded through Kickstarter. The boxed copy will launch alongside Broken Age: Act 2 in Spring 2015 for PC, Mac, a...
Ah-gay photo

Broken Age coming to PS4, Vita alongside Act 2 PC release

Early 2015
Dec 10
// Steven Hansen
Rounding out the trend of Double Fine games coming to Sony's consoles just short of Massive Chalice, which you should all be playing, is Broken Age. It began as the Double Fine Adventure Kickstarter that exploded, the first ...
Local multiplayer photo
Local multiplayer

I doubt you have 4 controllers, but Gang Beasts is coming to PS4

Fun with physics
Dec 10
// Steven Hansen
Over the weekend, Double Fine announced that the drunkard-on-ice-skates brawler would be making its way to PlayStation 4 next year, the same day it launches on PC (getting out of its current Early Access availability). Gang ...
Oh heck yeah! photo
Oh heck yeah!

Remastered Grim Fandango looks great, out next month

January 27 to PS4, Vita, PC, Mac, Linux
Dec 10
// Steven Hansen
I know a skeleton of people are waiting to play this, what with it being a chore to track down a playable copy of the classic adventure game. And now we get an even more playable, modernized version with nicer textures and s...
Day of the Tentacle photo
Day of the Tentacle

Day of the Tentacle: Special Edition announced

Partnership between Sony and Double Fine
Dec 06
// Chris Carter
Today at Sony's PlayStation Experience event, Double Fine announced a joint collaboration between the two. Day of the Tentacle is coming to the PS4 and Vita in the form of a Special Edition release. As PC fans know this is a pretty huge deal, as it's one of the most beloved adventure games of the 90s and beyond.
Layoffs at Double Fine photo
Layoffs at Double Fine

Double Fine lays off twelve staff members

Unannounced title canceled when publishing deal falls through
Nov 24
// Rob Morrow
Double Fine Productions confirmed with Games Industry International last Friday that it had to lay off twelve staff members due to a publishing deal falling through on an unannounced title. "One of our unannounced p...
Costume Quest 2 photo
Costume Quest 2

Costume Quest 2 knocks on Xbox's door today

Moseys on over to Wii U tomorrow
Oct 29
// Brett Makedonski
As it turns out, the duration of that Costume Quest 2 timed-exclusive on PlayStation wasn't all that long. Like, one day. But, that's okay because it means that everyone will have it in time for Halloween. That's s...
Costume Quest 2 photo
Costume Quest 2

Treat for Sony fans: PlayStation gets temporary Costume Quest 2 exclusivity

And an exclusive costume
Oct 24
// Brett Makedonski
This ain't no trick -- things are lookin' pretty sweet for PlayStation owners that want to do battle with some Grubbins just in time for Halloween. Sony's announced that it has a temporary console exclusive for Costume ...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

Double Fine ceasing development on sci-fi sim Spacebase DF-9

Costing more money than it brings in
Sep 24
// Steven Hansen
Double Fine is ending its development of Spacebase DF-9 with a somewhat sudden final build of the game next month. Double Fine intends to stick around for bug fixes, but many of the game's initially planned features will...
Hack 'n' Slash photo
Hack 'n' Slash

Double Fine's Hack 'n' Slash 1.0 has been released on Steam

Now games in Steam Early Access that have actually been finished are numbered in the tens
Sep 10
// Brittany Vincent
Hack 'n' Slash by Double Fine Productions had its beginnings during Amnesia Fortnight 2012, in which it received the most votes of any concept to be made into a full game. Now, it's finally complete, having left Steam Early A...
Gang Beasts photo
Gang Beasts

Gang Beasts out on Steam, fight your friends like a drunk on skates

Early Access
Sep 02
// Steven Hansen
Gang Beasts is fun as heck. That's probably why Double Fine picked it up. And now you can pick it up as it's come to Steam on Early Access.  I played it for a good while last week. Laughs and cries of exaltation we...
Grim Fandnago: Remaster photo
Grim Fandnago: Remaster

Here's Grim Fandango running on PS4

Aiming for 1080p, but keeping the 4:3
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
Double Fine has the original Grim Fandango running on PS4, with some joystick tweaks so it controls smoother. In the development video, they talk about things they want to address, like the compression, and things they ...

