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Disney Fantasia Music Evolved demo is out


Try it out!
Oct 10
// Dale North
I believe that Harmonix's Disney Fantasia Music Evolved is one of those games you'll have to experience for yourself to really get. You can read our previews and get some idea of how it made us feel, but I really think that t...
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Look at this super skinny gaming rig from PiixL, two inches thick


Straps to the back of your TV
Oct 10
// Dale North
I've hid my gaming/media PC rig behind or under my television for years. It's much easier these days with all of the small form factor boxes available.  But I don't care how lovely they make these things; I'm still hidin...
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Get hype with this Japanese PS4 title lineup video


BIIGU TIETORU!
Oct 09
// Dale North
This new Japanese PlayStation 4 commercial shows off a lot of the upcoming games. You might be excited about some of them. Watching it, I was like: yes. Yep. Oh yeah. Yep, that too. Uh-huh. They lost me a bit with a couple o...

The game trailers with the most feels

Oct 09 // Dale North
[embed]282327:55914:0[/embed] The Last Guardian It was at Tokyo Game Show -- I know that. Was it 2009? 2010? Whatever. I remember this clearly: what felt like a floor-to-ceiling display played the debut trailer. Full-blast sound, brilliant color. It stopped me in my tracks. I instantly fell in love with the dog/bird thing. This one. This super cute, cheery one. But the E3 one. Oh, wow. Even now, something about this trailer makes my heart rate slow. I breathe deeper. It's quite a bit more emotional than the TGS one. It makes you feel something. The final shots gave me goosebumps, even today as I put this piece together. The spears in its back get me every time. This game is going to fuck me up if it ever comes out.    [embed]282327:55915:0[/embed] Final Fantasy Tactics When did we first see this? I don't remember. Was it a bonus trailer on a disc? Something like that. Anyway, I watched it hundreds of times. It had me from the spinning crystal and that adaptation of the Final Fantasy "Crystal Theme." The music picks up quickly and then the "The Lion War!" text pops up, hammering in the hype. Then, that phased chorus brings us back into the Crystal Theme. Short, sweet, perfect.  This trailer sold me on the game. 100% effective.   [embed]282327:55917:0[/embed] Metal Gear Solid 2 Prediction: you forgot how great this trailer was. You're completely gone from three seconds in, thanks to that haunting vocal.  What's amazing about this trailer is that the hype holds for over nine minutes, all the way through to the majestic wall-of-strings theme ending. It doesn't let go. I think trailers these days are mostly shit. This is how you do a videogame trailer.    [embed]282327:55918:0[/embed] Dead Island This Dead Island trailer did nothing for me. Maybe I have no soul. Maybe I saw the future and knew we'd be tired of zombies. But there is no way that I would leave it off this list as it resonated with so many. Destructoid's staff was extremely vocal about it needing to be in this article. So here it is. Have you seen it reversed?   [embed]282327:55922:0[/embed] Gears of War The "Mad World" ad for Gears of War proved so popular that the song from it hit #1 on the iTunes charts soon after its release. Microsoft and Epic were surprised at how effective the ad was. The song really made the whole thing. It's amazing what a song can do.   [embed]282327:55923:0[/embed] Dead Space Speaking of songs, "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" was never as fucked up as it was in that early Dead Space trailer. Wow, that was some dark shit, right? The original words and that very end where the singer's voice wavers really make this one stick in your head.   [embed]282327:55929:0[/embed] Silent Hill 4: The Room I felt darkness wash over me the first time I saw the debut trailer for Silent Hill 4: The Room. Testing today, it still works on me.  The moaning and hazy imagery still freak me out. That floating with the shadow? Holy fuck! Yikes! This was an all-new kind of dark for the franchise. The trailer accurately conveyed the game's feelings of solitude and confusion. I loved you so much back then, Konami.    [embed]282327:55927:0[/embed] Smash Bros. Brawl Though the new one is no slouch, the Smash Bros. Brawl trailer from E3 2006 was super-powered original steam engine on the hype train. When that choir kicks in you feel it in your bones. That shot of Mario with his hands out, shaking his head in a power-fueled rage? I do the same thing when watching this trailer. This is a work of art.   [embed]282327:55916:0[/embed] Kingdom Hearts The king of them all. In my eyes, this is the pinnacle of game trailers that make you feel something. Today, even after all of these years, after pressing play on the video to verify it was the right one, goosebumps started at my toes and went to the very top of my head. My eyes watered up. What the hell is wrong with me?
Trailers with feels photo
A round-up of the best
I'm easy. And I think you are, too. Those debut game trailers get me every time. It usually goes like this: Stirring, slow beds of strings and woodwinds underlay a dramatic shot; an extreme closeup of some unknown character. ...

