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About
Toisu! You know me, or maybe not; but that doesn't matter much. I'm geeky and live in particularly dull area of the UK where I'm currently at college and spend most of my free time either on the net, playing video games, watching TV, reading manga, watching anime or just spacing out, relaxing and being an introvert nerd, as a result I'm actually quite shy around new people, never been good at "Small Talk", but once you get to know me I'm actually just odd. Fun, no?


I'm on Twitter! @Kaito_kun
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Sengoku Basara: Samurai Heroes was a hack 'n' slash game from CAPCOM released in the West at the tail end of 2010 for the PS3 and Wii with little to no notice taken by the public and the press. A shame in my opinion; while it was a game that certainly wouldn't have been to everyone's taste, seeing over the top stylish action and outlandish characters - such as eyepatch man with six swords, rocket launcher wielding mercenary lady, and robot-man with cannons strapped to his back - tear through hoards of enemies really hit the spot for myself and many others. Most probably due to the fact that it was a game that tried to be nothing other than to be fun. Perhaps the game's recent Japanese re-release Sengoku Basara: Utage - with it's additional content - could tempt more of us in the West to give the series a try? Provided that CAPCOM are willing to localise it and give the series another chance.



Much like CAPCOM's other releases of late Sengoku Basara: Utage - or "Sengoku Basara: Party" if you're after a rough English translation - is a re-release masquerading as a sequel, much like Super Street Fighter IV or Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom 3 were, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. The game follows the same main story line as Sengoku Basara: Samurai Heroes, however, formally non-player characters are now playable - raising the total from 16 characters to 30, with additions including some of my personal favourite NPCs each with their own individual story lines - and existing character stories have been extended. New game modes have been added too such as a tag mode that allows players to switch characters midway through a battle have appeared. These additions are enticing enough to encourage veteran Sengoku Basara players to return to the franchise's not entirely accurate depiction of Japan's sengoku era, meanwhile new players can still explore the game and all it has to offer for the first time as well as enjoy all the new features that the re-release offers.



Now if that last paragraph sounded like a bit of a sale pitch, that's probably because it was in a way; a pitch to CAPCOM in the hopes that they will localise Sengoku Basara: Utage in the West. I loved Sengoku Basara: Samurai Heroes so of course I want to see the sequel/re-release over here! I loved it to the point where I practically forced Sengoku Basara: Samurai Heroes upon people as gifts in the hope that those few extra copies bought might convince CAPCOM to localise Utage. There characters were likeable, the game was simple fun and the dialogue was cheesy enough in places to make me laugh. Yes, I could just import the Japanese version, but if I did that then I'd only have a vague idea of what was going on in the new stories. Is it wrong of me to want to be able to fully experience more of something I enjoyed? Am I selfish? A little. Am I odd for writing this blog response about an obscure, ridiculously Japanese hack and slash game and not "Space Zombie Hunter Modern War Battles 5"? Most definitely. However, I know what I want and I'm not ashamed of that. I'll take a samurai over a space marine any day.
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