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Watch Dogs: Bad Blood goes punk, features co-op play and new modes photo
Watch Dogs: Bad Blood goes punk, features co-op play and new modes
by Alessandro Fillari

Say what you will about Ubisoft, but they've got a knack for trying something a little different for their DLC offerings. After the incredibly successful launch of Watch Dogs back in May, it seemed like they've been biding their time with the release of some smaller DLC packs to one of their best-selling new titles. With so much content packed in Watch Dogs, I was curious to see how a single-player campaign DLC can stack up.

But now, it seems Ubisoft felt that four months was enough for players to explore the city of Chicago as Aiden Pearce. With a new playable character, a new set of tools, and new missions to dive into; players can see the streets of Chicago through a fresh perspective, and can even bring a friend along for the ride.

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BioWare is working to specifically differentiate Dragon Age: Inquisition from Dragon Age II photo
BioWare is working to specifically differentiate Dragon Age: Inquisition from Dragon Age II
by Chris Carter

When I entered BioWare's offices and had a chance to speak to the game's Executive Producer and Studio GM, I had one goal in mind -- to find out how Dragon Age: Inquisition was going to be more like Origins, and less like Dragon Age II.

You'd expect a lot of Molyneuxian backpedaling when confronted with the idea that the last game was a letdown in many eyes, but the responses I received were genuine, with a real concern for learning from past mistakes, and a confident assurance of the game Inquisition could really become.

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SoundSelf with Oculus Rift is the ultimate trip photo
SoundSelf with Oculus Rift is the ultimate trip
by Alessandro Fillari

It's no secret that gaming conventions are fertile ground for developers to try out their new creations. Back in April, Jonathan Holmes got the chance to check out SoundSelf with Robin Arnott, the creator of the unorthodox horror title Deep Sea, and saw first hand the impression it had on players. Utilizing virtual reality, players are taken for a ride through their own personal odyssey of light and sound.

During the hustle and bustle of PAX Prime, I got the chance to go on a special trip of my own, and it was clear that SoundSelf made quite a name for itself on the show floor. I also got some time to speak with Robin Arnott about his creation and the desire to create an existential experience that brings players to a state of zen and wonder.

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How Final Fantasy Type-0 came to PS4 and Xbox One photo
How Final Fantasy Type-0 came to PS4 and Xbox One
by Kyle MacGregor

Final Fantasy Type-0 HD wasn't on the show floor at PAX last weekend, but Square Enix did show off the action RPG behind closed doors.

During our meeting with the publisher, Destructoid touched base with director Hajime Tabata to discuss how different the game is from the rest of the series. We also learned about the Tabata's strong desire to create a MOBA.

Now let me tell you about the part where we delved into title's strange development history.

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Final Fantasy Type-0 HD is a mature new take on the series photo
Final Fantasy Type-0 HD is a mature new take on the series
by Kyle MacGregor

Final Fantasy Type-0 HD is taking Square Enix's beloved RPG series in a bold new direction. According to director Hajime Tabata, it's "much more mature in comparison with previous titles" and provides "a completely new take on the franchise" for adults. 

Destructoid met up with Tabata over the weekend in Seattle to check in on how the remaster of the 2011 PSP game is coming along. Visually speaking, it looks quite good, though that's far from the upcoming PS4 and Xbox One title's most striking quality.

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12:30 PM on 08.24.2014

Experts think competitive doubles could make it big in Smash Bros.

The Super Smash Bros series is one of the few ongoing competitive fighting game series that was designed from the ground up for two-on-two simultaneous play, but you might not know that if you only went by the biggest moments...

Jonathan Holmes



Alien: Isolation is haunting and uncompromisingly scary photo
Alien: Isolation is haunting and uncompromisingly scary
by Alessandro Fillari

Though it was initially seen as "Jaws-in-space," the legacy for Alien is certainly much more pristine than the one with the giant shark. Originally released in 1979, the first Alien would eventually become a much-loved horror film that spawned a major movie franchise. And while the sequels would get more attention and prominence among fans, the original still holds a special place in the hearts of fans.

After the release of some rather disappointing Alien titles, and with the Cameron interpretation of Alien as the de-facto standard for the franchise, the developers at Creative Assembly believed it was about time fans went back to the roots of the series. Just a week before gamescom, Sega invited Destructoid out to get some quality time with Alien: Isolation, and to speak with the game's creative lead, Alistair Hope. During our time, we got to learn just how different horror is when faced off with something out of your league.

