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About
I'm terrible at playing video games. I buy more than I finish, and almost always end up spending more time on Animal Crossing than anything else. Sickening, really.
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The iPhone version of Broken Sword is now available on the App Store and it's looking gorgeous.
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The Final Fantasy franchise is a well-oiled money-making machine. A main series guaranteed to keep going until the world ends, still selling millions as we're consumed by the fiery blaze; an iconic set of IPs that can support endless facile spin-offs, and at least two rereleases per game per console generation that sell well enough to compel Square Enix to keep bloody doing it.

Not to mention, of course, a still-loyal-but-beleaguered fanbase who fund all these shenanigans, of which I find myself front and centre.

So why should we even begin to humour the idea of yet another rerelease on a different platform such as FFVIII on the PSP? I'll admit there's something a bit off about again buying a game that I can see the game case for sitting on my shelf. And there's definitely something off about supporting a company like Square Enix that takes such gleeful relish in monetising our nostalgia.

The answer is simple: JRPGs as a concept are made for on-the-go play. Anything that demands a player repeat the same basic action over and over again [grinding] demands to be released on a system that you can play while on the crapper. Or sit in bed waiting to drift off. Or shamefully under a table on a lengthy train journey.

Further more, JRPGs take fecking ages to complete. The reason Persona 3 PSP is such an exciting proposition is because I can imagine myself clocking up 80 hours on a PSP game that I can fit in/around my life, whereas imagining myself sitting stationary in front of a television for that amount of time is pretty horrifying (though it didn't stop me for the PS2 version /hauntedeyes).

It's these simple rationalisations that justify spending money on a game I already own (he genre compels me to be a tool, is basically what I'm saying). Final Fantasy VIII particularly stands out as one of my favourite main-series games because I actually finished it without any resentful self-discipline -- the opportunity to experience it again while taking a dump is just too much to resist.
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Veck
11:49 AM on 06.05.2008



LucasArts claims DS carts can't hold classic adventure games

". . . Fracture assistant producer Jeff Gullett also commented during the interview, and he tried to explain why no adventure games would be appearing on a DS cartridge in the future: "The cart size of the DS makes it impossible to put out ports of any of our old graphic adventures... there's literally not enough room on those carts to put the games out." Gullett's remark, although it sounds informed, is actually very wrong."

LucasArts is obviously run by cretinous ingrates who don't know their arse from their elbow, and this is why adventure game fans gets no love. How could doing this be anything less than printing money? You'd think prospect of raking it in would be motivating enough, even if honouring the still-acute nostalgia/love of countless gamers isn't. Fuckwits, the lot of them.
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Veck
8:27 AM on 06.01.2008



There's almost too much going on. With a see-sawing episodic rhythm that visits some starkly different locations and play styles, a wealth of incidental and hidden detail, more gameplay mechanics than you can fully explore in a single playthrough - and above all, an epic, elegiac, arcane storyline that seeks to tie up every last loose thread and honour the passing of a classic videogame hero - Metal Gear Solid 4 is, in most senses, the biggest Metal Gear yet. But the best? Maybe not. If the super-slick thriller of the first Metal Gear Solid remains Kojima's masterpiece, then this operatic monster is his magnum opus.

If I were ever to become a games journalist, this is how I'd like to write. Damn.
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Okay, after thirty or so hours I've had enough of GTA IV's infuriating design flaws. Everyone convinced me that this instalment saw the end of the shoddy mission design of yore and it's obvious now they were drunk on hype and couldn't resist spewing the same old hyperbole. The cover system is awful, the missions are too easily hindered by the inherent anarchy of the open world and the three-star+ police pursuits need to die in a goddamn fire. Especially during missions when there seems to be twice as many police cars on the road. The fact that failing any given mission at least one or two times is standard practice can't be considered good game design - and usually for the stupidest, most asinine of reasons.

My brief love affair with this shit is over. I love so much about it - the immersion, the satire, the music, but a doting wife can only take so many smacks to the face before she realises that the plush house and expensive car aren't worth the abuse. Consider my toys officially thrown out the pram.
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