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Rakuen's first trailer is so sweet


Laura Shigahara's upcoming game
Oct 09
// Dale North
Laura Shigihara, composer and musician behind the Plants vs. Zomies and To The Moon soundtracks, has her own game coming up. She describes Rakuen as a mix between Maniac Mansion, The Legend of Zelda: Link...
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Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series hints 'Ironwoods'


Ironwoods
Oct 09
// Dale North
Look at this brand new tweet from Telltale Games. Ironwoods, eh? What does that mean for their upcoming Game of Thrones game? Well, besides hard trees. And how does it relate to the earlier Forrester hint they dropped awhile back?
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These 8- and 16-bit EWI videogame remixes are outstanding


Super Scope!
Oct 08
// Dale North
EWI is a wind controller, or an Electronic Wind Instrument. Basically, it's a synthesizer you blow into, allowing players of acoustic wind instruments to get into the digital music world. It looks kind of like a clarinet or ...
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Reminder: Hatsune Miku to appear on The Late Show with David Letterman tonight


I can't even
Oct 08
// Dale North
This will never fully compute. I doubt that it'll make sense in my head while it's airing, even.  Vocaloid's Hatsune Miku, the voice synthesizer turned popular character, will be performing live on The Late Show with David Letterman at 11:35 p.m. Eastern Time. As a hologram. Right alongside Anderson Cooper and Gina Rodriguez.  Is this world really real?
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Xbox Live has a dedicated weather news app now


WeatherNation launches
Oct 08
// Dale North
Xbox Live does just about everything, now including streaming weather news. WeatherNation has launched for the Xbox 360, bringing 24/7 streaming weather news to users, straight from their television network. It will also feat...
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I'm a sucker for a good Kingdom Hearts trailer: HD 2.5 ReMIX


Sparkles and chimes
Oct 08
// Dale North
That very first trailer for the first Kingdom Hearts game killed me. I still remember that first viewing, being completely overcome with goosebumps and trying to hide that I was tearing up. Moving? Oh man. Yes. I still love ...
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Nindies at IndieCade. Wait, Nindies? I love you, Nintendo


New Nintendo indies to be shown at IndieCade
Oct 08
// Dale North
The list of new Nintendo independent games to be shown at IndieCade that we received this morning? Great. Great news. But I'm more hung up on the title of the press email that Nintendo sent out: Nintendo Showcases Prolific &...
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Link: Open letter to Microsoft, Turn 10, Playground Games on DLC


Nice work, Cheapy D
Oct 07
// Dale North
Forza Horizon 2? Pretty damned good, right? Having to buy a car pack to get the most desired DLC car? Not so good. I have strong feelings of my own on that and other DLC topics surrounding the Forza franchise, but I can save ...