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Father of the Wasteland: How to trust your fans and revive a classic photo
Father of the Wasteland: How to trust your fans and revive a classic
by Alessandro Fillari

Take a moment and think about your dream game. You've probably been thinking about this for awhile. It's always in the back of your mind. Whenever you see new a title promising to do what your dream game does, you wonder if it can possibly reach it. Your dream game, it feels fleeting and impossible, but the joy and wonder it evokes is still real and raw. 

Suddenly, you've been given the chance to make you dream game real. Friends look to you and hope you won't screw things up. Now you've got strangers invested in it. With so many people now following you, watching you, wanting you to make your game, it puts an enormous amount of pressure on you. 

Sounds nerve wracking, right? This is all too real for Brian Fargo and his development studio inXile Entertainment. Two years after an enormously successful Kickstarter for Wasteland 2, they're quickly approaching the time for its release. We were invited to meet Fargo during his press tour for the game. During our talk, we learned just how much inXile and the creator are putting on the line with this revival of a classic post-apocalyptic adventure.

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1:00 PM on 07.27.2014

They grow up so fast: Game Informer interviews Aaron Linde about writing Battleborn

It doesn't feel like it has been that long since former Destructoid reviews editor Aaron Linde moved on to work in the game industry, but it has been almost six years now. In that time, he has contributed to a number of deve...

Darren Nakamura



Slender: The Arrival is coming to consoles, bringing new VHS-based terrors photo
Slender: The Arrival is coming to consoles, bringing new VHS-based terrors
by Bill Zoeker

Slender: The Arrival is coming to Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 this year, and it's arriving with some added content (which owners of the game on PC will receive for free). Casey Lynch from Midnight City came by to play through one of the new levels with Max.

The level shown in the above video actually takes place on a VHS tape being viewed by another character from the game. It puts the player in the shoes of CR, who is investigated the disappearance of a child named Charlie Matheson.

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11:00 AM on 07.13.2014

Two pros are 'edgy' about slight landing lag in Smash Bros. 4

Yesterday I wrote an article about why I'd like to have the option to turn on tripping in Smash Bros for the Wii U and 3DS. It upset a lot of people. Sorry, guys. One part that some people found particularly insulting was ins...

Jonathan Holmes



Throw children and provoke raccoons in The Road Not Taken photo
Throw children and provoke raccoons in The Road Not Taken
by Bill Zoeker

Max hung out with Dave and Daniel of Spry Fox Games to check out their upcoming title, The Road Not Taken. From the makers of Triple Town, this puzzle roguelike puts the player in an adorable world, with dark undercurrents. It's up to you to save the village's children from perilous evils using sheer wit, and the ability to throw things around. Coming this year to Playstation 4, Playstation Vita, PC and Mac (via Steam).

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DNA splicing will make you a better you in Subnautica photo
DNA splicing will make you a better you in Subnautica
by Hamza CTZ Aziz

Natural Selection began life in 2002 as a mod that successfully married the first-person shooter and real-time strategy genres. It's since gone on to eat up the last 12 years of developer Unknown Worlds' time as they created a sequel, and even an eSports tournament around it. Now, development of Natural Selection II is being handed over to the dedicated community around the game as the studio focuses on their next project, Subnautica.

Subnautica, a vast departure for Unknown, is an underwater exploration and survival game that doesn't have an emphasis on combat. It made its worldwide debut at PAX East and, despite hiding the game inside a little booth on the showfloor, I saw people lining up every day of the show just to see what this new title was all about.

I visited the team at Unknown Worlds and talked to co-founder Charlie Cleveland to see what the public reception was like, and got some new details on what they hope to achieve with Subnautica

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2:30 PM on 05.30.2014

The Cave Story/Kero Blaster/Gero Blaster connections

Daisuke "Pixel" Amaya (Cave Story, Kero Blaster, Ikachan, Guxt) has a unique style that would be hard for anyone to convincingly counterfeit. His music, visuals, stories, and designs complement each other in ways that allow t...

Jonathan Holmes







Cave Story creator on wanting to quit, working with publishers photo
Cave Story creator on wanting to quit, working with publishers
by Jonathan Holmes

[Kero Blaster art by Paul Veer]

Cave Story is one of the most influential games to see release in the past ten years. It showed the world that one person can make a videogame that is as good if not better than works from major studios, and without asking for a dime. That's a tough act to follow for the game's creator, especially seeing how long Cave Story was in development. Daisuke "Pixel" Amaya had put years of work into the game before it was released. There was even a completely different version of Cave Story, now known as the Cave Story Beta, that had to be almost entirely reworked before it became the classic that it is today. 

A similar thing happened with Kero Blaster, Pixel's latest game. It was originally called Gero Blaster, and had a completely different story, premise, level design, music, enemy design, items, and just about everything else. After months of production, Pixel had doubts about what Gero Blaster had become, so he scrapped nearly every aspect of it, despite being very close to wrapping development. Instead, he took "cat and frog" premise of Gero Blaster in a whole new direction for a whole new game called Kero Blaster (and its semi-prequel Pink Hour), which was released on Playism and iTunes earlier this month.  

In this first entry in a two-part mini-interview, we asked Pixel about what it took to remake Cave Story and Gero/Kero Blaster, and if he'd ever want to work with Sony or Nintendo. His answers may surprise you. 

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The old world European electronic noir of Transistor photo
The old world European electronic noir of Transistor
by Steven Hansen

As much as Jen Zee's mood paintings and art catalyzed what would become Transistor early on, so too did Darren Korb's music. The soundtrack is an important part of Transistor and while I'd like to be able to yell at you to go freely listen to it right now, there are some meaningful compositions that should first be experience in-game.

Making music is, "different at different stages of the process," Korb said. "At the beginning, there aren't a lot of other assets happening. There's not a lot of other stuff that defines the tone of the game so I'll kind of go off and try some things. I'll come back like, 'here's a thing and it feels this way,' and try to develop a center for the identity of music and the feel.

"As the process goes on, I can look at the art and look at the gameplay. That will affect and change the direction a little bit. Or I can regroup and go in a different direction. Once it's in and once we get a better sense of where the game is going story-wise, well here's a scene we need a specific thing for. It won't be blind, throwing darts and it hits something." That's when you get tracks that should be enjoyed in-game, but, like with Bastion, the early music helps set a tone.

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Transistor's sword was a briefcase at one point photo
Transistor's sword was a briefcase at one point
by Steven Hansen

Parts I and II of this series have touched on various elements of Transistor's design, but not one of its most striking facets, the artistry that immediately arrested many of us when Transistor was announced. We also sat down with Jen Zee at Supergiant, the artist behind this indelible style, and talked a bit about artistic influences, design process, refusing cyberpunk, and briefcases.

"We came off Bastion and Bastion is such a bright and colorful world that we kind of wanted to try something different. It was reactionary," Zee explained. "We did a fantasy world already, what can Supergiant do in the sci-fi world? What would that look like? We attempted to go for a more pallet-controlled world that would just feel a little more dark than Bastion.

"The difference between Bastion and Transistor for me, the big difference, is that I wasn't on board at the very start of Bastion -- pre-production. But I definitely got to scratch an itch where I kind of wanted to in a sense write a love letter to classical artists that I grew up really liking, like William Waterhouse or [Gustav] Klimt, or Alphonse Mucha. I wanted to inject that somehow into the art we made for Transistor because there's no other opportunity like the one that's right in front of you to express yourself the best you can. So I think that it's a combination of reactionary to Bastion, things that we wanted to do on Bastion that we never got to do, and also things that I wanted to do my whole life."

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8:30 AM on 05.22.2014

Watch Taro Yoko discuss Drakengard 3 as a sock puppet

Guys, Taro Yoko is adorable. At least, I think he is. I know he's not actually a cute little puppet, but this interview regarding Drakengard 3 is adorable and informative. This may be one of my favorite interviews yet, simpl...

Brittany Vincent



Under a red sky Part II: Transistor's strategy for doing strategy photo
Under a red sky Part II: Transistor's strategy for doing strategy
by Steven Hansen

Make sure to read Part I in this series. It deals with development crunch time, getting a game ready to launch, and the genesis of Transistor post Bastion. Now we're continuing the abrupt, jerky carnival ride through time and getting to the middle bits, to Transistor's design philosophy as it came together and the games that the people who made it love.

Come sit with us on Amir's dad's old, burgundy couch and learn about furniture utility with Supergiant's Amir Rao (co-founder), Greg Kasavin (writer), and Darren Korb (composer).

