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Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Sup Holmes++ goes live with N++ creators Metanet Software


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
May 31
// Jonathan Holmes
[Update: Show's over everybody! It was great. Rerun should be up soon. Here's a fun talk with Mare and Raigan to hold you over in the meantime. Love that "jobby".] "Why the heck are so many indie puzzle platformers, Pa?" If ...
Dragon Quest VIII photo
Dragon Quest VIII

Dragon Quest VIII is looking good on the 3DS


Time to bang us a Yangus
May 31
// Jonathan Holmes
When it was first released on the PS2 in 2004, Dragon Quest VIII defiantly stood apart from the sea of pseudo-realistic, cut scene heavy RPGs and action games that largely populated the console at that time. It aspired ...
Animal Crossing photo
Animal Crossing

Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer costs 4,000 Yen in Japan


That's about $32
May 31
// Jonathan Holmes
When we first heard about Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer, it was easy to look at it as a stop gap measure to satiate people's hunger for more of the series that would also work to cash in on the current amiibo craze. F...
Monster Hunter X photo
Monster Hunter X

Monster Hunter X looks to make the action fun for everyone


On 3DS in Japan this winter
May 31
// Jonathan Holmes
The Monster Hunter series remains huge in Japan, but it's still more of a cult hit everywhere else. The combat system probably has a lot to do with that. On the surface, it's pretty disempowering. Players are likely to feel ...
amiibo photo
amiibo

Chibi Robo gets a 2D action platformer on 3DS and an amiibo


Chibo amiibo
May 31
// Jonathan Holmes
Love 'em or hate 'em, the power of amiibo is undeniable. Case in point, I spoke to several people this last Friday that had just happily picked up the newly released Splatoon amiibo, but were planning to pass on the game its...
Legend of Pip photo
Legend of Pip

Surprise! Adventures of Pip bumped up to June 4, 2015


New game from WayForward vets
May 28
// Jonathan Holmes
Breaking News! I just received a top secret communique via the World Wide Web that reads as follows ~ "Due to popular demand & the magic of @NintendoAmerica, Adventures of Pip will launch on #WiiU early: June 4!" Destruc...
Splatoon photo
Splatoon

This Space Jam/Splatoon audio mashup almost makes me not hate Space Jam


Space Jam is the devil
May 26
// Jonathan Holmes
You know how a lot of Star Wars fans dislike Jar Jar Binks? As a life long Loony Tunes fan, that's exactly how I felt about Space Jam when I first saw it, back when it was originally released in theaters. I was pretty s...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Sup Holmes hears a hundred voices with Stephanie Sheh


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
May 24
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Show's over folks...
1001 Spikes photo
1001 Spikes

1001 Spikes Wii U patch offers new control options and Off-TV play


...but it has some issues
May 24
// Jonathan Holmes
Last April, Nicalis announced that I'll be a character in 1001 Spikes someday. As you might imagine, that announcement has changed the way my brain works. "Is today the day that I get to play as myself alongside Jonathan Blow...
WayForward photo
WayForward

Til Morning's Light, Skullgirls, and Sailor Moon actresses stream tonight


WayForward plays the greats
May 22
// Jonathan Holmes
[Til Morning's Light is a new horror adventure title from WayForward and Amazon Game Studios, bringing together talent from titles such as Aliens: Infestation, Skullgirls, and... Sailor Moon? We've got a v...
Splatoon photo
Splamiibo
Day one DLC is a tricky thing. If it's too good, people will howl that it should have been in the stand alone game at launch. If it sucks, then you can bet your sweet bippy that dogs will hunt. All of that goes triple for an...

Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Sup Holmes braids a second quest with David Hellman


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
May 17
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Show's over every...
Trigger photo
Trigger

Trigger looks to examine the PTSD process from the inside out


A visual novel about trauma
May 17
// Jonathan Holmes
Amy Dentata is a game developer's game developer, though her next project doesn't look like it's made to appeal strictly to game design theorist. Trigger is a visual novel about suffering from PTSD and the process of discover...

Adam Tierney and Mariel Cartwright on the evolution of Til Morning's Light

May 17 // Jonathan Holmes
Tell us about the origins of Til Morning’s Light. Where did the concept come from and how did you two get involved? Adam: It started as an original WayForward pitch that Mariel and I teamed up on 5 or 6 years ago. In fact, I think it might have been the first project we worked on together. Mariel: I had just gotten started working with WayForward at the time, as one of my earliest game industry gigs. I do a lot of art for WayForward’s game pitches, and this was one of the first ones I did art on! I always thought it was a cool concept so it was great to see it come back after all this time. Five years is a long time. What changed about the concept between that initial document and the game you ended up making? Adam: Not as much as you'd think. From the beginning, the main character was always a teenage girl named Erica, locked in a haunted house, trying to survive overnight and escape by morning. The enemies were different - just bugs and rats and bats, from what I recall. And the concept was originally envisioned as a 2D sideview game (like the original Clocktower), whereas the final game is fully 3D. But thematically, it didn't change much. Mariel: Yeah, surprisingly, from my end the biggest thing visually that changed about Erica was her outfit. It was actually fun to revisit just a few drawings I did back then and really try to bring that character to life. Can you talk about each of your roles on the game? Mariel: I was the lead concept artist.  I designed Erica, the NPCs, and most of the creatures under Adam’s direction. I also storyboarded all the cutscenes in the game, and did a few bit illustrations you’ll see in the game. Adam: I wrote and directed Til Morning's Light, and led the design team. I basically oversaw all creative aspects of the production, working with all the artists and coders as they implemented everything. How would you describe Erica? What did you hope to accomplish with her? Adam: I've always loved the standard setup of a young female protagonist in horror games and films. In the original pitch, we had a very clear visual for Erica (from Mariel's art), but she didn't have much of a defined personality back then. After the game was signed with Amazon Game Studios, we came up with the idea of making her very meek and timid at the start of the game, then slowly evolving her to be more aggressive and powerful over the course of her adventure, so that the girl who came out at the end would feel like a completely different character. Mariel: I think Erica is someone that a lot of girls can relate to— smart, self-aware, but shy and afraid to stand up for herself. Adam: Stephanie Sheh (who voices Erica) really brought Erica to life as sort of a cute dork. Once we heard her take on the character, all remaining dialog was written with that personality in mind. So Erica got a little more hammy and sarcastic as production went along. In what ways does Erica “evolve” over the course of the game? Adam: In terms of VO and story, she begins the game timid and easily-frightened. Her wit and sarcasm is still there, but it's less confident. As the game progresses and she has to defeat all these insane bosses and creatures, Erica gets more and more frustrated and aggressive, so that by the end of the game she's the strongest person in the house. It was a lot of fun to build a story around the idea of your main character slowly evolving over the course of 12 story hours. Mariel: She also changed visually as well - starting with just her normal outfit at the beginning and becoming more tattered, dirty and messy as she progresses through the house. It’s a cool way to evolve her both mentally and physically and show how far she’s come. How would you compare Erica to other WayForward characters? Adam: She's much more subtle than most of WayForward's heroines. With characters like Shantae, Patricia Wagon, and Kebako (Cat Girl) you have very loud, action-packed, dynamic personalities that hit the ground running. With Til Morning's Light, there were still the usual WayForward sensibilities (especially in the visual design and gameplay), but we wanted a very slow build of the characters, and a slow reveal of plot points, with more emphasis on emotional highs and lows than we typically include in our game stories. Mariel: Yeah, Erica is less cartoon-y and more relatable of a character, I think. I definitely I see a bit of myself in her and I’m sure many others will too. Is Til Morning’s Light a “horror” game? How scary is this thing? Adam: Most people would consider it a horror game, I think. "Spooky" might be a slightly more accurate term. There are lots of unsettling, creepy moments, but there's no real blood or gore. If you've ever seen the film Coraline - which is kind of a film for teens, although there is still real risk and death - we're tonally pretty close to that, but maybe a little bit older and darker. I'd say our bosses are probably the scariest thing in the game - even though they're each charismatic (in their own ways), they're also a tremendous, deadly threat to Erica. What’s the gameplay like? Is it a mix of action and puzzling? Adam: Yeah, the game is equal parts exploration, combat, and puzzling. You explore the mansion grounds, which spans over 100 unique locations. Advancing through the game is very lock-and-key driven (in typical horror genre fashion). Combat is rhythm-based, using a touch input system of taps and swipes that get more complicated and challenging as you advance. And puzzling involves a little of everything - deciphering clues, finding pieces, combining and manipulating objects - everything you've come to expect in this genre. Mariel: Erica is a normal girl that’s been thrown into a crazy situation, so she doesn’t have an arsenal of weapons to blow up her enemies. She instead has to rely on what she has, which is basically just herself, so the combat and puzzles were designed around that. Are there any unique features in the game you can talk about? Adam: Most of the ghosts you encounter in the game are friendly. As a general rule in this game, ghosts are good and creatures are bad (and it's explained why through the story). But occasionally you'll come across a ghost that's lost and attempts to flee from Erica. These moments provide a game-long secondary objective to locate and essentially rescue all the 'lost souls' in the game (ghosts without memory of who they are or where they come from). This process involves first revealing the ghost by using the camera on Erica's phone (a mode that's enhanced in the Fire phone version of the game), then after the ghost is revealed, chasing it around the area until Erica absorbs it. Performing this process on all lost souls in the game yields a very special reward. What’s the story like in this game? And how did that come together? Adam: As I mentioned, it's really all about Erica. Although there are over a dozen speaking characters in the story, the story revolves around her. And even the types of secondary characters we included were done as a way to highlight different aspects of Erica (romance, confidence, being a child, being an adult, etc). I'd say the story legitimately runs the gamut of being very funny at times, then very unsettling, then very depressing, and ultimately a (hopefully) very satisfying conclusion. Mariel: I did all the storyboards, so it was important to really show how she changed from scene to scene. Everything from her expressions, posture, and appearance changed as the story progresses, so I’m hoping people really relate to that. Adam: The story was developed between WayForward and Amazon Game Studios. As a publisher, they are very collaborative and tend to assign 'experts' in each area of the game. So rather than me working on the game's story with only producers, they had a story expert who would go back and forth with me on plot, characters, and drafts of the script. The process was very exciting, and I think the story and dialog we ended up with is more developed than if we'd just put it together on our own. The game is getting a release on iOS, Fire phone, and tablets. Were there any challenges in making a game like this for mobile devices? Adam: Not really challenges as much as things we needed to keep in mind. Thematically, there are a lot of complex actions Erica performs in the game. But we wanted the game's controls to essentially support single-touch throughout the adventure. So boiling down a fairly complex, traditional horror game design to a handful of single screen taps took some real thought. The combat, as I mentioned before, is rhythm-based, and this came from us experimenting with a variety of different approaches early on. Initially, we tried combat that was directly-controlled (hit for hit), but to get that feeling good on a mobile device, we had to essentially overpower Erica (which worked against the game being a horror title). So, we ultimately went with a minigame-like rhythm interface, similar to Buddha Finger or Elite Beat Agents. Once we did that, we were able to have tight, challenging combat, but still keep Erica as only a semi-confident combatant. How is TML different from other action-adventure games offered on the iOS and Fire devices? Adam: First and foremost, it's a really meaty game. I think gamers will be surprised by just how much content is here - story, characters, locations, secrets, battles, etc. It feels like a console experience shrunk down for mobile devices, rather than the more bite-sized adventures you often see on mobile. There also doesn't seem to be a tremendous amount of deep horror games on mobile devices. There are a few that attempt this – Amazon Game Studios just shipped another great horror game, Lost Within, on mobile devices a few weeks ago. But overall, I think most publishers and developers don't attempt the genre on mobile because they doubt the possibility of something being creepy and immersive on a tiny screen. Hopefully Til Morning's Light will go toward proving that these types of games are very possible, and work well, on mobile devices.  How has working with Amazon on this game been? Adam: Amazon Game Studios has been a dream to work with. They're very hands on, but at the same time never interfered with the process or put up walls. I think their primary goal is to understand the kind of game that the developer is envisioning and then do everything they can to help realize that vision. Whether we were tackling story or combat or puzzling, I don't recall ever getting any mandates or notes I disagreed with (which as publisher, would be completely within their rights to do). They just sought to fully understand what this game was all about then use any and all expertise they had available to help make it as great as possible. I look forward to working with them on another project in the future. Were there any previous games in particular that influenced your work on Til Morning’s Light? Mariel: Oh man, I love horror games— Silent Hill, Clock Tower, Resident Evil, Fatal Frame — with a soft spot for ones with female protagonists, like Haunting Ground. I love stories where a normal girl is thrown into a terrifying situation and has to fight her way out, so I tried to channel that into Erica. Adam: I've loved horror games and films ever since I was a kid, so I'm sure it all had a subtle influence on this game. My project previous to Til Morning's Light was a Silent Hill title, which is my favorite game series. So SH fans might note some similarities in this game. The same goes for Resident Evil, Luigi's Mansion, Castlevania, Metroid - anything creepy with room-by-room progression.  Who’s the target audience for this game? Adam: Core gamers, the same people enjoying the best games on PS4, Xbox One, Wii U, and Steam PC right now. From the beginning, Amazon Game Studios let us know that this product should appeal primarily to core gamers, which is why Til Morning's Light is a very robust, console-like experience. Obviously we tailored the controls to what works best for mobile devices and tweaked some of our design implementations based on how people enjoy mobile games. But the goal was generally to create something very substantial and immersive. At the same time, there's no real blood or gore in the game. So although it can get pretty dark and unsettling and tense at times, younger gamers who aren't easily frightened should also find the game appropriate to play. Anything else you want to let our readers know about Til Morning’s Light? Mariel: I’ve wanted to be part of a horror game for a long time, so it was awesome to be given the opportunity to work on Til Morning’s Light. I can’t wait ’til it’s out so everyone can see what we put together! Adam: This is the most personal game I've ever worked on, and the talent on this team was some of the best that WayForward's ever put together. I can't wait for gamers and horror fans to check the game out, and hopefully it resonates with you all the same way it did with us.
Til Morning's Light photo
Skullgirls and WayForward devs speak
[Til Morning's Light is a new horror adventure title from WayForward and Amazon Game Studios, bringing together talent from titles such as Aliens: Infestation, Skullgirls, and... Sailor Moon? We've got a v...

Splatoon photo
Splatoon

[Spoilers] Splatoon timeline partially revealed through unlockables


Not what I expected
May 17
// Jonathan Holmes
The image above is not the official Splatoon timeline. It's a goof created by a fan. Still, it shows that some people are already invested enough in the game to start pondering where it fits in the larger Nintendo universe, d...

What if Twitter was a Real Life Party? Video games and violence

May 16 // Jonathan Holmes
With video games in particular, there's absolutely no way of knowing what effect games alone will have on a person on a long-term basis. Some studies saw that many people show a diminished capacity for empathy after playing some videogames, but other studies show the opposite. Unless science is able to gather a perfect test group that is able to be studied by the effects that video games have on them alone, it will never be able to provide us with any conclusive answers. More qualitative, general observations aren't much more helpful. Sure, there are more mass shootings in America now than ever before, but the violent crime rate is also down overall. It would be easy to guess that means the rise of violent video games in America gives most people a positive outlet for aggression, decreasing their capacity for violent crime, while having the opposite effect on a group of outliers who later become mass murderers, but that kind of guess would be completely silly. That kind of guess would have to discount all the other concurrent trends in America today, like the increased levels of violence in film and movies, the increased use of thought- and mood-altering drugs (both street and prescriptions) in modern society, the drastic changes in our sociological/political/nutritional landscape, the Internet's influence on culture in general, and so many other factors. If you know a social scientist who can isolate video games from all those factors in determining how a person has been affected by his or her environment, I've got a crisp $20 bill with their name on it.  Regardless, this video wasn't meant to be a serious debate about all these issues, so I'm not even sure why I'm getting into them now. It's just a little animated reenactment of an unusual and semi-cute interaction I had with someone on Twitter. I hope you like it.  
WIT WAR LP photo
Social media animated!
One of the great things about the Internet is the limitless opportunity for social interaction it provides. While it always saddens me to see people use Twitter and other social media tools for the primary purpose of putting...

Til Morning's Light is a smart take on traditional survival horror

May 15 // Jonathan Holmes
Til Morning's Light starts off with protagonist Erica Page being forced into a big spooky house by two of her more narcissistic, subtly sociopathic peers. While they aren't as overtly monstrous as some of the enemies Erica will encounter later in the game, they definitely come across as soulless. I won't be surprised in the slightest if they turn out to be cannibals. Erica doesn't seem deterred, even in the face of harsh teenage snark and a probable death trap. This is the point in the game where Til Morning’s Light first shows you're playing as a character who has probably played a lot of the same survival horror games you have. Like the movie Kick-Ass, where the costumed heroes are open fans of superhero comics like Batman and Spider-Man, Erica seems to recognize how much her current dilemma feels like something from a PS1- or PS2-era horror title. It's a risky move, which if done poorly, could have easily broken suspension of disbelief. Thankful, Til Morning's Light has the tact needed to have the opposite effect. Erica seems even more believable and easy to relate to given her knowledge of survival horror. If you are the kind of person whose mind might wander to memories of virtual Raccoon City if you were ever trapped in a old, abandoned mansion, then you and Erica already have something in common.  You won't have too much time to sit and relate with Erica, though. It only takes her a few minutes of mansion exploring before she comes into contact with some serious threats in the form of giant flying insects. In the face of actual danger, she's less apt to wear her experiences with horror games on her sleeve and more apt to get into a kill-or-be-killed mentality, which also makes her easy to relate with.  Til Morning's Light is coming to multiple platforms, but it was designed for touch screen interfaces, which might have some of you worried about how fun its combat might be. Much as Superbrothers did with Sword and Sworcery, WayForward has found a smart way around the touch-only design interface that keeps the action simple but tense. Bumping into an enemy on the exploration screen triggers a battle not unlike in a turn-based RPG. Once you start fighting, there's no time for passivity. Things break down into a design that's probably most easily comparable to Elite Beat Agents, except without the upbeat party feel and all the fear of total failure. Tap a circle at just the right time as a ring closes around it. Hit it at the perfect time, do big damage. Come close, you'll squeak by. Fail outright, and you take a hit. Circles appear on screen at unpredictable rhythms and placements, so you'll have to keep your eyes and fingers active to stay alive.  It might not sound like it should work for a horror game, but the level or powerlessness and tension I felt during these encounters was a perfect fit for the genre. Like most real-life fights, combat in Til Morning's Light seems like it should be simple -- just hit the thing that's causing you problems and don't screw up. Of course, these fights are rarely that simple (especially as you gain new weapons that change the combat system) leading to teeth-clenching suspense where even the smallest mistake can make you suffer. These bloodthirsty bugs might feel like arbitrary horror game enemies at first, but dig a little deeper and you'll find that there is a valid explanation for their place in the mansion. I don't want to give too much away, but rest assured that in my time with Til Morning's Light, none of the action, exploration, and puzzle solving felt like it was there just to follow the "rules" of survival horror game design. Everything had an explanation, even the Resident Evil 4-like shop keeper who manages to pop up in the most unusual, dangerous places. Knowing that those explanations are there, should I be brave enough to discover them, was just one of the things that kept me wanting more from Til Morning's Light.
Til Morning's Light photo
Self-aware, spooky, but not smug
[Til Morning's Light is a new horror adventure title from WayForward and Amazon Game Studios, bringing together talent from titles such as Aliens: Infestation, Skullgirls, and... Sailor Moon? We've got a variety of exclusive ...

Newstoid, a Smash 4 guide by ZeRo, exclusive Bloodstained art, and more

May 13 // Jonathan Holmes
We've also got announcements related to our digital/print magazine with GameFan. We're in the process of generating some exclusive artwork from Bloodstained for our cover, an all new full color Arem comic by Corey "Reyyy" Lewis, an exclusive preview of Metal Gear Solid V, and a very special Smash Bros. for the Wii U and 3DS mini-guide by Gonzalo "ZeRo" Barrios.  And that's not the half of it! I wish we always had the opportunity to pop the hood and show you what we're cranking away, but any time spent opening the hood is time that could have been spent cranking. Thanks as always for cranking along with us, and please stay tuned for more announcements coming soon.   
Newstoid photo
Newstoid, a Smash 4 guide by ZeRo,
Destructoid is a lot like Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory. It may look like just another unpredictable carnival of joy and horror on the surface, but behind the scenes, there are hordes of even more wonderful, horrible thing...

WIT WAR LP photo
WIT WAR LP

'What if Twitter was a Real Life Party?' is coming for you


Social media animated!
May 12
// Jonathan Holmes
Hey, did you see those two little old ladies talking about Majora's Mask while innocuously almost eating eyeball cookies? If not, you're missing out.  After seeing that short, I knew that the team at Farleywink Animatio...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Doctorates and rockets on Sup Holmes today with Kim Voll


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
May 10
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Show's over every...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Making The Shining funny and ordinary parenting scary with Pippin Barr


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
May 10
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] Last time on Sup Holmes, w...
#GamerGate photo
#GamerGate

A Pokedex of game journalists that only lists negative traits?


Feelings-type vs. Ethics-type?
May 10
// Jonathan Holmes
Ethics is a major component of social justice, and in recent years, it has also become a hot button issue in the world of videogame journalism. It is with this in mind that a group of social justice warriors decided to come t...
Splatoon photo
Splatoon

What did you think of the Splatoon Global Testfire?


Splat happy or set to pass on toon?
May 10
// Jonathan Holmes
This past Friday and Saturday, Nintendo launched its first ever limited time online stress test/demo with the Splatoon Global Testfire. Due to multiple work-related responsibilities, I was only able to jump on for one match, ...
Nintendo photo
Nintendo

Nintendo talks region unlocking, no mobile games at E3, deal with Universal


Iwata continues to bend to trends
May 10
// Jonathan Holmes
A few interesting fan translations of a recent Nintendo Investor's Meeting hit the internet last night, but as always, we have to take them with a grain of salt until Nintendo's offical English transcriptions are released. Le...
Threats in D.C. photo
Threats in D.C.

#GamerGate get-together sabotaged by threats


Social event in Washington D.C. ruined
May 04
// Jonathan Holmes
[Photo via Daddy_Warpig.] A recent #GamerGate-themed meetup organized by "critic of contemporary feminism" Christina Hoff Sommers and political pundit/wonk Milo Yiannopoulos was put to a disturbing and sudden e...
Devs with Baltimore photo
Devs with Baltimore

Devs with Baltimore bundle includes The Yawhg, Sokobond and more


Seven dollars for some games and a good cause
May 03
// Jonathan Holmes
The Devs with Baltimore bundle is a limited time project organized in part by developer and essayist Merritt Kopas, co-orginizer of the Devs with Ferguson bundle from late last year. The bundle includes the award winning adve...
Dead or Alive photo
Dead or Alive

Microsoft's age guessing app puts Dead or Alive fighter at 12 years old


Kasumi is just a kid according to this
May 03
// Jonathan Holmes
First, a warning. Word has it that anyone who uses Microsoft's trendy new age guessing app gives the company full license to use whatever images it scans in any way they see fit, so watch out. Microsoft could own your face if...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Underground Hangovers and hating your own game with Jordi de Paco


Meet people who make great videogames
May 03
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] First, a word for our regu...
Combat Core photo
Combat Core

Cryamore artist lends talent to Combat Core, a Power Stone inspired fighter


Work in Progress arena fighter brings in top talent
May 03
// Jonathan Holmes
[Update: It turns out that Skullgirls co-creator Alex Ahad is also working on character designs for Combat Core. Is that a crossover I smell?] Most of the time when Destructoid posts something about the revival of a old Capc...
Karous 3DS photo
Karous 3DS

Trailer for 3DS shmup asks 'is life meant to be shitty?'


'Was I right to do this?'
May 03
// Jonathan Holmes
Karous is a vertical shmup about two hugging sisters that was released by Korea-based developer Milestone Inc. back in 2006. It was later ported to the Dreamcast, and then again to the Wii as part of the Ultimate Shooting Co...
WWE photo
WWE

Bullet Age developers' pitch for a WWE beat 'em up looks sublime


CM Punk and Cena take on adorable Brock Lesnar
May 03
// Jonathan Holmes
Not unlike that Black Steampunk Sherlock Holmes mock-up from a while back, the proposition of super deformed WWE beat 'em up is getting quite a bit of traction on Twitter at the moment. Sadly, the game isn't currently in...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Shining, parenting, and peens with the unflappable Pippin Barr


Get to know the people who make great videogames
Apr 26
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Shows over folks!...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Owlboy lead almost made Ducktales Remastered, wants to make Breath of Fire


Get to know the people who make great videogames
Apr 26
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] A couple weeks ago on Sup ...






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