hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

Dark Souls

PS' GOTYs photo
PS' GOTYs

PlayStation owners loved Destiny more than any other game in 2014


Dark Souls II won best PS3 game
Jan 08
// Brett Makedonski
We're well into the new year, but not everyone's put 2014 squarely in their rearviewmirror. PlayStation Blog just finished tallying the votes to determine which games Sony fans were most fond of last year. All PlayStation pla...

Swery's 2014 games that I haven't completed, but think are amazing

Jan 07 // Steven Hansen
4: Dark Souls II Even though the previous game broke me, the addictive nature of the game drew me to buy this sequel. Obviously, this game created a lot of waves, and I decided that I had to play it simply to experience that cycle of bitter aftertaste, frustration, and then catharsis one more time. Hardcore users say this game was easier compared to the original, but it was still enough to break me again. Getting killed by a player who invades especially makes me want to throw my controller. This is unrelated, but while I've never met the director, Miyazaki Hidetaka, his personal name is the same as mine (Hidetaka), so I feel a sense of closeness to him. Why I quit playing: The frustration from the game crept into my real life. 3: Destiny It may not be too much to say that this was the year's most talked-about title. I was too busy with development to take part in the beta test, but I bought the Xbox One version on the day it came out. Unfortunately, though, it wasn't localized into Japanese. When someone asked me "Why did you buy it if you weren't sure," I didn't really have an excuse, but that's what happened. Of course, not only the story, but the menu was also in English as well, so I had trouble understanding the system. I was really behind compared to my friends who had already bought the PS4 version, and became a bit of a Destiny dunce. Then I got busy with D4's release and PR, so there was no way I was going to finish it. Why I quit playing: My friends made fun of me so much that I lost all my confidence. 2: Dragon Age: Inquisition I added this game only after preparing myself to get yelled at. Why? Because I haven't played it. Right after I bought it, I suddenly got bombarded with things I had to take care of, and then there was an update to the consumer version of Minecraft, and I became desperate just to play that. Then, I went on a trip overseas without even getting to play it. I'm still on that trip now as I write this list. So, if I haven't played it, how can I say it's amazing? Well... just by using my intuition. Or, my sense of smell, should I say? I'm not a writer or a critic. I'm just a creator, so I have the right to self-righteously purchase and play games how I want to. Simple, right? Why I quit playing: My first vacation in four years. 1: Drakengard 3 The continuation of the famous series that Access Games developed. In this game, the action and graphics were renewed, essentially reviving the series. Ally NPCs and dragon growth were added, and you don't need to know the entire series to be able to enjoy the game. However, the story wasn't any good. It's really unfortunate, but it's the truth. And the graphics could have been a bit better, I think. If we get another chance, I'd like to use what we learned here to make an even better game. Why I quit playing: Self-hatred and self-defense. Runner-Up: Kirby: Triple Deluxe The world will wash your heart clean. The characters were just so cute, I couldn't not buy it. But the game was too beautiful for my heart. It ended up blinding me. It was hard for me to keep staring at the vibrant Kirby as he ran all around. It makes me wish that I could make a game someday like this, but at the same time, it also fills me with despair. That's all. Thanks to everyone who read this, and thanks to everyone at Destructoid for giving me the chance to write this! I apologize to anyone who was offended by anything I wrote. This is a list filled with personal taste and bias, but regardless of how it appears, I think it's very important for people to organize their thoughts as words, which is why I wrote this. I'm hoping from the bottom of my heart that 2015 will be a big step forward for the game industry. I Love You All!! SWERY
SWERY's 2014 GotY photo
The director of Deadly Premonition and D4 looks back at 2014
[Swery is the man behind Deadly Premonition and D4. The latter has kept him busy over the last year, so he hasn't been able to finish every game he loves. But love is not finite, finished, and with an eyebrow game this o...

Dark Souls Steam photo
Dark Souls Steam

You defeated Games for Windows Live, Dark Souls Steam migration update out now


You can keep your save data and achievements
Dec 15
// Jordan Devore
The long-time-coming update that replaces Games for Windows Live with Steamworks in Dark Souls: Prepare to Die Edition for PC is out today. Full instructions on how to transfer your achievements and save data are over here, b...

How did Destructoid's most anticipated games of 2014 come out?

Dec 15 // Steven Hansen
Brett Makedonski, Tom Clancy's The Division HAHAHA, I said I wanted The Division? God, early 2014 me was dumb. Let's revisit that in 2018. For now, let's pretend I said my most anticipated game was Valiant Hearts. Wow, was I ever spot-on with that one. It's one of the most important war games ever, and my hands-down pick for game of the year in 2014. Golly, I'm super good at picking these. Darren Nakamura, Starbound Going back and reading about Starbound being my most anticipated game of 2014 almost makes me a little bit sad. The game is still great, and the team at Chucklefish has been doing a fine job providing constant updates on its progress toward official release, but at some point my interest in keeping up with the minutiae just dropped off. I am still utterly fascinated by the concept, and I could still see myself losing hours to it if I started it up, but at this point I just want to wait until the final release so I can experience the universe it has to offer to its fullest. I am not even sure if the final release is scheduled for 2014 any more. Wake me up when it's ready. Until then, I can't dedicate my attention to it as much as I used to want to. It's not you, Starbound; it's me. Jordan Devore, Yoshi's Woolly World Unsurprisingly, my choice, Yarn Yoshi, didn't come out this year. Good-feels take a long time to make. But it did get a new name and a stage in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U. Having revisited the E3 trailer for Yoshi's Woolly World just now, yep, it's still my most anticipated game. Josh Tolentino, Watch Dogs Well, that was kind of a wash, wasn't it? Watch Dogs wasn't terrible, certainly, but it didn't set the world on fire like Ubisoft was hoping. Hell, I haven't even finished the story campaign yet, and the name "Aiden Pearce" is already a punchline in my mind. That said, the most intriguing parts of Watch Dogs' setup, namely its shared-world competitive multiplayer, did hold up to an extent. It's a real rush whenever someone invades my game, or I invade theirs, and there's nothing quite like pulling off a perfect one of the little cat-and-mouse hunts that come from the Online Hacking mode, or acting like a proper NPC to accomplish Online Tailing. If there's one positive that Watch_Dogs  may be able to leave in its legacy, it's that its best concepts may at some point come in to populate future, possibly better, Ubisoft games, because that's just how they tend to do things these days. Jonathan Holmes, Cat Girl Without Salad I have pestered WayForward about the missed release date of Cat Girl Without Salad for the past year. I have asked them questions like, "Why did you lie to me?" and "Do you enjoy making people feel glad only so that you can later make them feel sad?" In response, WayForward has said things that I can not tell you.  Cat Girl Without Salad is my most anticipated game of 2015.  Abel Girmay, Destiny So when we did the "Most Anticipated of 2014" list, I picked Infamous: Second Son as my most anticipated because Brett Z beat me to it when he called dibs on Destiny. Not knocking Second Son of course, it's just really difficult to talk about how a game turned out when you only manage to work through the first two hours. What I did play a lot of, though, was Destiny. Oh boy. What's left to say of this game that hasn't been already between all the reviews, Reddit posts, and parody Twitter accounts. Destiny was not a terrible game of course, but it was a deeply flawed one. Where we were promised a rich lore, we got 343 Dinkle Spark talking through a nonsensical narrative. Where we were told each weapon and armor piece would have a unique player story behind them, we got the endless grind for Strange Coins, hoping that Xur would have something good for our class. The latter touches on my biggest issue with Destiny, the endgame. Amidst promises of "the real game" starting after level 20, all that was waiting was a hamster wheel loop of grinding through the same missions, praying for that one good drop. Destiny has no postgame, just a grind that demands more than most modern MMOs, and no content to make the grind make it feel like anything but. I pushed my Warlock to level 25 and my Titan to 22, so it's not as if I didn't give Destiny a chance. Looking back at it, I just wish I would have given Second Son some of that time. Chris Carter, Dark Souls II The anticipated follow-up to From Software's Souls legacy was pretty much everything I wanted. While there were a few nasty tricks like tracking on some bosses, the actual environments were true to the series and, as always, the combat and itemization aspects were incredibly deep. There are too many memorable zones to count, and I can still map them out in my head as I type this. The new directors  Shibuya and Tanimura did right by Miyazaki, and even the three DLC bits were good in their own way. While I'm expecting a bit more variety from the next chapter, I'm happy to add Dark Souls II to my replay list for years to come right alongside of the other two Souls brothers. Steven Hansen, Gravity Rush 2 Not a damn word. Not a even a, "hey, how's it going?" phone call all year. I joked about waiting on word from Gravity Rush 2 to save a middling E3 (eventually saved by Metal Gear footage and Alien gameplay). I was actually let down to see nothing at Tokyo Game Show 2014 (it was announced at TGS 2013). By the time PlayStation Experience happened, I stopped getting even mild hope up.  There is a pulse. A mild blip of "this game is still being developed." Gravity Rush 2 is the fluttering eyelids of a comatose system and with last week's reassurance comes a doctor telling you, "don't get your hopes up yet," we don't know when it'll come out of this. Could be years. RIP PlayStation Vita.   -- I guess the good thing is that we can recycle half of last year's entries for "Most Anticipated Games of 2015" next month.  What were you looking forward to in 2014? Did it actually come out? Was it everything you ever wanted, setting your heart a flutter? Are you now planning the perfect Roadhouse theme wedding with it? Just make sure you do not tell me what you're anticipating in 2015. I will upload another post for you to do that in. Please understand.  
Anticipated retrospective photo
Mostly they didn't come out at all!
Want to feel old? January 2014 was just about one year ago. That's one whole season of a TV show or a complete Earth's orbit around the sun. Way back then--I can hardly remember it in the shadow of the god awful year--the Des...

