Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around
hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Sushi Bar Samurai

He worked on it for three years... and then threw it away

4:00 PM on 07.20.2012 // Hamish Todd

Hamish Todd is a journalist and playwright. His work has appeared on Kotaku, Insert Credit, and Action Button. It is his ambition to write about level design with all the seriousness that it deserves.

Sushi Bar Samurai was a game about making sushi for ghosts caught between worlds. It was made by one man, Casey Muratori, who had saved up enough money that he was able to work on the project for three and a half years.

Sushi Bar Samurai got a lot of attention directed at its somber visuals and its extraordinary music generating system, both of which Muratori created entirely by himself. A version was playable at PAX 2008 -- at that point the game was close to completion.

But something happened to Muratori at PAX that made him reluctant to release the game. In fact, he decided he would never be able to release it, despite everything he had put into it. He packed it all in and went back to his old job, programming. Between all his hobbies, he’s since made everything except videogames: he’s writing books and articles, composed music, and appeared in hilarious podcasts and cartoons.

What made him want to give up on the game?

I don’t like the idea of three years of a person’s life going to waste on any level, so I contacted him to try and find out what was going through his head.

Tell us a bit about yourself

I’m a software developer from Seattle. Most of the time I’ve worked on game technology, so I worked on the product called Granny at RAD game tools, which is a 3D character animation system. Right now I’m working on Bink 2, which is a video compression program. It’s the program that all games play their rendered cutscenes through.

[When he says “all” games, he means it. Bink has been used in 15,000 games and counting]

You regularly do podcasts with the head of RAD game tools, Jeff Roberts. The impression I get from hearing you talk about software is that you take programming extremely seriously

Definitely. I’ve been a programmer since I was seven years old -- for my age that’s pretty rare. My father happened to be a programmer, and I used to keep asking him “How do you do this stuff?”, and so he taught me. The culture I grew up in was with people who had originally learned to program with punch cards, where knowing assembly language was a pretty standard thing.

These days, a cellphone has the same resolution as a computer I was using in 1986, it’s a thousand if not tens of thousands of times faster -- and it’s still lagging all over the fucking place. Programmers today have no appreciation for the hardware that they have, and they piss it all away.

I’m curmudgeonly at this point because of where I learned to program and who I admire and the kinds of things I admire about programming. I see basically no one doing that today, and so RAD game tools is a good place for me.

Is programming an art form? Using whatever definition of “art form” you think is most relevant.

I’ll give you a two-pronged answer.

One way I could take “art form” is “there is no prescriptive way to get a result”. People sit down and say “I need you to program x for me”. “Art form” there becomes a craftsmanship term, like making furniture or building a house. A very skilled craftsman creates works in a way that is not necessarily easy to duplicate, and not prescribed in the original statement of what they were trying to do. In that sense, I think almost all programming is an art form. In general, anything of any sufficient complexity is going to have a lot of subtle, personal decisions that get made in the way that you construct what you construct.

There’s another way I could take “art form” which is “creating something which communicates between the person who made it, and the person who consumes or uses or experiences it”. In that case, there are some types of programming which are a communication between you and the person who’s experiencing the program, and there’s others that aren’t.

You’re friends with Chris Hecker, Jon Blow, and Sean Barret, three people who did the same thing as you: worked programming software and graphics for a long time, but then decided to make your own games. Why did you all do that?

Again, with the “two types of art” definition, If you like communicating, and I think all the people you’ve mentioned do, then writing functional code that people use is a bit limiting. You’re not able to communicate with an audience in any way, or get any communication back from that audience in the way you do with a game. People who work on code for a living will get that feeling, if they are natural communicators.

Jon Blow is a natural communicator with games -- he was made to do it. Me, on the other hand ... I don’t know if that’s true. My experience with Sushi Bar Samurai may have been largely because I’m not ready to take that step yet. Or because I’m not a natural communicator with games.

What were you trying to communicate with Sushi Bar Samurai?

I didn’t know that [communication] was important when I started, and that’s why I didn’t finish that game. The things I’ve just said are with the benefit of hindsight.

I really didn’t know what to do with the project. If you look at its evolution over the first year or so ... there is a game within the first month, January 2005. I had a game which was basically Diner Dash. There were people ordering, and you had to make basic sushi orders that you had to feed to them. That game was almost finished.

Diner Dash

But when I looked at it, I was like: “this is a game about someone having to do a menial task ... ” There’s a reason why I’m not a short order cook -- it’s because I think that would be a really boring job, and here I am making something where this is what you have to do, and by the way you have to pay for it.

Oddly enough, it turns out, that’s a totally moneymaking strategy! There’s a long history of games like that and it totally works. And it’s a pretty easy thing to make! But it’s like: “Why am I making this?”.

So I tried to branch out from there, and I tried many incarnations over the next two years, leading up to the PAX demo version. Although that version was marginally more interesting, it still didn’t have anything unique about it that I really understood.

If I was starting again today, before I would ever start making a game, I’d have a very concrete explanation of what the game is supposed to express, and how I’d want to express it. That, above all else (if you’re not just trying to make money) is the only way you can really know if your game is done or good. You can tell if it’s fun, or if it’s addictive, just by having someone play the game. But you can’t tell if it’s good, or meaningful, by your own definition, if you don’t know what [that definition] is.

So you’re not releasing the game because you feel it doesn't communicate enough?

It doesn’t really communicate anything.

You recorded a podcast after demonstrating the game at PAX. You sounded so inspired by the people you’d seen on the floor that you were overcome with new eagerness and zest to improve the game. And yet, paradoxically, it sounds as if those people who inspired you are part of why you’re not releasing the game?

That’s a very good way of saying that.

Of indie developers, some of them start out making their own games, and then some are like me -- you work at EA or something like that, you go through that system, and then you strike out on your own. One thing that happens uniquely to people in the second category is that ... there’s a great deal of commoditization of the audience that happens from your perspective, whether you like it or not. Once you’re through that system, once you’ve been in that culture long enough -- five years, ten years -- you start to think not about individual people and who they are playing your game, but about numbers. Like, how many people bought this game, how many people played this game, what did Metacritic say about this game. And that’s not because you’ve become cynical, it’s just that that’s all anyone ever talks about.

The thing that’s really eye-opening about showing your game at PAX (or at least the PAX 10 booth) is that the people who come by are a much more individualistic and thoughtful audience than you would ever believe existed for games. The questions they ask, the way they play the game, give you a much more respectful opinion of the audience. And, again, that makes it very difficult to ship a game where you were just thinking about the abstract “is this a fun game (i.e. will this sell copies)?”.

Once you’ve had that kind of experience ... that changes the kind of game that you want to ship to that audience.

You’re now writing fiction. Has game design taught you much about writing?

It’s almost the reverse. The Technician was originally a game design which I decided to turn into a book since I didn’t like how game design went.

I sat down and asked, of Sushi Bar Samurai: where did I think it was going to be before I started? How did it end up? What was missing from it? Was it wrong when I started or were there things I wanted to have that got lost along the way?

The core conclusion I came to is that I’m not a mechanics-oriented game player. I can’t sit down to enjoy a game of Tetris. I like to have a fictional experience; I like there to be some wonder and exploration, and characters. And in the original plan for how Sushi Bar Samurai was going to be, I had all that. That was more essential to what was supposed to happen but it got stripped out because I focused too much on thinking that the mechanics were wrong.

With The Technician I thought: “I’m just going to see about doing some writing”. To be satisfied with a game product in future I’ll have to learn to deliver a good fictional experience. Fiction is much easier to deal with in its traditional, linear form. Practice there, get good at that, then go back and see if you can do that in a game.

Hamish Todd, Contributor
 Follow Blog + disclosure Tips
Hamish Todd is a journalist and game designer currently working on "Music of the Spheres", a puzzle game about bouncing bullets, Islamic art, and sound. The trailer and website for Music of the S... more   |   staff directory

 Setup email comments

Unsavory comments? Please report harassment, spam, and hate speech to our community fisters, and flag the user (we will ban users dishing bad karma). Can't see comments? Apps like Avast or browser extensions can cause it. You can fix it by adding * to your whitelists.

destructoid's previous coverage:
Sushi Bar Samurai

View all:powered by:  MM.Elephant

Ads on destructoid may be purchased from:

Please contact Crave Online, thanks!

Solar Pony Django's Review on: Animal Crossing Amiibo Festival

Indivisible exposes why forced diversity and its proponents keep failing

Steam Controller Review

RAE - Back in Town

Thankful it's ov

Half - Life 3 FINALLY 100% confirmed...maybe.

Surprisingly... I'm *really* enjoying Fallout 4!!

Where the Hell is Breath of Fire?

Comments of the Week - バーガーベスト, ですよね?

My Month in Games - November 2015

 Add your impressions

Status updates from C-bloggers

Gamemaniac3434 avatarGamemaniac3434
Hey, my new blog is up! A few days ago! Go read it! Before......before its too late. Please. *walls start crumbling, reality starts oozing out, things begin to eeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Amna Umen avatarAmna Umen
Alright so I'm looking for a few games for my newly repurchased DS. I'm already set on RPG as it's all I have pretty much. Were there any good puzzle games? I've heard good things about Professor Layton.
FlanxLycanth avatarFlanxLycanth
I made chocolate and banana cake because why not.
able to think avatarable to think
After hearing Persona 4 Dancing All Night come out of my surround sound system; I can safely say my $20 Playstation TV purchase was totally justified. The bass on Best Friends (Banvox Remox) literally shook the floor. It's freaking awesome!
LinkSlayer64 avatarLinkSlayer64
I wish I could say I made this 'shop. [img][/img]
SeymourDuncan17 avatarSeymourDuncan17
Triple brown, triple brown, triple brown meow. Triple brown, triple brown, triple brown meow.
Alfie avatarAlfie
Was on the front page and was greeted by a new post, which I clicked to find "You cannot see the future". Then refreshed and it was gone. I saw Chris's post on Eight Days' cancellation as it was brought, new and unready, into the world! Rare and wonderful
Archelon avatarArchelon
Community Question: Have you ever purchased a game only to regret it later and then sell it/give it away, only to even later regret selling it and wind up purchasing it again?
gajknight avatargajknight
A decadent staircase adorned in gold rises into infinite darkness. Writhing beings beyond comprehension lurk in the shadows, their mere presence encroaching on the edges of human understanding. A blood moon glows . I am losing my mind. I need more eyes...
Mike Wallace avatarMike Wallace
We need to be implanted with microchips because I'd really like to know how much time I've spent playing different video games my entire life.
RadicalYoseph avatarRadicalYoseph
If there are rainbows in Xenoblade Chronicles X, Reyn must be in it as well. You can't have a rainbow without Reyn, baby!
The Dyslexic Laywer avatarThe Dyslexic Laywer
I really hope Xenoblade become it's own franchise, it has way too much potential to simply being reduced to 2 games.
Sotanaht avatarSotanaht
Touchable Holograms? When this eventually matures and hits market, almost all our regulars will vanish for weeks.
Serethyn avatarSerethyn
Xenoblade Chronicles Wii for €10? Sure, Nintendo, don't mind if I do!
KnickKnackMyWack avatarKnickKnackMyWack
Super Smash Bros. 4 has too much content. So much so I almost don't want a sequel. I honestly hope that NX gets a "Super Smash Bros. For NX" port rather than a new installment. It could be a GOTY edition and come with all of the DLC.
Batthink avatarBatthink
Flegma avatarFlegma
Bought my first full-priced physical 3DS game ever - New Style Boutique 2: Fashion Forward. I'll try to write a post on the previous game at some point before doing the same with NSB2.
Terry 309 avatarTerry 309
How do you guys manage to buy all these games at day 1 with such huge backlogs?
FlanxLycanth avatarFlanxLycanth
Guys if I were to do a thing, how many of you would watch my thing because I was thinking of doing a thing but I dunno if people really like that kinda thing so I just wanted to know if you liked that thing because I'm thinking of doing a thing, you know?
Atleastimhousebroken avatarAtleastimhousebroken
Bayonetta 2 is 40% off in the EU Nintendo eShop today. If you have a WiiU and don't have this game you are a horrible person and I want nothing to do with you. You can amend your errors by buying it. Xenoblade Wii is also 50% off as well.
more quickposts



Invert site colors

  Dark Theme
  Light Theme

Destructoid means family.
Living the dream, since 2006

Pssst. konami code + enter

modernmethod logo

Back to Top

We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -