hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

 photo

Bionic Commando remake trailer hits the Web to the sound of gruffness


Oct 17
// David Houghton
It was only announced yesterday, and already opinions are highly divided on Capcom's Bionic Commando remake. So far voices tend to fall on either side of a binary split, either gushing with the misty-eyed enthusiasm of a nost...

Destructoid interview: A pleasant lunch-time chat with the makers of Postal

Oct 14 // David Houghton
Destructoid: How's Postal 3 coming along right now? Vince: It's set to come out in the fourth quarter 2008. Everything we've released so far has been prototype footage and we just let it out because so many people asked "Can I see it?". You know, in the old days you never really wanted to show anything this early, but now I take the approach that we've still got eighteen months, so I'm not going to worry about it. Destructoid: Development schedules are so long these days, but people have got so used to having access to things through the internet. Vince: In the old days if you sent something out early you could die by it, but thankfully now that's changed. But what's really important to us is that it's the premier of Postal on consoles, so we're very concerned with the overall quality. The good news for us is that we're not under any financial pressure to have to release it for Christmas next year. Oh course I hope to, but I'll only do that if it's really optimized. It's got to come out strong. But we're really excited. It's got all the things Postal is known for, the crazy weapons, a lot of humour, the mature adult attitude, but also this time we've done something very different. This time you're going to be able to play the game three different ways, which is going to make the game very big and add a lot of replay value, which is what I'm a big fan of. I'm an old-timer in this industry and I go back to the old design philosophy of replay being important. A lot people today believe that games should be more like movies. Destructoid: Or people design games more for the multiplayer. Vince: Actually another thing about Postal 3 is that it will ship with multiplayer. And we're not just talking ten maps, we're already over twenty. So when you consider the game, I don't want to say it'll be 50/50, but it'll have very strong single player and very strong multiplayer. We're fortunate in that there are a lot of Postal mods out there. This Postal community is just... Postal's a cult. Destructoid: If you can capture the fan imagination and build a community like that you'll just run and run. Vince: People will ask me a lot, "Did you plan this?" and the truth of the matter's no. We just designed a game that we thought would be fun to play and that was funny. Half of what occured afterwards, we had no idea. It was never our intention. The same thing goes with a lot of the negative attention. I was like, "What is everyone so upset about?". But I think because we were a small independent developer we came in for a lot of scrutiny because we couldn't defend ourselves as effectively. Not because I'm not willing to, but because nobody wanted to give me a chance. Destructoid: No-one wants to listen to the little guy. Vince: And we were easier to pick on. Destructoid: If you'd been bigger or more established...Vince: Take2 has gotten away with murder. But the reason they're suffering now with Manhunt 2, or even prior to that with GTA and the  Hot Coffee thing is that they f*cked up. Hot Coffee came out and they didn't know how to handle it. It was like a polititian getting caught with his... It was like Bill Clinton saying "I never had sex with that woman". Some guy from Rockstar comes out and says "We don't know anything about Hot Coffee". And everyone's like "You are so full of sh*t dude". It was one of two things. One, you're stupid or two, you're lying. And neither's good. And so really what's happened now with the whole Manhunt 2 thing I think is that if they hadn't got themselves into so much trouble with Hot Coffee, they might have had more co-operation. And the same thing in America with the ESRB. I don't really blame the ESRB for taking the position they did, because they got f*cked by Take2. Mike: Well on top of getting f*cked by Take2, the ESRB fuck themselves. It's a good ratings system overall but it's just not implemented well. Destructoid: It's a similar problem in the UK. It's just not respected or enforced properly. Mike: It's not just that it's not respected by the public either. They just don't respect themselves, I don't believe, because it's kind of obvious they don't play through all of the games. They seem to just give you a rating based on what they know about the game, what you tell them about the game, and what they've seen. They don't have a team of people playing through every minute of the game. I mean it's fairly impractical, but a true ratings board should have it. Destructoid: The movie boards watch the whole movie... Mike: Yeah, they don't just watch the first ten minutes of a movie. You have a hundred people watching it right through and coming to a consensus. Vince: What I'd really