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Twilight Princess HD photo
Twilight Princess HD

A story trailer in case you forgot what Twilight Princess is about


Howl lovely
Jan 29
// Brett Makedonski
Twilight Princess is the Zelda game with the wolf and the orcs and the shadow monsters. There's a good chance you already knew that because Twilight Princess is nearly ten years old and was widely beloved. A l...
Hellblade photo
Hellblade

Watch Ninja Theory make this mocap lady do silly shit for Hellblade


Still seems like a fun job
Jan 29
// Zack Furniss
I'm quietly anticipating Ninja Theory's Hellblade, and its transparent development videos have been stoking that fire. I always enjoy watching how games are made, and confirming that I know dick about the process. In this lat...

Review: LEGO Marvel's Avengers

Jan 29 // Chris Carter
LEGO Marvel's Avengers (3DS, PC, PS3, PS4 [reviewed], Vita, Wii U, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: TT Fusion, TT GamesPublisher: WB Interactive EntertainmentReleased: January 16, 2016MSRP: $29.99 (3DS, Vita), $39.99 (PC) $49.99 ( PS3, Wii U, Xbox 360), $59.99 (PS4, Xbox One) Marvel's Avengers is the latest beat-'em-up in a long line of Traveller's Tales LEGO joints, a subseries that has hosted roughly 30 games since 2005. It follows the same rough format as past titles, with a few added bits of panache (like more cinematic attacks and sequences) for good measure. You probably know the drill by now -- multiple characters are on-screen at a time, all of which sport several attacks, but they have slightly different ways of going about it. For instance, Captain America and Hulk are both melee fighters, but Cap will be able to reflect beams, and Hulk can smash through giant machinery. Iron Man and Thor excel at range and can fly, but the former can melt metal with his beams. You get the idea. Playing with a partner will enhance your experience tenfold as you can operate in tandem with one another, as going at it solo puts a damper on things by forcing you to switch characters often. That's even more true for Avengers, where the two-person synergy attacks (like Thor slamming into Cap's shield for a shockwave) are that much more satisfying. The best part, the LEGO franchise's signature silly humor, is intact. Interactions and events play out in a similar manner, so there aren't a lot of surprises, but additional jokes and a general sense of lightheartedness actually elevate a few dud portions of the films. As such, every cutscene brings a smile to my face, and helps break up the repetition a bit. I never really minded the shift from the gibberish "LEGO speak" of the past into full voice acting, as Traveller's Tales has always maintained the same tone successfully. [embed]337320:62048:0[/embed] That cavalier, cartoony attitude can go a bit overboard, though. While including over 200 characters is a cool notion, especially for kids who are fans of some of the more obscure heroes, you end up with an overwhelming number of clones and a general sense of vanilla loadouts. They're also inherently limited by the plotlines put forth in the MCU so they can't deviate too much, compared to a wholly original game like Dimensions. So where does LEGO Marvel start to really falter? Its inability to stick to one script at at time. It jumps around so many films that it fails to tell a cohesive story, and assumes you've seen every movie. If you haven't, you'll probably be a mite bewildered as to what's going on. In fact, the game kind of just jumps into Age of Ultron's intro with no rhyme, reason, or setup, before moving onto scenes from both Captain America movies, Thor 2, Iron Man 3, and more. And don't think there's some overarching "Galactus is narrating the story" device -- it just happens as it comes. The open world hubs are a welcome respite from the constant bang bang action, in that sense. As for me, I've experienced every bit of the MCU outside of the comics, so it did mostly make sense. Some is good, some is bad (Agent Carter, which just returned to TV, is pretty good!), but the vast majority of it is easy to follow. It's not like you're going to be scratching you head trying to decipher poignant plotlines -- the game just mostly lacks context, and suffers from fanservice-itis. The latter especially comes into play when the game splices in direct quotes from the film, some of which feel forced, with an odd audio mix to boot. Does your kid constantly go on about Chris Hemsworth and Robert Downey Jr. while they run around the room in their Hawkeye outfit? Pick up LEGO Marvel's Avengers and add it to the massive pile of LEGO games you likely already have. It's a fun mindless romp through a couple of interesting setpieces, but not a whole lot more than that when it comes down to it. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.] 
LEGO Marvel's Avengers photo
WB always finds out, bro
The MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) is intimidating, to say the least. In addition to all of the feature films there's also official tie-in comics, one-shot short films, multiple sequels that set up sequels, and now, eight separate television shows with multiple seasons across two networks. If you haven't been at least following the movies, LEGO Marvel's Avengers probably isn't for you.

Conan photo
Conan

Funcom announces 'Conan Exiles,' with yes, that Conan


PC Early Access this summer
Jan 28
// Chris Carter
Funcom has been busy! In addition to maintaining The Secret World, experimenting with games like The Park, and even dabbling into LEGO a bit, they're taking another crack at the Conan license. They've announced Conan Exiles f...
Dark Souls 3 screens photo
Dark Souls 3 screens

Hot new Dark Souls III screens include eerie tiny king


New Dark Souls locations, characters
Jan 27
// Steven Hansen
Ah, screenshots. Some real classic, old-school video game journalism. More than anything I want to know what it is that compelled Bandai Namco to put out new Dark Souls III screens on a Wednesday night. Maybe something's fun ...
Hyrule Warriors Legends photo
Hyrule Warriors Legends

Hyrule Warriors Legends is adding a save data reset option in a patch


You can't do it now
Jan 26
// Chris Carter
Hyrule Warriors Legends came out last week on 3DS in Japan, and people are already clamoring for a pretty basic feature -- save data reset. Yep, if you just want to replay the game from a fresh file or resell your game with n...
The Division photo
The Division

Beta codes for The Division just went out


Check your email
Jan 26
// Chris Carter
If you're excited to give The Division a go (you can read all about it here compliments of our own Zack Furniss), check your inboxes -- Ubisoft is sending out codes for the beta now. Of course, the actual event doesn't s...
TMNT photo
TMNT

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants in Manhattan officially announced


That took forever
Jan 26
// Chris Carter
Well, Activision finally announced the Platinum-developed game we all knew existed -- Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants in Manhattan. It's a third-person action game set in the Big Apple (though likely not at 3AM), and wi...

Review: Final Fantasy Explorers

Jan 26 // Chris Carter
Final Fantasy Explorers (3DS)Developer: Square Enix, RacjinPublisher: Square EnixReleased: January 26, 2016MSRP: $39.99 Right at the character creation screen, it's immediately evident that Final Fantasy Explorers is a dated game. It was released in 2014 in Japan, after all, and the limitations of the tool itself will not inspire any confidence. I actually got a laugh out of the initial male avatar -- it had typical chibi-like features but a rock-hard manchild set of abs. It won't matter much when you're all suited up in gear, and the game has a Goku hairstyle in its small pool of options, so it gets a pass. Like many other entries in the series, Explorers revolves around crystals (of course), and the overall plot is kind of secondary to leveling up, acquiring cash, and completing missions, which lead to those sweet, sweet boss battles we all crave. You'll roam about in a Monster Hunter-esque hub world complete with shops, upgrade centers, and a few other fixins (like a one-mission-bonus-granting fortune teller who takes Play Coins as payment) as you take on new quests that lead you out into the overworld. Combat is based around AP, which fuels your abilities and is used when sprinting. The game has a rudimentary lock-on feature, the option to use the Circle Pad Pro (or the New 3DS nub) to control the camera, L or R toggles menus for your powers (with four mapped to each trigger, for a total of eight active abilities), an auto-attack button, and that's really it. To dodge or do anything fancy, you'll need to equip a skill for it, and even then, it's a bit rigid in nature. Make no mistake, this is not a high-intensity twitch action game. [embed]335296:61957:0[/embed] You'll get the keys to the kingdom so to speak after roughly 30 minutes of tutorials, where Explorers will provide you with five jobs (classes) right away: Knight, Monk, Ranger, White Mage, and Black Mage. Thankfully, it isn't as rigid as a lot of other RPGs in that jobs and abilities can often overlap. With the exception of, say, a Knight using bow-based skills while equipped with a sword, players can thankfully experiment a bit. Almost anyone can use magic, including the always helpful Cure spell. It's a great concession for newcomers and veterans alike. You can really mess around with nearly everything available to tool up your dream build -- which includes silly "Trance" modes featuring fan-favorite characters like Cloud. As time goes on it only gets deeper, as an impressive 21 jobs are at your disposal. The freedom to do what you want is even better when playing with a party (both locally or online). Team synergy and class makeups aren't necessarily bound by the RPG Trinity (tank, healer, damage), but are composed a bit more loosely, to the point where everyone can have fun with what they want to play -- like a Dragoon that can use his jumps along with evasion techniques from other jobs for maximum mobility. Speaking of multiplayer, there is support for lobbies online (rather than shoddy matchmaking), which allowed me to get into a number of games even before launch. If you're going at it solo, you can bring up to three other monsters with you on your travels, with the caveat that the AI isn't very intelligent or nearly as effective as players. By the time you fight Shiva several hours in, it picks up, but as a general rule Explorers is a slow burn. Now, I did have fun working my way up the ladder, earning more jobs, and crafting my own equipment, but it's a bit too slow going at times. As such, the "it gets better after you put time into it" argument comes to mind, but plenty of games do allow for an enjoyable early game to accompany the payoff. That's not the case here, to an extent. If you do end up sticking with it though, you'll find a 100-hour RPG full of stuff to do, including an endgame that involves fighting all of the core bosses again with new strategies in tow. Like many games filled to the brim with different classes, a lot of my time was spent trying out new jobs. While some of them don't feel wildly different from one another, the dichotomy between the three core playstyles (melee, ranged, and magic) is strong enough to feel like you're playing a different game. Final Fantasy Explorers has a litany of pacing issues, particularly when it comes to its quests and, visually, it feels like a DS-era game at times. But players who are willing to jump in with both feet will find a lot to love, and that goes double if you're planning to play through the adventure with a friend. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.] 
Final Fantasy review photo
Eidolon Hunter
If one wanted to delve into the world of Final Fantasy for the first time, the barrier to entry is generally rather high. You have a host of 50-hour JRPGs, several daunting MMOs, and a number of complicated and deep tactical spinoffs. Final Fantasy Explorers tries to ease people into the world of Black and White mages with a different, gentler approach, albeit with its own set of flaws.

Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

Invisigun Heroes isn't your typical battle arena


Players are (mostly) invisible, for one
Jan 22
// Jordan Devore
Earlier, Darren described Invisigun Heroes as being "like Bomberman but everybody is invisible." That should have been reason enough for me to investigate. It has a nice aesthetic. It looks well-designed. Plus, those old Bomb...
Valkyria photo
Valkyria

Yep, Valkyria: Azure Revolution still looks great


Announce the localization already
Jan 22
// Chris Carter
Valkyria: Azure Revolution kind of came out of nowhere. People basically assumed that the series was dead since 2011 when the third game came out (which was Japan-only, by the way), and BAM, Sega announces a brand new upcomin...
Unbox photo
Unbox

The Katamari-like Unbox is coming to consoles


PC, PS4, and Xbox One
Jan 22
// Chris Carter
In the far, far future, the postal service has developed self-delivering cardboard boxes. Wait, that's just the premise for Unbox. Developer Prospect Games has announced that in addition to PC later this year, the game is als...
Necropolis photo
Necropolis

Necropolis should be even better with friends


Let's siege some dungeons
Jan 21
// Jordan Devore
Since we last checked on Necropolis, the third-person action roguelike from Shadowrun Returns maker Harebrained Schemes, it gained four-person cooperative play. Why die alone when you can go down in flames with your dearest f...
Batman photo
Batman

Here's a roundup of all the major Batman: Arkham Knight DLC packs


There's tons of useless junk too
Jan 21
// Chris Carter
A number of people have asked me how all of the DLC for Batman: Arkham Knight has measured up since the Season Pass is done. My response is simple -- you can skip out on the pass itself. Instead of paying out for a bunch...
Sega photo
Sega

Surprise! That Sega 'classic' announcement hype was Sega 3D Classics Collection


CJ called it
Jan 21
// Chris Carter
Remember when Sega said a new announcement was coming today, and that classic gaming fans should be excited? Well, I don't think you're going to be very excited. Sega has confirmed that it is indeed the Sega 3D Classics Colle...
Lovers photo
Lovers

Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime hitting PS4 on February 9


Spreading the love
Jan 21
// Darren Nakamura
Released on Steam and Xbox One in September last year, I had already assumed Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime was on PlayStation 4 as well. It turns out it wasn't, but it will be soon. Announced today via the snazzy YouTube vi...
Uncharted 4 photo
Uncharted 4

Branching dialogue won't alter Uncharted 4's ending


'We're not making Mass Effect'
Jan 20
// Brett Makedonski
Naughty Dog's trying something new with Uncharted for its fourth major installment in that it's making use of branching dialogue. It's granting players with a certain degree of autonomy, a feature that's often assoc...
The Order: 1886 photo
The Order: 1886

Want to watch The Order: 1886's story without having to play it?


You can do that
Jan 20
// Darren Nakamura
The Order: 1886 was well known for two things: being a PlayStation 4 exclusive in a time before Bloodborne was available and being pretty. Note the things not on that list: gameplay and story. Still, if you want to experience...
Hyrule Warriors Legends photo
Hyrule Warriors Legends

Hyrule Warriors Legends will also support amiibo on 3DS


More daily items
Jan 20
// Chris Carter
Hyrule Wariors Legends is nearly out in Japan, and as a result, more concrete info is coming out of the woodwork. Due to pre-loading, fans have learned that the file size is 16,101 blocks (2GB). Additionally, there's only one...
Bombshell photo
Bombshell

Bombshell from 3D Realms is out next week, costs $35


First in a decade from the publisher
Jan 20
// Chris Carter
3D Realms reminded us yesterday that Bombshell is the first 3D Realms game to go gold in over a decade. While the jury is still out on this rather elusive title, I'm glad they're still around having grown up with th...
Twilight Princess photo
Twilight Princess

You won't want to use the Ganondorf amiibo in the Twilight Princess remake


He just makes everything bad
Jan 19
// Brett Makedonski
For the most part, amiibo are used to add small features to games, bonuses that just make everything a little easier. For instance, Hyrule Warriors uses amiibo to grant a spinning attack and to offer some extra weapons. ...
Final Fantasy Explorers photo
Final Fantasy Explorers

Final Fantasy IX gets the Final Fantasy Explorers snub


FFVII, X over-represented
Jan 19
// Steven Hansen
The upcoming Monster Hunter-ish Final Fantasy Explorers is a more nondescript, job-system-based affair, but that doesn't mean your favorite characters are absent. While in Trance mode, your character can use previously equip...
Slain photo
Slain

Slain delayed again, has a sweet new headbanging GIF


Take the good with the bad
Jan 19
// Brett Makedonski
Good things come to those who wait. This quote extols the importance of patience. We've been taught our entire lives to be patient people, to just wait a little longer for what we want. It'll be worth it. Hopefully that's tru...
Twilight Princess photo
Twilight Princess

PSA: Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD amiibo bundle back on Amazon


Physical version
Jan 19
// Steven Hansen
If you were looking to indulge in the upcoming Wii U version of Gamecube-then-Wii-game The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, it might be worth noting that Amazon has the physical version up for pre-order again. It's the one...
Hyrule Warriors Legends photo
Hyrule Warriors Legends

New Hyrule Warriors Legends spot reminds us that there's no campaign co-op


Also, I hope you have a New 3DS
Jan 19
// Chris Carter
I don't know why it didn't cross my mind, but the upcoming 3DS edition of Hyrule Warriors Legends will not have campaign co-op. This video confirms as much, noting that you can play levels side-by-side with a friend to s...

Review: The Deadly Tower of Monsters

Jan 19 // Chris Carter
The Deadly Tower of Monsters (PC [reviewed], PS4)Developer: ACE TeamPublisher: AtlusReleased: January 19, 2016MSRP: $14.99 The silly audio "DVD" commentary right from the start helps cement that B-movie feel Deadly is going for. Permeating through the menus, the "director" of the "movie" you're playing will continue to comment on your actions throughout, much like the narrator from Bastion. This narration however is a bit wackier, and will make fun of everything from gamey elements like finding useful items instantly in unexpected places, why items disappear after you pick them up (the hero "beams" them back to his ship), and how the actors got into a particular costume. He even boasts in one early scene that having his female lead rescue his male lead is progressive, and how he was "ahead of his time" for it. It's amusing enough to keep one interested throughout. So how does it play? Well, it's basically an isometric action game, with twin-stick shooting and melee attacks. The latter can be charged for effect, and players can also roll, or hover with a jetpack in a double jump of sorts. It's a small thing, but intuitive health bars circle each enemy, so you know exactly how much of a beating they'll need. There's also three playable characters available -- Dick Starspeed, Scarlet Nova, and Robot. All of them have unique powers at their disposal, but for the most part, the choice is aesthetic. What I really like about Deadly Tower is how fresh the game constantly keeps things. At first I thought it was going to be a simple sci-fi spoof with aliens, but it's so much more than that. There's Planet of the Ape-esque monkey men, "Energy Imps," a Ghost Pirate ship, and so much more that I won't spoil here. The gimmick is really cool as well, in that the entire game takes place on a gigantic tower that extends from the ground level of an alien planet all the way to space. Players will slowly climb said tower with checkpoints, which you can instantly teleport to after obtaining them. [embed]334028:61857:0[/embed] Great camera work also helps show off these environments in a big way, and I love how you can alter the visuals and music from "DVD" quality to the worse "VHS" setting. Cutscenes can also be fast-forwarded even upon the initial viewing, and there's several funny effects such as a forced black and white section for "budgetary reasons. ACE Team also goes full hog when it comes to the theme -- I'm talking Ray Harryhausen-like stop-motion animation in some cases. If it sounds jarring it really isn't, as the player character is always on point, so the framerate doesn't necessarily drop when enemies like that appear. "For those who are curious, here are the PC visual options and the control scheme. The best part though is the freefalling system. From any point of the tower you can jump off, starting a falling animation that allows you to aim and shoot downwards, collecting helpful objects in the air as you descend. It's a rush to jump off really high points and just take in the scenery, and boss fights that incorporate this mechanic are even more fun. The fact that you can use an "air teleport" system at the touch of a button to return to the point where you fell and teleport to any checkpoint at any time is the icing on the cake, allowing a large degree of freedom when it comes to exploration. This is especially helpful on PC, where I encountered two crashes in my first playthrough. When I loaded the game again I picked up right back where I left off. Despite all my praise though, you should know what you're getting into. My first playthrough only took me roughly three hours to complete, and I managed to spend an extra hour looking for artifacts and completing additional objectives. There doesn't seem to be any option for a New Game+ or the ability to alter the difficulty, which definitely stings a bit despite its strong initial run. I can definitely see replaying it every so often however, and jumping off of the top of the tower is something I did many, many times. The Deadly Tower of Monsters is a fleeting experience, but one that no B-movie fan should go without. I have a few issues with the loot and upgrade systems (namely in that they feel superfluous), but as a straight action game, it mostly succeeds in what it sets out to do. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Deadly Tower review photo
Harryhausen would be proud
I was lucky enough to grow up with parents who had a penchant for classic films, and B-humor. Hell, their first date was Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and as a child, I was raised with an endearment to the craft,...

Metal Gear Online photo
Metal Gear Online

Metal Gear Online's PC beta is already over, officially launches today


That was fast
Jan 19
// Chris Carter
Last we heard, Metal Gear Online's PC beta was pulled due to an exploit last week, but in the middle of researching when a fix would happen, I found out the thing already launched! According to a post on Steam from the develo...

Review: Resident Evil 0 HD Remaster

Jan 18 // Chris Carter
Resident Evil Zero HD Remaster (PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomReleased: January 19, 2016MSRP: $19.99 Zero begins with a rather interesting setpiece: a moving train. Rebecca Chambers, a member of S.T.A.R.S., is sent to investigate crimes in the Arklay Mountains -- conveniently located (and thus, linked) near Raccoon City and the original game's mansion. Here she meets Billy Coen, an alleged murderer and ex-Marine, and starts an "unlikely" partnership. You can probably tell from the setup that the tale is a pastiche of cheesy horror not unlike past games, but it's done just as effectively as before. Sure, the story never really makes much sense, even after the final credits roll, but you'll have a good time while you're along for the ride. Rebecca and Billy have a fun dynamic that is extended throughout Zero. The former can combine herbs and story-related chemicals, and the latter can take more of a beating and move heavy objects. It's not an original concept even for the era it was released in, but it works. This is mostly because of the "zap" partner system that allows both characters to be on-screen at the same time. You can opt to have your AI partner attack or stay idle, which is great if you don't want them wasting ammo. Swapping is as easy as pressing a button to start a second-long heartbeat transition to the other character. You can also control the AI with the right analog stick, which comes in handy for moving them out of harm's way. This idea is used in many different ways that chop up the game's pacing for the better. In some zones, Rebecca and Billy are split, working separately to exchange key items with one another through special devices like service elevators. In other areas, they're working in tandem to solve those wonderful box puzzles, where Billy is moving cubes and Rebecca is operating a device of some sort. Given that so many of Resident Evil's puzzles feature solutions born out of just one avatar, I like that Capcom went with something different here. There's another huge difference when it comes to Zero and all of the games before it: item management. In the past, players would mostly store their items in a magical gamey storage box of sorts, where you could access your armory and inventory wherever a box was located. Now, you can place items on the ground and store them anywhere on the map, no questions asked (well, outside of the single room item limit, which is inexplicably still in this remake). For instance, if you want to split a few typewriter ribbons off a stack of 10 and place them in a save room, you can. The same goes for weapons and herbs, or any key items you may pick up. [embed]332496:61804:0[/embed] Items now show up on the map, so there's no guessing as to where you put them. It's a more challenging system, for sure -- you don't have the infinite box to rely on, and sometimes you'll have to run through gauntlets of enemies if you happen to stash a key item and are required to run back for it. Its use does start to grate mid-way through the game, as it can get rather tedious to juggle everything. The mechanic isn't really re-used, but it helps cement Zero's unique identity (for better and worse) along with zapping, and the level designs mostly accommodate it. This is an old-school Resident Evil game at heart, back when "survival" was still a key factor of the series. Zero features limited ammo, save ribbons, and a lot of decision making, mostly in regards to inventory management. This is especially true given the zapping, because at any moment one character may be forced to fight a boss without the help of another, so ensuring that both cast members are fully equipped is key to your success. In terms of the actual "Remaster" moniker, a lot of the technical details are the same as before. The visuals and framerate have been updated, there's a new non-tank modern control method available, and you can swap between 16:9 and 4:3 resolution (even on consoles) -- but the cheesy FMVs remain untouched. Capcom really could bring back every entry pre-Resident Evil 4 just like this and I'd be happy. Thankfully though, it's slightly more than just a straight touch-up due to the addition of Wesker mode. In this special gametype only found in the remake (that's acquired by beating the game once), Billy is shoved to the side in favor of Wesker, who operates as Rebecca's partner throughout the game. This mode is meant to be silly. Wesker can use his superhuman powers he's flaunted since Code Veronica, including the ability to quickly dash across the room, and use a special energy attack to pop zombie's heads off. He can also mix herbs and doesn't have many limitations. They didn't go the full mile -- Billy is still present in cutscenes, as is his voice -- but it's a meaty enough change.  All of the old unlocks are also present, including additional costumes, weapons, and the Mercenaries-like "Leech Hunter." The latter is a mini-game of sorts that tasks players with escaping a modified version of the Research Center, and gets tougher as you play it. It's not as memorable as some of the true Mercenary modes in other games, but it's worth clearing at least once and should adequately test the mettle of series veterans. As a whole, Resident Evil Zero isn't one of my favorite entries, but with the amount of care that went into this remake, like Resident Evil HD Remaster before it, I'm really coming around. In fact, just get both if you don't have them already. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Resident Evil 0 HD review photo
Welcome, Wesker
For whatever reason, I didn't end up completing Resident Evil Zero back when it was released in 2002 -- in fact, it took me 10 years to truly dive into it. I think it just flew under the radar, but thankfully Capcom has opted...

Cave photo
Cave

Ubisoft's sending a 'lucky' contest winner to spend the night in a cave


Cave Story
Jan 18
// Brett Makedonski
Good things don't happen in caves. A best-case scenario has some bats buzzing through your hair. A worst-case scenario? Ummm, bears or dragons or satanic cults. OR, satanic bears riding dragons. Yeah, fuck that. Ubisoft wants...
Gunman Clive photo
Gunman Clive

Gunman Clive HD sold '10 times' better than the PC release of Gunman Clive 2


9,000 copies
Jan 18
// Chris Carter
Bertil Hörberg, the developer of the Gunman Clive series, has shared a post-mortem of sorts for recent entries in the series on NeoGAF. In short, he concludes that Gunman Clive HD has sold 9,000 units (not coun...

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