Costume Quest 2 is still cute, trying to be more engaging

Aug 29 // Steven Hansen
[embed]280362:55487:0[/embed] I was starting from the beginning of the game, so the fights may ramp up in intensity, but I was able to make it through the first area on auto-pilot, just using the attack of whichever costume I felt like wearing. Still, I didn't mind the basic JRPG battles, either, as I was taking in the colorful world. Down in the starting bayou, I smacked alligators to retrieve pieces for a clown costume. You can zip around on what I'm pretty sure are Heelys, which someone recently told me still exist. One of the starting enemies had a digital clock in its chest and they were all set to 4:20 (you know, the weed number), though that's going to be changed to 2:30. 2:30. Tooth hurty. The main antagonist is a dentist. At the start of the game, a rip in time brings you to the dentist-ruled, terrifying, authoritarian future. He's collaborating with some evil witch. You're then rocketed back in time to stop him after a cyborg ninja crow teaches you how to fight. Also, there's a Thomas Jefferson costume. Its special move is the Declaration of Destruction. He throws it dramatically at enemies, who will put on reading glasses and look at it closely before it explodes. And Jefferson's out of battle ability, Diplomacy, is great, even though I never used it properly. I was only chastised, "This doesn't seem like the time for diplomacy," which amused me endlessly. You also duel a little, fiddle-playing boy in a devil costume using your goofy clown horn. Costume Quest 2 is just precious.
Preview photo
New costumes, from Thomas Jefferson to a pterodactyl
Costume Quest, like every Double Fine game, is charming. It's a fresh-feeling, low stakes take on the JRPG genre, more Earthbound than Final Fantasy. Though, as Chad put it in his review, it's "RPG Lite," accessible...

I have a feeling Massive Chalice is going to be great

Aug 29 // Steven Hansen
[embed]280358:55485:0[/embed] Massive Chalice is structured like recent wonderful game XCOM: Enemy Unknown. There is the boots on the ground layer, which involves action points, movement restrictions, and killing monsters -- the Cadence -- on an isometric plane. Your troops will be one of several types. The Hunter is basically carrying a personal ballista on their shoulder. The Alchemist has a bladed hook used for melee, but is mainly meant for slinging explosives. The last has a giant battering ram of sorts. What you want to do is escort your gaggle of fighters throughout levels without getting people killed because if they're killed, you don't get to continue to use them (permadeath). Because of the melee focus, there's no cover bonuses, so you'll want to unlearn that XCOM tic. It's all line of sight and numbers. I got through the demo losing one soldier too many (that is, one), which then opens up to the overarching strategy screen, which is where things get interesting. Your goal in Massive Chalice is to make it through 350 years of encroaching Cadence. Your characters will die, eventually. Lineage and generations become key, like Fire Emblem: Awakening was mixed with XCOM, but stretched out. You can advance the chronology in large chunks between significant events (or battles) in the same way you'd run a few days on the world clock in XCOM's mission control. There are a lot of systems at play. You appoint Regents in ten or so kingdoms on the map to stymie Cadence spread and then you give them a partner to continue the bloodline. This detracts from your pool of warriors, however, as Regents can't fight. It's a sort of retirement spot, then, for your best fighter, but you have to weigh considerations like their age, risk of losing them in battle, and their genes. Some characters carry positive characteristics that can be passed down. Some are cursed with things like asthma, which reduces movement if you exhaust both AP in one turn. The accumulated experience points of a Regent and partner can affect the growth of the child. A parent could die of old age before the child grows up. The child would have the same genes, but have a different growth trajectory based on the stats of the replacement Regent.  One of the choices you'll make is what to research using the titular chalice. 15 years for improve health. 23 years for a global fertility boost. Adoption is possible too, through later chalice research, and that child can go to same sex or hetero couples. If your two strongest characters are of the same gender, you might want them to raise an adopted child (ages 0-15) to gain 40% experience from each of them during the raising process. Maybe you just appoint a Regency and partner for two characters whose unwanted traits you're trying to weed out of your lineages (asthma is pretty crippling).  Muir said it's "like a long form roguelike," in that you can lose the game. You can fail to contain encroaching cadence and have your kingdom slowly devoured. I love it. I liked XCOM for letting you lose. In that sense, it is divergent, replayable. Your starting soldiers are always different, and the soldiers you'll have to use throughout the entire game will inevitably be different as they age and die. Narrative bits come in the form of random events, like choosing whether or not to send Bella Black to retrieve her uncle, The Walrus, who refused to move from his home near encroaching Cadence. I did. It took nine years, but Bella came back stronger. The team is working on cranking these up, including some nastier ones where, "we just come around and spit in your soup, I guess."  Massive Chalice does have a more defined narrative, but it's mostly in the endgame, should you survive for that many generations. 350 years. I'm excited to try and get there. I'm excited to fail, and to try again. And I'm always down for playing digital matchmaker (by way of horrible eugenics scientist). 
Preview: Massive Chalice photo
Already in love, already fearing it'll devour my time with an XCOM-like fervor
We've heard little from Massive Chalice in the year and change since its successful crowdfunding campaign that took in over a million dollars following Double Fine's even more successful campaign for Broken Age. Jus...