like to see, and I don't think it's going to happen, at least in America, is that we need to simplify it. It's so f*cking... You can walk into a store, pick up a box, and spend a half hour figuring out the bullsh*t. To me it's like Under Eighteen or Over Eighteen. That's it. That's all you need. And guess what? If on the box it's a racing game or a Tony Hawk game, I think I can work out what kind of game it is. It's like, "Aw gee, it's a racing game, there's a guy on the box in a race car. Hmmm, I wonder, is that an action adventure?" No dude! It's a f*cking racing game! Mike: Let's put a race car on our next box. [Laughter] Vince: Just simplify it, please. Rather than making it easier, they complicate it. And then they come up with these descriptors, so you could have a game like Postal 2, which is M-rated, and then you have all these words like "Blood", "Violence", "Adult content", "Adult language", "Drugs". And Postal 2 was responsible for a new one, "Extreme violence". [Laughter] I mean you know, why not just make it eighteen-rated and we all live happily ever after? Destructoid: Just treat human beings with the respect of allowing them to make a decision and judge what's in front of them. In the UK now we've got descriptors on posters for every movie that virtually describe the whole plot in terms of the content descriptions. Harry Potter's a 12-rated movie, but you'll have "Mild to strong fantasy violence and minor peril". How do you define "minor peril"? Warning: Harry has a bad day and wakes up feeling a bit sh*t? Vince: "Harry Potter jerks off and discovers manhood".Mike: "Hermione gives him blue balls. He doesn't know what to do." [Laughter]Destructoid: Right down to kids' movies everything that's not a happy scene from start to finish is described in detail. It's ridiculous. Vince: We're not that bad but we're getting there. And here in Germany... Destructoid: Half the games here will not be released here. Mike: I heard at the EA booth, when the Crysis video comes up there's a big thing on the screen that says "Not allowed to show this trailer at GC". [Laughter]Vince: The industry, while we are maturing, we are actually regressing. Destructoid: We're becoming too aplogetic. Vince: The whole thing that Postal is about is that it's politically incorrect purposefully. Personally I happen to be a very big animal fan, but that doesn't mean I don't like throwing a hammer up a cow's ass in a videogame. Destructoid: Some things are just funny. Vince: That's exactly what I mean. I'm not advocating, "Okay everybody living out there in the countryside, PICK UP YOUR HAMMERS! Start throwing them up your cows' asses!" I mean come on! We're supposed to tell people "Don't do this"?Destructoid: I'm the most pacifistic person in the world, but I grew up on Warner Bros. cartoons, so I appreciate over-exaggerated comedy violence. Vince: Oh dude! Destructoid: You just accept that it's violence in a completely different context. Vince: You know when I was a kid I watched a lot of The Three Stooges, Abbot and Costello, all the Loony Tunes, Warner Bros., all of that crazy stuff. Now I didn't go out and immediately start beating animals. Every now and then a stray cat got lit up, but that was just the neighborhood. [Laughter]Mike: Wrong cat, wrong time. Vince: You never wanted to be a four-legged animal walking around Brooklyn on the fourth of July. Mike: Nothing like a little M80. Destructoid: Did you hear that Manhunt 2's actually just been passed with an M in the US? Vince: I read that this morning. They've modded it though. I don't know what they've done, but it's stripped. Mike: Maybe they just lightened the color a bit so it doesn't look so gritty. [Laughter]Vince: I don't know what they did, but you've got to understand that the ESRB in the United States is pretty much owned by the top ten publishers, Take2 included, and you can't bite the hand that feeds you. So they need to work with them. So I never had any doubt that it would get passed, it just had to go through this process. There's so much money involved. You know, it's a Take2 title, it's Manhunt, I mean it's not going to do GTA numbers, but... Destructoid: It'll going to do bigger numbers than it would have done now. Vince: Oh yeah, it'll do better now, and the thing is, those retailers want to make money. Those distributors, they want to make money. This issue you know, it's the M & M factor. Money and morality. Well I've found in my lifetime that money always wins. Just go ask your local priest. [Laughter] It's all bullsh*t, it's all crap.
 photo

I like the guys from Running With Scissors. Far from being the baby-eating, kitten-punching corrupters of children that certain quarters would paint them as, I've always found them to be thoroughly funny and intelligent peopl...

 photo

Games Media Awards: the images (quantifiably NSFW)


Oct 13
// David Houghton
Having vague and hazy recollections of this week's Games Media Awards, I found myself quite looking forward to going over the photos and video from the night so that I could piece together everything that went on. Alas my fri...
 photo

Hitman movie censored already?


