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The paradox of selling The Beginner's Guide

Oct 03 // Darren Nakamura
When the game begins, writer and narrator Davey Wreden talks about a person he used to know named Coda. He builds a history between them: they met at a game jam, Wreden was fascinated by Coda's games, this one particular game was the first Wreden saw though it isn't the first presented to us, and so on. He inserts little details about the relationship, like how they used to argue about whether games need to be playable to be meaningful. Given the mundane setup, there's no reason not to take Wreden at his word. He speaks directly to us, letting us know our role. We are people playing a collection of art games, and he is our guide through it all. Everything fits as a nonfiction work. As we play further, we see the games get darker in tone. Coda crafts inescapable prisons. He has players destroy the machine that produces his ideas. He creates game worlds with obstacles that are impassable without altering the code. Not only that, but the time between each "release" increases. In the beginning, Coda's games have only a few weeks between them. Toward the end, he is spending months. Wreden takes notice, and he worries about his friend. At this point, I was a little worried myself. So Wreden went on to show Coda's games to others, thinking the validation of hearing how good his stuff is might work him out of his funk. This sets in motion the climactic sequence, a game built specifically for Wreden. After some grueling tasks only surmountable through attrition or reprogramming, we come to a hallway filled with messages. They are the first explicit thoughts we get from Coda, after a whole game of supposing from themes and symbolism. And the message is clear: Davey, stop trying to analyze me and stop showing my games off as if they were yours to share. This sequence hit me hard. "Oh god," I thought, "I've been wading through this guy's personal space this whole time without his permission." I felt like I just took part in something terrible. I felt a chill run down my body. I felt awful. Wreden addresses the irony himself, in his increasingly distraught voice over. By releasing The Beginner's Guide, he's doing the exact opposite of what Coda wanted, and he's a terrible person for it, but he just can't get it out of his mind and he needs help finding Coda, to find out what makes him tick. It was here I went back through other details I hadn't previously given much thought. In the original email chain Davey Wreden sent to Destructoid, he made it clear William Pugh, his collaborator on The Stanley Parable, was not involved in this project. At the time I shrugged it off as an unimportant piece of information for my purposes. Looking back on it, it only gave more credence to the whole narrative; Wreden wanted to leave Pugh out of this, making sure everybody knows he alone had done a very bad thing. But then I thought about one thing: the price. Wreden is selling The Beginner's Guide for 10 dollars. He took a collection of somebody else's games, which include a game about not sharing his games, and is selling it for profit. That's just unthinkable. Suddenly, the illusion popped. I had been taken for a ride. Coda is not real. He never was. Herein lies the paradox. As a complete narrative package, The Beginner's Guide had me fooled. I was so emotionally invested in the history and events because it felt so real. I felt genuine regret over my actions affecting a real person in this world. But the entire history surrounding Coda is a fabrication. It has to be. Wreden crafted a fiction so convincing I was sad and angry. I couldn't stop thinking about it. Isn't that worth 10 bucks? For me, there's no question. Of course it is. But the fact it costs anything pulls back the curtain on it. Would the experience be even more powerful if it were free? I think so. I would probably still think Coda is real if it weren't for this detail. The Beginner's Guide is easily worth the price, but it would be worth even more if it cost nothing.
The Beginner's Guide photo
Or, I'm sorry if you're real, Coda
The Beginner's Guide released a couple days ago, and it made me feel stuff. If you are not averse to having feelings, you might want to play it. More importantly, if you have not yet played it, you probably don't want to cont...

Kingkiller Chronicles photo
Kingkiller Chronicles

There's a Kingkiller Chronicle game in the works

The Game of the Wind
Oct 02
// Darren Nakamura
Behind George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, Patrick Rothfuss's The Kingkiller Chronicle is probably the most well-regarded current fantasy book series. The former has had plenty of games based on it at this point, in...

Review: The Beginner's Guide

Oct 01 // Darren Nakamura
The Beginner's Guide (Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Everything Unlimited LtdPublisher: Everything Unlimited LtdReleased: October 1, 2015MSRP: $9.99Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit The Beginner's Guide opens on a de_dust-like Counter-Strike map with Wreden narrating. It isn't Wreden narrating to save money on a voice actor or Wreden narrating the in-game story. Davey Wreden is narrating as Davey Wreden, telling a story about his personal life. He was once friends with another game designer named Coda. Ever since meeting at a game jam, he had been fascinated with Coda's work. Most of the games are short, five to ten-minute affairs involving walking and philosophical musing. All were built in Source, but the art styles vary. Coda never released his games publicly, but Wreden hounded him to play each one upon completion. What we play through is Coda's entire body of work, presented chronologically. All the while, Wreden offers insight about game design, from the nuts and bolts of the tools used to the deeper symbolism of a particular segment, whether it was intentional or unintentional. [embed]313130:60582:0[/embed] Unlike a lot of these narrative-focused games, which allow the player to passively experience the story, absorbing or ignoring as much as desired, it's the kind of experience that demands intellectual engagement. I mean that literally; Wreden explicitly asks the player to send him critical analysis, providing an email address toward that end. There is exactly one puzzle in The Beginner's Guide, and it is repeated a few times. It involves two doors and solving it requires an irreversible step. When solved, the entrance is sealed and the exit is open, providing only one possible path: forward. Wreden's interpretation of this puzzle involves a symbolic closure of the past, marking something as "complete" and putting it out of mind. While I was playing through, my mind went to thoughts about having to take risks in order to progress and the idea of finding comfort in familiar things.  The structure provides a strange sense of immersion only a few games can manage. I am not the avatar of the character in these environments navigating through them; I am the guy sitting at his computer, playing a game while another guy talks to me about it. The story being told is a history that took place in the real world, and together we are piecing together the deeper meaning behind these weird art games. The roundabout immersion is ironic in a way. Normally making it clear the player is just someone playing a game adds a layer of disconnect. Since the reality matches with the premise in The Beginner's Guide, it actually drew me into the meta-narrative even more closely. I realized about halfway through just how emotionally invested I had become. I found myself marveling at Coda's creations just as Wreden had done before me. I spent time reading every note posted in one section even after being told I didn't have to. I wanted to understand the person who made these just as much as Wreden. I was grateful for his aid when it came to surpassing the intentionally frustrating or impossible barriers. I had to see it through to the end. And then, just as my emotional investment hit its peak, the revelatory climax rolls in. Maybe Coda isn't the enigma Wreden paints him as. Maybe he just wants to be left alone. Wait, maybe he wouldn't want me playing his games. Maybe I'm violating his personal space by participating. Maybe I'm an asshole for doing things against someone else's wishes. Maybe I'm a bigger asshole for writing a whole review about it. My involvement as just the guy sitting at his computer playing a game is non-negligible at this point. I've been thinking about this game a lot for the past 36 hours. It demanded I think about it, at first only superficially, but later more substantively. I mulled over a lot of questions when I should have been sleeping. I continued thinking right when I woke up. I think I dreamed about it in between. I won't spoil with the explicit questions here, but I'm sure we will be talking more frankly soon. On the surface, The Beginner's Guide is a game about game design and critical analysis. Digging deeper, it provides a window into the mind of a man I might not have fully understood otherwise. It does all of this in a way only a video game could. More than anything else, it has caused me a lot of introspection, a feat few games ever achieve. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Beginner's Guide review photo
Start here
The Stanley Parable is famous for its fourth wall-breaking narrative, taking the maligned "walking simulator" genre and showing how effective it can be in the hands of a capable designer. When writer Davey Wreden surprise-ann...

Minecraft: Story Mode photo
Minecraft: Story Mode

Meet the cast of Minecraft: Story Mode with this trailer

'I'm a PC'
Oct 01
// Darren Nakamura
Minecraft: Story Mode officially kicks off on October 13 with its first episode The Order of the Stone. Though we previewed it recently at PAX Prime, there haven't been any trailers for it since the teaser back in July. With ...
Home Free Kickstarter photo
Home Free Kickstarter

Control an abandoned dog in the city in action-RPG Home Free

Control your tears watching the video
Sep 30
// Darren Nakamura
The first few moments of the Kickstarter trailer for Home Free bring up sad memories of the Futurama episode "Jurassic Bark," which I apparently cannot even read the Wikipedia entry for without getting misty-eyed. Dogs, man. ...
PS Plus free games photo
PS Plus free games

Super Meat Boy and Broken Age will be October's free PlayStation Plus games

'Meat Boy and meet boy' -Steven Hansen
Sep 30
// Darren Nakamura
I'm torn on Super Meat Boy at this point in my life. On the one hand, it probably controls better with a PlayStation 4 d-pad than it ever did on the Xbox 360. On the other hand, I already went all the way through it when I wa...
The Beginner's Guide photo
The Beginner's Guide

The Stanley Parable writer's new game releases this week

The Beginner's Guide
Sep 29
// Darren Nakamura
Normally, what we have here would hardly be worth a post. All we have are a handful of weird screenshots, a barren teaser website, and the following description: The Beginner's Guide is a narrative video game ...
Mushroom 11 release date photo
Mushroom 11 release date

Mushroom 11 spreads its spores on October 15

National Mushroom Day
Sep 28
// Darren Nakamura
Back when I first played Mushroom 11, more than a ago at PAX East 2014, it was a cool concept. Judging by the launch trailer below (and Brett's preview from earlier this year), Untame has really expanded on that concept, work...
Portal song photo
Portal song

'You Wouldn't Know' is the third Portal song by Jonathan Coulton

From LEGO Dimensions
Sep 25
// Darren Nakamura
The reveal of LEGO Dimensions earlier this year was kind of bizarre. How can Traveller's Tales get all those different licenses? Jurassic Park, Scooby Doo, Batman, and Portal 2? It's like every kid's toy chest in video game f...
Spaceteam card game photo
Spaceteam card game

'Cooperative shouting game' Spaceteam getting a card version

Up now on Kickstarter
Sep 23
// Darren Nakamura
Back when we interviewed Spaceteam developer Henry Smith about the free cooperative mobile game, he mentions the real-time board game Space Alert as an influence. Now things come full circle, with Mathew Sisson taking the tab...
Paladins photo

Paladins behind-the-scenes video goes into the deck-building aspect

'We love making free-to-play games'
Sep 23
// Darren Nakamura
Originally announced as just "Paladins," Hi-Rez's free-to-play team-based shooter Paladins: Champions of the Realm is set to have card collection and a sort of deck-building aspect. Details were scant during the announcement,...
Fallout 4 SPECIAL photo
Fallout 4 SPECIAL

Fallout 4's SPECIAL video series' third episode focuses on endurance

'Sudden loss of limb'
Sep 23
// Darren Nakamura
So far we've seen Strength and Perception, so moving onto the next letter in S.P.E.C.I.A.L. brings us to E for Endurance. As it turns out, navigating the post-apocalyptic wasteland requires a bit of toughness. Who would have ...
The Last of Us sale photo
The Last of Us sale

The Last of Us sale starts tomorrow, Clicker statue up for pre-order

Outbreak Day 2015
Sep 22
// Darren Nakamura
Canonically, Outbreak Day -- the day when the Cordyceps fungus got out of control and dramatically altered the world in The Last of Us -- occurred on September 26, 2013. We're coming up on the second anniversary of that fatef...
Rise of the Tomb Raider photo
Rise of the Tomb Raider

Rise of the Tomb Raider trailer shows off hot grappling hook action

Also: tomb exploding
Sep 21
// Darren Nakamura
Lara Croft probably has some sort of death wish. Mountain climbing can be good exercise and recreation, but I don't think anybody in her right mind would swing from a grappling hook, launch 30 feet, then catch on a vertical r...
Pokemon Shuffle Mobile photo
Pokemon Shuffle Mobile

Of course Pokemon Shuffle Mobile's leaderboards are hacked

Because why wouldn't they be?
Sep 21
// Darren Nakamura
There are already a lot of reasons why Pokémon Shuffle Mobile is inferior to the previously released 3DS version, like the increase in item prices, the removal of Jewel rewards for beating Mega evolutions, and the...

