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Rage

Bethesda photo
Bethesda

Bethesda is seeking playtesters for unannounced game


Anyone in the Dallas-Fort Worth area can apply to test unknown title
Dec 03
// Alessandro Fillari
There's been a lot of chatter lately about what the developers at Bethesda Softworks have got in the works. With the recent survivor2299 website popping up, and the trademarks for Fallout 4 being registered, many people are c... read
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RAGE sale

RAGE free-to-play and on sale this weekend via Steam


RAGE against the Steam
Nov 22
// Joshua Derocher
RAGE, id Software's post apocalyptic shooter, can be played for free this weekend on Steam, and if you want to own it forever you can grab it for just $4.99. You have until Sunday at 1:00 PM Pacific time to play it for free, ... read
RAGE photo
RAGE

Well, yeah: RAGE as a franchise isn't 'dead'


Would you want more?
Aug 05
// Jordan Devore
In what should come to the surprise of exactly no one, id Software's Tim Willits tells Polygon that RAGE is something the studio would like to return to eventually. "The franchise is not dead, and we built the game in such a ... read
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SimCity

Petition demands the removal of DRM from SimCity


And all future games too
Mar 08
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
SimCity is broken. Players aren't able to connect to the servers, and without that connection you virtually cannot do anything with the city building game. Fans are rightly outraged, taking to various social media outlets ... read
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RAGE tool kit

RAGE tool kit for user-created content available today


35+ GB download from Steam
Feb 08
// Patrick Hancock
Bethesda has announced that the RAGE tool kit will be available later today via Steam, allowing users to create their own content for the game. It is apparently the "same tools used to create RAGE and its DLC, The Scorch... read
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'The Scorchers' DLC finally makes it to RAGE next week


Do you still have your copy?
Dec 15
// Jordan Devore
When a PEGI listing for new RAGE downloadable content surfaced months ago, it felt a bit late, considering the game released in October of last year. Still, the add-on seemed like something we'd be interested in checking out ... read
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QuakeCon: Carmack apologizes about RAGE to PC gamers


Aug 02
// Allistair Pinsof
[Destructoid is grabbing its rail gun and heading to Dallas, Texas this weekend for QuakeCon. Stay posted for game news, previews, and strange happenings from the infamous LAN room.] John Carmack opened his annual QuakeCon ke... read
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'The Scorchers' DLC possibly listed for RAGE


Jun 19
// Jim Sterling
According to European ratings board PEGI, Bethesda is ready to publish downloadable content for RAGE, the id Software shooter that released late last year.  PEGI's listing reveals something called RAGE: The Scorchers was... read

Review: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680

Mar 22 // Ryan Perez
[embed]224337:43139[/embed] NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680Manufacturer: NVIDIARelease: March 22, 2012MSRP: $499 Important GeForce GTX 680 specs: CUDA Cores: 1,536 (Three times more than the 580) Base Clock: 1006 MHz Boost Clock: 1058 MHz Memory Clock: 6008 MHz Interface: 256-bit Total Memory: 2048MB GDDR5 Total Memory Bandwidth: 192.26 GB/s Texture Filtering Rate (Bilinear): 128.8 Giga Texels/sec Connectors: 2 x Dual-Link DVI, 1 x HDMI, 1 x DisplayPort Recommended Power Supply: 550 Watts Thermal Design Power: 195 Watts (244 Watts for 580) Power Connectors: 2 x 6-pin (One 6-pin and one 8-pin for 580)  My general PC specs: Windows 7 x64 (cards are already compatible with Windows 8) Intel i7 2.80 GHz 8GB DDR3 SDRAM I'm just going to get straight to what most of you want to know: How it handles games. The reason I posted my rig's not-so-uber specs above is actually a way of pointing out that my 680 has been taking a lot of the stress with all of the graphically heavy games I've thrown at it. It's all for the card. Believe me, I would have gladly neglect mentioning my specs, as mentioning your lackluster PC to techies is like showing your four-incher to a porn star. The first game I tested -- and the most obvious -- was Battlefield 3. An important note about its Frostbite 2 engine is that it's very efficiently built to run on an adequately powered rig. My old 560 Ti (always overclocked) could handle ultra settings at around 40 to 50 FPS, minus VSync or anti-aliasing. So it's obvious that a 680 would make short work of this game's demands. However, even on powerful rigs, framerate drops are common during heated battles with an abundance of particle effects (smoke and explosions) and game models crowding the screen. To test this out the best I could, I played through several "Conquest Large" matches on BF3's biggest maps available, all on completely maxed-out settings. Even when a team had only one point captured, and the player focus was centered on that entire area, I didn't witness a single drop in smoothness. I mean I literally kept my eyes on the framrate as the sh*t was hitting the fan, and noticed no fluctuation at all. I then tested the 680 on an engine that isn't very efficiently built. The Witcher 2's RED Engine has turned quite a few heads due to its looks, though it's no secret that maxed-out settings require an overall top-end PC. More specifically, the "Uber Sampling" feature is typically what kills the game's performance, as it renders each scene several times over to provide a smoother image quality. Most people turn this feature off, as the slight visual improvement doesn't justify the hardware demands. On my 560 Ti, you could swear I was playing some game I received from ten years into the future; a whopping 15 FPS was the best I got out of it. With the 680, though, it ran at a very stable 40 to 50 FPS, with almost no drops below that 40 (even during combat). Mainly due to the RED Engine's cumbersome features, The Witcher 2 was one of the most technically demanding games I could test on it. A close equal was Crysis 2 with its DX11 upgrades, which ran surprisingly better than Witcher. Out of all the games I tested on the 680 (others include Skyrim, Rage and Just Cause 2), the most rewarding was undoubtedly Crysis 2. The Frostbite 2 engine looks beautiful because of it versatility, but the CryEngine 3 looks incredible because of its cutting-edge features, and the 680 handles them all brilliantly. Displacement maps, high-quality HDR, real-time reflections, and particle motion blur all look absolutely fantastic. My 560 Ti could barely handle Crysis 2 on max settings at around 30 FPS. My 680 laughs at it, with a strong 60 FPS, only dropping to near 50 during moments of extreme action (lots of explosions and particle effects). After all of this, I can't say I'm surprised that the 680 performed the way it did. Many people may remember the Unreal Engine 3 Samaritan Demo from last year's GDC. Well, that demo, mind-bogglingly beautiful as it was, originally required three GTX 580s and a power supply the size of a small child. When I was first presented the 680 at NVIDIA's Editor's Day event during GDC 2012, the same tech demo was shown ... running on a single 680 and nothing else. NVIDIA wants this card to really mean something to the gaming community, not only by being ultra powerful and providing us with longevity, but also via the cutting-edge features that are idiosyncratic to NVIDIA cards alone. A lot of you might have been wondering how I got such close framerate fluctuation with VSync presumably on (it was). Without getting too technical, a big issue people have with VSync is that it forces the framerate to drop by positive integers, based on your monitor's refresh rate (i.e. a 60Hz monitor dropping by 60FPS, 30, 20, 15, etc.) all for the sake of preventing "screen tearing." We gamers can see the obvious problem with this, as the drastic drop in framerate results in "jittering." To combat this, NVIDIA has developed what's known as "Adaptive VSync," which automatically turns off global VSync whenever the framerate needs to fall to anything below your monitor's max refresh rate. No more jitter and no more screen tearing. As another means of providing a smoother gaming experience, NIVIDA is aspiring to do away with MSAA (Multisample anti-aliasing) by providing their own FXAA, which can be activated within the card alone and be applied to any game. They're also providing the upcoming TXAA, a new film-style AA that is at least 4X more effective than MSAA. The result is a welcome addition, as we've been long overdue for an upgrade in this area. Another great feature that we're all becoming acquainted with is PhysX, NVIDIA's proprietary physics engine. PhysX has been steadily appearing in a lot of high-quality titles, providing great rigid and soft body dynamics, as well as fluid and cloth simulations. At NVIDIA's Editor's Day, Gearbox Software CEO Randy Pitchford showed off Borderlands 2 and how it implemented PhysX. Fluids pooled and flowed in complete real-time, and even reacted to explosions -- splashing about into numerous smaller puddles. Cloth materials reacted accordingly to foreign objects, and could even be torn and shredded when fired at. It was quite incredible how these effects could be handled with such relative ease in real-time, when just five years ago it took me several hours to render them for 3D animations on a high-end PC. The last upgrade I'm going to mention is, in a lot of ways, more of a downgrade, but sold me on the card merely due to my living situation. As stated before, the 680 is a very efficient card, and that applies more than anything to its power consumption. The 680 is so streamlined that it actually draws less power than its predecessor, the 580 (see the specs above). What does this mean for me? Well, as a city that desperately tries to retain some sort of bullsh*t identity, San Francisco is adamant about holding on to their Victorian architecture of the 1920s. This includes the f*cked up power distribution systems that came with them. With that said, I can only have about two appliances on at any one time, before I cause a power surge and my place goes completely dark. When it comes to PC gaming, this presents a problem. I actually used to SLI two 560s, but had to get rid of one if I wanted to game with my heater on -- enduring cold San Francisco nights is definitely not worth an extra 560 Ti. So you can imagine that a card like the 680 fairs well for someone with my situation, if not also for people who dig the environment or like saving money on bills. Not only does it consume less power than the best of last generation, but its TDP is only 25 more than my freakin' 560 Ti. After seeing the Samaritan demo and what it took to run it last year, I don't know how they accomplished what they have with the 680. It's like someone sold their ass to the Devil to make this thing. To really explain every notable change and addition with the GeForce GTX 680 would take so much more time. This new line of graphics cards is leaps and bounds beyond the 500 series. This review alone is obviously not going to convince you to throw down $499 on a new card, but I do hope it drives you to do a little more digging into the fine details of the 680 ... especially if you plan on upgrading. PC gaming is slowly but surely making a comeback, and the GeForce 680 is the card to welcome it with open arms. Several games are in development right now with this very card in mind (others shown at the NVIDIA event were Max Payne 3 and The Secret World). If you yearn for the time when you filled your PC with the best of the best tech in preparation for the hottest-looking games to come, then the time is certain now, and the tech is certainly this card. Oh, and before I go, all of you hardcore NVIDIA fans are probably going to want to watch this: [embed]224337:43138[/embed]
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For some of us, upgrading our PCs with the best hardware and enjoying the most jaw-dropping games in all their glory is a not-so-distant memory. Even though I've consistently owned beefy rigs my whole life, I've spent less an... read feature

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Black Friday: Kmart selling MGS HD for $35, more


Nov 22
// Brett Zeidler
We are getting ever closer to the busiest shopping day of the year. Kmart has some pretty good deals going on. Here's a short list of what you can expect to find should you choose to do shopping there: $199.99 - Get a $25 gi... read
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Black Friday: Best Buy deals revealed, start saving


Nov 11
// Brett Zeidler
Let's get right into this one, shall we? Best Buy's Black Friday 2011 ad surfaced recently and it doesn't disappoint. Here's just a short list of some of the more notable deals: $29.99 - Batman: Arkham City, Rage, Battlefiel... read
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Rumor: DOOM 4 'indefinitely postponed' (Update)


Oct 21
// Jim Sterling
[Update: Bethesda's Pete Hines has denied the rumor, stating that no title has been postponed, "indefinitely or otherwise."] According to "anonymous sources" speaking to Kotaku, id Software's next project has been put on inde... read
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RAGE PC getting new patch to fix blurry textures


Oct 17
// Jim Sterling
RAGE was patched for PC shortly after launch, but it wasn't completely fixed. There have still been issues with blurring textures, but a new patch is on the way that will sort everything out. "We have a bicubic-upsample+detai... read

RAGE patch available for PC

Oct 10 // Jim Sterling
- Implemented workaround for AMD driver crash right after intro cinematicon Win 7 32-bit systems.- Disabled UBOs because they are causing animation issues with AMD drivers.- Don't allow swap-tear to be enabled on AMD while the extension is notexposed because it may crash.- Support for new video settings: "texture cache", "vsync" and"anisotropic filter"- Automatically adjust vt_maxPPF based on the number of available cores.- Improved performance for SLI cards when GPU transcode is enabled.- Fix for GPU Transcoding option being disabled after exiting gameplay.- Added safe mode to restore video settings to default values.- Allow g_fov to be changed from the RAGE launch options in Steam.- Server now forwards text chat from clients to all other clients whilein-game.
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A large PC patch for RAGE arrived this weekend, aiming to fix the grotesque graphical issues that many users complained about. It also gives players some actual video settings to tweak, rather than stick with threadbare menus... read feature

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id Software: PC isn't the market leader anymore


Oct 08
// Jim Sterling
id Software's history with PC gaming led gamers to believe that RAGE's computer-based version would be a worthy product. Unfortunately, it released to the tune of angry customers thanks to it looking like garbage and running ... read
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Lights Out: RAGE, Sony passing the buck and Xbox TV


Oct 08
// Conrad Zimmerman
[Lights Out: A Destructoid Newsreel is a video series highlighting a selection of Destructoid staff and contributors, featuring a discussion of the biggest gaming news of the week over a spirited round of Team ... read
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The DTOID Show: Conrad Bears His Dark Soul


Oct 06
// Max Scoville
Hey Gang! Here's yesterday's Destructoid Show. For reasons I do not understand, this post didn't go live last night. In any case, here it is now. If you want to catch our episodes when they're fresh outta the video-oven, be ... read

Not-Review: RAGE on PC is appalling

Oct 05 // Jim Sterling
RAGE (PC version)Developer: id SoftwarePublisher: BethesdaMSRP: $59.99Released: October 4, 2011Tested On: Intel i7-2600k @3.40 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, GeForce GTX 580 GPU (SLI) Things start off poorly with a menu screen that has random black lines flickering across it. Sometimes they're there when the game boots, sometimes they're not. I wouldn't be able to play with the in-game settings to see if something can be fixed, however, because the in-game menus are pathetic. The only graphical tweaks available within RAGE are screen resolutions and anti-aliasing settings. id Software didn't feel the need to provide anything else.  Right from the very outset, RAGE looks like garbage. The first cutscene is so poorly compressed, it could have been an opening FMV for Dungeon Keeper back in the nineties, and the in-game graphics don't fair much better. Any dark spaces are clouded with artifacts, as if the shadows were actually low quality jpegs.  [Pictured: A dark corner, looking like it was drawn in MS Paint] I can confirm one of the most common complaints -- textures pop in a split-second before you view anything, leading to a distracting environment in which everything appears to twitch. Turning around at any point in the game causes the visuals to "re-focus" which puts the player off completely. Speaking of being put off, the screen-tearing is beyond obscene. Whenever you turn around, you have to deal with obnoxious lines all over the screen and textures shunting themselves in before your very eyes.  The framerate, especially on vehicles, is abysmal as well. This is all after I did as Bethesda recommended and installed the very latest NVIDIA drivers. I noticed a slight framerate increase on-foot, but no improvements anywhere else. Screen still tore, textures still popped in, and the vehicle sections look like they're being watched through a zoetrope.  [Pictured: A corridor I was able to screengrab a moment before the textured popped in] Oh, and you'll want to alter the keyboard controls for vehicles. Someone figured they should control exactly the same as the first-person perspective, which means that you're expected to hit Shift to boost -- which means you'll be taking your finger off "A" and thus can't turn left without enjoying some finger gymnastics (Edit: Or you can be like the FREAKS in the comments who use their pinkies, I guess. How uncomfortable).  Another weird control issue is the fact that the cursor sensitivity ramps up considerably during any in-game menu. Be it the options screen, the mission acceptance screen, or the inventory, the mouse suddenly goes at more than twice the speed, which is incredibly jarring and forces the player's brain and hands to recalibrate every time they go from gameplay to menu browsing. I just have no idea how something so stupid could be allowed to happen, other than to surmise that nobody cared, and nobody tested anything.  [Pictured: Some pre-texture scenery. Character models don't seem so badly affected] All these issues were apparent within the first fifteen minutes of play, leading me to conclude that RAGE is by far among the very worst ports I have seen on any system, from any company, during any year. While the game is good on consoles, and a recommended purchase, I'd say that anybody looking to get it on PC steer well clear, at least until a laundry list of tweaks and the obligatory first five patches have arrived. Right now, there are all sorts of conflicting reports on how to make RAGE run better on PC, but most users will be tearing their hair out and lamenting their wasted cash if they download this and expect to get a good product for their $60.00.  Yes, $60.00. It's ten dollars more expensive than PC games should be, and it's still one of the worst PC versions of any game currently available. That such things are legal truly blows my mind. 
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RAGE's release has been dominated by reports of the game running poorly on PC. Unfortunately, a PC version wasn't provided before we were able to run our review, but I've gotten my hands on a copy via Steam and played through the first mission to see how it stacks up compared to the Xbox 360 version.  I am beginning to count myself lucky that I didn't have to fully play it for the review. read feature

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PC RAGE players should download new drivers 'immediately'


Oct 05
// Jim Sterling
RAGE PC players with AMD/ATI graphics cards can now download the "RAGE Catalyst" drivers in order to fix a number of horrendous issues with the game. As revealed yesterday, the PC port of id's post-apocalyptic shooter has bee... read
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Problems with RAGE on PC? Grab these new AMD drivers


Oct 04
// Jordan Devore
We've heard reports that PC users are going up against a number of technical issues with RAGE, which publisher Bethesda Softworks has attributed to driver problems. No matter the cause, it's disappointing to see any game -- e... read
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The DTOID Show: Our RAGE Review & Impressions


Oct 04
// Max Scoville
[The Destructoid Show gives a rundown of all the top news from Destructoid.com every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Subscribe to us on YouTube, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.... read
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RAGE said to be suffering on PC


Oct 04
// Jim Sterling
You'd think that a graphically demanding shooter from id Software -- of all studios -- would be at its peak on PC, but according to a growing number of users, RAGE is a broken mess. Users around the 'net (including NeoGAF) ar... read

Review: RAGE

Oct 04 // Jim Sterling
RAGE (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: id SoftwarePublisher: Bethesda SoftworksReleased: October 4, 2011MSRP: $59.99 It would be very difficult to discuss RAGE without mentioning both Fallout and Borderlands -- comparisons that are easily justifiable since id Software has merrily stolen from both. Set in a post-apocalyptic world where cryogenically frozen people emerge from "Arks" to find a wasteland ruled by bandits and mutants, everything about RAGE feels familiar.  Borderlands' visual style -- including bold, cartoon-esque outlines -- and Fallout's general premise are blended with a BioShock-inspired loot system to create a game that looks and feels like something we've seen a bit too much of in recent years. The game looks dated, which is strange, considering it is one of the most graphically gorgeous games on the market.  While its art style feels passé, the technology bringing it to life definitely does not. Of particular note are the animations, which are easily the most lively I've seen. Enemies movements' are especially stunning, and I was most impressed by just how varied their behavior can be. Even the simple mutant has a wide range of actions -- they'll roll to avoid fire, grab onto the ceiling, hold themselves elevated in doorways like spiders, and leap to close large distances. Different tribes of bandits have unique behaviors to boot, with Ghost clan members charging wildly and running along walls, or the more pragmatic Shrouded retreating when taking heavy fire and covering each others' escape.  RAGE splits itself into first-person combat and third-person vehicular sections. Taking a rather formulaic structure, general progress consists of heading into town, taking on a mission, driving to a "dungeon" area and killing a lot of things. This pattern repeats itself from beginning to end, in a world that looks quite open but tends to be shockingly small and restricted. There are huge chasms, open mountains and wide fields, but the they are inaccessible and exist only as window dressing. There's a linearity to the game that seems at odds with the world's open appearance. This is a problem that's only compounded when you realize how devoid of exploration that world truly is -- there is one small city area for each half of the game, and the dungeon locations sit at the ends of a meager selection of straightforward paths. One wonders why the illusion of an open world was put in place -- I'm all for linear experiences, but not when they're pretending to be something they're not, and offering the vision of something far larger than it is. Getting from A to B is a pleasant affair, as vehicles are easy to handle with tight, precise controls. Players can take part in races within each city, earning tokens that can be spent on upgrades such as increased boost power and extra weaponry. These upgrades will be essential as the Wasteland becomes increasingly populated with enemy vehicles that spew bullets and rockets with deadly precision. Collecting and upgrading vehicles is a cool part of RAGE, but the overall selection of machines and corresponding enhancements isn't quite deep enough to remain compelling for long.  The combat sections will feel a bit more familiar to id fans, especially those who enjoyed the atmospheric DOOM 3. Like the horror-shooter sequel, RAGE's combat is all about setting up a series of corridors, broken up by rooms full of enemies. Opponents are remarkably aggressive, and rather difficult to hit thanks to their love of rushing, ducking, weaving and taking cover (not to mention the fact that aim assist is either terrible or non-existent on consoles.) There's a nice variety of weapons, ranging from the humble pistol and assault rifle to more delicious arms, such as a crossbow that can fire mind-controlling darts. Each weapon has multiple ammo types, and can extra attachments can be purchased at stores in town. If you die, you have the ability to get back up by taking part in a small QTE-like minigame. However, this "defib" option needs to recharge, so players can't just resurrect indefinitely.  Aside from the fact that erratic enemies are frustratingly difficult to hit, RAGE brings the action in a big way. Combat sequences are fast-paced and intense with enemies that range from savagely aggressive to prudently tactical. As the game progresses, more vicious factions are encountered, each with their own unique weapons, strategies and environments, from the feral Jackal clan to the high-tech, militant Authority. There's a real sense of life in each fight, with opponents communicating to each other about their battle status and commenting on the player's movements. Sometimes the smoke and mirrors of this combat dialog is exposed when enemies that can't see you are still telling their friends what you've done, but the illusion of smart, observant opposition is generally maintained to an effective degree.  Helping out in combat is a range of gadgets that can be built using debris from the environment and corresponding schematics. These range from the invaluable Wingstick -- a deadly bladed boomerang -- to remote-controlled bomb cars, sentry turrets, and spider-like robots that act as autonomous allies. Due to the huge, cluttered menu system, it can be difficult to find or even remember the gadgets on offer, but they're all incredibly useful once you recall they exist.  Speaking of the menu system, it could definitely have used some work. Unnecessary visual effects upon switching tabs makes menu navigation feel laggy and inconvenient, and items are thrown together with monochrome images representing each one. With only four weapons and four gadgets able to be stored in a quick-select slot, the menu is needed often, and it's a pain to use.  RAGE throws a few extra distractions into the mix, just to spice things up. As noted, each city has a collection of vehicle races, and there's also a job board with intermittent sub-quests. There are also minigames, such as a board game in which you "roll" dice to shoot mutants before they kill your avatar, a finger-puncturing knife trick challenge, and a battling card game called RAGE Frenzy. The card game is my personal favorite, using collector cards found in the game world to battle AI opponents in a simple but satisfying game of chance. I'd have loved for RAGE Frenzy to be expanded, as the random element of collecting has been killed off in favor of predetermined cards hidden in predetermined locations, and there are only two people in the entire game who play.  The problem with RAGE Frenzy, however, is the ultimate problem of RAGE as a whole -- it's full of great ideas and it's truly fun to play, but every single idea fails to reach its potential. It would be unfair to call such a polished and enjoyable game unfinished, but the fact that every included element needed further expansion at least suggests an experience that must be deemed incomplete. There are weapon upgrades, but only a mere handful of them. You can enhance your vehicles, but there's a tiny range of auto parts on offer. You can equip new armor ... only once during the whole game. There are gadgets to be built, but no depth to the crafting system. There's the tease of an open world, but it's not open at all. There are hints of role-playing elements, but no attainable new skills or statistics. There's a collectible card game without the fun of collecting and only two people to play it with. There are shops, but you can buy all the new schematics and armor upgrades on your first visit and only need to return for ammo or crafting ingredients. There are cities but only two of them, featuring the same minigames, and they're small. RAGE is a game that promises many things but delivers only a fraction of each. A vastly entertaining fraction, I have to add, but it leaves one aching for more, and imagining what could have been if the experience weren't cut so coldly short.  This is a feeling carried through into the multiplayer, which is amusing but shallow. RAGE's competitive online mode is cribbed from the various vehicular combat sections in the campaign, and feels like a mixture of Twisted Metal and Mario Kart. However, each game can only contain four players on maps that are far too large for such a small number. As a result, matches feel constrained and often consist of three players shooting the rear of whoever is in front, then another swapping its place. At the time of writing, matchmaking doesn't seem to work, either. Bethesda had scheduled matches for reviewers, but nobody was able to find them. There are multiple reviewers still trying to get into a game, but RAGE so far doesn't even attempt to find lobbies, forcing each player to start their own instead. I eventually got to try it by starting a private match and inviting someone else in.  There's a co-op mode that revisits locations from the campaign and gives two players a series of objectives to complete against quite challenging odds. These "Legend" stages have a scoring system in place for some passive competition, and attempt to breathe extra life into RAGE's narrative by theming every stage around a backstory. Ultimately, however, these short little levels feel shallow and the scoring system encourages a more frantic style of play that contradicts the need for players to take their time and work together. All told, the multiplayer simply isn't worth putting that third 360 disc into the machine, and it would have been far better for id Software to remove it completely and work on a fully-fleshed-out solo mode.  For the ten or so hours that it lasts, RAGE has a lot of honest, straightforward, amusing action on offer. However, one can't help but feel that this is little more than a prologue, something id Software put together in order to show the potential of a franchise, rather than realize the potential of a game. As you rush around the world and get brief introductions with major characters, it seems like you're on a quick sightseeing tour of RAGE's universe rather than setting up camp for an extended stay. Everything RAGE does, it does well, but it just doesn't do anything to a conclusive degree. This is hammered home by the rushed ending with an absolutely classless cliffhanger. RAGE is fast food, the kind of fast food that looks much more satisfying on the menu than it does once served. It's tasty, for sure, but you'll be starving almost as soon as you've finished. By no means is RAGE not worth your time -- it looks stunning, the combat on both wheels and foot is fun, and there's a tremendous sense of atmosphere that deserves to be experienced. However, RAGE's quality only makes its lack of ambition more painful in the long run, as it could easily have been better than it is. It's a good game, most definitely, and one that id fans will enjoy ... just don't expect it to do half of what it looks like it can do.
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It's been quite some time since id Software released a brand-new hatchling into the world. DOOM and Quake have kept it relevant through the years, but there's a new four-letter name on the cards, and that name is RAGE.  ... read feature

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The Jimquisition: Fighting the 'problem' of used games


Oct 03
// Jim Sterling
For the past two episodes, I have railed against publishers and their war on used games. In the concluding part, I praise those tactics that I do not find obnoxious, and would like to see further encouraged. Rather than puni... read
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id Software pushes the importance of franchises


Sep 29
// Jordan Devore
Rage isn't even out, but that's not about to stop id Software's Tim Willits from being hopeful that the game will be successful enough to warrant a sequel, and speaking more generally about the subject to GamesIndustry.biz. "... read
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RAGE: Three Xbox 360 discs, 8GB PS3 install


Sep 25
// Jim Sterling
Never has the name RAGE been more appropriate for console gamers, with word that non-computer versions of id Software's upcoming shooter will have some controversial requirements -- whichever machine you pick.  The ... read
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New RAGE trailer counts bodies like sheep


Sep 15
// Jim Sterling
What would your Thursday be without some game footage set to A Perfect Circle songs? Rubbish, that's what! Bethesda has sent over a new trailer for the gorgeous looking RAGE, and it features "Counting Bodies Like Sheep To Th... read
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Cooperative carnage in Rage's Water Service


Sep 08
// Jordan Devore
As it turns out, Rage has a co-op mode. In this mission, vile fiends have placed bombs throughout Wellspring in an attempt to destroy what's left of the water supply. There's an awful lot of running, gunning, and reloading. ... read
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Here are your RAGE PC system requirements


Sep 07
// Jim Sterling
Bethesda has released the minimum and recommended specs for RAGE on PC. It's a gorgeous looking game, designed to showcase the new id Tech 5 engine, so you'll want to make sure your computer's swanky enough to take advantage ... read






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