Review: Driveclub

Oct 07 // Dale North
Driveclub (PS4)Developer: Evolution StudiosPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: October 7, 2014MSRP: $59.99 Evolution Studios, the folks behind the MotorStorm games, wanted to create a racer where everyone would play together in one big racing hangout. Driveclub is that. Its strongest point is that it is smartly networked so that even single-player events' scores and times are automatically compared to your friends' results, making for instant competition fuel. Leaderboards exist for nearly every trackable aspect of Driveclub, and the game's Social Hub keeps you up to date on yours and others' stats. Being online also adds pop-up challenges to just about every race. The connective-ness of it all really does have it feeling like a big, digital hangout.  And then there's the actual club aspect of the game, which lets you team up with five friends to work through the game as a group. Your successes benefit the rest of the team along the way, with points going to each member for taking on challenges. When you earn new rides or access, your club members do, too.  Driveclub has a single-player mode that branches into single races and a full career mode, and a multiplayer mode that relies heavily on the social system. All of these modes will eventually put you into about four dozen of the hottest cars and just as many tracks, based on locations around the world. With its challenges and face-offs, slick environmental system, strong course visuals, and constant online connectivity, it always feels like there's something to do or see. But when you boil it down, you're only really taking on three race types in Driveclub: time trials, standard races, and drifting challenges -- a pretty short list. There's nothing like rally or snow racing to mix things up. That all said, even after a couple of weeks of play, I have yet to grow bored of the racing. I suppose this is a testament to the strength of Driveclub's connectivity and social features. For as big as it is, there's a refreshing core that makes Driveclub incredibly accessible. You simply get in the car and drive; there's nothing in the way of tuning or customization, save for a few color/coat options. In fact, outside of Auto/Manual transmission selection, there isn't anything you can change. Everyone is on the same page. Those that like the tinker under the hood may be disappointed at how locked down Driveclub is, but I'd bet that the majority of those that will play the game wouldn't bother if the option did exist. That's not to say that you can't change any options.  Driveclub has six camera views to choose from, all of which have their uses. There are two third-person views, a clean first-person view, a hood view, and two interior views. The two in-car views (cockpit and hood/partial dashboard) are among the best I've ever seen in a racing game. Both sport slick reflective modeling on the windshield, making the view impressively realistic. Under bright light the reflection is sometimes a bit too strong, though. And I wish the height of the behind-glass hood view was a tad bit higher.  The single-player tour has you on the path Evolution has picked, in the cars they've chosen, racing on the the track they've set up. In other words, this is a pretty straightforward career mode. While it branches out a bit with more event types after a few events have been completed, you're still basically on the course they've set. Each of the events has its own requirements, which, when completed successfully, earns you a star. Subsequent event groups are unlocked at set star levels.  Aside from stars, every event and challenge earns you Fame points. These points are at the heart of the game's leveling system, allowing you to unlock more of the game as you play. The better you play, the more points you earn. In classic form, you'll race, eventually place, and then earn new cars and tracks with these points. Club activities also earn you points. Multiplayer has a few different faces in Driveclub. Asynchronous functionality lets you send your just-completed races as challenges, essentially copying your exact race for others to go up against when they're ready to. They've made it really easy to issue a challenge, making for nearly endless competitive play. Conversely, the social system lets you browse others' accomplishments and tackle them as you please. It's kind of like picking a fight. Of course, there's also live multiplayer races to take part in. Driveclub digs through your friends list and tells you who is playing, making matches very easy to put together. The game does a nice job of keeping what's going on in your face at all times, again, making you feel like you're hanging out in a big racing event with everyone else.  The panel-based menu system that lets you do all of this is sufficient, but I wouldn't call it elegant. Sometimes you'll find yourself in a menu loop when trying to find how to accomplish a task, especially on the social side. To be fair, there's a lot of information to be presented. But it would be nice to, say, be able to sort through the list of friends' results by race type. The system could use a bit more polish. There are some bugs, too. I ran into plenty of errors and stalls while trying to join or create multiplayer sessions. Hopefully these will be ironed out in patch releases. The driving feel of Driveclub rides a pretty confident line between simulation and arcade racing, which is impressive to this fan of both sides of racing games. I immediately grinned at the super-assisted cornering and braking as I barreled into my first corner at too-fast speeds without consequence. This means that those just looking for some casual fun will have no problems here. But, unlike some of the more casual arcade racers, Driveclub is respectably responsive and seems to have some solid physics foundations under the hood. This all means that you can approach things like drafting and cornering by the book, or you can just go nuts with the drifting and sliding. You can't please everyone, but this racing fan was mostly satisfied. I found myself completely in the zone when it came to time attacks and other driving challenges, as Driveclub's feel is very easy to get into. But I was literally knocked out of the zone by the constant AI car bashing. This is my biggest problem with Driveclub -- the constant crashing from the single-player AI cars.  Yes, avoiding collisions is a part of racing, but there were too many instances during my time with Driveclub where they felt unavoidable. Pretty much every single race I took part in had me playing what felt like bumper cars with AI cars in some way. At best, I'd get an unfair bump off the road by a passing car during the last stretch of the last lap of a race, knocking me off the road, taking my chances of a podium finish off the table. At worst, AI cars would ram me from behind, smashing me into a wall, making the time spent racing up until that point fully wasted. There have been several instances of an unexpected, unwarranted AI car crash resulting in me earning a collision or cornering penalty. Imagine having your car temporarily throttled for something you didn't do. That's not fun at all. Constant, senseless crashing made Driveclub's single-player tour mode feel like being stuck in the worst version of online racing at times. Crashing is a part of racing -- sure. But the frequency in this case is highly frustrating, so much so that having to take on any challenge against other cars really started to feel like a chore. Thankfully, after unlocking cars and courses, you can play Driveclub against real people and not have to worry about the crashy AI. If you're not fully leveled up, the game will loan you cars until you are. Even with as much as I dislike the constant crashing in the tour mode, Driveclub still has legs with the wealth of multiplayer and challenge options.  It helps that Driveclub is very nice to look at. The cars models are highly detailed and very easy on the eyes. But the courses take the cake here. The beauty of the sun beams flooding the spaces between the trees in the surrounding forests are almost distracting in one course. Snowy mountain passes, dirty back roads, lakeside drives -- all of it lovely, and all serve to show what the next generation of racers should look like.  It's too bad about the infrequent weird visual bugs, especially in the in-car views. Floating gauges and highlights from the environment looked to be pasted on the windshield at times, like weird decorative stickers. Other times I saw floating semi-transparent boxes obscuring the race view in first-person modes, sometimes way in the distance, and others just at the corner of my view. When glitches distract from or obscure the player's view like this, it's hard to overlook them. But it always sounds good. The sound coming from some of the cars in Driveclub is so good that gear heads might fight themselves salivating. Engines roar convincingly, always making beautiful noise as you race. Equally impressive is the treatment of car sounds to fit the visuals. The in-car views in particular have it sounding like the car's machinery is just beyond the monitor.  For racing wheel fans, Driveclub only supports PS4-compatible wheels.  Driveclub is fast and easy to get into, nice to look at, and it has a lot going on in the background to keep you connected and competitive with your club members and other individuals. But that doesn't change the issues in the foreground. Its approachable and enjoyable racing is marred by AI cars that love to unfairly bash and crash on the single-player side. And bugs with the interface and the networking kept me from fully enjoying the multiplayer side. Beyond all of this, it feels like Driveclub needs more race and event types. What it offers has kept me going for a couple of weeks, but how much longer will it continue to do so? It's then fitting that Driveclub will be offered in a free form for PlayStation Plus users. The offering gives players about a fifth of the full game's total cars and tracks, but is otherwise unlocked for exploration both offline and on. Players can see for themselves if Driveclub has enough to offer over other new and upcoming racing alternatives out there.
Driveclub review photo
In the Club
Driveclub was supposed to be a launch day title for the PS4, but it was delayed for a while, pushing back until now. We got our hands on it at the E3 following the PS4 announcement last year and thought it needed more time in the oven, so a delay was actually welcome. But that was a long delay. So, how much of a difference has a year made? 

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Mevius Final Fantasy trademark filed in Europe


Gotta light?
Oct 06
// Dale North
The sharp eyes of NeoGAF have found a European Square Enix trademark for "Mevius Final Fantasy." The trademark covers games and merchandise, so this is probably some kind of videogame. I have no idea what a Mevius is, but I w...
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Operation Kos-Mos works to support Xenosaga HD Trilogy release


You in?
Oct 06
// Dale North
Last month, Namco Bandai producer (and Tekken series director) Katsuhiro Harada called on the fans of the Xeno series to show their desire for an HD remaster of the Xenosaga games. Lots of fans ask him for something like a Xe...
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Crash...into me
[Update: Shows over, but you can watch me play through again in the video above.] Funny thing. I love racing videogames but I'm a terrible driver. In real life, too! Ask anyone that has ridden in my car. In fact, Hamza rode ...

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Former Call of Duty director Dave Anthony talks national security


But it's not as scary in context
Oct 03
// Dale North
This article on gamesindustry.biz had me looking away from my computer screen for a second, dazed. Here's a quote from it, pulled from a new Businessweek article featuring some words from Dave Anthony, former Call of Duty&nb...
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Falcom Sound Team jdk library of music on iTunes


!!!
Oct 03
// Dale North
Game music fans, did you know about this?! I didn't until I wrote this piece about my dream racing game a few days back. While I was throwing out unrealistic wishes I daydreamed about the famed sound crew from Falcom making t...
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Uber is giving Sonic Boom Rides at New York Comic-Con


Gotta go fast!
Oct 02
// Dale North
I hate missing New York Comic-Con. This is only the second one I've missed. I'm missing out on the Sonic Boom Rides in New York, provided by Sega, Chevrolet, and Uber. Imagine jetting around New York in a Sonic-themed ride? I...

If I made my own racing game...

Oct 02 // Dale North
Sim or arcade? Uhh... Both? No, I don't want that and you wouldn't either. But I believe there's a middle ground between simulation racer and arcade that would make fans of both sides happy as well as serve new players with accessibility.  Cornering and braking would be realistic -- sim-ish -- but would be somewhat assisted so that, say, hitting corners at too high a speed wouldn't be as ridiculous of a situation as it is for new players of fully unassisted sim play. I'd want it to be comfortable for everyone to get in and zip around, though also accurate enough that highly skilled racing game players would still have a good time. It's possible. Physics are weird in racing games. You have some of the most accurate simulations ever for things like traction, turning, and braking in some games, but the same title will have you bouncing like a rubber ball against a guard rail. It makes no sense. I'd rather have the whole experience approachable and acceptable than have the uneven response we've seen lately. I'd lean more toward fun than realism, but I'd want it all to be at least somewhat anchored in reality. Crash damage? You can take it or leave it, I say. While I don't mind either way about my car showing dents and scrapes, I think too much time is spent building this part of racing games. And for what? At 150MPH you're looking at the road, not your car. When there's modeling for how damage affects performance, I look at that as an open invitation for your opponents to crash into you. And that makes a bumper cars game, which no one wants. More on that later. Keep it simple. No turbo/nitro, no boosts, no launch pads, no stunts bonuses, no upgrades -- nothing like that. Just a bunch of great cars that can go fast and look cool doing it. Gas, brake, e-brake, steering wheel, speed. That's all you need. But none of those on-the-ground racing guide lines.  One size fits all I like to compete on a level playing field, so for my racing game I'd have nothing in the way of drive tuning or parts customization. An eight-player match with all racers using Dodge Neons should have them all on the same level, right? How is it fair if one of them gets to change out exhausts to gain 25 horsepower?  There might be a better way to work up to being able to buy new parts now, but everything up to this point has seemed like a bit of a grind. Wouldn't you rather just get/earn another car? Acquiring a new car is more fun than clicking through arbitrary parts packs that add minimal improvements to the vehicles. No 'buying' vehicles I understand the need for a progression -- it keeps you playing. Most racing games have you jumping into a starter car or two, with more being unlocked as you progress through increasingly more challenging races. I suppose that's fine, though I'd rather you have access to every car, straight away (see Forza Motorsport 5).  But having to work up to unlocking cars, and then working up the virtual cash to buy them? And then, having to buy parts for upgrades? Stepping back, it seems so unnecessary. I think this all gets in the way of the whole point: racing.  I'd have a system that recommends cars for races, and I'd definitely unlock special cars at points, but for the most part I'd have them all available at game's start, for free. And while I'm thinking about it, let's calm down on the car counts. Why do we need 8 versions of the same car? Lots of tracks That should go without saying, right? Lately, some games have launched with what gamers might consider not enough tracks for the cost of entry. There's only so much you can do with race types and track reversal. And saving some tracks for DLC later? Gross. Go with lots of tracks. Go nuts. We're talking Mario Kart numbers here. Who says you can't do that in a real-world racer. Variety is the spice of life. There's no need for every track to be based on a real-world locale, or for them to be painstakingly laser scanned, either. Just make some good tracks with some fun S-curves and plenty of straightaways. Put a cornering nightmare in there. License Laguna Seca. Do that one track with the tree canopy that has the sunlight rays peeking through. I love that.  No fucking bumpercars Nothing ruins a racing game faster than poor AI. No one liked the brainless, pre-scripted choo-choo train of cars in older racers, and having an opponent magically teleport next to you as you near the finish line (read: rubber banding) is just as bad.  Thankfully, those problems are fading. There's only one really large problem left to deal with: bumper cars. This refers to how AI cars will bash and crash against you in single-player challenges. Some of the Gran Turismo games were horrible about this, to the point where your skill played only a small part in winning a race. You had to pray that you wouldn't get rammed off the course. Restarting after a senseless bashing is the norm in these games. Having cars that bash into you for no good reason (read: as part of the simulation) in your game doesn't get you there. It's miserable. Turn 10 has made progress on this issue with their latest titles with the introduction of their Drivatar system. It's not perfect yet, but at least you're more apt to blame your friends than the AI when you get slammed into. Forza Motorsport 5 was the first time that racing against a computer felt real to me. So I'd want something like Drivatar in my racing game. Right stick gas/brake, full controller/wheel support A few years back, I tested my lap times in Gran Turismo to compare the traditional right and left trigger gas/brake control scheme to their optional right analog stick scheme. Though it's far from proper testing, I can say that I always fared better using the analog stick. My reaction time improves greatly, my cornering looks nicer, and I'm less distracted by having my fingers constantly gripping down. This leaves the fingers open for bumpers to serve as paddle shifters, which just feels cool.  As for controller and wheel support, I know that's easier said than done. But if we're talking dream game here, I'd want all the wheels to work. Remember the Namco NeGcon twistable controller? Yes, support that. Put the Jogcon in there, too. Hell, get that Sega Saturn Nights analog controller in there. Customizations of the right type I get that customizability is a big deal in racing games. It's one of the key marketing bullet points, sure. You want a pink car with a pixelated ninja turtle on it? Fine. I'll be out on the track while you do that.  I'm fine with leaving in customization options for car decorations, but I'd rather racing game makers spend more time on the customizations that I can really use. How about a variable height setting for the in-car views? I can't be the first person that has dreamed of this. I'd love to be able to change the size of the rearview mirror, or have variable reflectivity settings for the car glass. Now about some kind of option for visual alerts for oncoming cars with in-car views selected? My racing game would let you do things to the UI to make the view make more sense for the player.  [embed]281930:55824:0[/embed] Personality, please How did racing games become the most sterile and boring genre of games? Everything is shiny and simulated and cold and flat. How about some personality? Remember Ridge Racer 4? It had that killer intro song, the crazy color scheme, and that pit crew guy with the great facial hair. Great story-based career mode, too.  I'm not saying I'd copy Ridge Racer, but I'd certainly go farther than some have lately. I like Forza Horizon, but the club culture is more of a design inspiration than genuine personality. We need more. We don't need a generic avatar, and you can keep that creepy, faceless driver from the simulation games. Either do it well or don't do it at all. I don't think it would take much to inject some personality into these racers. Make it funny. Fart jokes or something. Make the cars talk. I dunno. Just do something! [embed]281930:55838:0[/embed] Music to my ears I'd find a way to get Falcom Sound Team jdk to do all of the music. How fucking incredible would that be? And I'd actually have the team write theme songs for each of the tracks so that the music would fit the feel. I know they do that in character-based kart racers, but why can't we do that in street racing games? But I'd take anything over the shallow, mindless random playlist of go-fast electronic tunes. We need big playlists for the hundreds of hours of play these games will get. Remember how Snoop Dogg did a track for Gran Turismo 3? That was fantastic. And in the same session you could get some cool acid jazz, and then a track that rocked. Nice music in that game for sure. Ridge Racer almost never disappoints; the fifth game had music from Boom Boom Satellites.  I'm not saying that the songs need to be licensed. Sometimes that's exactly the wrong thing. I'm saying that game makers should think about their game and have music made specifically for it. Crazy, right? Multiplayer doesn't have to be that hard I think too much goes into creating multiplayer in racing games. I'd stay mostly asynchronous as it keeps things easy. I love time challenges, and those are perfect for asynchronous match- ups. I'd definitely want a challenge system like that of upcoming PS4 game Driveclub. You can take your performance from a single-player race and send that out immediately after as a challenge to friends and others. Constantly running leaderboards track the times and performance of all your friends. That's all you really need. Of course, group matches are different beasts. I'd want the ability for 8 or more players to go at it in roll-your-own race events of their choosing. That's it. It's my experience that racing game players are out on their own. We'll see how Driveclub does, but I've found that it's usually every man for himself in online racing. There could be some way to have multiplayer matches figure into rankings, but unless that way makes sense to the players, they'll stick to their personal times and leaderboard rankings. And that's fine by me. No Paid DLC This is my game, right? If it is, then I'm giving customers the full game right out of the gate. All the cars, all the tracks, and all of the options, with no surprises later. Maybe that's crazy. ----- Go ahead. Tell me you wouldn't play my racing game.  My dream game? Its core would be something like a new OutRun game with lots of licensed cars and more tracks, with some rally racing added in. It would be slightly more competitive, with sharper driving control. It would probably be a huge mess of a game that no one would dig. To be fair, we're spoiled these days with all of the great racing offerings out there. There's something to love in just about all of them. And they'll only get better. If you're not thinking too hard you can have fun with any racing game. I'm itching to play some Virtua Racing right now for some strange reason.
Dream racing game photo
Like that would ever happen
With both Driveclub and Forza Horizon 2 hitting the streets this month my mind is fully in racing game mode. We racing fans are spoiled this month with two very nice titles, and I'm racing my days away in them. As of late I a...

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Nintendo's new website is fun


And informative!
Oct 02
// Dale North
Check out play.nintendo.com, Nintendo's new website. Nintendo says you can visit regularly to see what's happening with your favorite characters, or to download new "cool stuff." Content will be updated weekly. The stuff they...
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Katamari Damacy composers confirmed for MAGFest 13


Lonely Rolling Staaaar
Oct 02
// Dale North
MAGFest, the Music and Games Festival, is going into its thirteenth year, and to celebrate they have some big musical guests lined up. Katamari Damacy composers Yuu Miyake and Yoshihito Yano will be...rolling into town t...
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Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Curtain Call song contest winners announced


Picked by Nobuo Uematsu himself
Oct 02
// Dale North
The Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Curtain Call Legacy of Music contest results are in! Final Fantasy series composer Nobuo Uematsu picked the winners himself (I'm still kind of freaked out that he heard my contest demonstration ...
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These limited edition The Evil Within PS4s don't look very scary


Especially the white one
Oct 01
// Dale North
Oooh, a building outline! Terrifying! You'll get a scary-ass building etched onto your PS4 if you're nabbing a Japanese Psycho Break (The Evil Within here in the west) limited edition release. It comes in Jet Black or Glacier...
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Ms. Pac-Man Pink Ribbon Campaign to benefit breast cancer foundation


New maze proceeds to to foundation
Oct 01
// Dale North
Namco Bandai has launched its Ms. Pac-Man Pink Ribbon Campaign in cooperation with the National Breast Cancer Foundation.  They plan to raise awareness through gameplay in their range of mobile titles, with the highlight...
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Green Man Gaming launches publishing arm, Green Man Loaded


Announcements coming soon
Sep 30
// Dale North
Awesome-ass online gaming store Green Man Gaming now has a publishing label called Green Man Loaded. They're already neck deep in the business, with contacts that reach out to every corner of gaming. So publishing makes sense...
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Dragon Quest X producer wants his game on PS4


Hey, so do I!
Sep 30
// Dale North
In a fan Q&A during today's Dragon Quest X TV Niconico stream, Dragon Quest X producer Yosuke Saito was asked if Square Enix would bring the game to PlayStation 4. According to  Hachima Kikou, Saito said that he...
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Yes, a Tetris sci-fi movie is currently in production


No, really
Sep 30
// Dale North
Mega entertainment company Threshold Entertainment has the green light from The Tetris Company to create a live-action Tetris movie. That alone is crazy. But Larry Kasanoff and Jimmy Ienner are planning on turning the puzzle ...
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Here's a full 15-minute Yakuza Zero story trailer


...in Japanese
Sep 29
// Dale North
Even if you don't understand Japanese this new Yakuza Zero story trailer looks hot as fire. This was the exact one blaring from Sega's Tokyo Game Show booth a few weeks ago, made watchable on the internet for the first time ...
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The Evil Within has gone gold so let us hack up some bodies


New trailer
Sep 29
// Dale North
I'm good and ready to jump into The Evil Within. So ready. The game has gone gold across all platforms, says Bethesda. That means that we're on track for the October 14 release of Shinji Mikami's latest survival horror, brin...

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