More Quick Tips: Pokemon Shuffle Mobile

Sep 17 // Darren Nakamura
First things first: the time-sensitive stuff If you read nothing else of this guide, this is what you should take away. Enter the code 65607110 under Settings > Code for Lucarionite. This code expires on September 30, 2015. Lucarionite will let you Mega evolve Lucario, which is a huge help throughout the game. I'll explain why in detail later. Your first long-term goal should be to capture Groudon. Groudon is currently part of a special event set to expire on September 25, 2015. Opportunities for both of these are likely to show up in the future, but obtaining them now will be a great help for getting through the early, mid, and late game. Matches The game explains the basics of making matches, but leaves a lot of nuance for the player to discover. Moving a Pokémon on the board almost always involves swapping two Pokémon. On a board with few disruptions, you can frequently make matches on both ends of the swap. Taking the above into account, double-ended matches do not occur simultaneously. The Pokémon being dragged into place matches first, while the one swapped back by default matches second. This can come into play if you want to control how surrounding tiles fall. In general, by swapping from the bottom up, you can increase your chance of getting lucky as the dust settles. When matching a single Pokémon both horizontally and vertically, precedence is given to the larger match (for example, a match of four will clear before a match of three). When the horizontal and vertical matches are equal in size, the horizontal match will take precedence. This can be very important when matching certain Mega evolutions. Abilities Short descriptions of abilities are given, but some could use more explicit explanation. With a few exceptions, abilities are usually activated for only the first Pokémon matched in a single combo. Exceptions include powering up a Mega evolution and activating a Mega ability. These will occur no matter how far down a combo the match occurs. Power of 4 (Bulbasaur, Charmander, Squirtle, Kangaskhan, and more) will activate every time a match of four is made for the first match of a combo with the corresponding Pokémon. Most other abilities activate some fraction of the time, with bigger matches (fours and fives) increasing the chance the ability will activate. Before playing a round, take the time to familiarize yourself with your Pokémon's abilities. When making a double-ended match, it's better to take a chance on a random ability like Opportunist than waste a first-match-in-the-combo on Block Smash when there are no blocks around. Types The Pokémon Shuffle type chart follows the X/Y type chart. Here are some important notes. Unlike classic Pokémon, Shuffle has players building teams of four specifically to fight a single type at any given time. Instead of taking a team that covers a wide set of types, you want a whole team of Super Effective (double damage) Pokémon for the task at hand. Fighting-type is the only type Super Effective versus Normal-type. This is partially why obtaining Lucarionite for Mega Lucario is so helpful. Thus far, Lucario is the only Fighting-type that can Mega evolve. Ground-type is the only type Super Effective versus Electric-type. This is partially why capturing Groudon early is so helpful. With Groudon, you can build an all-Ground team after Stage 101. Without Groudon, you can't have an all-Ground team until Stage 136. All other types have at least two types that are Super Effective against it, so it is much easier to build an appropriate team. Some levels feature weak Pokémon as a fixture and are easier to complete if those Pokémon are brought along as part of the team. Togekiss is easier to beat with Togetic along. Milotic is basically impossible without bringing Feebas to the party. Don't forget this is an option; several stages use the trick. Mega evolutions Mega evolutions are a big part of Pokémon Shuffle, but strategy is key. Several of the early Mega evolving Pokémon (Audino, Kangaskhan, Lopunny) are Normal-type. They are not Super Effective versus anything. Due to its higher base attack power, Mega Lucario is preferable to the Normal-type Megas unless fighting Poison-, Flying-, Psychic-, Bug-, or Fairy-types. If you hit the Optimize button repeatedly when building a team, it will cycle through different Mega evolving Pokémon. It is up to you to determine which one is actually most appropriate for a given level. In shorter stages (10 moves or less), it is often advantageous to leave out a Mega evolving Pokémon entirely. Since it takes time to Mega evolve, it is generally better to bring a Super Effective regular Pokémon as opposed to a normal damage Mega. Sometimes it can even be better to switch a Super Effective Mega out for a different Super Effective Pokémon with a greater attack power. Mega abilities are not created equal. Mega Gengar is great for stringing together big combos, but terrible for taking out unbreakable blocks. Mega Aerodactyl is great for taking out blocks, but useless in stages without those disruptions. Don't just take what Optimize gives you. Grinding In general, you won't want to grind, but here are some tips for when you should. Usually, the path to greater power is to capture stronger Pokémon. A single Pokémon's power can increase up to 20 points by leveling up to MAX, but base attack power can range from 30 to 90. Capture Pokémon with a base attack power of 60 or above instead of grinding your 40s and 50s. You can reasonably make it up to Mega Glalie (Stage 120) without grinding or using items. If you haven't already, this is a good time to switch to Expert stages to catch some of the upper tier Pokémon. Moltres, Blaziken, and Entei would specifically help against Mega Glalie. Getting S ranks on Main stages unlocks Expert stages. I can be worthwhile to go back to previously completed stages in order to bump the ranking. Experience is awarded in proportion to the number of moves a level contains. Buneary (Stage 21) is the best stage for grinding experience until Ampharos (Stage 130). Snorlax (Stage 183) technically awards the most experience of any main stage, but it is much more difficult to complete than Ampharos. An uncompleted stage still awards experience, but it's less than if the stage were completed. Meowth (Stage 37) can be played repeatedly to grind for coins. You only keep the coins if you beat him, so you have to be able to balance matching coins and attacking, but not attacking too quickly. Spending You can still play Pokémon Shuffle Mobile without spending a dime, but you'll have to be smart about it. Check in every day for 500 coins. Make sure to play the Special stages during the weekends for Meowth's Coin Mania. When making coin matches, a match of three is worth 100, a match of four is worth 300, and a match of five is worth 500. It is more profitable to get one match of four than two matches of three. Patience is the greatest asset in Pokémon Shuffle. You will be tempted to use a Great Ball often, but it is almost always better to save those coins. Even something as low as a 10% capture rate means (on average) ten tries to get it, or five hours of waiting. A single Great Ball on Mobile costs 3500 coins, or seven days of checking in. One thing I keep in mind when going for captures with low percentages is a comparison to a standard six-sided die. If you have a 17% catch power, that's like rolling a 6 on the die. It's not exactly likely, but if you roll the thing enough times you're bound to hit it eventually. The best time to use a Great Ball is when it triggers Super Catch Power on a particularly difficult battle. If you can't consistently beat a stage and you get Super Catch Power, it's probably worth it. Save your coins for the competitive events. These are often the only ways to get certain Mega Stones, and they are only awarded to a fraction of participants. Attack Power+ is an easy way to make sure you're in that group. When you do spend your coins, spend them wisely. Some stages are only difficult because of disruptions. Use a Disruption Delay on these. Some begin with a huge obstacle but get easy once that is cleared. Use a Mega Start (and an appropriate Mega Pokémon) on these. Determine the main problem of a level and use the tool best suited to tackle that problem. For the Main and Expert stages, you should not need items at all until you start going for S ranks. Be patient with your captures, be smart with your matches, and wait for that one really lucky run. So there you have it. Now that I have this all written out, it might not really be a set of "Quick Tips," but you should now be better prepared to take on the addiction that is Pokémon Shuffle. Good luck!
Pokemon Shuffle tips photo
Let's diglett deeper
Earlier this year, Pokémon Shuffle released on 3DS and Chris Carter handed out some tips for success in the free-to-play match-three puzzler, despite the fact that he didn't care much for it. He's so magnanimous. Pok&e...

Ace Attorney 6 photo
Ace Attorney 6

Ace Attorney 6 trailer is looking pretty feudal

Nice beard, judge
Sep 17
// Darren Nakamura
Capcom has a new Japanese trailer up for the recently announced Ace Attorney 6. Though I don't know what they're saying, it has all the desk-pounding and witness-badgering we have come to expect from the series. Also, check o...
Lost in Harmony photo
Lost in Harmony

Valiant Hearts creator teams up with Wyclef for Lost in Harmony

'Mystical and brave'
Sep 16
// Darren Nakamura
Valiant Hearts' director Yoan Fanise worked at Ubisoft for 14 years before leaving earlier this year to form his own studio, Digixart Entertainment . Today at Tokyo Game Show, the fledgling company revealed its firs...

Review: Leo's Fortune

Sep 16 // Darren Nakamura
Leo's Fortune (Android, iOS, Mac, PC, PlayStation 4 [reviewed], Windows Phone, Xbox One)Developer: 1337 & SenriPublisher: Tilting PointRelease: April 23, 2014 (mobile), September 8, 2015 (Mac, PC, PS4), September 11, 2015 (Xbox One)MSRP: $4.99 (mobile), $6.99 (non-mobile) Originally released on mobile last year, Leo's Fortune is now playable with a controller elsewhere. It's equal parts precision platformer, speed platformer, and puzzle platformer, alternating between the three to keep the experience fresh throughout. Leopold is a slippery guy, which aids in the speed sections. Certain areas have ramps and curves built in, giving Leo a playground to jump, inflate, and dive toward the exit quickly. Of the three styles of platforming present, this is the most exciting. The other two styles slow Leo down considerably. With his inflate ability, he can not only jump and launch off walls, but he can also slow his descent, giving himself greater control in spiky sections. Here, Leopold's slipperiness can get him into trouble; he will sometimes maintain momentum from a speed section straight into a trap. It can be difficult to make the small adjustments necessary for the precision segments, because pressing in one direction for more than a split second will send him careening in that direction. The puzzles are a welcome change of pace, though they never really tax the brain. For the most part, they are the same kinds of physics-based puzzles we've seen elsewhere. They're certainly not bad, but they're never mindblowing either. [embed]310626:60351:0[/embed] All of this is tied together by an after school special-esque story. Though the specifics of the big twist aren't exactly predictable, it's clear throughout that Leopold is barking up the wrong trees and stands to learn a life lesson. It's almost like one of Aesop's fables; it comes with the moral of appreciating people over possessions, which is a great message to teach children, but feels trite to those who have heard it before. In that way, the story mirrors the puzzle sections. It's totally serviceable, but I'm not particularly impressed by it. Where Leo's Fortune excels is in the presentation. Leopold's fuzz and a lot of the environmental effects are fantastically animated. Leo slides as he moves, meaning he doesn't have any walking or rolling animation, but despite that he exudes personality, particularly through facial expressions. I love the look he gives when he inflates. So what we have in all is a beautiful platformer with ups and downs (literally and figuratively), a mundane narrative with a good message, and some real difficulty toward the end. The whole game probably only takes about an hour or two to finish (with full game speedruns clocking in at about 45 minutes. It's not a must-buy, not even for platformer fans, but it's a cute little game that most people can find some fun with. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Leo's Fortune review photo
Favors the bold
Coins. Plenty of games have them scattered around to collect, but few explain why they're there in the first place. If they're so valuable, why did somebody just leave them there? Leo's Fortune gives a reason. The titular mus...

Game is a 4 Letter Word photo
Game is a 4 Letter Word

New podcast is like This American Life for video games

Game is a 4 Letter Word
Sep 15
// Darren Nakamura
A long time ago on this very Internet web page, Destructoid had one community member temporarily step up to "the big leagues" to provide front page coverage during PAX 2007. I mean, that has happened a lot; a good portion of ...
Nintendo Direct photo
Nintendo Direct

Nintendo Directs aren't going away

'No details to provide now'
Sep 15
// Darren Nakamura
The most recent Nintendo Direct video was released three and a half months ago, covering Chibi Robo: Zip Lash, Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon, Bravely Second: End Layer, and other titles. It was short and unassuming; we...
N++ photo

N++ is even bigger and more difficult than we thought

For wizards only
Sep 10
// Darren Nakamura
N++ released back in July with a bold claim: "No way anyone 100%s it." Given its enormous level select screen featuring more than a thousand levels and the brutal difficulty the series is known for, it seemed fair enough to m...
Ausaustin's Creed photo
Ausaustin's Creed

Journey composer Austin Wintory scored Assassin's Creed Syndicate

More than three hours of music
Sep 10
// Darren Nakamura
Since his work on flOw, Austin Wintory has been fairly well-known in the indie game scene. He has since provided the soundtrack for Journey, The Banner Saga, Monaco, and other small titles. All those years of creating unique ...

Review: I am Bread

Sep 08 // Darren Nakamura
I am Bread (Mac, PC, PlayStation 4 [reviewed])Developer: Bossa StudiosPublisher: Bossa StudiosReleased: April 9, 2015 (Mac, PC), August 25, 2015 (PS4)MSRP: $12.99 I'm glad I stuck with I am Bread until the end. There was a point about halfway through when I considered giving up. I was spending a lot of time getting to the end of a level and then failing and having to start from the beginning. I was constantly fighting the camera in addition to the controls. I just wasn't having any fun. Eventually, it gets better. As a slice of bread, each of the four corners is assigned one of the shoulder buttons. Holding one of the buttons will make that corner stick to a surface. By alternating which corners are anchored, the bread can walk, climb, and even jump. The big problem I faced early on has to do shape of the bread. It is essentially a rectangle, and it is constantly flipping and rotating. Though the corners are labeled with their corresponding buttons, it doesn't feel intuitive. Sometimes the top left corner on screen is controlled by L1; sometimes it's controlled by R2. After spending more time with it, some nuance does show up. Since it's cut from a loaf of bread, the slice has two rounded corners; those are always L1 and R1. Also, since the length and width of the slice aren't equal, orientation can be manipulated in order to increase or decrease stride. There is room for impressive maneuvers to be performed, but man is it hard to get to that point. [embed]309590:60274:0[/embed] Even after coming to terms with the unintuitive controls, I never felt quite comfortable with the camera. It's always sluggish to respond, it doesn't allow any zoom control, and it's often clipping through walls and objects in tight quarters. The main goal in I am Bread is to become toast without getting dirty or wet. This means a lot of climbing along walls and across furniture. It isn't always clear what surfaces are safe. Toenail clippings on a pillow (ew) are hard to spot, and moldy walls aren't clearly delineated from clean walls. Getting to the end of a level with 100% edibility takes some trial and error. It is somewhat open in that there are multiple paths across an area and occasionally there are multiple heating elements available for toasting. It's a bit of a missed opportunity for organic difficulty scaling; I can imagine there being a fast-but-difficult route to complement the slower-but-easier route. As it is, there doesn't seem to be any obvious structure. Though the story mode was more frustrating than fun for me, the additional modes add their own twists along with new bread types. Bagel Race switches in a round rolling bagel, adds cardboard race track pieces to the levels, and has players hitting checkpoints as quickly as possible. Rampage uses a baguette, which features simpler two-button control as it tries to smash as many plates and vases as possible in a strict time limit. Cheese Hunt features cracker bread, which is more rigid and is prone to breaking, as it focuses more on exploration. Finally, Zero G adds rockets to each of the bread's four corners, allowing for total control in the zero gravity environments. As much as I didn't particularly like the plodding, frustrating story mode, I can't help but be impressed by how differently each of the additional modes plays. All of them are difficult to control, but I ended up finding some enjoyment in Bagel Race and Zero G. Fortunately, every mode is available from the start. Still, when I think about I am Bread as a whole, I'm reluctant to say it's good. It's a silly idea and it seems like developer Bossa Studios had a lot of fun building all of the different modes, but I wish I were having that much fun playing it. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
I Am Bread review photo
Not worth the dough
I can only imagine how I am Bread came to be. I picture a couple of friends sitting around, drinking, when one says, "Man, wouldn't it be funny if we made a game where you play as a slice of bread?" Then everybody laughs and ...

Binding of Isaac photo
Binding of Isaac

The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth is releasing on October 30

Devil's Night
Sep 07
// Darren Nakamura
When Edmund McMillen brought word of the new Greed Mode in The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth, most of the shouts in the comments were, "Looks great, when can we play it?" Soon enough. The features for the DLC are detailed over...
Pokemon Shuffle Mobile photo
Pokemon Shuffle Mobile

Pokemon Shuffle Mobile squeezes more out of players

A mathematical analysis
Sep 04
// Darren Nakamura
When I started playing Pokémon Shuffle Mobile earlier this week, I noticed a weird discrepancy between it and the 3DS version. When the option to use a Great Ball came up, it was asking for 3500 coins, up 40% from 2500...
Pokemon Shuffle Mobile photo
Pokemon Shuffle Mobile

Here's how Pokemon Shuffle Mobile stacks up to the 3DS version

Pros and cons
Sep 04
// Darren Nakamura
After about my 50th hour into Pokémon Shuffle for the 3DS, I regretted getting into it late. When it released, I did what most people do when they hear "free-to-play;" I tuned it out without giving it a second thought....
Borderlands Xbox One photo
Borderlands Xbox One

Borderlands supported on Xbox One Backward Compatibility in November

'Strip the flesh, salt the wound'
Sep 03
// Darren Nakamura
Current-generation console owners have been able to get their Borderlands fix via The Handsome Collection, but the game that started it all is notably missing from the HD rerelease. Soon enough, Xbox One users will have a way...
Humble Tom Clancy Bundle photo
Humble Tom Clancy Bundle

Splinter Cell, Ghost Recon, Rainbow Six abound in the Humble Tom Clancy Bundle

...Redeem on uPlay
Sep 01
// Darren Nakamura
Years ago, my friends and I used to make a habit of sneaking up on one another from behind and putting each other in headlocks. We called it "Splinter Celling." We also called series protagonist Sam Fisher "Tom Clancy" as a l...
EndWar Online beta photo
EndWar Online beta

Tom Clancy's EndWar Online closed beta starts today, runs through November

'War never ends'
Sep 01
// Darren Nakamura
I had forgotten about Tom Clancy's EndWar Online. It was originally announced just about two years ago, took on some alpha playtesters, and went dark to everybody else. Today, it is coming out of alpha and into a closed beta ...

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