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Antiestablishment in Dead Space - Destructoid




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I started this blog to voice my opinions about the artistic merits and disappointments of video games today. I'm Canadian, so for anyone reading outside the Canada, pardon the variance in spelling. To give you a general sense of my experience, I've been playing videogames for over seventeen years. My primary console is the Playstation 3, though I also own all Nintendo, Playstation and Xbox platforms, along with a Macintosh computer.





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George A. Romero, famed director of Dawn of the Dead, read the zombie-apocalypse genre as being about "revolution, one generation consuming the next." The idea of the living dead stems from social change, people fearing the downfall of one culture as another consumes it. The conservatives -- or the survivors -- are the ones refusing said change, as they attempt to quell the revolt. The dissent from the impeding social mores are then nullified by a shot to the head, or some miraculous concoction that cures the walking dead of their ailment -- a subversion of one opinion for traditional norms.

The spice Dead Space peppers on its decaying entrée is similar to the former, but varied by a focus on dismembering multiple limbs to subdue a hostile, rather than the trite mechanic of aiming for the head. This may be considered a simple gimmick to add nuance to a tried scenario, however given the importance of organizations within the series' narrative, this new convention actually manifests itself as a metaphor.

In the average zombie story the undead serve as obstacles for the survivors, merely trifles to be disposed of for the advancement of the narrative, and enforce the protagonists' persistence in preserving their ideals. Though the unimportance given to each zombie is utilized to express how the threat is social change as whole, across a body of shambling corpses rather than something unique to an individual. But in this syndicate's tangible manifestation the rising trend exists in an array of individuals, each brought to naught with a coupe de grace to the cerebrum.






But what if these individuals -- these zombies, represented something less than themselves, or the sum of their combined efforts? That's exactly the case with the Dead Space series as the necromorphs don't represent a change in the tides of society, but rather the consumption of society by organizations. In this case, the objective of the individual's malevolence is replaced by subservience to a cause greater than it -- a future it doesn't necessarily see itself a part of, but rather a reason it can't question or understand, leaving it in a state of blind obedience.

Necromorphs are therefore used as pawns, tools, or cannon fodder. Their sovereigns are earthly organizations that are familiar to players, yet hyperbolic nonetheless. Government, military, science, religion -- all the major institutions of civilized society attempt to harness the power of these brutes as means to their insidious ends. Naturally, their modus operandi is pure hostility, slashing and corroding everything in their path to impel a state of vulnerability in their prey. Consider this a breaking point, a place for the organization to employ the target when it's at its weakest. What follows is recruitment or, indoctrination if you choose to be cynical about the matter. In the most literal sense, this is the conversion process following the subjugation of the quarry, transforming the human into a necromorph. It parallels with how social inequities impel people to join particular groups. For example, the recruitment of the poor for military purposes, or the absolving sins and instilling hope by means of religion -- the diegetic counterparts being EarthGov and Unitology respectively.

Though the blind submission to organizations is coupled with a blind persistence, in which Dead Space uses mechanics to shimmer in its dingy halls in using dismemberment as metaphor. Isaac Clarke may be an engineer by trade, though, ironically he spends the majority of his escapades destroying everything in his path. Thusly, he is quite anarchic in nature by not only neglecting the conventions of his profession, but by disestablishing the puppets and constituents of organizations.





Disestablishing, is putting it lightly -- Isaac brutally tears apart necromorphs using the myriad weapons at his disposal. Decapitation does little to hinder a necromorph's intent as it relentlessly uses the resources it has left to inflict harm. Only by mutilating its limbs can the threat be put to rest. From the point of the game's narrative, the monster is made immobile by the lack of appendages. However, to look at the underlying imagery would show that Isaac destroying necromorphs in said manner is actually an allegory for disassembling an organization.

The destruction of an organization is a feat difficult to accomplish, but that's exactly what's exhibited in a necromorph's struggle: the attempt to survive without all of its limbs. Like a necromorph, companies will do everything in their power to survive despite the loss of their constituents. Though only through the disablement of significant partitions can an organization be rendered non-functional or non-profitable. The panned out view of the entire story reflects this core principle, as Isaac's strife in fending off the various organizations of the Dead Space universe are never enough to keep him out of harm's way, because as he cuts of one arm of organization, the other still swings.


It's by this metaphor for dissolving companies that Dead Space truly sets itself apart from the rest of the zombie stories littered across the medium. Instead of relying on the lumbering, pedestrian trope of acute gameplay through shooting someone or something in head, Visceral Games focused on delivering unique and varied gameplay that gave deeper meaning to the story, and efficaciously added depth to the antagonists through the absence of character in its pawns.
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