Dark Souls vs. GFWL photo
Dark Souls vs. GFWL

Dark Souls' transition from GFWL pushed into December


Games for Windows Live is the final Boss
Nov 30
// Rob Morrow
Publisher Bandai Namco recently took to the Steam discussion boards to issue an official statement in regards to Dark Souls: Prepare to Die Edition's planned November transition away from Games for Windows Live in this ...
Dark Souls II re-release photo
Dark Souls II re-release

Dark Souls II is set to respawn on PS4 and Xbox One


Time is a flat circle
Nov 25
// Nic Rowen
A re-release of Dark Souls II for the current-gen consoles and a DX11 version for the PC has been announced in classic Souls fashion – with a moody and cryptic trailer showing scenes of unimaginable horror. Sign me up.
Dark Souls II photo
Dark Souls II

Dark Souls II gets a pretty sweet first-person mod


Challenge accepted
Oct 23
// Chris Carter
Dark Souls II had a few of the toughest bosses in the series, but they'd be especially hard if you played the game in first-person. That's what a modder named Benzoin-Gun has done, detailing his creation in the vid...
Dark Souls PC photo
Dark Souls PC

Dark Souls will shed Games for Windows Live next month


And I'll shed a tear of joy
Oct 20
// Jordan Devore
There were enough worthwhile PC games tied to Games for Windows Live that I was willing to put up with service, which seemed to range from mildly annoying to downright frustrating, depending on the day. For many of us, Dark S...
Dark Souls Design Works photo
Dark Souls Design Works

Dark Souls II Design Works book is full of bleak, gloomy pictures


Just how Dark Souls fans like it
Oct 16
// Nic Rowen
Today in news that made me squeal like a fanboy, From Software has released a Design Works book for Dark Souls II just like its predecessor in Japan. It features over 200 pages of the darkly beautiful art of the Souls world,...
Dark Souls II DLC bosses photo
Dark Souls II DLC bosses

Dark Souls II's DLC bosses are HARD


Who would have thought?
Oct 12
// Nic Rowen
Dark Souls II players aren't doing so hot against the Fume Knight from the Crown of the Old Iron King DLC. According to stats released by From Software, 93% of attempts against him haven ended in miserable, abject failure. GG Chosen Undead.

Review: Dark Souls II: The Crown of the Ivory King

Oct 01 // Chris Carter
Dark Souls II: The Crown of the Ivory King (PC, PS3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: From SoftwarePublisher: Bandai NamcoReleased: September 30, 2014MSRP: $9.99 ($24.99 Season Pass) Like the previous add-ons, you'll have to access the DLC manually within the game -- in this case, you'll have to enter through the Shrine of Winter in the Shaded Woods. Without wasting a moment, Ivory King presents one of the most memorable openers for an area that I've ever seen in the series, alongside of a breathtaking snowy landscape. Although the engine has only taken baby steps from its predecessor, the art direction is phenomenal, and this is yet another area to ogle at while you're taking a much-needed break. The lore is a bit more in-your-face this time around, but never so much that it breaks the conceit of the Souls series and over-explains itself. You'll get a neat bit of exposition, and even a final chat with a major player in the overarching story. It definitely has a different feel from the detached Sunken and Iron scenarios, and I enjoyed the attempt to unite Ivory with the core game. Just don't expect an amazing conclusion -- but that's par for the course, really. Enemies consist of an array of ice-centric creatures, with only one real "new" addition -- a deadly porcupine-like thing. The good news is that the cast is varied in terms of forcing you to adapt strategies on a constant basis, which keeps gameplay engaging even if there aren't a whole lot of fresh faces. Ideally though, I would have liked to have seen all-new enemies. Here, it's not so much how the enemies change things necessarily, but the environment, which is true of a number of zones in the franchise. While consistent in their design, Ivory King doesn't really throw anything at you that you haven't seen before with one exception. In addition to the claustrophobic corridors the DLCs are known for, there's also one very open area that takes place in a low-visibility snowstorm. Much like the foggy woods before it, it can be the source of quite a bit of anxiety not knowing what to expect from any given angle. Boss fights are a little more imaginative this time around -- though still not what I'd call "classic" -- with a confrontation against a tiger (Aava), and a foe called the Burnt Ivory King. The former battle has a bit of a twist to it that will stump players if they attempt to fight without fulfilling a certain requirement, which is a nice little devious extra. The King mostly just throws adds at you (which was fine a few times in Dark Souls II, but gets old fast) and delivers standard swordplay to boot, but the introduction and battle arena are more than worth the lack of bravado. This is also one of the most difficult challenges yet in addition to the Iron King DLC -- so much so that I'd make the claim that it's easily up there with some of Demon's and both Souls games' toughest portions. Difficulty doesn't automatically make something good, but those who revel in it will enjoy seeing their talents put to the test. None of Dark Souls II's DLC is particularly spectacular compared to what was already in the base game, but they are great companion pieces to the proper package. If you're a diehard fan this is all you're going to get until Bloodborne arrives, and with multiple playthroughs and New Game+ runs, odds are you'll get your money's worth. Everyone else who took a more casual approach to Dark Souls II should probably wait for a possible Game of the Year edition or a sale.
Dark Souls II DLC review photo
And that's a wrap on the DLC
Dark Souls II was quite the ride. Although the game had its fair share of issues, I had a blast playing it, and a number of its zones now have a place in my list of all-time favorite Souls locations. One of those areas includes the last piece of DLC, The Crown of the Ivory King, which brings back some of the powerful icy imagery from the Painted World of Ariamis.

Dark Souls II DLC photo
Dark Souls II DLC

Dark Souls II's final Lost Crowns DLC chapter is here


Crown of the Ivory King
Sep 30
// Jordan Devore
After a brief delay, the Dark Souls II DLC trilogy has come to an end with Crown of the Ivory King. It's available today on Steam and Xbox 360 and tomorrow on PlayStation 3 for $9.99 -- or you can get all three add-ons bundle...
Dark Souls II photo
Dark Souls II

Dark Souls II's third DLC, 'Crown of the Ivory King' delayed


By one week
Sep 22
// Chris Carter
Bandai Namco has announced that the third (and presumably final) DLC for Dark Souls II, the Crown of the Ivory King, has been delayed by one week. Originally it was set for this Wednesday, but now it's due on September 30th a...
Dark Souls II photo
Dark Souls II

Feel the icy chill of these Dark Souls II Crown of the Ivory King DLC screens


I'm interested to see what From can do with snow
Sep 18
// Chris Carter
Snow isn't a common theme with the Souls series, so it's interesting that the upcoming Dark Souls II DLC Crown of the Ivory King will take place on an icy tundra. This new batch of screens looks suitably dreary...
Dark Souls photo
Dark Souls

This guy's better than you at Dark Souls, because he plays with a Rock Band guitar


And that's the worst of the guitar controllers
Sep 08
// Brett Makedonski
Fancy yourself quite the Dark Souls player? Bet you can cruise right through that game, patiently parrying and rolling your way to victory after victory. Good for you. Now, do it with a Rock Band controller. It may seem...

Review: Dark Souls II: The Crown of the Old Iron King

Aug 27 // Chris Carter
Dark Souls II: The Crown of the Iron King (PC, PS3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: From SoftwarePublisher: Bandai NamcoReleased: August 26, 2014 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360)MSRP: $9.99 ($24.99 Season Pass) Iron King starts off exactly the same way as Sunken King. This time around you'll make your way through fire and brimstone to the Primal Bonfire of the Old Iron King, which will allow you to enter a door and enter the DLC. Almost immediately the zone draws you in, kicking off with a vast expanse of castles, clouds, and a giant imposing chain that leads to the core part of the add-on -- Brume Tower. From there you can touch the bonfire and teleport around to any area at will. Unlike Sunken King where I had no real attachment to the zone, Old Iron King exhumes lore and nuance. Ghostly whispers in the dark, melted and ash-ridden corpses, and even the types of enemies you'll encounter all tell a story that's relevant to the area you rode in on. Don't expect anything new or mind-blowing -- it simply fits, is all. The imposing bronze-kitted skeletons feel like natural denizens, as do the hulking giants that spew lava from their arms. One of my favorite new enemy types are the harmless barrel-holding imps, who you can "corral" into fires to blow them up and dish out damage to other baddies. In addition to a set of brand new foes you'll also find the Ashen Idols -- mysterious demons that are impervious to damage unless you strike them with special items called "smelter wedges." You'll get a handful of these items at the start of the DLC, then you're on your own after that. If you're the type of person who rushes through zones in Souls games, you're going to be disappointed when you conquer the main path in just several hours. But fortunately as someone who loves the spirit of exploration, I found a number of sidepaths, including a giant optional zone that is one of the biggest tests of skill in the entire game. Everything in Iron King thankfully gels with rest of the game both aesthetically, and in terms of overall level design. While there were a few parts of Sunken where I became frustrated and didn't feel as compelled to go on, Iron King sucked me in. Bosses however are still a problem, re-iterating the biggest issue from the first DLC. They simply either aren't memorable enough on their own, or they're complete re-skins of prior encounters from the core game. That's not to say that they aren't just as satisfying at times as their predecessors, but for a piece of $10 DLC it would be nice to have all-new content.  Crown of the Iron King didn't blow me away, but it's a very nice zone that feels like a natural extension of Dark Souls II, and it's meaty enough to feel like a real DLC and not just a bonus area. Now that there are two DLCs down and one to go, it's hard to really recommend the Season Pass unless the third zone really knocks it out of the park. Stay tuned in September for our coverage of The Crown of the Ivory King.
Dark Souls II DLC review photo
That white hot light
While Dark Souls II brought me back to that special place that I found with Demon's Souls in many ways, the first DLC pack, Crown of the Sunken King, didn't go far enough with its concepts. It's really hard to give ...

Dark Souls DLC photo
Dark Souls DLC

Dark Souls II 'Crown of the Old Iron King' DLC out today


Journey past the Iron Keep
Aug 26
// Jordan Devore
When From Software announced the three-part Lost Crowns DLC for Dark Souls II, it all seemed so far away. But here we are, already on the second release. Time is flying. Crown of the Old Iron King hits today on Steam, PlaySta...
Bloodborne photo
Bloodborne

Check out new direct-feed Bloodborne gameplay


It's a Victorian-era Dark Souls, basically
Aug 19
// Alessandro Fillari
Last week, I got to go hands-on with Bloodborne. This visually evocative and bleak follow-up to Dark Souls II is a change of pace, but also something that feels and plays very much like the games of the past. While the change...
Bloodborne photo
Bloodborne

Bloodborne's health regaining system detailed


Regain System revealed at gamescom
Aug 13
// Dale North
A new system for upcoming From Software PS4 title Bloodborne was revealed at gamescom today in a behind-closed-doors meeting. It's called the Regain System, and it lets you recover health after taking a hit.  It's not as easy as it sounds to get your health back, though. 
Dark Souls II photo
Dark Souls II

Dark Souls II gets patch 1.08, fixes and balances in tow


Not quite as major as some fixes in the first Dark Souls
Jul 25
// Chris Carter
Fresh off its new Crown of the Sunken King DLC, From Software has updated and tweaked Dark Souls II for everyone. Weapons have been balanced (with extra or decreased damage depending on the item), and spells have be...

Review: Dark Souls II: The Crown of the Sunken King

Jul 22 // Chris Carter
Dark Souls II: The Crown of the Sunken King (PC, PS3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: From SoftwarePublisher: Bandai NamcoReleased: July 22, 2014 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360)MSRP: $9.99 ($24.99 Season Pass) So here's what you're getting with Crown -- three new areas, new spells, more items, and extra enemies. Not all of them are created equal however, as some of the baddies feel like re-skins of prior models (one actually is a re-skin), and not all of the weapons and items are particularly useful for extended playthroughs. Still, the core areas are very well done and manage to differentiate themselves from the rest of the series. Entering the DLC is dead simple, and will likely appease fans who found the process to access the Artorias content in the previous game frustrating. All you have to do is have the Black Gulch area cleared (up to and including The Rotten boss). In that area is a new snake-like statue -- just touch the statue and you're in. There's a bonfire right near the start of the DLC, and with Dark Souls II's convenient travel system, you can head to and from the content anytime you please. This is a huge plus for me, since the DLC doesn't lock you out after completing it and feels like a genuine expanded portion of the game that you can return to and explore freely. Crown of the Sunken King starts off in a giant open cavernous area, filled with ancient Aztec-like structures. It gives a real Indiana Jones vibe, which is accentuated by special obelisks that you can strike to raise or lower specific platforms. The Souls series has always had environmental manipulation in some form, but here it feels a lot more liquid than normal, and figuring out the puzzle of the ruins felt more taxing than most zones. In fact, the DLC is actually one of the more difficult zones I encountered in general, as enemies do tons of damage, nearly everything poisons (even regular foes) and there are pits at every turn. Just when I thought I had mastered an enemy type a new concept sprung up in its place, and I can't count the amount of times I misjudged a jump only to fall into the abyss. If you're looking for more of a challenge, this will suit that need nicely. As far as the enemies go, the base models feel like modified skeletons, but have an interesting "glass armor" feel with a unique green color scheme. The entire DLC has a cohesive green hue to it, without going overboard like Blood Gulch's shiny emerald lighting. One of the most devious adversaries though is the poison statue cluster -- which is basically just a bunch of poison statues cobbled together. It's a lazy design, but it's an effective enemy that will keep you on your toes. Sadly, the boss fights aren't nearly as memorable as the bar that was set in Artorias. While those had completely original and terrifying models like Manus, Crown borrows some concepts from the original game -- and even if a few aren't directly taken, they still feel pretty static overall outside of the final boss. Having said that, I was still consistently entertained throughout the entire DLC, even if I wasn't blown away. Dark Souls II: The Crown of the Sunken King is not a "must have" add-on, but it does its job of delivering more Dark Souls. As always, I advise you to skip out on the Season Pass until all three of its pieces are out so you can judge it by the strength of its parts. However, hardcore Souls fans will want to at least buy Crown simply to experience a challenging new area that's worth trekking through.
Dark Souls II DLC review photo
It's no Artorias, but it'll do
2014 has been very good to me, but Dark Souls II is one of my favorite games of the year. Many debates have raged on as to whether or not it's as exceptional as its predecessor (Demon's Souls is better than bot...

Dark Souls photo
Dark Souls

One week to go: More Dark Souls II DLC screens while we wait


July 22 for PC and Xbox 360; July 23 for PS3
Jul 15
// Jordan Devore
The last batch of images for Crown of the Sunken King left me anticipating this Dark Souls II DLC which is, oh good, only a week off. There's more where that came from. Using an item acquired in the DLC, players will reach th...
Dark Souls as an eSport photo
Dark Souls as an eSport

Here's what Dark Souls II would be like as an eSport


A glorious peek into a potential future for professional gaming competitions
Jul 05
// Kyle MacGregor
A lot of us would find eSports far more alluring if the genres associated with these competitions were more diverse. We see plenty of first-person shooters, RTS, fighting games, and MOBAs. But what about something atypical l...
Dark Souls II photo
Dark Souls II

Enjoy these new Dark Souls II DLC screens before you cryogenically freeze yourself until July


'Crown of the Sunken King' DLC
Jun 11
// Chris Carter
In case you haven't heard, DLC is coming to Dark Souls II. Three add-ons in fact! The first up is Crown of the Sunken King, set to drop on the PC, PS3, and Xbox 360 on July 22nd. To celebrate, Bandai Namco sent over some scre...
Dark Souls II DLC photo
Dark Souls II DLC

Bandai Namco announces Dark Souls II DLC trilogy


Coming this summer for PS3, Xbox 360, and Steam
Jun 04
// Kyle MacGregor
A set of downloadable chapters dubbed The Lost Crowns trilogy are heading to Dark Souls II, Bandai Namco announced today. The first episode, Crown of the Sunken King, will be available on PlayStation 3, Xbox 3...
Speedrun photo
Here's Distortion2's 20:14 run
I haven't been keeping up with Dark Souls II speedruns. I should be. We got a tip in this weekend about Marksel's 21:25 world-record any% run, which has since been topped by Distortion2's 20:14 run, included above. Seems the...

 photo

Rumor: Clips emerge showing Project Beast in action


Is this the next game from From Software?
May 29
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Project Beast is the rumored PlayStation 4 project by From Software, the developers behind Dark Souls. Some images were supposedly leaked not too long ago, and now NeoGAF has found four short gameplay clips. Is this actually...
Dark Trolls II photo
Dark Trolls II
With the right clothes and American Werewolf in London green skin color, it's possible to stand in as an enemy in Dark Souls II. And then watch invading players flounder about, confused, trying to find you. Can't pull the wool over Guile's eyes, though.

From Software photo
From Software

Demon's Souls creator becomes president of From Software


Hidetaka Miyazaki is movin' on up
May 21
// Jordan Devore
Demon's Souls and Dark Souls creator/director Hidetaka Miyazaki has been promoted to president of From Software, reports Gamasutra. Which is excellent, maybe. Or maybe it's not. Between this and Kadokawa Corp. acquiring the c...






Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Why were we all put on this earth, and where are the best tacos?
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -