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Steam Hardware photo
Steam Hardware

Steam Hardware's early stock is sold out


November 10 release date for the rest
Jun 30
// Joe Parlock
Were you hoping to get your hands on one of those early release versions of the Steam Controller, the Steam Link, or a Steam Machine when they come out in October? Well bad news, they’re all sold out. If you pre-order t...
The Last of Us 2 photo
The Last of Us 2

Nolan North lets slip The Last of Us 2 is coming


Nolan North's a pretty fun-gi... eh...
Jun 30
// Joe Parlock
I know most of us assumed it was coming after the massive, massive popularity and success of Naughty Dog’s The Last of Us, but Nolan “The Voice of Fucking Everything” North has accidentally let slip The Last...
Fire Emblem maker photo
Fire Emblem maker

I'm hooked on this Fire Emblem character creator


Don't mind if I do!
Jun 29
// Jordan Devore
Since Fire Emblem Fates isn't going to release outside of Japan until next year, let's melt some time away with this web-based character creator put together by LuminescentBlade. I want to see your angsty people. [Via Tiny Cartridge]

Clumsy God photo
Clumsy God

In Clumsy God, helping looks a lot like hurting


God moonlights as a surgeon, apparently
Jun 29
// Jordan Devore
The itch.io Twitter is always bringing strange morsels to my attention. Today, it's Clumsy God, a Windows game about a giant heavenly hand helping people recover from an earthquake. "Just be careful not to crush anyone along...
Smash Bros. glitch photo
Smash Bros. glitch

Strike a pose with this silly Smash Bros. glitch


Or freeze your game in the process
Jun 29
// Jordan Devore
Smash Bros. glitches are among the funniest. A new one, captured here by MasterOfHyrule, involves pushing the Home button before the match transitions to the result screen. While the bug varies from character to character, i...
Riding the Rift photo
Riding the Rift

Watch me get queasy with an Oculus Rift!


Don't do a barrel roll!
Jun 29
// Jed Whitaker
[Update: Stream is over. Embedded the replay below in case you missed it.] So I broke down and got an Oculus Rift DK2 after finding one for a decent price on Craigslist. I've been toying around with my Rift for a few da...
Visceral Star Wars photo
Visceral Star Wars

Visceral's Star Wars has hints of Uncharted and 1313


Uncharted writer lost 8 months of work
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
Visceral Games' (Dead Space, Battlefield: Hardline) Star Wars game was noticeably absent from EA's E3 showing this year. I thought there was a chance we'd see it, anyhow. Uncharted voice actor Nolan North did give some hints ...
Mega64 nails it again photo
Mega64 nails it again

Entitled terrorists at Mega64 demand Nintendo cancel Metroid Prime: Federation Force


Petitions are so OVER!
Jun 29
// Jed Whitaker
Mega64 never ceases to entertain me and its just-released Metroid Prime: Federation Force petition spoof is proof of that. I mentioned the petition during E3 and some people took it that I was attacking all Metroid ...

'You paint the world with your Soft Body'

Jun 29 // Jordan Devore
[embed]295022:59271:0[/embed] Introducing Soft Body on PS4, PS Vita [PlayStation Blog]
Soft Body photo
Gooey
Well, that headline wrote itself. Soft Body, *ahem*, looks like a cool, free-flowing take on Snake. Here, you're dodging bullets while filling in the world and your snake can split apart to form two bodies, each controlled by...

CEO 2015 highlights photo
CEO 2015 highlights

My favorite matches from CEO 2015


The best of the best!
Jun 29
// Patrick Hancock
CEO 2015, one of the biggest fighting game tournaments of the year, took place this weekend and had some insane moments. My favorite was probably the above match between Armada and Leffen in Super Smash Bros. Melee. Yes, it'...
Scrolls sunset photo
Scrolls sunset

It's the beginning of the end for Scrolls


Mojang's card game has a year left
Jun 29
// Jordan Devore
No, not The Elder Scrolls, silly. The other one! Just "Scrolls." Microsoft-owned Minecraft studio Mojang has confirmed the inevitable -- that work is winding down on its card title now that the "last major content patch," Ech...
#darksiders photo
#darksiders

The Darksiders II remaster doesn't look all that different


Reminder: This thing is $40
Jun 29
// Jordan Devore
Were we expecting the remaster of Darksiders II for current systems to look significantly better than the 2012 original (RIP THQ)? I was not. Crisper and smoother, sure, but that's about it. Here are some comparison screenshots that, at least to these less-than-stellar eyes, took some studying.

Review: AVerMedia Live Gamer EXTREME

Jun 29 // Jed Whitaker
Product: Live Gamer EXTREMEManufacturer: AVerMediaMSRP: $179.99 1080p, 60fps is the holy grail of console games these days and the Live Gamer EXTREME (LGX) handles those specs without issue. Footage looks exactly as intended by the game's developers. The LGX also has all the frills you'd expect a capture device to have such as HDMI input and output, its own recording software, but also includes some things I've never seen on other cards. Included in the box is an HDMI cable, a component cable, a 3.5mm cable, and a PS3 cable. The latter cable can be used to connect directly to a PS3 instead of connecting it with component cables, a feature only on the LGX, though I'm not sure how useful it is as it seems gamers and game publishers have mostly moved on from the previous generation. A component cable adapter is also included for capturing legacy consoles.  The included 3.5mm cable can be used to connect an external audio input source to be mixed into streams and captures alongside a 3.5mm microphone jack. Personally I opt to go with USB microphones, as they tend to offer a better sound quality overall, but for those on a tighter budget, a 3.5mm microphone might be a better fit as they are typically less expensive. The purpose of the 3.5mm jacks is to allow the LGX to be used in place of an external audio mixer, though most streaming software allows you to do this already. Also in the box is a manual, the Rec 2 -- AVerMedia's own capture and streaming software -- and a three-month subscription to the streaming software XSplit. I could go on for days about the various streaming software out there, but currently there is no one true winner. Rec 2 is pretty simple and great for beginners, allowing for picture in picture and layout designs with ease, while XSplit has more options and advanced features but runs a monthly fee. I personally use OBS, as it is free and covers most of my needs, though sometimes I still use Rec 2 or XSplit if they have a specific feature I need at the time.  The main feature that the LGX touts is ultra-low latency uncompressed video, meaning you see the game as intended with no real lag or delay between what you'd see on your TV. In my pseudo-scientific tests, I shot 240fps footage with my iPhone of my computer screen versus my TV screen with Mario Kart 8's timer on the screen, and found that AVerMedia's claim of under 0.05 seconds of latency is true. On average, it seemed be around 0.04 seconds, sometimes going up to .08 at worst and .02 at best. The latency is better than any previous capture device I've used and allows me to play off my computer screen instead of switching inputs, as I use a single-screen setup with my desktop in the living room connected to my TV. This allows me to react to my onscreen follower and subscriber alert without having an impact on my gameplay.  Also included is the ability to print your own cover image for branding and vanity purposes. It doesn't serve much purpose, in my opinion, but you can easily make what you'd like with the included cover creator software. I personally suggest a Red Bull can overlaid onto an image of Destiny for the coolest of covers. Overall, AVerMedia has made the Live Gamer EXTREME the capture device to beat. It is more feature rich than competitors at the same price point, and no other device has offered the minimal latency. [This review is based on retail hardware provided by the manufacturer.]
AVerMedia LGX review photo
Live streamer's delight
I've been making gaming videos and streaming for what seems like forever, and I've gone through my fair share of capture devices. My original card only did 720p and 30fps, required hard drives setup in a RAID, and only captur...

Pokemon Shuffle photo
Pokemon Shuffle

Pokemon Shuffle is (Rapi)dashing over to mobile devices


Can you Diglett?
Jun 29
// Brett Makedonski
You know the Beedrill by now: Popular games usually come to multiple platforms. It's especially true when those games are laden with microtransactions designed to wring Whiscash out of the player. It'd be Oddish if that ...

Review: You Must Build A Boat

Jun 29 // Conrad Zimmerman
You Must Build a Boat (Android, iOS, PC) Developer: EightyEightGames Publisher: EightyEightGames MSRP: $2.99 (Android, iOS) / $4.99 (PC)Released: June 4, 2015 You must build a boat, and that's all there is to it. Building a boat means assembling a crew. Assembling a crew means exploring dungeons located at points along the river, which is what you'll spend pretty much all your time in the game doing. When attempting dungeon exploration, the player is presented with a view of their character running left to right through a tunnel. On the run, they'll be stopped by obstacles. Being stopped doesn't prevent the background from moving, and the character is dragged back to the left as long as they aren't running. Enemy obstacles push the player back faster by attacking. If they fall off the left edge of the screen, the run is over. Rather than engaging directly to surmount obstacles, the action is represented through puzzle gameplay. On the most basic level, the play will be instantly familiar to anyone who has experienced a "Match-3" game before. The player moves tiles to create matching lines of three or more. Upon making a match, the connected tiles disappear, tiles above fall into the newly created space, and new tiles drop in to replace those lost. Each of the seven basic types of tiles produces a different effect when cleared. Some are directly used to pass obstacles and progress further, and their effects are wasted when cleared with nothing to use them on. Some have a chance to add special tiles to the grid, which provide one-time use effects when clicked. Others provide no immediate benefit but serve as resources back on the boat, not to mention occupying valuable real estate within the puzzle better served by more urgently needed tiles. Clearing groups of more than three tiles at a time multiplies the effectiveness of the tiles. In YMBAB, tiles are moved as entire rows and columns, wrapping around the edges of the grid. This particular method of movement is a bit more interesting than, say, simply switching the positions of two neighboring tiles. It could have an impact on strategy by allowing a tile at the bottom of the grid to move to the top and drop down to pair more easily with others, or anticipating groupings on opposing sides. That is assuming that you had time to actually think about the actions being taken, which is almost never the case. The near-constant pressure of needing to find a relevant match to clear an obstacle just doesn't allow for it. It does, however, offer a lot of opportunities to create matches once the player gets accustomed to visualizing the whole board and eliminates the risk of a situation where no combinations can be made. The game's tutorial makes it all look so easy. But once you're past the introductory runs which demonstrate how the different tiles work and the game no longer gives you a moment to look at what you're doing, there's no letting up. Speed becomes essential and there's no substitute for it. Intense, yes, but also exhausting. Dungeons are endless but increase their difficulty at regular intervals. Each new difficulty level reached provides a helpful opportunity to restore lost ground on the map while adding a new effect to tweak dungeon elements. Enemies may receive a boost in damage, chests become more difficult to open, or greater financial rewards could be bestowed, among other curses and boons. To reach new dungeons, specific objectives (assigned prior to entering) must be accomplished, with each adding some element to the construction of the boat when successful. Success has less to do with strategy than instinct, luck, and persistence. In attempting specific objectives, it's possible to have some forethought (a vendor added a few dungeons in allows for some adjustment of tile probabilities), but the player is always at the game's mercy to some extent. That said, it isn't cruel either. YMBAB only ever rewards the player for playing it, each run earning additional resources to spend on upgrades that make subsequent runs easier, making progress inexorable as long as the will to play persists. Back on the boat between runs, the player may purchase upgrades to attack and shield tiles, monsters captured in the dungeons can be trained to provide additional bonuses, and acquired crew members offer other benefits. The short round length and simple, lizard-brain gameplay makes it ideal for either the commute or the commode. Dedicating more attention to it than that may prove to be a bit tedious (not least because of the simple, repetitive music) and the design lends itself far better to touch controls for mobile devices than a mouse, so your better bet is to grab it on the phone and take it with you places. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
You Must Build A Boat photo
I mean, if you feel like it
The premise of You Must Build A Boat is simple, but unexplained. In order to travel up a river, you must build a boat. The why is, seemingly, irrelevant.

SDCC photo
SDCC

Tomb Raider? I hardly even know her, and it's even harder to pick her out on account of all the Croft cosplayers at this SDCC event


When Steven writes headlines for me
Jun 29
// Brett Makedonski
San Diego Comic-Con is a breeding ground for cosplay. You'll find everything from the most amateur of outfits to the best professional-grade costumes. People really like to dress up like the things they really like. Microsof...
Bukkoro photo
Bukkoro

Nier, Drakengard creator starts new company


Still doing Nier 2!
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
Taro Yoko (Nier, Drakengard) has started a mysterious new company, Bukkoro. There's a website and not much else to go on. It does have adorable drawings done by Taiko Drum Master artist Yukiko Yokoo. According to Siliconera, ...
Final Fantasy VII remake photo
Final Fantasy VII remake

So people are really into this Final Fantasy VII remake


A casual look at some numbers
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
I was rooting around YouTubes as one does when a number of (hah) zeros caught my eye: 10,018,000. That was the view count on the PlayStation upload of the Final Fantasy VII remake announcement trailer (there's an additional m...

Review: Super Star Path

Jun 29 // Jed Whitaker
Super Star Path (PC)Developer: DYA Games Publisher: DYA GamesMSRP: $2.99Released: June 22, 2015 Flying through tons of enemies to get to a boss at the end of a level is nothing new, but how Super Star Path makes you get there is unique. Enemies approach from the top of the screen and are mostly static aside from some small animations. Shooting them causes them to blow up, taking any adjacent enemies of the same color with them. The final enemies to explode in a chain will cause nearby enemies of different colors to crystallize which then can't be cleared from the screen.  After navigating through the maze-like wave of enemies on every level, a boss will appear. Boss battles play similarly to what you'd expect see in a bullet hell shooter; tons of bullets covering the screen with a boss that requires a lot of shots. Luckily the difficulty of a bullet hell boss can be curbed by purchasing upgradeable ships. After normal enemies are destroyed, they leave behind crystals that are used as currency to buy one of the 10 ships. Each ship has some kind of added benefit -- like being immune to certain attacks or increasing the value of crystals -- and stats that can be upgraded. During each stage, three special enemies appear that, when killed, drop upgrade points; one for speed, health, and damage. These upgrades can then be applied to each specific ship to power them up. Upgrading health allows ships to take up to five hits before exploding and is really necessary for some of the later boss fights, unless you're a veteran bullet hell player. Each level has its own unique twist. Some levels have added enemies flying at you, while others have mines that explode when you get too close or lasers that shoot in straight lines, clearing anything in their way. Figuring out which ship to use for each level feels almost Mega Man-like, as each stage's hazards have a ship that is immune to them. Every level also has three black bat enemies that drop green emeralds that are required for completing the game; thankfully, you can play levels over until you come across them without much trouble. While blasting through each 16-bit-esque level, an awesome soundtrack plays and the main character makes quips about what is happening around him. Something these quips include swearing, which may be off-putting to some, but they are far and few between. Nothing you wouldn't see on Dtoid every day. If anything, the swears add some flavor and character to the game, something most space shooters are lacking.  Super Star Path nails the mixing of space shooter, roguelike, and puzzle genres in a way I didn't even know I wanted. Sadly, the whole experience is over within an hour. But at a measly three dollars, I find it hard to complain -- though it did leave me wanting more. If that's the only complaint I had with the game, it is easily recommendable. I just hope we get to see more space shooter puzzlers in the future! [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Super Star Path review photo
Space puzzles, the final frontier
Space shooters used to be popular. Back in the 8-bit and 16-bit days, everyone knew Gradius and R-Type, amongst others. These days they are few and far between, at least quality ones. Sure Steam is flooded with them...

Ocarina of Time photo
Ocarina of Time

Europe just got an Ocarina of Time Wii U Virtual Console release


Rad
Jun 29
// Chris Carter
Good news Zelda fans that happen to reside in Europe -- Nintendo has released Ocarina of Time on the Wii U Virtual Console today. You can find it for £8.99, and you should get a discount if you already own the...
Policy change photo
Policy change

Valve no longer restores items lost in Steam trade scams


Policy change
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
If you get swindled on Steam, Valve doesn't want you to come crying to it anymore. Used to be if you were tricked out of an item in a Steam trade, Valve would restore it, but an update in the Steam Trading Q&A ends that. ...
New Atelier photo
New Atelier

Gust announces JRPG Atelier Sophie for PS4, PS3, Vita


The Alchemist of the Mysterious Book
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
Gust has turned heads with a new PlayStation (3, 4, and Vita) action RPG Yoru no Nai Kuni (something along the line of Land of No Night). It's much darker (but still pretty) than the Atelier games the company might be best k...
Club Nintendo  photo
Onto the next iteration
If you haven't spent all your Coins yet at Club Nintendo US, now would be a good time to do so -- the service is closing forever tomorrow. It will officially close at 11:59 PM PST on June 30, 2015, so get moving! Yo...

Mixed accounts photo
Mixed accounts

Sony: 'We failed,' technical issues on PS3 'compromised' The Last Guardian


Mark Cerny rumor 'totally bogus'
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
Ah, so here's a thing. Director Fumito Ueda just gave an interview with Game Informer where he put the delay on "a corporate decision by Sony" and not just technical issues. "There are always delays in production, as you know...

Review: Subject 13

Jun 29 // Caitlin Cooke
Subject 13 (PC) Developer: Paul Cuisset , Microids Publisher: Gravity Europe SAS Release: May 28, 2015 Subject 13 begins dramatically with your character, Franklin Fargo (yes, that’s his actual name), attempting suicide via driving into a river. As he descends into the water, a mysterious event occurs which transports him into an abandoned research facility inhabited by a strange disembodied robotic voice. Franklin (otherwise known as Subject 13) is encouraged by this entity to use his intellect to solve puzzles and make it out of the compound -- and thus begins the challenge. The gameplay has a nice balance to it, starting off with fairly simple concepts as an introduction but not taking too long to get your mind ticking. Most of the challenges are spin-offs of popular games and brain teasers like Reversi, Minesweeper, sliding puzzles, etc. If you aren’t a fan of these kinds of puzzles -- especially sliders since they make up approximately half of the puzzles -- then this game may not be for you. There’s also a bit of traditional point-and-click detective work along with finding items as you search for ways to make it past obstacles. The game’s inventory allows you to inspect, rotate, and zoom in on any item -- which adds additional complexity to the puzzles, as many of them require you to modify, combine, or inspect items to find solutions. If you get stuck, a hint is available at any time, however I found them to be simple and would often give me information I had already figured out on my own. Contextualized pointers are extremely helpful and help you determine if an object is movable, or requires an item to move forward. When solving more complex puzzles, the game transitions to a clear first-person viewpoint which makes the puzzles easy to work with and simple to back out of with the scroll of a mouse wheel. Luckily, there were only a few moments when I felt puzzle logic or solutions were obtuse and I needed to search for help online. While Subject 13 isn’t extremely long, the pacing is just right in terms of the story. Small plot elements are sprinkled throughout in “testimonies”, recordings from researchers who had lived in the complex. The mysterious voice that guides you throughout the game also occasionally asks questions to which you can respond and in turn receive background info on Franklin. Strange occurrences become more and more frequent as you progress, revealing more of the interesting details of the story. Eerie background music is perfectly stationed throughout, amplifying the mysterious setting. The plot and story elements seemed to borrow heavily from other games (ie Portal and Mass Effect come to mind), however Subject 13 is interesting in its own right. The only real downside to the story was the quality of the dialogue and voice acting -- unfortunately the latter wasn’t very good, and some of the dialogue came off as cheesy. The writing could have also used some proofing, as there were times when the dialogue didn’t match up with the subtitles, or just didn’t quite flow well. However it was a valiant effort for an indie game with only two voice actors. Being a puzzle fanatic, I really enjoyed Subject 13, but I was disappointed with a few elements. For example, sometimes the action wheel where you could view or take an item wouldn’t connect, depending on which angle you were viewing the object from. More than a few times I found that I missed clues because of this. I also felt it was a bit of a let down to make the last puzzle of the game an extremely large, glorified Minesweeper. I was hoping that with the ingenuity of some of the previous puzzles that the game would go out with a bang. That being said, Subject 13 as a whole is thoughtfully challenging. I can see it working really well for casual and hardcore puzzle fans alike as it intermingles timeless puzzles with original concepts. Despite the storyline having some slightly cheesy and generic moments, it was intriguing enough to keep me interested and engaged. Although it doesn’t hold a candle to its predecessors in the genre, it’s definitely worth a play if you’re a fan of exploration puzzlers. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
Subject 13 review photo
Logic always wins
Point-and-click puzzle adventures set in an abandoned world were always my favorite games to play growing up. There’s something exciting about uncovering the story of a desolate world via solving puzzles -- games like T...

Mafia III photo
Mafia III

Take-Two registers domains that imply a third take at Mafia


Maybe we'll hear more soon
Jun 29
// Brett Makedonski
Mafia II was a game with an interesting premise that was largely weighed down by the low-level chores the player was routinely asked to perform. Controlling the seedy underbelly of a city as a mobster is an exciting idea...
Star Fox x amiibo photo
Star Fox x amiibo

Star Fox Zero won't lock content behind amiibo


Well, not gameplay content, anyways
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
Unlike some of the addled fringe elements of Destructoid, I do not partake in amiibo. Recent Nintendo releases like Splatoon and Yoshi's Wooly World have locked certain gameplay bits behind Nintendo's line of collectable doll...
Uncharted photo
Uncharted

The Uncharted movie project loses yet another director


Pictured in the background -- the movie
Jun 29
// Chris Carter
Let's start from the beginning. Back in 2009, it was announced that an Uncharted film was already in development. Famed hot-headed director David O. Russell was tapped to direct, and everything seemed to going swimmingly -- u...
Canceled Mario photo
Canceled Mario

Spikers: Canceled Mario was a volleyball/wrestling hybrid for Wii


Super Mario Spikers
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
Next Level Games developed two fun soccer games, Super Mario Strikers, then a bunch of other junk before the excellent Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon. Somewhere after the Wii version of Strikers, though, it was working on some u...

Which is your favorite Batman: Arkham game?

Jun 29 // Chris Carter
[embed]294941:59268:0[/embed]
Batman photo
Don't say 'Origins!'
Let's start at the beginning, shall we? Batman: Arkham Asylum, through and through, is just a good video game. It took a simple concept ("Be the Bat"), introduced the free-flow combat system and the Predator stealth...


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