PAX photo

The Costume Quest 2 PAX Collector's Challenge sounds fun

It wouldn't be PAX without buttons
Aug 26
// Jordan Devore
Midnight City is hosting a Costume Quest 2 'Trick or Treat' Collector's Challenge at PAX Prime later this week and it's going to be worth setting some time aside for if you're looking to score swag. Essentially, you'll need t...
Multiplayer photo

Double Fine picks up goofy multiplayer brawler Gang Beasts

Coming to Steam Early Access next week
Aug 18
// Jordan Devore
Gang Beasts is hardly new at this point, but we've been given another opportunity to talk about it now that it's a part of the Double Fine Presents line. I'll take it. The funny multiplayer brawler will be playable later thi...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

Double Fine embarks on new publishing venture

Sounds (double) fine to me
Jul 24
// Brittany Vincent
Double Fine Productions has decided to point its talents in the direction of helping indie game studios with publishing and marketing. In an interview with Tim Schafer, it was revealed that although Double Fine won't be a pub...
Maniac Mansion photo
Maniac Mansion

Ron Gilbert releases original design document of Maniac Mansion

Meanwhile, I can't contain my excitement
Jul 22
// Brittany Vincent
I absolutely love the SCUMM period of Lucasfilm Games (later LucasArts) development and this document gives insight into the game that started it all. It's interesting to see that although the Edison family stayed much the sa...
Grim Fandango photo
Grim Fandango

Grim Fandango is headed back to PC in all its remastered glory

I can't wait to dive back in
Jul 09
// Brittany Vincent
It seems like it should have been a no-brainer, given the game's original success as a PC adventure games, but the remastered version of Grim Fandango has just been confirmed for PC as well. Additionally, it'll be headed ...
Broken Age photo
Broken Age

You can play Broken Age now on your iPad

Now's the best time to check it out
Jun 12
// Brittany Vincent
Double Fine's latest adventure game Broken Age has made its way to the iPad, and it's just as gorgeous as a mobile game as it was upon its original release. It's split up into two releases, and right now, you can catch Broke...
Grim Fandango remaster photo
Grim Fandango remaster

Yes! Grim Fandango remaster for PS4 and Vita!

Jun 09
// Steven Hansen
I always complain about how hard it is to find a copy of Grim Fandango, which I desperately need to play. Well, Grim Fandango is getting a PS4 and Vita exclusive remaster. Of all the remasters, reboots, remakes shown off thus far at E3, this is by far the best.  Thanks you based Schafer.

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