Oct 10
// David Houghton
The inner workings of the minds of Hollywood's executives often make very little sense. That's as true a statement as saying that the sky is blue or that Snowboard Kids is better than Mario Kart 64. The modern Hollywood exec ...
 photo

Mistwalker confirms Blue Dragon DS and a shiny new title


Oct 03
// David Houghton
I couldn't be more thankful for Mistwalker's existence right now. As a long-time JRPG fan, these last few years with my once beloved Square-Enix have been like watching a much-loved family dog slowly die while a relationship ...
 photo

Destructoid interview: Pure Pwnage


Sep 30
// David Houghton
If you haven't seen Pure Pwnage yet, - and frankly you have very little excuse at this stage - stop reading this right now, head over to the site, and come back and resume once you've watched all fourteen episodes. Go on. You...
 photo

Bungie: Internet Matlocks correct, Halo 3 not running in HD, but so what?


Sep 29
// David Houghton
It's a universal law of human snarkiness that the bigger the game launch, the more attention will be paid to any hitches, large or small. It's also a universal law of videogames that the more you hype, the more trouble you te...
 photo

Ghost Squad trailer shows off some slick shooting


Sep 29
// David Houghton
While probably not a release likely to be setting Wii owners' pants on fire with anticipation in this year of incoming Mario and No More Heroes, - and with Metroid still to come if you live in Europe - Sega's port of arcade l...
 photo

Dead Island site goes live


Sep 28
// David Houghton
Techland's up and coming zombie dismantlement simulator caused quite a stir when it was unveiled at the Leipzig Games Convention, due to its smile-inducing two-hit combo of gorgeously idyllic tropical vistas and savagely brut...
 photo

Jack Thompson sends gay porn to judge, doesn't even buy dinner first


Sep 26
// David Houghton
My friends, it's almost time to start popping champagne corks, for the glorious day must surely be soon upon us when Jack Thompson's legal career is curb-stomped savagely into a fine red mist. For quite some time now things h...
 photo

Valve uncertain about the future of episodic gaming


Sep 25
// David Houghton
Valve might be dropping the whole concept of episodic gaming once Half-Life 2: Episode 3 finally sees the light of day. While that release may seem like a distant prospect with Episode 2 still awaiting its delayed release, Ga...
 photo

Timesplitters 4 looking probable for the Wii


Sep 25
// David Houghton
Some new tips drop into my in-box like a shiny big dollop of liquid gold. From the day the Wii was announced, FPS on the machine has been at the forefront of my mind, and I've had a vaguely realized image of a perfect example...
 photo

Wii availability creates tourism boost in rural Japan, seashell art sales stable


Sep 25
// David Houghton
Nearly ten months in and still the Wii is only marginally easier to get hold of than rocking-horse manure. Having pre-ordered mine before launch, I had to be honest, pretty much stopped tracking their proliferation in stores,...
 photo

Surprise of the week: Jericho banned in Germany


Sep 25
// David Houghton
In a move which has stunned the entire population of those who have actually been living under a rock for the last ten years, - incidentally a proud people who are sick to death of being reduced to a semi-humorous cliche in t...
 photo

Coming to America: Square Enix looking for US partnerships


Sep 24
// David Houghton
First Capcom, now Square Enix. This generation is seeing some big westard steps taken by Japanese publishers eager to lap up some of the creamy monetary goodness waiting on the other side of the globe. Its not a surprising si...
 photo

New Seaman 2 video: Man-faced fish-birds and cell phone-using cavemen aplenty


Sep 23
// David Houghton
 I was expecting most things relating to the sequel to Sega's Dreamcast pet simulator to be pretty weird, but after watching this Japanese gameplay overview, I'm less dazed and confused and more disturbed and utterly con...
 photo

TGS 2007: New No More Heroes video brings your dreams of a laser crotch to life!


Sep 23
// David Houghton
 No More Heroes gets more and more screwed up the more we see of it, and I for one thoroughly approve. So far we've had otaku buying light sabers from Ebay, arm-mounted rocket launchers, explosive gore and mandatory Wiim...
 photo

Jack was right all along! Chinese cops train with Counter-Strike


Sep 23
// David Houghton
It seems the anti-gaming lobby aren't the only ones operating under the apprehension that sitting in the comfort of one's living room, pressing a series of buttons in order to incite some on-screen animations, is exactly the ...
 photo

TGS 2007: Wipeout HD gameplay videos direct from the Show floor


Sep 19
// David Houghton
The nigh-mystical powers of The Golden Donut have just pointed us towards the existence of some shaky-cam videos of the PS3's new incarnation of F-Zero's most famous offspring that emanated from the Tokyo Game Show today. I h...
 photo

New Dragon Quest IX scans have come to massage your eyeballs seductively


Sep 19
// David Houghton
JeuxFrance have been on one of their secret sneaking missions again, this time liberating a bunch of new Dragon Quest IX shots previously imprisoned within the pages of the brutal Shonen Jump regime. It was a mission fraught ...
 photo

New Dementium trailer baffles and amuses


Sep 19
// David Houghton
I can't wait to play Dementium: The Ward. I've had high hopes for the horror shooter for a good while now, and after Hamza's impressions from EIEIO were largely favourable despite a couple of niggles, my desire to be blowing ...

Pew! Pew! Preview!: Clive Barker's Jericho

Sep 16 // David Houghton
It had been a long day already when I arrived at Codmasters' countryside hideaway. Three hours in the cold-hearted company of the British train service had taken their toll, and I was in need of a big pick-me-up. "Never mind", I thought. "A day spent with the kind of top-quality carnage I saw at the last preview, and I'll be bouncing off the walls like a puppy with ADHD for the next week and a half." And at least partially, I was right, as over the course of the afternoon, Jericho provided me with exactly the kind of visceral, brutal, and punishingly atmospheric gameplay a boy needs to stay perky and smiling throughout a tiring day. Were it's bounties enough to ensure that I'm still giving the structural integrity of my house a good reason to worry though? Well, not quite. This is by no means going to be a wholly negative report. Jericho has got a lot going for it, and from a personal perspective I'm very pleased to be able to say that a great deal of that comes from some excellent execution of Barker's input on the part of  developer Mercury Steam. There are though, definitely a few issues stopping me from giving it an unequivocal thumbs-up at the moment, and they're made all the more frustrating by what Jericho gets right. How much you enjoy the game is firstly going to depend on exactly what you want out of an FPS. There's a school of thought these days which I in no way agree with which states that a shooter is only as good as its multiplayer. Campaign modes now seem to be almost becoming sidelined in favor of online play, and if you're the sort of person who's all about blowing holes through your friends' heads, then Jericho is not for you. When I asked Codemasters about how the game approaches the issue, I was told that there are currently no solid multiplayer plans at all. To be honest, it was an answer I'd been expecting, and the explanation didn't surprise me either. With Jericho being focused on a Barker-penned narrative centering on a team of seven strong protagonists, each with unique personal abilities and attributes, and not necesarily combat-oriented ones at that, it was decided that to try to shoe-horn the characters into a contrived deathmatch scenario would have been both hard to balance in gameplay terms and cheapening to the whole project. As a player who much prefers a strong, immersive and coherent single-player mode than for developers to redirect resources to a headshot frenzy, I totally agree with that thinking and I believe it's a philosphy that has definitely benefited Jericho. Given the squad dynamics of the game though, having played the game it's now easy to pine over the joys that an online co-op campaign could have blessed us with, and that's something I'll be discussing more later on. For now though, let's focus on the good things that Jericho does do. In terms of atmospheric horror experience, I genuinely can't think of a game that's ever got under my skin faster or clamped down harder onto my sinew once it's messily burrowed in there. My earlier description of the game as "an assault" is just as apt as it ever was. The overall feel of Jericho is that of being plunged deep and fast into somewhere dark, dense and unpleasant with little hope of escape. That place is filled with nothing but the most nightmarish filth imaginable and none of it is your friend. As you'll expect if you know Clive Barker's work, the game's production design is dripping with severely foul imagery which goes well above and beyond the level you'll find in any other shooter at the moment, and all of it is realized brilliantly. Sure, a Doom Imp is no-one's choice of drinking buddy, and the Locust are the last ones asked to the prom on a consistent yearly basis, but Jericho out-does both of them from the very start, besetting the player with frantic assaults from emaciated S&M cadavers with large pieces of metal both protruding from and nailed onto their bodies, and lumbering, mutilated torsos, bulging with pus and dripping black filth from their rendered, wire-bound flesh and severed genitalia. The game might well contain the now seemingly obligatory 1940's Nazis, but where these differ from their World War II FPS cousins is that Jericho's are half-naked, bondaged-up zombies, complete with fishnet stockings. That's three fetishes for the price of one right there. And when I said "dripping with severely foul imagery" I wasn't being entirely figurative. Jericho's gore is sickeningly realistic. As Jim said after we first got to play it, one of the most striking things about the game's visuals is just how sticky everything looks. Each of its monsters shimmers with the acrid gloss of exposed muscle and torn flesh, giving combat the feel of being attacked by a collection of angry, fresh, open wounds. When Jericho's creatures are seen up close, they glisten with a fetid tangibility that gives the impression that you could reach out and touch them. Not that you'd want to unless you were really weird, but you'll definitely feel like you could. I've previously summed up the Jericho gameplay experience with the word "visceral", and I'm going to do it again, as no other collection of letters and syllables comes close. I'm not though, just talking about the literal level of innards heading outwards. While Jericho does provide some stunningly messy firefights, - Use a weapon powerful enough in a small room containing enough monsters, and the resulting explosion of entrails and limbs bouncing violently off walls can rival the ending of Hellraiser - that viscerality also comes from the sheer density and tension of the game. Through a combination of powerful dynamic lighting, atmospheric effects and the squad dynamic, - Being in hell on your own is scary, but what about when you can hear your friends being picked off? - Jericho whips up a brilliantly upsetting sense of place, which is boosted by frequent QTE cut-scenes which crop up during both combat and scripted story events and make great use of bodily awareness in first-person. Combat itself is punchy and frenetic. Jericho's monsters seriously do not let up or give the player chance to breathe for a second once they give chase, affording the game a real sense of immediacy and danger. It's real "Kill fast or be killed faster" stuff, and for a good few hours I found it very refreshing indeed. Enemy AI doesn't pretend to be as sophisticated as something like F.E.A.R., or as unpredictable, but I've never been one for unfairly comparing a game to something it's not supposed to be, and the level of enemy behavior in Jericho suited me just fine for the type of game it is. Smaller, faster enemies will work their way through the battlefield until they find you and try to remove your face, bigger, slower, better-armed ones will thump around further afield, using cover and ranged weaponry to their advantage, and the nippy, airborne buggers will float around before flitting in for a quick attack and escaping again. Its nothing groundbreaking, but these are slavering, hell spawn mega-bastards, not trained commandos, and in context I found myself with no real problems with the way they handled themselves. Not every game needs to be a tactical masterclass, and there will always be a place in my heart for the therapeutic excess of a well-realized monster hunt.  Speaking of tactics, I think I'm long overdue to go through how the squad-based gameplay pans out in practice. As I've detailed before, Jericho requires the simultaneous control of a varied seven-man team, either by giving orders or hot-swapping between characters for direct control, and the game places a major emphasis on this mechanic for both combat and general progression through the game. The team's individual weapon specialties - sniping, rapid-fire, heavy weaponry, sword-based melee, etc. - and supernatural abilities, which include pyrokinesis, astral projection, telekinesis, time manipulation and bullet control, are the key factors in adding variety to the game's gun-play and also the chief means by which Jericho builds its puzzles.  You might find yourself, for instance, astral projecting to a walled-in enemy in order to unlock the path ahead, or slowing down time to sneak past a machine gun turret's hail of fire in order to disable it. In terms of combat, the team's special abilities can be used individually or in combination to unleash all manner of tactical whup-ass, with a couple of button presses switching from character to character pretty easily. Careful squad management allows some pretty cool multi-directional assaults, particularly on larger enemies and in more expansive areas, and at it's best, combat can take on an almost action-RPG flavor at times. Ironically enough though, those last two paragraphs have brought me crashing inexorably towards the problems I had with Jericho, and I'm afraid I can't hold off my dissection of the less-than-thrilling any longer. You see, the more I played Jericho, the more I couldn't help feeling that its focus on the squad was a little too strong, to the detriment of other elements of its design, and more frustratingly, there were times when that squad-based mechanic just didn't work as well as it should.First up, while the meaty, run-and-gun gameplay was actually a breath of fresh air to me in these days of free-roaming environments and non-scripted AI reigning supreme, after a few hours play the excitement started to lose inertia. It wasn't strictly that that the game was too basic, - given the amount of combat variety available through changing characters alone, there were more than enough ways to approach taking the beasties down - rather the problem seemed to be that with the developer focus clearly on the team, the design of the actual levels had suffered. My main issue is that the environments I played through in Jericho were just far too linear, and while that wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing in a claustrophobic horror game, outside of the squad's abilities, they provided very little to do. Each new section seemed to provide a whole host of possible directions for approach and flanking, but upon closer inspection the old dead ends and invisible walls tended to rear their ugly heads, particularly in the outdoor sections. Again though, I wouldn't have minded that too much, but a lot of them had a frustrating habit of at first appearing to definitely lead somewhere, causing me to pursue a false path for just that bit longer than I usually would have. And "just that bit longer" was coincidently often just long enough for an ambush attack to break out elsewhere and force me to run around trying to find out where the game's genuine path, and therefore the monsters and my subsequently set-upon team, lay. It didn't happen constantly, but it happened enough. Other than the problems of getting lost though, I found the overall layout of the levels often too lacking in variety and options. Once on the right path, the environments were very much a case of "What you see is what you get", with little scope for exploration of approach coming from the landscape in comparison to the protagonists' abilities. I found myself with a similar problem to the one I had when playing through Gears Of War, whereby progression was too often a case of simply being presented with a skirmish area with a single path through, mopping up in whatever way I saw fit, and then moving on to the next one to repeat the process. Something about the game's structure often felt too scripted and regimented, and the lack of environmental options didn't help. Why for instance, give me a telekinetic character who can blow holes in (pre-designated) walls and then barely give her any ability to throw things around in combat? I could briefly stall monsters by knocking them back with a quick blast before comboing with some gunfire, but I wanted to be tearing the place up. I'm sure that limiting the team's paranormal powers in combat situations was a conscious decision to dissuade the player from over-using any one character and force the use of the whole squad, but with the advent of Bioshock I couldn't help wishing that I could properly use the tools at my disposal to wreck and burn a few things and find new routes around the levels without having to have such actions predetermined by the game. The team's abilities are used well in dedicated puzzle sections, but I would have loved a little more freedom to go crazy. Rounding off my paragraphs of woe are some irritations I found with the actual use of the team themselves. While all the protagonists work brilliantly in isolation and are individually very well balanced, - telekinetic Abigail for instance, can use close-up psychic blasts, but is physically armed with a long-range sniper rifle and weaker melee attack, wheras blood-mage Church uses an automatic pistol, mid-range binding magic to hold enemies in place, and a lethal close-range katana - getting the whole group to behave as desired proved a little tricky. The main cause of my troubles was the fact that I just didn't find the command system for ordering around characters not under direct control detailed enough. Options are limited to "Stay", "Go ahead", and splitting the team into two smaller groups to do either one separately, and I found myself longing for the option to direct my team-mates to specific cover with my cross-hair and dictate their levels of aggression or defense without having to jump to them and take manual control. As it stood, my team seemed to behave in much more general terms that I would have liked, too often wading straight into a fight upon sighting the enemy and certainly not always making the best use of their surroundings. This is where the case for multiplayer co-op burst to the front of my mind and started screaming its manifesto with the full force of its lungs. Not only would it have ironed out these frustrations instantly, but having seen the amount of cover lying around that my CPU controlled team was wasting, I can safely say that it would be an absolute blast to play with a few friends.  On top of that, if the character I used to give a "Stay" command got killed, I repeatedly found myself respawning as one of the waiting party only to see the rest of them immediately forget orders and go charging into the fray too fast for me to stop them. Frustrating indeed, and a situation that led to some horrible instances of my auto-leaping from character to character only for each to drop in a hail of gunfire as soon as I took control. It's a situation that is managable, as I saw some Codemasters staff get through a couple of sections that had repeatedly devastated me by using some well-practiced tactics (including keeping the command character alive), but as a beginner with the game, the problem verged on off-putting on more than a few occasions. Don't think though, that my rounding off this write-up with so much negativity means that I think Jericho is going to be a bad game. It has currently got flaws that had me leaving Codemasters' studios a little deflated compared to how I felt when I went in, and I can't help feeling that what I played didn't reach the full potential of what the game could be, but I still have enough air in my balloon to want to give the game a thorough play through when it's released around Halloween. All of the positive points I made about it in my original preview still stand, and while they're a little muddied at the moment due to the unnecessary irritations I found during my play-test this week, I still have hope that they'll be enough to make Jericho a worthy horror experience. Certainly, I'm dying to try out the game with my much-more favored keyboard and mouse set-up, and to play it late at night in the dark to get the full effect it was intended to give. While I'm not expecting a complete overhaul of the things I took issue with by that point, I'm hoping that things can be ironed out a little by then and that more of the good things I saw in the game get a proper chance to shine. And please guys, please could we have a co-op update at some point? Just for me? Pretty please?
 photo

Regular readers will by now be well aware of my excitement over Codemasters' upcoming collaboration with author, film maker, artist, and all-round creative legend Clive Barker. I've been a huge fan of Barker's work since my t...

Quake Wars competition winners

Sep 07 // David Houghton
 photo

Okay chap and chapettes, the results from yesterday's feeding frenzy are in and I'm ready to announce the lucky spammers who've got themselves a beta key for Enemy Territory: Quake Wars. Given that things got a little messy w...

 photo

Do you like Quake? Do you like wars? Have you longed for some time to combine your two passions in videogame form, maybe giving the whole thing a beta-style vibe as you do? If that rather contrived set of predilections sounds...

 photo

Leipzig GC 2007: The French team preserving gaming history for the future


Sep 04
// David Houghton
"Dave, you've got to get over to Hall 5. There are some guys over there who've got every console ever on free play.""Every console ever?""And a couple of arcade cabinets. And the consoles are all set ...
 photo

Leipzig GC 2007: Quake Wars


Sep 04
// David Houghton
Time was short at Activision on the day I popped over for a look at the new Quake II-themed Enemy Territory game, so I unfortunately didn't get as long as I'd hoped for with what was one of my most looked-forward-to games of ...
 photo

Leipzig GC 2007: The mysterious mystery of THEY


Sep 03
// David Houghton
A game called THEY was teasing me for the entirety of the GC. It was one of the first games I made an appointment to see having recieved a press release weeks earlier about it, the last one I got to see over the course of the...
 photo

Leipzig GC 2007: Far Cry 2


Sep 02
// David Houghton
Around a week into my Leipzig coverage, and looking at my writing schedule I've still got a bunch more FPS to detail. It's a sign of the times my friends, and one I'm not entirely happy about. Somehow, this whole genre bandwa...
 photo

Leipzig GC 2007: Hands-on with Crysis


Aug 30
// David Houghton
You might have read Fronz's report of his play test of Crysis back in January. While he found the game to be trouser-troubling beautiful and solidly playable -- despite bugs -- he ultimately wasn't blown away by the overall e...
 photo

Leipzig GC 2007: Hands-on with Rayman Raving Rabbids 2


Aug 30
// David Houghton
I like Rabbids. They do a lot of important work. In this world of mopey, emo, RPG heroes, violent, grizzled, downtrodden anti-heroes, earnest corporate mascots, and cute and cuddly cartoon critters, the Rabbids want nothing m...

  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -