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About
Intro and Setup:
link

My Photography
Not On Monday - photographic blog - updated frequently

Consoles Owned: Atari 2600, PS1, PS2, Xbox 360, PS3
Computers Owned: Amiga 500 x2, Amiga 2000, various PC's.

Currently playing:
Uncharted: Drakes Fortune
Fight Night Round 4
Forza2

Favourite Games:
Forza2
Assassin's Creed (I know, but it was the first game I completed after years of being away from gaming)
Stunt Car Racing
Rainbow Six Vegas 2

Hobbies:
Cars
Guitars
Photography
Gaming

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Following (1)  


One thing I never had when growing up was the public competition and feeling of obtaining publicly viewable achievements. Sure there were high-score boards on the machines at the local arcades, over which we would all claim to be the coolest-of-cool three-letter-name, "ACE". But no one would ever really know who "ACE" was.



Back then obtaining the highest score was always a private affair, and it was not often that your friends would even know that you were attempting to best them.


Achievement Unlocked - That Great Feeling

Whoever, or which ever team/group came up with the idea of the 360's Achievement system is brilliant, and deserves to be recognised for assisting with the success of the 360.



This system feeds one's natural want for competition. In real time you can compete with your friends that can be playing totally different games and have your scores instantaneously visible to all that want to see.

IMO Xbox Achievements go deeper than this. Everyone desires a sense of achievement in anything they do. Whether it be getting that diploma, obtaining that Masters degree, or having a clean/tidy gamer setup. The 360 achievements enable this. A menial task in a game can become something that you want to do, just so you can achieve that lot of gamer-score and stay infront-of, or catch-up-to others in your friends list, or even just hear that noise and see the achievement pop up.

For example, two friends of mine from work have 360's, and one of these friends is currently sneaking ahead of me in gamer-score. At nearly every opportunity he rubs it in. Because of this I am desperately trying to find games to play and get achievements. Is this a good thing? We'll get to that later.

Also, am I comparing achieving 1000GS in a game to obtaining a Masters? Hell yes. Everything one would do to obtain that 1000GS can be related to everything one would do to obtain a Masters. Practice/Study, research, and immense amounts of time.


These achievements also appeal to those with addictive personalities. Getting that next achievement is like obtaining that next fix. I know from observing someone very close to me that this can cause one to buy obscene amounts of games in short amounts of time, and become unhealthily obsessed with finishing games. Good or bad? Well, that depends on whether or not the person affected can still function as a normal person, and that real life is a higher priority than the game.


Achievement Locked - The Ruin

When does something so good, become something so bad? When it becomes the sole reason for playing a game.

One game that I am playing at the moment is Fallout 3.

I had attempted to play this game when it first came out, but I just couldn't immerse myself. At the time I put that down to not wanting to put enough time into it. This game, for those that have played it, requires immersion. In order to achieve any enjoyment out of it you have to become the character, and think as though you are in that world.



Recently, while wanting to beat my friend's gamer-score I attempted to start playing it again. I figured there were a bunch of gamer-points to be had. What a mistake.

Any enjoyment that I might have been able to achieve was negated by the fact that I was doing everything to up my gamer-score. Instead of taking my time, and doing what I wanted to do, interacting with the environment the way I wanted to, I was thrashing away attempting to fulfill what was necessary to get achievements.



I was losing on both sides. No gamer-points, and no fun. What was the point? I was also starting to get motion sick.

I wasn't playing the game for myself. My experience was starting to be affected, and subsequently the xbox was turned off. Achievements had ruined my Fallout 3 experience.


The Real Reason For Gaming

Achievements do add to the gaming experience. Adding a dimension to completing tasks that would otherwise not be there. But given the chance, they can take away from it too.

Taking a step back, I listened to the advice of my other work colleague who had been compelling me to try Fallout 3 ever since I put it away the first time. He said, "Just play the game, play it for the experience. Don't worry about the achievements, they'll come anyway. Just try and enjoy it for what it is..."
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Hey all,

Since I'm new I thought I'd write up an intro post. I found this site through my girlfriend, who has been coming on here for about 2 years but only started a blog recently.

I'm 29 years old, work full time for a very large IT corporation, co-own and run a photography company, live in Sydney, and have recently returned to gaming after a very long absence.


The Beginning

It all started with my parents buying me an Atari 2600 for my birthday many years ago. It's the normal story of my friend's down the road having one and me spending an inappropriate amount of time at their house playing River Raid and Wizard Of Wor





Just last year I found my old Atari 2600 that I had put away. I was so surprised I setup a little shoot.


Actual box:


My console out of the box:


...and I even found the original receipt that I stuck on the inside of the box!


Wow, can't believe my parents paid that much for the console back in the 80's!


The Progression

Amiga's were next. I stuck by the Amiga virtually all the way up to the end, only wavering one day when I played Wolfenstein 3D on a friend's 486dx2.

My PC years were full of FPS gaming. Using Apci-DOOM to connect over 28.8k modem to deathmatch with mates on all the old Wads (Dwango, Ozwango). Good times. Eventually progressed through to Quake and LANs. I'm actually slightly embarrassed to admit going to LANs and having 24hours of Counter Strike. My girlfriend gives me no end of grief about it.

The Intermission
After this came guitars and cars. Which I'm still very into, and have learnt several Metal Gear Solid songs and Persona 4 songs at the request of my significant other. But I now also make time to play games.

Here's one of my guitars and a part of my car:



The Renewed Love

So, how'd did I get back into gaming?

I met a girl many years ago at a car show that I had my car at, turns out this girl is into the same things I am. Fast forward and she buys a Skyline, and tracks her car with me. Fast forward again and it turns out she use to be massively into gaming and consoles. Fast forward yet again and she buys a 360, followed by PS3, and convinces me to buy an Xbox 360....and the rest happened from there.

Here's my home office, and my girlfriend's first xbox360 (she ended up buying an Elite). This 360 is now living with her parents at an attempt to get them into gaming...



...and the rest you may have seen before on Pure Poison 1's blog. :)




I've networked the entire house, and all consoles are online. We frequently game together and with others online, generally being in the same game.

When we're not playing the same game I pop on my headphones. So it's a win win situation. I get to spend time with my girlfriend, and game too!
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