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Assassins Creed

Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

We found hidden clues about the next Assassin's Creed


We'll find out for sure on May 12
May 07
// Brett Makedonski
Six months ago, a rumor surfaced that the next Assassin's Creed would be set in Victorian London. Although the report looked extremely credible, we hadn't ever received anything in the way of confirmation from Ubisoft th...
Assassin's Creed movie photo
Assassin's Creed movie

Michael Fassbender's Assassin's Creed movie will start filming in September


It's still happening?
May 05
// Chris Carter
If there's one thing that would get me interested in an Assassin's Creed movie, it's the attachment of Michael Fassbender to the project. While I have very little hope for the film, Fassbender (and his penis)&n...
Ancestors: The Humankind photo
Ancestors: The Humankind

Assassin's Creed creator unveils Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey


It's episodic
Apr 23
// Chris Carter
In 2010, Patrice Desilets decided to leave Ubisoft, and thus, his creation, Assassin's Creed. He returned in 2011 with THQ, then in 2013 his studio was sold back to Ubisoft. Then he was fired. He had quite a ride, but he...

Review: Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China

Apr 21 // Chris Carter
Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China (PC, PS4, Xbox One [reviewed]) Developer: UbisoftPublisher: UbisoftReleased: April 21, 2015MSRP: $9.99 (China is part of the Assassin's Creed Unity Season Pass) Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China isn't a new concept, as Assassin's Creed II: Discovery basically built upon the older Prince of Persia games, which Ubisoft even took a crack at last generation with a remaster. Nonetheless it's a welcome one on paper if we get to see other parts of the world beyond western civilizations, even if it does feel rushed in many aspects. The story this time around follows Shao Jun, one of the lone assassins left in her order after Zhang Yong of the Tigers (Templars) wiped them out. It takes place after the events of Assassin's Creed: Embers, which ties her into the core storyline by way of a chance encounter with Ezio Auditore. Fans will enjoy the connection for sure, but most of you out there can completely ignore it as yet another wacky "Assassins versus Templars" adventure and just enjoy this as a 2D platformer. You might want to ignore the story anyway, because it's not very good. Framed as a standard revenge tale, Shao Jun will hobble across various landscapes killing whoever gets in her way to the top. The dialog is particularly terrible and not in a funny B-movie way, and no one that turns up is memorable. I know a lot of people didn't dig the meta-narrative fluff in the core series, but at least it was something worth talking about. In many ways it feels like a missed opportunity to flesh out the brotherhood in China, but hot damn if the setting itself isn't beautiful. [embed]290711:58237:0[/embed] In fact, the first thing I noticed about the game was the killer art style. The lazy slideshow cutscenes aren't that big of a deal when everything looks like a living painting, especially Shao's flowing red cape. In-game the art is still wonderful, but the environments themselves often lack detail, with washed-out backgrounds making a frequent appearance. That feeling of disappointment will pass quickly though once you reach another vibrant setpiece. Fans of the core series will find it easy to acclimate, as the controls are very similar. There's a button to hold down to run and initiate reckless mode, a button to go all stealthy, and your standard light and heavy attacks. While the narrative isn't all that slick, Shao Jun controls like a master assassin, and I had very few issues getting her to go anywhere I needed her to be. Grabbing ledges, crawling about, and avoiding guards was a breeze. All of this action will be navigated around awareness cones for enemies, which are visible front and center on-screen. Enemies are fairly observant of their surroundings, with clear "sound" circles and other nuances influencing their movements, but sadly they don't follow you to the ends of the earth like past games -- if you're in a tricky spot, they'll just sit there for about 10 seconds before returning to their patrol route. It reminds me of the camp of the original Tenchu, with mixed results. Non-lethal force is preferred, but Shao has access to a whistle ability for distractions, in addition to firecrackers, daggers, and a noisemaker tool. Every power feels roughly the same which makes for some dull variations early on, but every level will unlock newer, cooler abilities that mix things up much more than her basic skillset. I'm talking grappling hooks, more options for hiding places (like that "quick switch" leap Sam Fischer is so good at), and sliding assassinations. Melee combat is run-of-the-mill but it looks sexy, especially when coupled with Shao's unique animations. Backwards blocks and bullet dodges are fluid and responsive, which is key as you'll be doing both of those things a lot. You won't fight many interesting enemies, but even the meat grinder of foes the game throws at you is fun with this system. Once you're done with the five-to-six-hour adventure there's two New Game+ options to replay with slightly different mechanics, which do just enough to justify another playthrough or two. Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China has the makings of a good 2D Prince of Persia re-awakening, but it lacks a lot of character both aesthetically and mechanically. Still, there's very little actually wrong with it if you're looking for another platformer to add to your pile. Hopefully future iterations of the Chronicles subseries can build upon the foundation that China has provided. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Assassin's Creed review photo
Shao Jun gettin' it done
Just last week I asked readers if they were into the idea of 2D Assassin's Creed games. Roughly 41% were on board, 33% preferred the 3D iterations, and 26% have checked out of the series entirely. Ubisoft doesn't really care what you think, though. As long as they sell, those assassins will keep on stabbin'.

AC Chronicles photo
AC Chronicles

Assassin's Creed has a new perspective, but a familiar thirst for blood


We go to China first
Apr 20
// Brett Makedonski
A cursory glance at the launch trailer for Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China, and you might think that the franchise is moving in an entirely different direction. A stylized aesthetic, wonderful ploofs of color, and a focus...
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Are you interested in Assassin's Creed Chronicles?


Or do you wish these settings had proper 3D games?
Apr 15
// Chris Carter
Assassin's Creed Chronicles will take the series to China, India, and Russia over the coming months. All three (in addition to Japan and Egypt) were among the highest requested settings for the series, leading to a certain de...
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Travel to India and Russia in future episodes of Assassin's Creed Chronicles this fall


Fan-favorite Assasins finally have their time to shine
Mar 31
// Alessandro Fillari
Recently, I got to go hands-on with Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China. For this downloadable title, Ubisoft redesigned the AC experience to fit within a 2.5D perspective. With China releasing next month, players will finally...

Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China gives the series a fresh perspective

Mar 31 // Alessandro Fillari
Assassin's Creed Chronicles (PC, PS4, Xbox One [previewed])Developer: Climax StudiosPublisher: Ubisoft Release date: April 21, 2015 (Episode One) / Fall 2015 (Episodes Two and Three) "It's a very exciting and very challenging project to work on," said lead game designer Xavier Penin. "[Ubisoft] had a pretty [sizable] pitch for the project and wanted them to be short, episodic, and each of the stories would have their own specific artstyles that fit the character and time period. We knew we had to focus our efforts on making something that didn't just feel like a smaller Assassin's Creed." For the first episode, Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China, players take on the role of female assassin Shao Jun, who fans might recognize from the animated film Assassin's Creed Embers. Picking up some time after the events of Embers in 1526, Shao Jun returns to China after her training with Ezio Auditore and seeks revenge against Emporer Jiajing of the Ming Dynasty after the massacre of the Chinese Assassin Brotherhood. During her exploits, she'll acquire new abilities and contacts that will help in her quest, and revitalize the Assassin presence in 16th-century China. China has been a top requested location from fans, along with a playable Shao Jun, and seeing it come to pass is exciting. In the three levels I played, set in The Forbidden City and Fujian Province, we got to experience a starkly different setting and visual palette not seen from the series. Moreover, the brief taste of the India and Russia episodes we saw also feature their own art styles and aesthetic. Granted, the nature of this downloadable title allows them to try different settings, but I was blown away by the potential AC has in such lush environments. This enthusiasm was also shared by the folks behind the title. [embed]289710:57987:0[/embed] "When we were going to do this game with [Shao Jun], I was really excited about it and wanted to get all the information about background and her story, but it was actually pretty thin," said Penin. "So eventually we decided to come up with new ideas and settings, beyond Embers, and we came up with a story that AC fans will enjoy." Understandably, the switch from 3D to 2.5D has brought some changes to the action-stealth gameplay. For the most part, players will still traverse the environment with free-running maneuvers while avoiding detection, and only using combat as a last resort. Players will run and leap across obstacles in the environment and move between the foreground and background during traversal. I was impressed with the depth shown in the environments, and I was quite surprised that areas shown off were largely interactive. In one section during a prison escape, I had to find my gear before making an exit, which meant having to search for a guard's keys. After traveling through a hallway, I entered a large cavern housing dozens of prison cells. Off in the distance in the background, there were several guards making their rounds near a number of prisoners. From the foreground, I jumped onto a fallen pillar, which allowed me seamlessly run across to the background of the environment, which had its own unique layout and design. It was neat to be able to see how much depth the levels have, and the later levels show off much more intuitive and clever design. The stealth gameplay has had a bit of change, however, and the assassins now have to rely more on shadows and darkness to slip past their foes. Instead of the line-of-sight design from past titles, Chronicles utilizes a vision cone system. Similar to Mark of the Ninja's gameplay, all enemies can see and hear only a certain distance ahead of them, which gives you the means to figure out the best way around them. While it's still very much AC, the new design feels different. The lead designer elaborated a little further with how they went about re-designing AC stealth for 2.5D. "We had a lot of work to find the right recipe because this is the type of gameplay that require precise signs of feedback," said Penin. "We experimented a lot with the detection system, which focuses on cones of vision that work really well because it shows accurately in the 2D perspective. While some people initially thought [the visual representation of enemy line of sight] got in the way of the art style, ultimately the function allowed for us to design the stealth for players to be more interesting." Though you can easily avoid all conflicts by sticking in the shadows or hiding inside doorways or off the sides of ledges, there are a whole assortment of gadgets that Shao Jun has at her disposal, such as the rope dart which can sling enemies and help her traverse to new heights. The action and pace of the stealth from past games is present, though there seems to be much more thought put into it. Some sections felt like actual puzzles more than action-stealth gameplay, and I mean that as a good thing. The narrowing of the perspective put a lot more depth into this facet of gameplay, and it was refreshing to have a more refined approach to it. I'm also quite impressed with the visual aesthetic of Chronicles. The developers have stated that each episode will have a unique look to it, and China's style is stunning in its representation of perpetual autumn and uses of inkblot-style visuals and palettes. The colors are vibrant and lush, and the shadows and darkness show a certain roughness, as if it's a place that only the Assassins, history's wet-workers, can venture to. These still-images do not do this title justice -- it's quite gorgeous in action. While I was enjoying myself throughout the China setting, a part of me wished this was a fully 3D title rather than a downloadable side story. Nothing against this game, as it's really solid and makes some clever choices in regards to approach to stealth in a limited perspective, however I feel that such rich settings would be better used for full-fledged 3D Assassin's Creed titles. In any case, Assassin's Creed Chronicles is looking to be a nice surprise for the franchise. Though we can undoubtedly expect to see another main entry in the series this year, Chronicles will serve to be a nice change of pace for those looking for a different take on the series. For those who bit on the Unity season pass, you'll get the first episode on day one. The bite-sized nature of these titles will make them easy to get into, but they're sure to surprise players with how much depth is present.
2.5D Assassin's Creed photo
Stabbin' necks through history in 2.5D
It's not often we see a major player in the big leagues of yearly releases reinvent itself in a more modest and distinct way. With Assassin's Creed titles expected every year, it's been a bit of a challenge for Ubisoft to kee...

SteelSeries Sentry photo
SteelSeries Sentry

I couldn't trick the eye-tracking tech in Assassin's Creed Rogue


Say 'trick the eye-tracking tech' five times fast
Mar 06
// Brett Makedonski
Whenever I get my hands on new technology, my first inclination is to try to break it. Well, not the way Fred Durst likes to break stuff, but to see if I can expose any hiccups in the design. Going into a demo for the SteelSe...
Ass Creed modernity photo
Ass Creed modernity

Assassin's Creed will feature more modern day segments in the future


Twenty more years of Assassin's Creed
Feb 27
// Steven Hansen
The amusing glitch-fest that was Assassin's Creed Unity didn't intentionally eschew the series' whacked out modern day narrative. In fact, more dalliances into now-time were planned for Unity, Assassin's Creed lead writer Dar...
Assassin's Creed science photo
Assassin's Creed science

Scientists: Don't jump off buildings into haystacks like an assassin


'If the jumper is willing to suffer severe injuries...'
Feb 25
// Darren Nakamura
Everybody knows that people who play videogames are impressionable. After playing Pac-Man, we invariably binge eat. After a session with Call of Duty, we all joined the military. But science says that maybe we shouldn't do ev...
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Assassin's Creed movie is in production, is actually happening


Still one week away from Star Wars
Feb 13
// Chris Carter
Say what you will about recent Star Wars films, but the franchise is still a juggernaut in just about every facet of the market. People are hopeful about the new wave of Disney movies, and that includes the spinoff relea...
Ubisoft photo
Ubisoft

Ubisoft had a good quarter despite mediocre showing from Assassin's Creeds


No year-over-year change
Feb 12
// Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft didn't have a disappointing holiday season, as it posted financial reports today indicating that the publisher exceeded its quarterly sales expectations by approximately €80 million. More surprising, it did ...
AC Rogue on PC photo
AC Rogue on PC

Assassin's Creed Rogue's PC port will be first triple-A game to use eye-tracking


Made possible by SteelSeries Sentry
Feb 05
// Brett Makedonski
When Assassin's Creed Rogue comes to PC later this spring, players will be able to take advantage of some optional tech that, in a sense, won't restrict their field of vision to the confines of their screen; in fact, it...
AC Rogue PC date photo
AC Rogue PC date

Assassin's Creed Rogue sneaks over to PC on March 10


Stabs a thing or two along the way
Feb 05
// Brett Makedonski
For more than three months, Assassin's Creed Rogue has been an exclusive to legacy consoles. That'll change on March 10, as the PC version finally has a release date that's set in stone. Strangely, the word doesn't come...

Assassin's Creed fans' best guesses for Victory in painstaking detail

Jan 22 // Brett Makedonski
England's Victorian era was designated by the entirety of Queen Victoria's lifespan. That's 1837-1901 A.D. Not exactly a short period of time. However, some fine attention to detail has possibly narrowed down the time-frame that Victory will take place during.  We have deduced that the majority, if not all, of the game will take place from 1878 onwards. This is due to the the fact that: 1. The construction on Big Ben was completed in 1858.2. Electric street lighting in London began in 1878, as seen in the train station and on the street. But there are other things that Alpha (a forum member) has noticed that would lead one to believe the game is set further in time. An ad can be seen for "Havelock Tobacco" in the last screen from Kotaku, among many others. We have traced this product to being sold in 1891, but these are minor details. Although, 1891 easily fits into the time frame. Now that we have a smaller time period nailed down, let's take a look at some of the monuments that'll surely be included. Ubisoft does love to build faithful recreations of landmarks, after all. This is Saint Margaret's. The building Sam (half the users have settled on "Samuel Fey" as the protagonist's name; the other half is outraged by this unfounded designation) is seen sitting on in the first screen. The placement is very accurate and through my research on Google Earth, and heavy analyzation of the screen, I am sure that they are the same place. You can also see a Google Earth pic of Westminster Abbey in the last pic. If you are unfamiliar with London, you may be surprised to find that it and the Notre Dame are very similar. Next up is Saint Paul's Cathedral. It is seen rising highly above the other buildings, so much so that I don't see how the scale is 100% accurate. Buckingham Palace: this London residence and principal workplace of the monarchy of the United Kingdom was built in 1703 but expanded in the 19th century. This magnificent palace is right across the street from Sam's viewpoint in the first pic (you can probably see it from there) so it is very likely that this will be in the game. Fun fact: Wolve's ancestors helped build the palace. Lastly is the train station seen. This has been confirmed to be the Charing Cross Railway Station, because of it's location on the horizon in screenshot #1 and the distance between the two. [embed]286537:56985:0[/embed] About here, some users went into incredible detail about the various ads that appear in the game (like Foster's Beer). Seriously, it's amazing how deep down the rabbit hole they go. None of it does much apart from further cementing the circa 1891 setting and again affirm that Ubisoft does a pretty great job with authenticity as far as things like that go. I guess a series about history should get the "history" part down. Anyway, one person gave the boldest of predictions. It was my absolute favorite. It takes a very critical eye to even venture this sort of crazy thought. there are going to be hats Sadly, this present-day Nostradamus was largely ignored. The Assassin's Creed forums don't know a good thing when they see it. Instead, they turned their attention to some of the more notable figures we might meet in Victory. A decent-sized list included: Isambard Kingdom Brunel: A civil engineer of the Victorian Era. He also built the Great Western Railway from Bristol to London. Known to have developed powerful steam ships. Sir Titus Salt: A successful businessman that unlike other buisnessman, felt a general concern for the workforce. John Stuart Mill: An utilitarian philosopher and supporter of radical / liberal politics and the emancipation of women. Benjamin Disraeli: British prime minister and personal friend of Queen Victoria herself. Charles Darwin: English naturalist; His published theory of Evolution was one of the greatest changes of the Victorian period. George Stephenson: Father of the railways; He was known for making the first railways that changed the Victorian society and their means of travel. Michael Faraday: A scientist who helped electricity become more practical in the Victorian Era. But, later, someone else chimed in with this golden nugget. The new flamboyant De Sade-like character will be Oscar Wilde, no doubt about that. Right time and place. Brilliant, and sure to please subscribers of r/gonewilde. Yet another talking point were the social aspects. As some users pointed out, the era was rife with class division and terrible working and living conditions. One person mentioned that the streets were flooded with sewage (cue comments saying "Perfect. Assassin's Creed is just wading through shit!" Beat you to it, jokesters.) There's also the theme of child labor and the general poor treatment of kids. Another user weighed in hoping there'd be the option to kill kids. It got pretty grim. Luckily, the tension was broken up by this earnest request: I wanna ride a bicycle across London. So do I, Namikaze_17. So do I. Circling back around to the Assassin's Creed-centric bits of speculation, someone wanted to know how the First Civilization elements could be incorporated into Victory. One response had a few likely answers. It is difficult to predict which areas will be related to the first civ. For example, in AC3 it was a nameless cave, and in Dead Kings it was the catacombs of Saint Denis. But I can make a few guesses. If we are going off of underground places, then it could be the London Bridge catacombs, or maybe an offshoot from a deep underground railway tunnel. Both of these are mysterious and secluded places. I was trying to think of places of power and although it's not in London, Stonehenge is very mysterious and has big potential for AC to put its historical "spin" on it. Who knows what kind of crazy ideas the writers may come up with. Of course, there was the requisite person trying to bring everyone down: My speculation: The game will be buggy. The game will be rushed. The modern story will be almost non-existent. People will still buy it. That was not met with kind replies. And then there was the guy that put the cart way ahead of the horse. So what do you think the DLC will be? Slow your roll, pal. We can't even agree on this guy's name yet. We'll tackle the DLC next week. AC Victory Speculation Thread [Assassin's Creed forums]
AC predictions photo
All before the game's even announced
There's a normal cycle of news for finding out about upcoming videogames. After a tightly-controlled reveal, details will trickle out slowly -- just enough at a time to barely placate prospective players, their longing for th...

Review: Assassin's Creed Unity: Dead Kings

Jan 15 // Brett Makedonski
Assassin's Creed Unity: Dead Kings (PC, PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Ubisoft MontpellierPublisher: UbisoftReleased: January 13, 2015MSRP: Free Dead Kings eschews Unity's crowded Paris in favor of the relatively quaint Franciade (present-day St. Denise). It's there that Arno longs for passage to Cairo, but one last task awaits him. He has the wealth of kings to find, and it's wrapped up in layer after layer of mystery. It's the sort of treasured prize that turns men mad and converts former allies into evil, no-good-doers (as confusing and not elaborated upon as that is). Actually, that's the bulk of what Dead Kings does wrong: it weakly strings together plot points that might be okay on their own, but are cohesively unconvincing. There's the greed of mankind constantly trying to one-up one another to be the first to take sole possession of the coveted, secret treasure. There's a supernatural element wherein spirits guide Arno along the way, if he can solve their rudimentary puzzles. And, there's a child sidekick that tries taking the entire operation down from the outside, whom Arno reluctantly teams up with. Not that all of this is outside the realm of possibility for Assassin's Creed; it's just that it doesn't quite work in this instance. Really, it smacks of a love letter to Raiders of the Lost Ark more than anything else. One setting in particular evokes memories of the Spielberg classic if you're willing to trade snakes for rats. [embed]286101:56870:0[/embed] That isn't to say that Dead Kings doesn't feel like an Assassin's Creed game; it very much does. That's wildly evident by the sheer amount of content in the add-on (especially considering how much of it consists of menial tasks). The six main missions are a sizable chunk, and the rest mostly serves as the filler that has become synonymous with Ubisoft open-world games (for better and for worse). Despite Franciade boasting a respectable three outdoor regions, it's the underground interiors that are highlighted for a change. They feel otherworldly in a sense -- a foray through dimly lit, maze-like, narrow passages when we're used to anything but. It's not at all a stretch to say that these spaces double Dead Kings' playspace from three to six different areas -- two halves that are polar opposites from one another. In these tunnels, packs of explorative scavengers roam with intent to loot -- ravaging caves, tombs, and human remains in pursuit of wealth. While their numbers are strong, Dead Kings mercifully grants an out for almost every combat situation. Each group has a leader, and once he's dead, his followers quickly surrender rather than suffering the same fate. Essentially, this means that a well-timed assassination maneuver or a crafty projectile blade to the head disposes of a half dozen men instead of just one. It may seem like a small example, but it kind of acts as a knowing nod from Ubisoft that perhaps the tedium of the Assassin's Creed rubric is in need of some sort of shake-up. Maybe it's not ready to fully relent, but at least it allows clever assassins to work smarter, not harder. That potential revelation extends to the gameplay in that the six campaign sections possibly serve as the best sample platter of Assassin's Creed missions in recent memory. Interchanged with relative frequency, Dead Kings offers stealth (though not required), combat sequences, environmental puzzles, and exploration-based platforming challenges, all in the few hours that it has to work with. Unfortunately missing are elaborate assassinations (hands-down, the best part of Unity), but nevertheless, this add-on should nicely placate the impatient franchise fan that's easily bored with the "same old, same old" despite the fact that it's still kind of exactly that. For all the directional changes that Ubisoft took with Dead Kings, the most confounding decision is that the add-on isn't really comfortably positioned for any one audience. Those that have completed Unity will find it a bit under-challenging, as end-game gear will usually quickly eliminate the mid-level opposition. However, Dead Kings takes place after Unity ends, meaning that anyone that's statistically aligned with the enemies will have to play the game out of order. All in all, Dead Kings adds up to a package that's somewhat schizophrenic in nature. At times, it seems like both the story and the gameplay aren't quite sure where they want to go. Even more surprising, it kind of works. Anyone that knows Assassin's Creed will feel an innate familiarity with Dead Kings and maybe even a bit of excitement (particularly the last section, which conjures memories of a classic series moment). However, there's an air of freshness about it that works in some ways and falls flat in others. Dead Kings isn't likely to reignite anyone's love for Assassin's Creed, but it certainly won't extinguish any existing flames, either. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided for free to the public as apology DLC.]
AC DLC review photo
What's old is new again... kind of
If our time spent wandering the Parisian streets in Assassin's Creed Unity has taught us anything, it's that Arno Dorian is a self-serving man. Almost all of his actions, whether aligned with the cause of the Brotherhood or n...

Writers Guild Award photo
Writers Guild Award

Big names dominate Writers Guild Award nominations


Two Assassin's Creeds, Alien, and The Last of Us DLC
Jan 13
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone that's of the belief that mainstream videogames are often devoid of great writing will need to look somewhere other than the Writers Guild of America for vindication. The organization's nominees for Outstanding Achieve...
AC Unity DLC photo
AC Unity DLC

A new trailer commemorates the release of Assassin's Creed Unity's free DLC


Available now
Jan 13
// Brett Makedonski
Do you believe in ghosts? I'm not sure Arno does, but who wouldn't temporarily suspend their disbelief for "ancient artifacts and lost fortunes?" "Sure, the spirits of dead kings are everywhere. Whatever. Big money, big mone...
Mega Bloks photo
Mega Bloks

These Assassin's Creed Mega Bloks were 'designed with adult collectors in mind'


Hey, kids, wanna stab?
Jan 08
// Jordan Devore
Brett told us about the Assassin's Creed Mega Bloks only to totally leave us hanging now that the toys are viewable online. Never did trust that guy. Makedonski? Obviously a phony last name. Anyway, yes, Ubisoft has posted im...
Assassin's Creed movie photo
Assassin's Creed movie

The Assassin's Creed movie is probably totally, definitely, absolutely releasing in 2016


Uh huh...
Jan 06
// Brett Makedonski
Just like the legendary Morrissey, stop me if you think you've heard this one before: a silver screen adaption of a popular videogame has a definite (albeit far off) release date. This time, it's Assassin's Creed, and it's to...
AC Unity photo
AC Unity

Assassin's Creed Unity's free DLC is a week away, and it looks too spooky


Human remains will do that
Jan 06
// Brett Makedonski
Assassin's Creed Unity was mostly an adventure that took place on the crowded Parisian streets, all jam-packed with people. The game's first add-on looks to be similarly populated -- not by lively dissenters, but by the...
More Amazon deals photo
More Amazon deals

A really cheap bundle of Assassin's Creed games highlights some decent Amazon deals


And a few other noteworthy items
Jan 05
// Brett Makedonski
Amazon must've had a bunch of download cards left over following Microsoft's holiday promotion featuring a reduced Xbox One bundle. Apart from several unsold Assassin's Creed packaged consoles, how else could you ex...
Panache photo
Panache

Assassin's Creed creative director has a new game


This sounds pretty familiar
Dec 19
// Laura Kate Dale
Patrice Désilets is a man whose name you may not know, but whose work you probably do. Patrice used to be the creative director on the Assassin's Creed series, before Ubisoft kicked him to the curb and held on to the r...
AC Unity photo
AC Unity

Come get your free game, Assassin's Creed Unity season pass owners


It's really easy
Dec 18
// Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft's offer for a free game for Assassin's Creed Unity season pass owners is now live, and it's extremely simple. In fact, it only took a few clicks before I was the proud new owner of Far Cry 4. Here's how to do it....
Xbox One contest photo
Merry Christmas, ya filthy animals
[Update: Contest over! Winner is Sam Butler1!] Our friends at Microsoft have bestowed upon us an Xbox One Assassin's Creed Unity bundle to give away to one lucky Dtoider! Included in the bundle is a standard Xbox One console ...

Unity patch photo
Unity patch

The latest Assassin's Creed Unity patch is a meager, tiny 40GB on Xbox One


Luckily, there's a work-around
Dec 17
// Brett Makedonski
The fourth Assassin's Creed Unity patch released yesterday, and Xbox One users found that it was substantially larger than advertised. The update, which was meant to be 6.7GB, clocks in at 40GB on the Microsoft console. ...
Free game photo
Free game

Assassin's Creed Unity season pass owners' free game is coming this week


Six to choose from
Dec 15
// Brett Makedonski
As an attempt to make amends for the flubbed Assassin's Creed Unity launch, Ubisoft announced last month that it'd grant the Dead Kings story add-on for free to all Unity players. This put out the season p...

The next Assassin's Creed reportedly takes place in Victorian London

Dec 02 // Brett Makedonski
Ubisoft responded to our inquiry for comment with a semi-confirmation of the title's legitimacy. The publisher's statement in full to Destructoid is: "It is always unfortunate when internal assets, not intended for public consumption, are leaked. And, while we certainly welcome anticipation for all of our upcoming titles, we're disappointed for our fans, and our development team, that this conceptual asset is now public. The team in our Quebec studio has been hard at work on the particular game in question for the past few years, and we're excited to officially unveil what the studio has been working on at a later date. In the meantime, our number one priority is enhancing the experience of Assassin's Creed Unity for players." In his piece on Kotaku, Jason Schreier states that he's seen a seven-minute "target gameplay" video that looks polished enough to be an E3 demonstration. It highlights some firsts for the series such as fighting on top of moving vehicles, and a grappling hook for speedy traversal. It also looks to have some new UI features, like the interface blending into gameplay -- something that was shown to us at an E3 demo of Unity, but never made it into the final game. We'll have to wait for Ubisoft's official reveal of this project, but this seems like a legitimate look. Some may be burned out on the annual iterations of the Assassin's Creed franchise, and that's perfectly understandable. Those who aren't can prepare for anarchy in the UK. Next Year's Big Assassin's Creed Is Set In Victorian London [Kotaku]
Next Assassin's Creed photo
That was quick
The Assassin's Creed franchise goes through a little routine each spring where someone leaks information about the next installment in the series before Ubisoft can properly make the announcement. Tradition's true to for...

Ubisoft removes Assassin's Creed Unity Season Pass from the marketplace

Nov 26 // Alessandro Fillari
"The launch of Assassin's Creed Unity was a highly-anticipated moment for me and for our development teams around the world who dedicated a tremendous amount of energy, passion and skill to the game's creation," said Mallat. "For us, it was the culmination of years of work on new technologies, the development of multiple innovations -- including an all-new game engine -- and an evolution of the Assassin's Creed franchise's core pillars. More importantly, we know that it was a highly-anticipated moment for many of you as well, as you looked forward to taking part in the first truly next generation Assassin's Creed game." As we all know, the state of Unity was in shambles, causing many game-breaking and unintentionally humorous bugs. With the recent patches having repaired the game, the publisher recognizes that there is still more work to be done. "We've been working hard to fix the problems players are reporting, and the patches we have released so far have resolved many of them," said the CEO. "Today, we're releasing our third patch, which fixes a variety of specific issues related to the game’s stability and performance, matchmaking and connectivity, gameplay and menus." This sort of move is rather unprecedented for a major publisher. With everything going on with Unity over the last month, we can all assume this decision was not made lightly. An Update on Assassin's Creed Unity from Yannis Mallat [Ubisoft]
AC Unity DLC update photo
The publisher seeks to regain trust by offering free content
Earlier this morning, several users on NeoGAF noticed that Steam, PlayStation Network, and other online stores had removed all pages for the Assassin's Creed Unity Season Pass, with German games site GamersGlobal claiming tha...


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