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Under a red sky: How Transistor came to be Part I  photo
Under a red sky: How Transistor came to be Part I
by Steven Hansen

Turning down a one-way alley towards SuperGiant's downtown San Francisco office space, I noticed the fenced parking lots on either corner decorated with two sorts of barbed wire. Three classical, no nonsense parallel strands were circumscribed by much more lively spirals of metal like a sharpened, stretched out slinky. 

This is the coveted San Francisco startup space over two million Bastion sales led to. Atypical out of the gate success that the team doesn't take for granted. The move from the sleepy San Jose suburb that bore Bastion to an urban hotbed would, perhaps by coincidence, bear Transistor, SuperGiant's next project.

We sat down with Supergiant's Amir Rao (co-founder), Greg Kasavin (writer), Jen Zee (artist), and Darren Korb (composer) -- on Rao's dad's old, burgundy couch from the San Jose house -- after development on Transistor had wrapped, while the team was prepping it for launch.

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Hack 'N' Slash lets you take revenge on those darn block puzzles photo
Hack 'N' Slash lets you take revenge on those darn block puzzles
by Bill Zoeker

Max recently sat down with Brandon Dillon of Double Fine, Programmer and Project Lead on Hack 'N' Slash. Brandon walked us through a demonstration of the game, which allows players to manipulate the actual code of the game with the protagonist's USB sword, and we all learn some lessons in critical thinking.

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11:00 PM on 05.07.2014

Last Life shows that death is not the end in a cyber-noir future

Max sat down with Sam Farmer, the creator of Last Life. Being developed in association with Double Fine, Last Life is a point-and-click adventure game set in a cyber-noir future, where death doesn't always mean the end. Check out the Kickstarter for this game here.

Bill Zoeker

2:00 PM on 04.28.2014

Bungie making sure you can import characters from last- to current-gen in Destiny

Destiny is going to be a huge game where you'll be able to sink hundreds of hours into the experience. So it's a good thing Bungie is looking into making sure players can import their characters from last-gen consoles to the ...

Hamza CTZ Aziz

12:30 PM on 04.28.2014

Destiny's competitive multiplayer will be balanced, says Bungie

Destiny wants players to create the exact experience they want. Your character, weapons, and gear are all customizable to fit whatever desired play style. These persistent characters you can create can be carried to any aspec...

Hamza CTZ Aziz



Video: Watch Dogs' Jonathan Morin talks delays, multiplayer, and the franchise's future photo
Video: Watch Dogs' Jonathan Morin talks delays, multiplayer, and the franchise's future
by Max Scoville

After almost two years of wringing my sweaty little hands and looking at screenshots like a schlub, I finally got to take Watch Dogs for a spin last week. After hacking into steam pipes and blowing up cars for two hours, I took a moment to chat with the game's creative director Jonathan Morin. 

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Firaxis designers speak on Civilization: Beyond Earth photo
Firaxis designers speak on Civilization: Beyond Earth
by Darren Nakamura

Last weekend during its panel at PAX East, Firaxis announced the next big project for the Civilization franchise: Civilization: Beyond Earth. After the announcement, Destructoid took some time to talk to some of the designers behind bringing the strategy series into space.

Lead Designers David McDonough and Will Miller were present for the interview along with Systems Gameplay Designer Anton Strenger. The designers discussed the inspiration behind Beyond Earth, some of the world building systems, and the possibility for crossover with other Firaxis science fiction properties. Read it below!

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2:00 PM on 04.20.2014

Checking in with Renegade Kid on Moon, Cult County, and more

Holmes had an extra long interview with Renegade Kid's Jools Watsham during PAX East, and it covers all the games the small studio is currently working on. It's a nice showcase of every thing they got going on, and biggest of all is Cult County. It's their upcoming survival horror game, and there's just under two weeks left on their Kickstarter.

Hamza CTZ Aziz

11:00 AM on 04.20.2014

Tetropolis is Tetris crossed with Castlevania

There's a headline I never expected to write. Like ever. But that's Tetropolis for you! Tetropolis sees you playing as those iconic falling blocks, going through levels and exploring the things that need to be explored. The ...

Hamza CTZ Aziz

6:00 PM on 04.19.2014

See why Mushroom 11 was one of my favorite games at PAX East

Alex Bruce, the man behind Antichamber, was at PAX East with no game to show off at all. He was simply there purely to help out other indies. I saw a lot of indies supporting other indies at PAX, as a matter of fact. In this...

Hamza CTZ Aziz

5:00 PM on 04.19.2014

Max Gentlemen was inspired by a spam email for penis pills

Max Gentlemen was inspired by a spam email for penis pills. Yup, that's according to the developer Holmes interviewed at PAX in the video here. It was then created in a drinking game jam, and brought around to some shows lik...

Hamza CTZ Aziz

10:00 AM on 04.19.2014

Monsters Ate My Birthday Cake is not as simple as it looks

Monsters Ate My Birthday Cake saw success on Kickstarter, and it's coming along nicely as evidence by our interview at PAX East. It looks super cute and simplistic, but there's way more depth than you'd imagine here. A deep ...

Hamza CTZ Aziz

2:45 PM on 04.18.2014

Civilization: Beyond Earth designers inspired by Cosmos

To take a brief aside from videogames: are you watching Cosmos: a Spacetime Odyssey? If not, you should be, especially if you are not particularly scientifically literate. It is filled with a lot of important information abou...

Darren Nakamura

4:15 PM on 04.17.2014

Hyper Light Drifter is the developer's own 'dream game'

When you look to hard-hitting journalism you (hopefully) look to Destructoid. In keeping with this tradition we had the creators of Hyper Light Drifter onto our live channel to talk about developing the game while we totally...

Spencer Hayes

2:00 PM on 04.17.2014

Woah Dave scratches the manic arcade itch

One of the most common questions one gets asked when visiting a show like PAX East is, "what's the most fun game you've played this weekend." Woah Dave was my automatic response to any such query this past weekend. An a...

Conrad Zimmerman

2:30 PM on 04.15.2014

SoundSelf is an experience that puts you into a trance

SoundSelf was one of the more interesting experiences I had at PAX, or any other convention for that matter. I put on the Oculus Rift, the headset, and then hummed into the microphone where the visuals and audio would react ...

Hamza CTZ Aziz

10:00 AM on 04.09.2014

Why Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel is sticking to last-gen

The industry is currently trying to support two generations of consoles at once, which means game publishers have to decide what the safest bet is for their next projects. Some companies are creating the the same content for ...

Hamza CTZ Aziz





11:30 AM on 03.27.2014

World of Tanks in 2014: Mobile MMO, new PC engine, console updates coming

I met with Wargaming boss Victor Kislyi last week in a dark, quiet, private meeting room on the GDC expo floor on an early morning following what was probably the biggest party of the week. The chief executive looked surprisi...

Dale North

10:00 AM on 03.23.2014

Sup Holmes finishes off with Conker's Chris Seavor

Oh my god, it's the last Sup Holmes on Dtoid! Ahhh! What does that even mean? We'll find out soon enough, as the Sup Holmes year 3 Kickstarter is set to go live any second now. In the meantime, why not tune in to the show tod...

Jonathan Holmes



What do indie developers think about the ID@Xbox program? photo
What do indie developers think about the ID@Xbox program?
by Brett Makedonski

There's no two ways about it -- Microsoft had a terrible reputation with independent developers during the last console generation. Not that indie's games didn't sell well on the platform, because many of them certainly did. However, the culture and attitude at Xbox was one that didn't mesh with a lot of small teams and many of them documented their experiences in a negative light.

That's not a good position for Microsoft to be in. With the audience for independent games growing at a tremendous rate, the "triple A" development process makes less and less sense from a business standpoint. After all, an indie game needs to move far fewer units to be considered a "success." Nothing needs to sell at an astronomically high rate to be worthwhile.

Microsoft's attempt at repairing this somewhat burned bridge within the indie community was to launch the ID@Xbox -- a program designed to be more accommodating to independent developers and make it as painless and attractive as possible to publish on the Xbox platform. Microsoft held an event at GDC to showcase 25 studios' games that are part of ID@Xbox and we got a chance to talk to some developers about their feelings about the program thus far.

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Capy Games' Nathan Vella talks Super Time Force, Below, and the IGF Awards photo
Capy Games' Nathan Vella talks Super Time Force, Below, and the IGF Awards
by Max Scoville

Literally the first thing I did at GDC this year was sit down with Capy Games president Nathan Vella and talk about their upcoming games Super Time Force and Below, as well as his hosting duties at this year's IGF awards.

Also, a woman in the background knocked over a lamp and broke it, which I thought was pretty funny.

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