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Borderlands screenshots photo
Borderlands screenshots

Tales from the Borderlands: Escape Plan Bravo screenshots, we got 'em


Is episode five out yet?
Aug 18
// Darren Nakamura
Wow wow wow. This episode was so good, guys. I don't think I've ever given a 10/10 to anything on Destructoid before. Y'all need to play this series. For those who would rather just look at some pretty pictures, I have those ...

Review: Tales from the Borderlands: Escape Plan Bravo

Aug 18 // Darren Nakamura
Tales from the Borderlands: Escape Plan Bravo (iOS, Mac, PC [reviewed], PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Telltale GamesPublisher: Telltale GamesReleased: August 18, 2015 (Mac, PC, PS3, PS4)MSRP: $4.99, $24.99 (Season Pass)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit [Editor's note: there will be no major spoilers present for the episode reviewed here, but events in previous episodes may be discussed.] Things were looking bad for Fiona and Rhys at the end of the third episode. Sure, Gortys found her first upgrade and the path to the Vault of the Traveler became clearer, but newcomer Vallory had the group pretty well pinned under her thumb by the end. Complicating matters was the revelation that the final Gortys upgrade isn't even on Pandora; it's up on Hyperion's moon base Helios. For a series known for fast travel between exotic locations and featuring interstellar travel as part of its lore, it's easy to forget just how infrequently anybody takes a trip off Pandora. Usually, denizens of the wasteland are stuck there. And so the first act of this episode involves the non-negligible task of actually getting from Pandora to Helios. The group grows as August and Vallory's henchmen ride along to ensure Rhys and Fiona don't try anything funny and Scooter hops in as the on-board mechanic. It's a pretty motley crew, well deserving of the '80s rock credits sequence rocket launch montage. [embed]306135:60017:0[/embed] Telltale continues to demonstrate its comedic mastery with Tales from the Borderlands. One of the funniest parts comes from a totally visual gag within the launch montage. It elicited more laughs with no words than some comedy games do with thousands. The written jokes here are on point too. Each of the characters brings something different. Gortys remains a highlight through the whole ordeal, even if she has fewer lines than she did in the previous episode. Fiona's sarcasm hits just the right notes. Handsome Jack is about as likable as a murderous psychopath can be. The plan that comes together even allows players to act like total assholes without having to feel too bad about it. The trip to Helios also allows for one of the most bizarre scenes in recent memory. Without spoiling too much: it's a classic Telltale quick-time event action sequence, but it involves a horde of Hyperion accountants and a lot of mouth-made sound effects. It isn't all laughs. The series has had its serious moments in the past, but Escape Plan Bravo will cement Tales into the overall Borderlands lore. It is no longer a side story on Pandora. It feels like its own proper entry in the timeline, with real effects on the world Gearbox built. It's a stark contrast with Telltale's other current series Game of Thrones. While the events in that series are important to the Telltale-designed protagonists, they aren't important to anybody else in that world. Telltale's characters and story in Tales from the Borderlands are important to Borderlands as a whole. I have to imagine there is at least a modicum of trepidation when handing over a franchise to another developer, but if Gearbox had any fears that Telltale wouldn't do right by Borderlands, those fears would be unfounded. If anything, it feels like Gearbox needs to hire the Telltale writers to consult on Borderlands 3. Escape Plan Bravo solidifies Tales as a must-play series for those interested in the Borderlands universe. I cannot wait for the last episode, The Vault of the Traveler. There is so much to resolve: Vallory, Handsome Jack, Vaughn, Gortys, the masked man, Felix, the vault. I'm stressing out just thinking about it all. There isn't much more to say without spoiling the best episode of Tales from the Borderlands yet. I laughed. I cried. I haven't been able to say that about a Borderlands game since Tiny Tina's Assault on Dragon Keep, or about a Telltale game since the first season of The Walking Dead. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Borderlands review photo
Encore! Encore!
[Disclosure: Anthony Burch, who consulted on the story for Tales from the Borderlands, was previously employed at Destructoid. As always, no relationships, personal or professional, were factored into the review.] Tales ...

Review: Volume

Aug 18 // Darren Nakamura
Volume (Mac, PC [reviewed], PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita)Developer: Bithell GamesPublisher: Bithell GamesReleased: August 18, 2015MSRP: $19.99Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit Bithell has cited Metal Gear Solid as an inspiration for Volume, and the similarities are easy to see. Specifically, it evokes Metal Gear Solid: VR Missions with its simplified visuals and a structure that follows a string of small, self-contained rooms to clear. Volume is more stealth puzzle than stealth action, with some levels leaning further than others in the pensive direction. The starkly colored, clearly delineated environments work exceptionally well to communicate important gameplay information. Coupled with the enemy vision cones laid directly onto the floor and the visible sound radius, there is never any question what might have set a particular guard off. Protagonist Robert Locksley (get it?) starts off with nothing but his wits and whistle. He defaults to a slow, sneaky walk and can crouch lower behind single-block walls to stay out of sight. He is also able to set off sinks and toilets to lure the guards from their posts, or he can just purse his lips and let out a sound that will cause them to hone in on the position. [embed]306112:60012:0[/embed] Eventually, a host of gadgets unlock to help Rob on his way. The Bugle can be thrown to cause a faraway noise. The Oddity will hold an enemy's attention regardless of any sounds. The Mute allows Rob to run silently. There are more, and each one feels useful and fun to play with in its own right. Smartly, gadgets are tied to levels and Rob can only hold one at a time, so the right tools for the job are always there without overwhelming the player with unnecessary options. Of course, this gives rise to some occasions where a particular gadget would fit the situation perfectly, but the challenge is in solving that problem with something else. Over the course of the 100 story levels, Rob uses an old "Volume" -- a VR simulator in the future -- to broadcast to the world how to break into properties of the wealthiest citizens and steal their belongings without harming any person. He isn't exactly robbing from the rich and giving to the poor; he's teaching the poor how to rob from the rich themselves. Therein lies a bit of a discontinuity between gameplay and narrative. The more gamey aspects of Volume work well in the context of having clear objectives and solve puzzles, but when Rob broadcasts himself alerting every guard and touching the exit square just as he's about to be shot, it doesn't really make sense for somebody to want to replicate that performance in the real (in-game) world. A worse offender in this regard is with the checkpointing, which, like most of Volume's gameplay elements, is very lenient. By touching a checkpoint, current progress in a level is saved, but enemy locations are reset upon restarting. It's clear why this is the case: it keeps the player from being caught in a death loop if he were to hit a checkpoint just before being killed, but it brings up some edge cases where the fastest solution involves being caught and resetting the enemies. The fact that it doesn't gel with the idea of Rob showing the public how to pull off these heists just adds to the weirdness. The leniency makes Volume a one-and-done type of experience. The par times are easy to hit on the first try for most levels even with a few flubs in play. (I only had to go back and retry two.) I would have appreciated some extra incentive to really master a level, like bonuses for exceptional times or for completing a level without being spotted. Still, even without any added replay value, the campaign runs about six hours; it's not meager by any means. I ran into a handful of bugs during my playthrough, though most were reportedly squashed before launch. I did still encounter one particularly annoying glitch in the level editor, where menu items were constantly scrolling, making it difficult -- though not impossible -- to engage in my usual level editor ritual of making a playable Mr. Destructoid likeness. When I think about Volume, I'm of two minds about it. From a pure gameplay perspective, it handles stealth in a way that always feels fair and, if anything, is almost too forgiving. It conveys information clearly and it's never too frustrating. My biggest complaint of what's here is the ability for a player to cheese through a level, abusing the checkpoint system or the exit square to call something a win despite feeling like a clumsy mess. However, a lot of where Volume suffers is in what's not here. I wish I could pan around a level to formulate a plan before diving in. I wish I were given incentive to play well instead of just adequately. Volume is not a bad game. But it still leaves me wanting for something more out of it. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Volume review photo
Does not go to eleven
[Disclosure: Jim Sterling and Leigh Alexander, who are both credited in Volume, were previously employed at Destructoid. As always, no relationships, personal or professional, were factored into the review.] I went into Volum...

Telltale Borderlands photo
Telltale Borderlands

Tales from the Borderlands Episode 4 trailer blasts off


'I was wired ready!'
Aug 17
// Darren Nakamura
Tales from the Borderlands: Escape Plan Bravo hits this week, so as is its custom, Telltale has released a trailer to pump audiences up for it. In Catch a Ride we learned Gortys's second upgrade was somewhere up on Heli...
Rocket League DLC photo
Rocket League DLC

Rocket League's Supersonic Fury DLC is cooler than I expected


Love that new pearlescent paint finish
Aug 14
// Darren Nakamura
Rocket League just released two DLC packs: Utopia Coliseum is a new arena to play in and is available for free while Supersonic Fury contains a host of new car customization options and runs about four bucks. The two new cars...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

Super Mario Maker's level components will be drip-fed


Tools, sounds, and effects unlock
Aug 12
// Darren Nakamura
Every time I think I know what to expect out of Super Mario Maker, a new video shows up with a little more information. The video below was just released and I'm having trouble keeping the hype in check. Here's what's new to ...
Telltale Borderlands photo
Telltale Borderlands

Tales from the Borderlands Episode 4 out next week


Have some screenshots
Aug 12
// Darren Nakamura
From the announcement of the "crowd-play" event at PAX Prime, we knew Tales from the Borderlands: Escape Plan Bravo was imminent. I figured the event attendees would have advance knowledge and the rest of us would get it the ...
Skulls of the Shogun photo
Skulls of the Shogun

Nerdist's new Skulls of the Shogun cartoon debuted today


'That's why they call this a cold open'
Aug 11
// Darren Nakamura
This is a little surprising. Skulls of the Shogun was a great little game that suffered from a rocky launch and never saw widespread success, even after breaking out of its Windows 8 exclusivity. So for Nerdist to pick up the...
Grow Home on PS4 photo
Grow Home on PS4

Ubisoft's robot beanstalk game Grow Home heading to PS4


A.I. grown home
Aug 11
// Darren Nakamura
Grow Home released on PC earlier this year, and it sort of took us by surprise. This is an Ubisoft game? The publisher currently best known for squirting out iteration after iteration of Assassin's Creed is doing a game ...
The Walking Dead photo
The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead: No Man's Land features tactical zombie killing


Voice work not as bad as 'Merlinderl'
Aug 11
// Darren Nakamura
Oh! A game based on The Walking Dead that focuses on tactical zombie survival? Sure, sounds great. Or maybe it doesn't technically sound great, as Norman Reedus really hams up the voice work in this trailer, going overboard w...
Lighthouses photo
Lighthouses

Today is National Lighthouse Day, go play To the Moon


Everything's Alright
Aug 07
// Darren Nakamura
We have a lot of silly "holidays" in the United States, when we don't actually take off work but instead just take a few minutes to think about a thing we maybe don't often think about. Today is National Lighthouse Day, so le...
Telltale Borderlands PAX photo
Telltale Borderlands PAX

PAX Prime attendees able to 'crowd play' Tales from the Borderlands Episode 4


Potential hints about its release date
Aug 06
// Darren Nakamura
With just a little over three weeks to go, PAX Prime is almost upon us. The full schedule isn't available yet, but Telltale sent over a snippet including its plans at the sold out gathering. On Saturday, August 29, Telltale w...
Nero on PS4 and PC photo
Nero on PS4 and PC

Sparkly narrative-driven puzzler Nero headed to PC and PS4 'early next year'


Or maybe 'puzzly visual novel'
Aug 06
// Darren Nakamura
Nero (stylized as NERO) released earlier this year on Xbox One. Our own Brett Makedonski liked it quite a bit, giving it a nine out of ten and saying it "prioritizes emotion above all else." I had been tentatively interested ...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live's new batch of songs is... actually pretty good


Boston, Rush, MGMT, and others
Aug 05
// Darren Nakamura
Past updates to the Guitar Hero Live set list have puzzled me, betraying how out of touch I am with popular music, but this one brings me back. I don't care how many times I have played Boston's "More than a Feeling" in a mus...
Mario's li'l dick photo
Mario's li'l dick

Mario's silhouette shows off his li'l dick


Also he shares animations with Kid Kool
Aug 04
// Darren Nakamura
Mario has been with us for a long time. He's an icon. He has been scrutinized, discussed, and deified among gamers. That doesn't matter at all right now. What matters right now is Mario's silhouette looks like it has a li'l d...
New Hi-Rez game photo
New Hi-Rez game

(Update) Hi-Rez announces tactical team-based shooter Paladins


Playable at gamescom
Aug 03
// Darren Nakamura
[Update: In an email with Destructoid, a Hi-Rez representative confirmed that Paladins will be free to play, but the developer is "still working out the specifics." To prognosticate for a bit, I would personally guess the mon...
Hue photo
Hue

Hue uses color to solve its puzzle platforming


ROY G BIV
Jul 31
// Darren Nakamura
Making objects disappear and reappear at depending on visibility has been done before, but Hue multiplies that idea by a factor of four. Instead of it being a simple light/dark dichotomy, backgrounds in Hue can be one of eigh...
Roll Playing Game photo
Roll Playing Game

Roll Playing Game gets the ball rolling this fall


And other ball-related puns
Jul 30
// Darren Nakamura
We might just be in a new renaissance of "roll the ball to the goal" games right now. Super Impossible Road showed us the benefits of breaking the rules. Polyball took it to a trippy otherworld. Now we have word about Roll Pl...
Hard West photo
Hard West

Hard West playable at gamescom and PAX Prime, releasing this fall


Kanye and Kim's second child
Jul 30
// Darren Nakamura
Hard West did enough to impress Kickstarter backers last year, with its bloody Old West theme and its tactical combat. Good news for fans: it's looking like this one won't be languishing in development limbo like so many othe...
The Banner Saga: Warbands photo
The Banner Saga: Warbands

The Banner Saga getting a cooperative tabletop miniature game


Warbands
Jul 30
// Darren Nakamura
Stoic released The Banner Saga last year, and it was a great strategy role-playing game. It had characters on a square grid, drama, and lots of death. Basically, it was ripe for conversion to a board game. Today at GenCon, St...
Iconoclasts photo
Iconoclasts

Iconoclasts finally gets a release announcement: Steam and Sony systems in 2016


Also drops the 'the' from its name
Jul 29
// Darren Nakamura
We have had our eyes on The Iconoclasts for a while now. It started development in 2010, and we have covered whispers of updates sporadically since then, including a rad mecha-worm boss fight using rail transport last year. G...
Severed delay photo
Severed delay

DrinkBox's Severed is being delayed past summer


A few new screenshots to show off
Jul 29
// Darren Nakamura
Guacamelee! was rad and DrinkBox Studios' next project Severed has a lot of the same stuff going for it, despite existing in an entirely different genre. It has that same sharp cartoon art style and it doesn't shy away from s...
Alphabear mad libs photo
Alphabear mad libs

Some of the best Alphabear mad libs out there


It's what's for dinner
Jul 28
// Darren Nakamura
Alphabear has been out for a few weeks now, but we haven't done much talking about it since its release. That's a dang shame, because it might just be one of my favorite games of 2015. On its surface it's just a word game, bu...
Legacy board game photo
Legacy board game

Risk Legacy designer working on new civilization-themed legacy game


Chronicles: Origins
Jul 28
// Darren Nakamura
It sure has been a long time since Risk Legacy originally released, and yet, I can't help but perk up at the news that Rob Daviau is working on something in that vein. Heck, I named the previously announced SeaFall as my mos...

Review: Divide by Sheep

Jul 24 // Darren Nakamura
Divide by Sheep (Android, iOS, Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Victor Solodilov and Denis NovikovPublisher: tinyBuildReleased: July 2, 2015MSRP: $2.99 (Android, iOS), $4.99 (Mac, PC)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit Like many well-designed puzzle games, Divide by Sheep starts out with a simple premise, which it builds upon as the player progresses. Groups of sheep in numbers ranging from one to nine are spread across platforms whose sizes can vary within that same range. Sheep can be moved between adjacent platforms, but if a group size ever exceeds the destination platform size then the excess sheep are thrown into the water and drowned. The goal is to load life rafts with sheep, but only in specified numbers. Too few and the raft won't launch, too many and the raft will spring a leak and sink. Hitting one numerical goal for a level will unlock the next, but mastering a level requires three quotas to be met in a specific order. In the beginning, there isn't a lot to think about. The options for adding and subtracting sheep from a group are small: combine two groups together to increase the number or throw more sheep than a platform can hold to decrease. It might sound complex in writing, but it's an easy concept to pick up after a few minutes of play. [embed]296494:59650:0[/embed] Not far in, Divide by Sheep introduces new elements to use toward the end of filling up life rafts. Fences block movement between adjacent platforms. Dynamite platforms explode and disappear if they have no occupants. Laser fields will slice sheep in half so one divided sheep takes up two spots on a platform. (This is where the name of the game comes in.) The first major change comes with the introduction of wolves. If a wolf and a sheep share the same platform, the wolf will eat the sheep and become so obese it cannot be moved or fed again. Wolves have their own life rafts and the two species can never commingle on rafts. It almost reminds me of the old fox/rabbit/cabbage puzzle; there are constant calculations for when and how to feed the wolves in order to get the right number of animals to safety. A wolf can be fed to completion on half a sheep, so one sheep sent through a laser can feed two wolves. With all of the mechanics put together, there are several ways to add and subtract from groups of sheep and wolves. What I like about the setup is that even though there is often only one three-star solution to a puzzle, there are several different avenues to mentally attack it from. In some levels when the quotas are high, it's important to note exactly how many animals can be safely sacrificed. Others require a different kind of foresight, forcing one initial move since all others would lead to failure. Still more are so complex that a sort of trial-and-error can reveal the path to the best answer. The next big wrinkle comes in the Dark World, where Death finally shows up. He has rafts of his own, and he is collecting souls. It doesn't matter how the animals die; they can be drowned, sliced, eaten, or burned and he will take them. It eventually gets to a point where sheep can do double duty in terms of raft occupancy. The sheep can be cut in half to fill Death's raft, then duct taped back together to fill a sheep raft. That highlights the odd tone of Divide by Sheep. At a glance, it looks like an average cartoony mobile title. The soundtrack is bouncy and upbeat. So the juxtaposition of that G-rated presentation and the graphic slaughter with copious amounts of blood is funny in the same way the fictional cartoon The Itchy & Scratchy Show is. It would be disturbing if it weren't also adorable. Divide by Sheep hits the perfect level of difficulty, where every stage makes me think for at least a few seconds (and often for several minutes), but each one is also small and self-contained enough that persistence and critical thinking can always lead to victory. It has never felt too easy nor have I ever been permanently stumped. It's smart, it's pretty, and it never dwells on any one idea for too long. At its heart is a quality math puzzler, but what makes it shine is the dark comedy found in killing cartoon animals just to satisfy some arbitrary numerical requirements. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Divide by Sheep review photo
Not baaad
Death is lonely. Death wants some company. So naturally he would flood a plain filled with sheep and wolves, then float rafts requiring very specific numbers of dead creature souls at a time. Obviously. Divide by Sheep is a math-based puzzle game and to that end it works well. What makes it noteworthy is the window dressing, a whimsical cartoon presentation of fairly morbid subject matter.

Rare Replay trailer photo
Rare Replay trailer

Rare Replay trailer goes the cardboard cutout route


Now I want to play Parappa the Rapper
Jul 24
// Darren Nakamura
Rare Replay is coming out on August 4. That's in less than two weeks! The collection of games from Rare's past 30 years is showing up on Xbox One with some extra nuggets thrown in as well. The trailer above talks about this ...
XCOM 2 Muton photo
XCOM 2 Muton

XCOM 2 Muton is borrowing Marcus Fenix's Lancer


Unofficially
Jul 23
// Darren Nakamura
2K Games and Firaxis just released a couple screenshots for the new Mutons in the upcoming XCOM 2, and something jumps out right away. Is that a chainsaw bayonet? Granted, it's not like anybody could "own" the idea of attachi...
The Talos Principle photo
The Talos Principle

The Talos Principle: Road to Gehenna is out now


Watch the launch trailer
Jul 23
// Darren Nakamura
The more time passes since playing The Talos Principle, the more I think it's going to end up on my personal games of the year list. Releasing late last year, it just missed the cut to be considered for 2014, so it will be g...
Pixels on Rotten Tomatoes photo
Pixels on Rotten Tomatoes

Some jerk ruined Pixels' perfect zero Rotten Tomatoes score


He probably did it for the clickbait
Jul 22
// Darren Nakamura
Look, we all knew from watching the trailer that Adam Sandler's 1980s video game-themed Pixels was going to be bad. That much was clear. So when Twitter was abuzz this morning about its zero percent Rotten Tomatoes score...
Game of Thrones screens photo
Game of Thrones screens

Game of Thrones: A Nest of Vipers screenshots, we have some


Hisssss
Jul 21
// Darren Nakamura
Another episode of Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series, another batch of screens I took while playing through for review. This batch seems especially small, for two reasons. For one, I was less diligent about taking scree...

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