Quantcast
Community Discussion: Blog by Khazar222 | Close, But No Cigar: The Mark of KriDestructoid
Close, But No Cigar: The Mark of Kri - Destructoid

DestructoidJapanatorTomopopFlixist





click to hide banner header
About
Hello, I'm Khazar.

I'm a senior in college, with a major in English and a minor in Biology. I've been playing games since about age five from all across the spectrum of genres.

I am fascinated by the way games tell their stories, so much of this blog is devoted to looking at the design, writing, and style of video games.

Currently Playing:

Farcry 2
Spartan: Total Warrior
Dawn of War
Yoshi's Island (Game Boy Advance)
Rachet and Clank: Up Your Arsenal
Klonoa 2


Player Profile
Follow me:
Khazar222's sites
Badges
Following  


Inspired by Edge’s Time Extend article on the The Mark of Kri, I thought I would do my own writeup, which arrived at many of the same conclusions as the Time Extend. Nevertheless, I decided to post it since The Mark of Kri has six levels in it. Each will take you around an hour to complete, maybe a little longer. It’s mostly about a bad guy and a good guy in the most American cinematic sense of the terms. It doesn’t sound very remarkable - in fact, it's a lopsided sort of game after all is said and done. But it is pretty remarkable. Here's why:

The Mark of Kri looks like Don Bluth and a bunch of Disney animators made a video game based on Polynesian and Pacific mythology. That’s not very far from the truth. Most of the people on Sony Computer Entertainment America’s San Diego Studio were classically trained 2D animators who had worked for places like Nickelodeon, Disney, and Dreamworks. The character designs were animated by hand, as opposed to motion-capture. It took 18 months of animation. It’s a rolling, thundering ballad that -when you're least expecting it - will kick you in the teeth.



How do you talk about The Mark of Kri? Let’s start here: “If Ico had been an architect’s blueprint of a platformer, Kri was more an animator’s impression of a third-person action game” (EDGE 2009). The Mark of Kri doesn’t operate like any other action game. There are no grab bags of powerups to collect, other than extra health scattered around the level and bundles of arrows tucked away* – no long ticking chains of combo numbers and points flashing on the screen during combat indicating 99 HITS! with a flash and a guitar riff. In combat, you use the right analog stick to send out an abstract “focusing” beam of light, representing Rau “targeting” enemies. These enemies are then coded to a different face button on the controller, either Square, Triangle, or Circle. The less foes you target, the more frightening your combos and finishers.

The Mark of Kri is violent. If it was a Disney movie – which it sure as hell looks like – people would be appalled by the violence. Rau Utu is a barrel-chested, tattooed beast, silent at all times, save for grunts of pain and bellowing war cries. His “stealth mode,” walking without a weapon equipped, is low, predatory, rolling. The first time you sneak up on a guard and catch him unawares, Rau will grab him by the throat, press him against a wall, and quietly run him through. In combat, enemies will shrink with fear whenever you kill one of their comrades, disgusted by the savagery. The shock of it is not gratuitous - even when paired with animation which people would normally consider “family friendly” – it just contributes to the overall flair of the game. His bird, Kuzo, is just as much a player character as Rau, he can be directed to fly to – and perch on – objects in the various levels of the game. The player can then switch his view to that of the bird, getting a literal “bird’s eye view” of the dangers ahead. Rau, the implacable bull, and Kuzo, the silent device for planning your next course of action – add up to form one unstoppable being.



The Mark of Kri is a myth in every sense of the word. You are a Herculean force, and enemies only exist to be overcome. Once spotted, you cannot reenter stealth by evasion, you can only leap into the fray - it's an interesting, and I'd say realistic touch. How many games have you played where guards just GIVE UP chasing you after twenty seconds?** Even in the levels where the enemies do not appear to be frightening cultist-soldiers (two of them to be precise), your foes are dispatched which just as little mercy as any other. They are an obstacle in your path. Kri has no puzzles or unnecessary backtracking, just pure forward motion.

The Mark of Kri doesn’t get into stride until the third and fourth levels, particularly the fourth. The fourth has you fighting your way through a mountaintop monastery / fortress filled with vicious pseudo-samurai. You drop patrolling guards with well placed arrows, you stalk through the mute snowdrifts, and you throttle soldiers quietly and quickly in the shadowed parapets. The Mark of Kri’s visuals and violence come together in near perfect harmony in this level (called Vaitaku).



Unfortunately, this feeling doesn’t last. You acquire a spear at the end of the level. Visually it’s a joy to wield in combat, but it can target more foes, which the next level heaps on you at an alarming speed, starting to abandon the previous emphasis on stealth and those pregnant moments before explosive combat. By the sixth and last level, you’ll have acquired an axe, which can target up to nine foes at a time. All pretense of stealth is gone and the shortcomings of the combat system - which really only shines through careful application (read: less is more) - are exposed.

The Mark of Kri is a unique game, in the same vein as Shadow of the Colossus.*** It strives to maintain its tone throughout the game, and while mechanically it is not on the level of Sony’s later third person action blockbuster God of War, it isn’t trying to be. The bottom line is that it is an uneven experience that peaks in the middle and fizzles by the end. But that peak is worth the trek. “Gather round, all of you who would listen: I have a tale to tell,” begins the narrator in the opening of The Mark of Kri, and what a tale it is – one that players would do well to experience.


*I lied – there are some hidden “Tikis” to collect in each level, but since I can’t recall what they do, they can’t have been that important.

** Rhymes with "Betal Meer"

**Author’s Note: I didn’t like Ico much.
Photo Photo Photo



Is this blog awesome? Vote it up!




Those who have come:



Comments not appearing? Anti-virus apps like Avast or some browser extensions can cause this.
Easy fix: Add   [*].disqus.com   to your software's white list. Tada! Happy comments time again.

Did you know? You can now get daily or weekly email notifications when humans reply to your comments.


Back to Top




All content is yours to recycle through our Creative Commons License permitting non-commercial sharing requiring attribution. Our communities are obsessed with videoGames, movies, anime, and toys.

Living the dream since March 16, 2006

Advertising on destructoid is available: Please contact them to learn more