Quantcast
Destructoid: Videogame News & Community




Game database:   #ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ         ALL     Xbox One     PS4     360     PS3     WiiU     Wii     PC     3DS     DS     PS Vita     PSP     iOS     Android




DESTRUCTOID, EST. IN 2006, IS AN INDEPENDENT NEWS COMPANY. WE ARE GAME CRITICS. OUR COMMUNITY IS RAW, VOCAL, AND HARDCORE <3
Support Dtoid by becoming a Huge Member








Dtoid is...

Hamza Aziz
Executive Shark
Jonathan Holmes
America's Sweetheart
Jordan Devore
Deputy at Arms
Chris Carter
Reviews Beast
Steven Hansen
Features Chef
Max Scoville
Video Warlock
Andy Dixon
Community Loveboat

Contributors
Meet our staff

Our sites
Flixist
Japanator
Tomopop

Contact Us
Suggest News
Advertising
Privacy
Contact Us



Happy 21st anniversary to the most important FPS in my life photo
Happy 21st anniversary to the most important FPS in my life
by Brett Makedonski

My, how time flies. Today, we're 21 years removed from the launch of one of the most influential videogames ever, Doom. It may not have been the original first-person shooter, but it was certainly the most important one in my life. Well, indirectly.

That prestige actually goes to Final Doom. Back in fourth grade, I made a new friend. We went to his house one day after school. The first thing he wanted to do was to boot up his computer and show me Final Doom. I remember being blown away by how awesome it was.

We weren't taking legit runs at Doom, mind you. IDDQD, IDKFA, and IDCLIP made sure that we could run wherever we wanted and kill whatever we wanted with absolutely no problem. Cyberdemons and Arch-viles fell by the hundreds. And, there was always a squeemish glee to watching a Cacodemon die in a messy pile of gloop.

view full story + comments




PlayStation Experience was my favorite convention of the year photo
PlayStation Experience was my favorite convention of the year
by Brett Makedonski

I've been to a lot of videogame conventions this year. From the relatively small BitSummit to the monstrosity that is gamescom, I've pretty much seen them all. I didn't think this past weekend's trip to Las Vegas would result in me saying this, but for better and for worse, I think Sony's PlayStation Experience was my favorite convention of the year.

Part of what makes that so surprising is that the event itself was surprising. Nobody really knew what to expect from the PlayStation Experience. How big would it be? What would the booths look like? Would third-party publishers show up in force? Would it be a ghost town? No one knew.

The doors to the show floor opened up just as Saturday morning's keynote ended, and we finally got a glimpse at the mysterious PlayStation Experience. At first, it was bustling. Everyone coming off the high of the keynote, and they just wanted to play some games. Attendance was probably at its peak in those moments. It didn't feel packed, but there was certainly a steady flow of people at all times.

view full story + comments




Uncharted 4 trailer analysis: Hints at improvements over Uncharted 3 photo
Uncharted 4 trailer analysis: Hints at improvements over Uncharted 3
by Steven Hansen

"Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa" - Nathan Drake. 

As Chris mentioned when the trailer debuted at PlayStation Experience, Uncharted 4 looks, "very Uncharted." There are Nolan North quips at everything you see. The dark and dingy cave gives way to a sun-washed, cinematic vista as three birds fly by right as your eyes adjust to the sun.

The climbing, too, looks same as it ever was, save for the addition of a centuries-old, apparently indestructible soft-rock-climbing dagger. And a grappling hook, which was at least used once. 

But while the base mechanics are familiar, the layout, at least as it appears in this trailer, is different, and that's why I'm a bit more excited for A Thief's End after being less impressed with Uncharted 3

view full story + comments


2:00 PM on 12.08.2014

LIVE! Absinthe vs. The Talos Principle: A Most Distinguished Stream

You guys might recall (we sure as hell don't) a month or so ago, Devolver Digital sent me and Bill an early build of Titan Souls and a couple large bottles of some sort of ale made by wizards or monks or something. Bill and I...

Max Scoville



Dear devs, stop it with tutorials all the way through the game photo
Dear devs, stop it with tutorials all the way through the game
by Nic Rowen

“THA'S HOW YOU RIDE A CARRRRRAGOR!"

Yeah, thanks asshole. I've already done this like two dozen times. You might have noticed I rode up to your mission marker ON a Caragor.

“WHEN UN' ORC IS DOWN, THA'S WHEN YOUR CARRRAGOR CAN POUNCE ON EM!”

DIE IN A FIRE.

I loved Shadow of Mordor. You know, unlike some people. I could ignore the generic revenge-driven plot, put up with Gollum's shenanigans, and embrace the hell out of the unique cast of orcs the game generated for me. Hell, I even loved the Arkham-style combat and the kill-crazy orc murder sprees it enabled. I'm not sick of that brand of carnage yet, not by a longshot.

But the game committed one unforgivable sin – It was still tutorializing basic mechanics well into the back half of the game. Every time it happened it was enough to make me want to pitch the game into Mount Doom's lava basement.

view full story + comments




Megan Fox talks Lego Universe, pigeon racism and nonviolent gun play  photo
Megan Fox talks Lego Universe, pigeon racism and nonviolent gun play
by Jonathan Holmes

 

[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on Youtube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.]

Last week on Sup Holmes we welcomed Megan Fox of Glass Bottom Games to the studio. Megan is a powerhouse of imagination and business acumen. We chatted about her time working for Lego on Lego Universe, how your portfolio is more important than your degree when applying for work in the business, the right and wrong way to do Steam sales, the non-intrusive themes of race and sexuality in her upcoming game Hot Tin Roof and a lot more. 

Thanks again to Megan for hanging out with us, and tune in today at 4pm EST when we welcome the developers of Rocket Rumble to the program. 

view full story + comments








Hardline 37: Happy 20th birthday, PlayStation photo
Hardline 37: Happy 20th birthday, PlayStation
by Jordan Devore

This week on Hardline, Bill, Steven, and I used the PlayStation's 20th anniversary as an excuse to bring up a bunch of old games for better (Bushido Blade, Castlevania: Symphony of the Night) and for worse (Blasto, some fighting game with a praying mantis).

There's also last-minute talk of dog testicle physics in Ashen Rift, which easily would've been the highlight of the episode except Steven's attire happened and, well, you'll see.

For the audio-only episode, you can subscribe on iTunes and RSS or download directly.

view full story + comments




The perfect games for your holiday get-togethers photo
The perfect games for your holiday get-togethers
by Nic Rowen

The holidays are fast approaching, and that means quality time with all the family you haven't seen since last year. Unfortunately, "quality time" can quickly devolve into awkward small talk and watching It's a Wonderful Life if you aren't careful.

I wouldn't want to see that happen to anyone, so I've compiled a list of games you can use to keep the entire family entertained, even if they haven't touched a joystick since Pac-Man. I've also included a few amazing couch multiplayer games you can play with your friends who are a little more game savvy. This is the perfect time of year to enjoy these games the way they are meant to be enjoyed, so don't miss out!

view full story + comments




Does amiibo work on the Boston subway system? photo
Does amiibo work on the Boston subway system?
by Jonathan Holmes

The reality of Amiibo is kinda cool, but the dream of Amiibo is infectious. The Russian Instagram video of someone trying (and apparently failing) to use a Samus Amiibo to get on the subway is at over 100K views on my Youtube channel. That's a lot of passion for the potential of Amiibo. It's the kind of thing that myths and legends are made of. 

Case in point, I was at my local GameStop yesterday and the clerk behind the counter mentioned to me that his "buddy confirmed" that "only the Samus Amiibo would get you a free ride on the Boston area subway system." Without name dropping too hard, I told him I worked for a videogame blog that reported on that story, but that it was the Moscow subway and that it didn't actually work. He was polite but insistent, stating that his "buddy was never wrong about this kind of stuff."

Being the consumed truth seeker that I am, I dashed right off to the subway with my four Amiibos in my pocket, determined to get to the bottom of this breaking videogame news story. The results speak for themselves, as seen above. Only one question remains -- would you want to see an ongoing series of videos focused on busting Amiibo-related myths? I'm already hearing stories of Amiibos being used to open locked doors, tricking food stamp card readers into thinking you're rich, and to making mean, bad children become good, nice children with just a quick scan of their brains, all thanks to Amiibo's power. A team of "Amiibyth Busters" could take on these alleged truths if that's something you'd want to see. Let us know in the comments. 

view full story + comments




Here are some day-one thoughts on The Crew photo
Here are some day-one thoughts on The Crew
by Chris Carter

Ubisoft recently notified the press that it wasn't going to send out early copies of The Crew. Instead, critics would have to experience everything at launch and beyond, meaning there would be no reviews for the game at release. That's a bummer for anyone who pre-ordered and has no idea of what to expect.

But fear not, as Brittany Vincent and I have obtained copies of The Crew, and while she's hard at work giving you the full rundown in the future, I'm here to give a few quick thoughts for all of you who haven't picked up your pre-orders yet.

view full story + comments




For the love of God, please, no: Horrible game marketing strategies, part one photo
For the love of God, please, no: Horrible game marketing strategies, part one
by Brittany Vincent

When I was a young warthog, I didn't know diddly about the games I was buying. I simply made a beeline for the nearest video game section, be it PC or otherwise, and browsed until there was a title that immediately leapt out at me. I kept up with magazines and the like, but I remained mostly oblivious to the development cycles surrounding the titles I wished to procure, the personalities behind them, and in many cases, the content within them.

Sure, I'd check out Seaman in the back of an Electronics Boutique or lust after Monster Rancher Card Battle GB for Game Boy, opting to trade in half of my cartridges for a meager discount off the new title. But there was none of the "announcement trailer, character trailer, preorder trailer, launch trailer, trailer trailer, trailer trailer trailer" nonsense back then. There wasn't much of an opportunity for me to learn unless I truly went digging. And honestly, I liked it that way.

Don't mistake my nostalgia for bitterness. It's fantastic that we have so many opportunities to survey upcoming titles and appraise their quality before spending the $60 (and sometimes more) and ultimately being disappointed. It's only when these opportunities are used to trick consumers that I get heated. There are several ways that companies are marketing video games to this end, and while I can admit to falling victim to one or more of these marketing fads in the past, it's about time that we see them all put out to pasture. I'll be talking about a different stomach-turning technique each week. 

First up -- Emotionally manipulative trailers with accompanying musical covers and/or deceptive footage!

view full story + comments


7:00 PM on 11.29.2014

Radio Destructoid 050: The Louis Conundrum

Radio Destructoid is our official community-focused podcast! Join Aaron "Mxy" Yost (Forums Admin), ConorElsea.com (US Community Manager), Beccy Caine (EU Community Manager), Kyle MacGregor (Contributor), and Mr Andy Dixon as ...

Mr Andy Dixon



We made Dimmujed play Titan Souls because we got too drunk photo
We made Dimmujed play Titan Souls because we got too drunk
by Bill Zoeker

A little while ago, Max and I were bribed with booze by Devolver Digital to play Titan Souls, an upcoming monster-slaying action game. We got so drunk during our stream of the game, that I'm not even going to link the video here. Luckily, I managed to trick Dtoid community member, Dimmujed, into doing some videos for us, and made him play Titan Souls. He did a lot better at it than we did. We plan on having this milky sex boy do more videos for us, so let us know what you think of him in the comments.

view full story + comments




A look at eating in videogames photo
A look at eating in videogames
by Jonathan Holmes

Physical violence is one of the most commonly used game mechanics. There are a few good reasons for that. Violence is an instinctual and direct method to interact with objects, virtual or otherwise. It's something that involves visual, auditory, and tactile feedback to suspend belief around in-game actions, making them feel real despite our conscious awareness that they are not. When done right, violence feels good and it feels real. That's a near-universal truth. 

There are a lot of other things that are just as widely enjoyable. A good nap, hugs, and eating a delicious snack are a few. Sadly, we've had a lot harder time translating those experiences into satisfying game mechanics. We've probably come closest with food. While there is only one first-person eating/drinking game currently on the market, there are plenty of titles that contemplate eating and show the pros and/or cons of chowing down. 

view full story + comments




Armchair psychology: Why we keep playing bad games photo
Armchair psychology: Why we keep playing bad games
by Nic Rowen

Destiny is the worst game I can't stop playing

I keep hearing this, or variations of it again and again from my friends, all of whom seem unable to escape the jaws of a game they all claim to hate.

And you know what? I get it. Because it's 1:00 am, and I'm up playing MechWarrior Online again. Or if we go back a few years, Ragnarok Online. Or Gun Griffon Blaze, or Rainbow Six, or whatever other shitty game I either never liked to begin with, or learned to despise, but dumped a needless amount of hours into for reasons that I couldn't articulate then and barely understand now.

I think we've all probably done a stint at the crappy-game-rodeo in our lives. Played something our heart wasn't into but put up with long after it was time to call it quits. But why? Well, I won't pretend to know all the answers, but I've been down this road a few times, and I think I can point out a few recurring patterns. More importantly, I think I might have a few ways to break the cycle.  

view full story + comments




Why I love The Last of Us multiplayer, in a nutshell photo
Why I love The Last of Us multiplayer, in a nutshell
by Kyle MacGregor

We're outnumbered, down to our last pair of lives. The clock is ticking, it's as much of a threat to my team's survival as the four armed men bearing down on our position. I don't like our chances, not one bit, but moments like this, they're the reason I play the game.

view full story + comments