hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum


11:59 PM on 11.08.2014  

Jinx's Most Wanted Games of 2015

Hoffman did a cblog a couple days ago about what upcoming games he was looking forward to. A lot of us responded with our lists as well, but I figured it might be fun to double-check mine and share it in little more detail. So I present to you my most anticipated games of 2015 - now with pix and links (and Links!). Most are multi-platform or PC. Not all of these will make it out in 2015, and some are already available in beta/alpha form. So this is all approximate...

A.N.N.E.

I backed this on Kickstarter. Glorious pixel graphics, and a mix of platforming and shmup. <3

Batman Arkham Knight

Looking forward to this not just for the gameplay, but some incredible visuals like Origins.

Defender's Quest 2

The first game is my favorite tower defense game ever. Want this so bad.

DOOM 4

Still mad they never made the QuakeCon preview public. Probably won't be till 2016 but whatevs.

Grand Theft Auto V

I never liked GTA much, I am more a Saints Row or Just Cause guy. But this... so pretty...

A Hat In Time

Still a rough alpha, but this is looking like a true N64-style platformer. Do want.

Hellraid

Look at that, what do I even need to say?

Legend of Iya

Another platformer with pixel graphics that I backed on Kickstarter... just shut up, you.

Killing Floor 2

Because I love gore in games, and KF2 has a whole system for it.

Pillars of Eternity

So pretty...

Road Redemption

More or less a 2014 version of Road Rash. Hell yeah.

Secrets of Grindea

A bit like the old NES/SNES Zeldas, but bigger and more complex. Please be good.

Starbound

Updates to the beta have been slow, but a big one is coming soon...

Survarium

So much potential here. The beta is just PvP and I have put a ton of time into just that.

Vector Thrust

Looks like Afterburner, but cell-shaded and more complex. Gimme.

The Witcher 3

Looking amazing.

Woolfe

A 2.5D, Alice-ish platformer. The alpha is already very good.

Zelda U

Yeah, I'm going to have to buy a freaking Wii U. Screw you all >.<

I really want a Fallout 4 or Metroid U announcement, too. Just let us know they exist! What surprised me most about this list is how many were either PC exclusive or "PC first" releases. I guess I'm on the right platform for me.



I feel like 2015 will be a better year for gaming than 2014. With new-gen consoles entering their second or third year, we should finally see some games that were really designed for their hardware. Plus, the fruit of Kickstarter will continue to blossom, giving us a lot of great smaller games to fill the time between big releases. It's going to be a great year :)

  read


3:12 PM on 11.04.2014  

Jinx's Week In Screenshots

I take a lot of screenshots, so I thought it might make for an interesting kind of blog to cover what I've been playing visually. With plenty of commentary, of course, and lots of relevant links in case anything catches your eye. So here's what I've been playing this last week or so. Most images are linked to their original, full-resolution versions.

X-Wing. I remember this game from back in the late 90s in undergrad. I didn't have a PC then, but my friend TJ did, and that's where I got to see Doom, Master of Orion, and X-Wing for the first time. I didn't get to play X-Wing much, but I remembered it being cool, so I snagged it immediately from GoG when it was released (you can get Tie Fighter as well). And it is cool, but it's also flawed in a lot of ways. The main issue is the difficultly. There is no "curve" where the game slowly gets harder, it's just random. Worse, many of the difficult missions still rely on luck in terms of how things turn out with the AI allies and enemies. Pretty annoying when missions might take a good 20 minutes to complete. I don't mind hard games, but X-Wing is just frustrating. Yet I still keep playing it, so it must be doing something right.


"Escort Mission: The Game". (more shots)

Epic Mickey 2. I was really thrilled when I saw this show up on Steam. I thought it had been canceled, but apparently it got a tiny retail release a few places. It has a lot of technical issues - it hates my CPU so I am just going to wait till I upgrade to play. It looks okay, though, and there are so few N64-style platformers that I'll take what I can get.


Pretty game, but it hates hexacore processors and is locked at 30fps.

A Hat In Time. Speaking of N64-style 3D platformers... here comes one with the potential to be great. It's only in the alpha stage, but I'm digging the visual style, music, and initial levels. You can buy into the alpha (via Steam) on their website, though it's a lot more expensive than just preordering. I spent the extra cash because I just had to check it out.


This level reminds me of Mario 64, but on a bigger scale (more shots).

Castle of Illusion. Back to pretty good Mickey games, I picked this up on Android. I have the PC version, and I was expecting this to be cut down. Nope. It's the same exact game, and it looks beautiful on my Note 3's 5.7" screen. The controls are actually half-decent, too. It's still rather play on PC or console, but if you want a higher end game for on the go this is a good choice.


Great platformer, and a real treat if you are a fan of the original 16-bit version.

 Freedom Planet. Another great platformer! White it's inspired a lot by the 16-bit Sonic games, it also has shades of Rocket Knight and feels more like an evolution or spinoff than a copy of Sonic. The visuals are beautiful, and even better if you add scanlines. The music is great and sounds like it could easily have come from a 16-bit platformer. If you like classic Sonic and/or 2D platformers you should look into this one.


I really don't know why this game hasn't gotten more attention (more shots).

 Blazerush. I don't even remember why I bought this game but holy crap am I having fun with it. Just silly racing fun with weapons and knocking people off the track and lots of play modes. I haven't gotten to try the multiplayer (online and 4-player local) but I can imagine it would be a blast. If you have a controller and just want to sit back and have some goofy fun it's a great game for it.


A frantic and crazy game, hard to capture in a still image (more shots).

Woolfe: The Red Hood Diaries. I've been following this for a while, and they just released a demo for Halloween. It's a truly "2.5D" game, in that while the camera is set, and gameplay is mostly 2D, you can go into for the foreground and background sometimes. The demo has three very different levels and they were pretty enjoyable. Definitely one to watch if you like platformers and/or the Alice games.


This part is more 3D, letting you go into the background Double Dragon style (more shots).

Evolve (alpha). I played a little. It was kind of "meh". It's kind of like fighting a boss monster, but with no level beforehand to build up tension, no worrying about conserving supplies for the upcoming battle, no foreplay. I really don't see how this concept can carry a whole $60 game. And I have a feeling, like Titanfall, it will launch light on content then expect you to buy the season pass to fill it out. No thanks.


I only played a couple rounds. But that's because I got bored.

What's next? Well, I'm really looking forward to Valkyria Chronicles next week - I don't have a PS3 so it's new to me! I'm passing on most full-priced AAA titles this winter, though. Too much backlog, I can't justify spending $50 on a new game when I have equally good stuff I haven't even gotten to yet. I think I'd rather save for a big HDTV or maybe a 1440p monitor anyway. Hmmmm...

See you next week maybe? If people think this is fun they should try it, too. Either weekly, or just do a best-of blog with your favorite shots. Screenshots are a good way to share our gaming experiences, but a lot of them just sit around in our profiles unenjoyed.


  read


12:03 AM on 09.04.2014  

Time For Some Humor I Think

(HIGH BANDWIDTH BLOG, avoid if you aren't on wifi!) I'm having stress issues, so rather than commenting on the latest drama I decided to put together another compilation of my goofy memes, images, screenshots, etc. Yeah, I'm probably not as funny as I think I am, but hopefully people will gets some chuckles from these and maybe we can all de-stress a bit together. I provided a little commentary on most of them, just so I don't look too lazy...


I started making Jem memes for another blog I didn't finish... I'm at 60...


Eat a dick, Microsoft.


And this is why you don't buy Day 1.


Motherf*cking bears, man.


Pretty much what's happening.


An exaggeration, but it sure ain't the 80s no more.


Something about the word "monetize" infuriates me.


So yeah this is probably my fave. I love Dog.


"Deleted scene" from my Squeenix Tomb Raider article.


Made this for my blog giving Squeenix hell for selling out to MS.


I forget the occasion. So many it could have been...


Coming full circle back to R.O.B. amiright?


I like any piece of hardware that looks like it will give me cancer.


PCGMR FTW bitches!


Me when I have to use a console.


Well this was unfortunately prophetic :(


Was gonna do a series of these with a car called "Burnout Bob". I'm glad I didn't, too.


Eh.


Steam has finally been noticed by Japanese developers it seems.


PS+ sits oddly in the middle, but I won't argue that it isn't a great deal.


Not sure why Nintendo gets a pass on everything lately. They used to be the big evil corporation that ran everything!


Me when I bash the Wii U...


Don't forget the pre-order bonuses you'll miss out on if you don't buy blindly before reviews are out. Sketchy as fuck, this industry.


Or I can Force choke you. Whatever works.


Almost posted this on the Kuro review. I saved it just for you guys.


Can't remember what Japanimation game this was for, but teasing weeboos about being peedoos is funny.


I'm pretty patient but yeah this shit is getting ridiculous.


Went through this awful phase last Fall where all I wanted to play was Triple Town...


Luigi, out-death-stared.


Or I have so much I can't decide, I really don't know.


My controller concept for Ryse and other QTE games.


Well it sorta fits.



STEAM SALE TIME, BITCHES


Ugh why did I do this.


Wizard of Oz and 60s Spiderman. I don't even.


This would be the end of us all...


IT'S A TRAP!

OTHER STUFF MAYBE INTERESTING OR NOT WHATEVER MAN


Google had a playable logo, I think for the Roswell incident. Notice the similarity to E.T.?


My friend's girlfriend made him this. Pretty sweet.


Response to someone, not so funny out of context...


I played Shadowrun Returns with an infinite zoom hack and noticed this couch... stuff from Half-Life, Borderlands, Doctor Who...


Went in to change during a defense mission and got interrupted in the changing room lol


More like #juststalkerthings


Nice side-article placement, Dtoid!


Unfortunately this vending machine in Borderlands 2 does not, in fact, dispense boobs.


Speaking of boobs...


Pay attention to the mission names in X-COM, there are some good ones.


Me at the goth club...


My bank statement from a year ago... notice a pattern?


It's tough but you can set up a third-person view in Borderlands 2!


So I DJ at goth-industrial clubs sometimes. Made this custom collar inspired by Gaige's from Borderlands 2.


When I was surfing for images to make custom grid images in Steam for Deadpool I found the *original* art from this scene. If you look close you can see just how badly they photoshopped clothing on them. But their bras are still hanging on the wall behind them lol


I'm a smart ass...


*strokes his PC*


So yeah. That's all, folks. Hope at least a couple of those weren't awful. If you did enjoy them, I did another entire blog of these a while back.

I will not be responsible for any terrible side-effects looking at this blog might have on you.

  read


12:53 PM on 08.30.2014  

Steam Grid View - Making and Using Custom Images

The Joy of Steam's Grid View


I made several for this game... and I don't even own it yet.

For years I neglected the "grid" view in Steam – I preferred the "detail" view because it seemed easier to navigate. Last winter, though, I decided to try the grid view as a way to limit what games I had in front of me at any given time so I could focus on finishing them. The easiest way to do this is just to create a set of Favorites and switch to grid view. You can also select to show any category in grid view now, which is a huge improvement – it used to just be "all" or "favorites".

Grid view is easy to tweak in terms of scaling the tiles to show more or fewer games at once, and you can easily toggle between grid, detail, and list view as needed (all in the upper right hand corner). Part of the reason I'd avoided grid view before was because I felt it didn't show enough games on screen at once. But even at a medium sized scale it shows a lot more games than the "list" view, though not as many as the "detail" view. So you actually aren't giving up much.


When I got in on the Survarium beta the first thing I did was add it to Steam.

What are you gaining? Well, for one you're actually using most of your screen, rather than having 80% of it basically blank while you squint at a tiny list over on the far left. Second, you are getting a way to really appreciate your library visually. Having your games in grid view is the virtual equivalent of having them on your shelf – except it's prettier because it's like having all the box art facing out.

Well, in theory it's prettier. The problem is that some Steam games have mediocre images for the tile view. Moreover, any non-Steam games or emulators you add to your library will not have an image at all and just show the icon instead. You should also know that these are the same images that get displayed in Big Picture Mode. If you are using that interface, replacing ugly or broken images is especially important.


Making images for NES games is tough because all the box art is vertical.

Luckily there are a few sites like the Steam Banners Booru which have custom grid images uploaded and cataloged. If a game has a poor or missing image in Steam you will probably find one, and maybe some neat alternates to use as well. Even if the default image for a game is nice, I may change it out sometimes to keep my library looking fresh. You can also upload your own custom images to that site, which is what I do with mine. And that, of course, is the other option – simply make your own images!


Making Custom Images for Grid View


Original image from the art book. Crop, add logo, pow you're done.

The key to making custom images is finding good art to work with. This can be difficult because the art for most games was designed for vertical boxes, making is awkward to use in a horizontal layout. I typically use Google Image Search to find images to use, just downloading anything potentially useful into a folder to tinker with later. In addition to the game's name, you may also want to add in keywords such as:

"steam grid image" or "steam banner" - Hey, someone else may have already made one that's good! You might also limit your search to 460x215px images under advanced options (the size of grid images).
"box art" - This can narrow it down a bit, getting you more art and less screenshots.
"art" - Sometimes you can find stand-alone versions of the box art (no logos etc) uploaded by fans or the artists themselves. Invaluable and very cool if you are a fan.
"logo" - Finding a stand-alone version of a game's logo is great, because it gives you far more layout options. It also saves the grueling work of cutting a logo out of the box art. You can often find .png files that already have a transparent background – those are very useful!
"manual" – Sometimes scans of game manuals have different art, or the box art without logos etc. plastered all over it.
"wallpaper" – Both official and fan wallpapers can be a good resource, especially since wallpapers are often in a letterboxed layout. You might just need to resize and crop it to make a tile!
"arcade" or "cabinet" – If it is an arcade game, or a port of one, sometimes the original cabinet art can be a great way to go.

Screenshots can be another source of imagery – either online, or from your own collection. For Saint's Row: The Third I took a screenshot of my custom character, then cropped it and added the logo. And my current Skyrim image is from a screenshot I took in my (modded) game.


This was made from one of my favorite screenshots.

I would like to make a more detailed tutorial, but that's difficult because everyone uses different image software – and it would require a crash course in image editing. I use an ancient copy of Photoshop 7, but GIMP (link) should provide everything you need. If you have some experience with basic image editing, it shouldn't be too hard to pick up. A few basic things you need to know:

* Grid Images are 460x215, though larger variants (same aspect ratio) of that seem to work.
* You can use .jpg or .png format. I suggest .png as you don't lose quality that way.
* Try to find a .png version of the game logo with a transparency. It increases your options because you can paste it on any artwork as a layer and arrange it as you like.
* To make a logo/text stand out, try using "outer glow"… but instead of a white glow, set it to "normal" render mode and use black. This can help the text stay visible by darkening the background around it, and is a lot more subtle than a bright glow.

Even if you don't have much image editing experience, you can sometimes just take a wallpaper and resize/crop it – not too hard to do in GIMP.


Enjoy That Library


A sample from my library with a lot of my custom images.

Overall, Grid View can be a great way of both browsing and displaying your PC game library. Custom images are crucial to keeping things looking nice, though especially if you add your non-Steam games like I do. So once you've weeded out the duds into the new "Hidden" category, run through your library to add or update your images and make your library look the best it can.

One last thing – I love making these, so if you have some you can't find on the Steam Banners Booru, let me know in the comments and I'll try to make one for you!


In case you're playing the pre-alpha of the new Unreal Tournament...   read


5:59 PM on 08.18.2014  

Square Enix - Sellout Sh*tbags



It was revealed this week that Rise of the Tomb Raider would be coming "exclusively" to the Xbox One. I put that in quotes because the phrasing of the announcement left it open for the game to release later on other platforms. Will it? Who fucking knows. I suspect a late PC release is, at the least, very likely. Harder to say with the PS4, based on Dead Rising 3 and Ryse. You won't get a straight answer from anyone involved, in any case. That would be too courteous.

Even if we ignore the series’ long history as a multi-platform title, the whole situation is a big "fuck you" to the fans who – across five platforms – made the 2013 reboot successful. It isn’t just a matter of what is happening, either. Exclusives are fairly common. It’s more the situation surrounding it, and Square Enix and Microsoft’s inadequate reassurances to frustrated fans.

That's what I want to talk about here. Why is this situation different from other "console exclusives"? How have Square Enix and Microsoft made things worse? The outrage might seem over the top, with no one involved able to make so much as a Facebook post without receiving an onslaught of replies from angry fans. But I think the outrage is justified, and both Square Enix and Microsoft deserve every damn bit of the hell they are getting.


Precedents and Expectations


Part of what made this so bad for fans is that it came out of left field. I see some apologists saying this is "just another exclusive", but that's just not true. Rise of the Tomb Raider is the immediate sequel to a game that was on other platforms. It is not from a studio or IP owned by Microsoft. When Rise of the Tomb Raider was announced everyone was right to assume it would be cross-platform, or at least show up on the PS4/One/PC if it wasn't feasible on the PS3/360.

Speaking of cross-platform, let's not forget that earlier this year Square Enix released the “Definitive Edition” of the first game on PS4/One – encouraging people who bought it on PS3/360 as well to repurchase it. I think if someone bought the original game twice it’s not too much for them to expect the immediate sequel to be available to them as well.

And finally… it’s 2014, people. It’s a multiplatform world. There’s a good piece over on Eurogamer about what a backwards move this was by Square Enix. I guess it’s our fault for assuming they were with the times.


The Story Factor


Part of the issue here, though, is somewhat unique to Tomb Raider. The reboot was a gritty, personal game about the brutal experiences which forged Lara into the woman she is. It was a story-driven game which left fans with an emotional investment in Lara's fate. The immediate response of fans to the sequel was excitement. Finally, we would get to see Lara's story continue! Then a few months later we were informed that if we didn't own a One we were shit out of luck.

In what other media does this kind of bullshit happen?!

Can you imagine reading an amazing book… then being told you weren't allowed to read the sequel unless you bought a $400 book light? Or if the next season of your favorite TV show was suddenly only viewable if you had Time Warner? What if you could only get in to see Avengers: Age of Ultron if you had an iPhone? Only in the game industry does this kind of bullshit fly. And speaking of flying bullshit…


The PR Bullshit Nightmare


The most utterly in-fucking-furiating thing about this situation is how it has been handled by the parties involved. There have been statements from Microsoft and Crystal Dynamics, but both ignore the two questions everyone is asking:

"Will Rise of the Tomb Raider be released on other platforms?"
"If so, how long will we have to wait?"

Microsoft shoves the question off to Square Enix and Crystal Dynamics, saying that they have nothing to do with whether it is released on other platforms after the exclusivity is up. But Crystal Dynamics will not clarify any of this either. I suspect part of the "deal" was that both the length of exclusivity and other platforms remain undisclosed until after the One gets its sales boost from the "exclusive" release.

The whole tone from both camps has been both condescending and evasive. We know the game will probably come out for other platforms, just fucking tell us already. Nobody likes to have these kind of bullshit PR games played with them, especially when it comes to something they care about.

The worst to me is actually Crystal Dynamics. They actually have the nerve to say that they aren't "walking away from our fans who only play on Playstation or on PC." That is the goddamn definition of what you are doing you lying assholes. These guys are literally sell-outs, having taken Microsoft's money to deny a huge percentage of their fans access to this game.

So yeah. Fuck these guys.


It's Just Business! It's Nothing Personal!


This is what the apologists are saying. It's "just business". We have no right to be angry, after all it's nothing "personal".

But isn't it? These companies lure us into making an emotional investment in their products. They encourage us to form an attachment to characters like Lara. Hell, they spend millions in marketing to make it personal. Yet when they screw us over, we're supposed to suddenly turn that off? We're expected to be loyal fans and customers, but to expect no loyalty in return from these companies? What kind of sick fucking relationship is this? One it's time to get out of, that's what kind.

So here's the deal. I'm going to be passing on Temple of Osiris this Fall I think. And if Rise of the Tomb Raider does come out on PC? Yeah, I'll wait for it to be $10 in a Steam sale. I'm not paying $60 for a game that isn't new.

Square Enix and Crystal Dynamics have not shown any loyalty to me as a fan. Why should I show them any loyalty as a customer?

Don't get mad, guys. It's nothing personal.   read


8:07 PM on 05.20.2014  

Transistor - Custom Images For Steam Grid View

I made a batch of custom images to use in the larger Steam grid view for Transistor. The default image is okay, but not terribly exciting:



To use a custom image for a game in the large grid view, just right-click on it and select "Set Custom Image" to pick the one you want to use from your PC. You can always remove it (pick "Remove Custom Image") and Steam will automatically go back to the default.

Anyway, here goes:


.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


I've been making a lot of custom images lately, including some for Survarium, Stalker: Lost Alpha, and even some NES classics. I've uploaded most of my work to the Steam Banners website to share. You can check out my work there, as well as find a ton of custom images for your games.

I've been planning a blog on making and using these in general, life has just been a bit of a mess since last summer. It's definitely refreshing to use some nicer images, though, or even just to change them around to keep your library looking fresh. In parting, here's a glance at what part of my library looks like right now, with quite a few custom images in use:


(click to enlarge)   read


8:19 PM on 09.29.2013  

The Steam Controller: Shut Up and Listen



Since the announcement of the Steam Controller last Friday, I don't think I've seen so many otherwise intelligent people say so many ignorant things. Just look at this moron. While I'm sympathetic to having a negative gut reaction when faced with something different, most concerns or complaints people have expressed are directly addressed on Valve's announcement page. The rest are mostly unfounded if you take a minute to think about how the controller works, or look at a picture of it with your brain on.

Valve also showed the controller to a number of developers, and their response was overall quite positive – impressive considering this is still a prototype. I highly recommend reading the detailed blog by Tommy Refenes of Team Meat about using the controller. It gives you a good sense of what it feels like to use it. There's also an article on Kotaku detailing other developers' reactions to the controller. I'll be quoting both below.

Anyway, I'm just going to go through the things I've seen people say and explain why they are, you know, wrong. And don't be afraid of change, people. That wouldn't be... wise...



"This is just another annoying gimmick like motion controls!"

Nooooope. This is not "innovation for innovation's sake" like the Kinect or Wii U GamePad. The Steam Controller was developed for a reason, to address a specific problem: "How can we make games that traditionally require a keyboard and mouse easily playable on the couch?" While the Steam Controller's functionality surpasses that primary goal, and may offer new ways to play and enjoy games, it has a reason to exist. They same can't be said of most other controller "innovations".


"But I'd have to take my thumbs off the trackpads to press the buttons!"

Really? You're right, that's different from the 360 controller, where you can easily press XYAB without your thumbs leaving the analog sticks.



I mean, you know, if you have a third thumb or something. You circus freak.

But no, let's not stop there. Let's address this whole supposed "button issue". Because people seem to have forgotten how to count.

On a 360 controller you can access 6 buttons without your thumbs leaving the analog controls, assuming you count the wonky analog stick-buttons.



Well HOLY FRICKIN' MATH, BATMAN, you can actually press more buttons on the Steam Controller!



Note that I labeled the right analog pad "8+" because it can be dynamically changed to emulate several buttons when needed.

To be fair, Valve really shouldn't have labeled those central buttons "XYAB" on the prototype, as they aren't meant to fulfill the same functions as the buttons by the same name on a 360 controller. I think that's throwing people off.

Ignoring those, though, the thing actually has a ton of buttons you can press without having your thumbs leave the trackpads. It addition to the two top buttons/triggers there are two underneath you can access, kind of like the Z button on the N64 controller. Moreover, the trackpads themselves are buttons, and I suspect it would be easier to press them without issue than analog-stick buttons. By altering the magnetic field they can even make the touchpads themselves function as multiple buttons. In other words, where your thumb is when you press down would signify a different virtual button. You could "feel" each button by changes in the magnetic field across the pad. And yes, developers who tried it say that works quite well. Well enough to play Super Meatboy and Spelunky.


"But this is just like using a touch-screen in a cell-phone game, there's no tactile or sensory feedback!"



Okay. Let's start with the basics. Look at the controller. No, seriously, stop what you're doing, and look it with your freaking eyeballs. Each pad is circular and concave. So they are already way more tactile than the annoying, slippery "virtual" pads on a cellphone screen. Each pad also has a series of raised concentric circles to better give you a sense of depth. Finally, the haptic feedback can create sensations based on your thumb's location, providing customizable feedback that can change depending on the game and situation. Refenes suggested that they add more "regular" tactile feedback to the pad (maybe a nub in the center or at up-down-left-right), and that's among the things Valve is already considering.


"But this isn't going to be as accurate as an analog stick!"

No, it's going to be more accurate, though somewhat shy of mouse accuracy. One indie developer described it, compared to a standard controller, as "much more precise for (say) anything WASD+mouselook." So, as Valve suggests on their announcement page, the controller should give you FPS accuracy and speed superior to a standard controller, albeit still shy of a gaming mouse.


"But this will be horrible for games I play with a D-Pad!"



It wasn't designed with those games in mind, but signs actually point to it being just fine. According to Refenes of Team Meat, "I was able to play Meat Boy the way Meat Boy can be played on an advanced level." He also found it fine with Spelunky. And Team Meat… well, if anyone knows platformers, it's them. The jury is still out on how it will work with fighting games, but I can actually see it being great for circular movements.

In any case, nobody is taking away your old controllers. A lot of us already have multiple controllers for different types of games, like special pads/sticks for fighting games. This one is more for using the SteamOS UI and keyboard-mouse style PC games.


"But why come up with a new controller when the current ones are just fine?"

They are just fine for many kinds of games. But, as I stated above, they aren't designed for complex keyboard-mouse titles. Moreover, for certain genres like FPS games the Steam Controller is potentially superior.


"But I don't want to use it because ________!"

Then don't freaking use it. Your 360 controller and keyboard-mouse setups will still work fine. Valve specifically states that the new controller is not meant to replace them. Maybe you should take some time away from gaming to improve your reading comprehension skills?


So Anyway…



One last thing. It's just a freaking prototype. Based on player feedback and the hardware beta they could end up adding a D-pad, swapping one of the touchpads for an analog stick, or making any number of other changes before release. Hell, during the developer demonstration one of the Valve employees tweaked the firmware on the fly at someone's request. Can you imagine Sony or Microsoft involving the community in the development process like this? No. Freaking. Way.

And, everything else aside, it's going to be hard to judge this thing one way or the other until more of us get our hands on it. Putting your thumbs into dynamic magnetic fields sounds pretty crazy... and I can't wait to freaking try it out.


- Jinx

PS: I'm moving to reserve recapper for now. That way I have more time to harass you all with my regular blog posts. Aren't you lucky?   read


12:04 AM on 09.14.2013  

A PC Gamer's Guide to Shopping Online

I've been meaning to make this guide for a long time. I get a lot of great deals on PC games, and I want to teach you how to do it, too! It's part strategy, and part knowing where to look. To that end, this blog starts off with some advice, then presents a guide to most of the digital game stores for easy reference.



Here are some general rules of thumb for digital PC game shoppers:
1) Check your favorite sites frequently, at least once a week. That alone will help you catch most of the deals. Sites often have weekend deals, too, so that's a good time to double-check.
2) Friend the sites on Facebook, especially Green Man Gaming and GoG.com, because often sales are mentioned there as well as new releases.
3) Sign up for email promotions. Normally I hate that crap, but it's how I usually find out about the best deals on Green Man Gaming, when a new Humble Bundle is released, etc.
4) If you want to preorder an upcoming title, keep an eye on Green Man Gaming. They don't have every game, but if you pay attention you can usually catch a preorder voucher for 25% or more off on the games they do have. That's often in addition to a regular discount, or a cashback or store credit option.
5) If you don't get a good preorder deal on a game, wait about a month and keep an eye on the sites. I bought Mortal Kombat Komplete for $22 (vs $30) via preorder. Great deal, right? Two weeks later I saw it for $12 somewhere. Game prices can drop that fast. Just look around frequently.
6) Patience can ultimately be your greatest ally, both in getting great deals and avoiding a huge backlog. You'll quickly get a backlog on PC... so focus on the great games you already have, biding your time to get other games on sale (see JoyfulSanity's blog on game hoarding, too).

I put together a list of most of the major – and some not so major – online game stores. My personal favorites are Steam, Green Man Gaming, GoG.com, and Amazon. GMG and Amazon often give you Steam or Origin keys, whereas GoG.com offers DRM-free games. Note that some indie games can be purchased on their developer's website – often netting you a Steam key and a DRM-free copy.



Different stores also have different catalogs. GoG.com started as "good old games" and has a ton of older PC classics in addition to some newer titles. GamersGate and Desura could use a little more quality-control in my opinion, but they do offer a lot of little indie and import titles (eg Japanese bullet-hell shooters) that aren't on other sites like Steam. Origin (EA) and Uplay (Ubisoft) exclusively carry some of their publishers' titles, though most can be purchased elsewhere then activated on their clients (eg you might buy Mass Effect 3 on Amazon and get an Origin key).

This list starts with the stores I am most familiar with, as I feel more comfortable sending you to sites I have used a lot personally and thus feel are safe and legit. Sites I have not personally used will be marked with an asterisk. I try to provide a link to both the store's front page and, if possible, its "sale section". I'd still check the front pages, though, as sometimes they might link to deals not in the regular sale section. At the very end of the article is a condensed repost of all the links for maximum convenience.

I'm going to start with Green Man Gaming because it requires some explanation.



Green Man Gaming
"Hot Deals"
GMG Blog
GMG is a bit complicated. In addition to regular sales deals, most of which are mentioned or linked to on the front page, some games offer you a choice of getting cash back or a store credit. They also have "vouchers". These are codes you enter during checkout to get a discount.
Here's what you need to know about vouchers:
* They are often on the front page, or with a batch of games linked to on the front page (eg a special 25% voucher on select preorders).
* However, sometimes they are only mentioned in the blog. So check it!
* Big vouchers (25-30%) are usually on a specific selection of games (often preorders).
* There is often a 20% voucher available for almost any game on the site, though.
* You can often combine vouchers with sale prices, though you can't combine two vouchers. For example, a $15 game on sale for 33% off is $10… then you add a 20% voucher to get it down to $8. It's not always clear when you can do this, but worst case you add the voucher and it won't accept it.



Steam
"Specials" tab near bottom of store page lists games on sale.
There is no "on sale" option in the search unfortunately.



GoG.com
On Sale tab on front page, as well as alerts to special deals.



Amazon.com Digital Games
Sale Items



GamersGate
Sale Items



EA Origin
Deals Page



GameStop
Sale Items



GameFly Digital
Sale Items



Uplay
Good luck navigating this mess.



Humble Store
Humble Bundle
Humble Weekly Sale
There are sales on the Humble Store site, and tabs to take you to the current Bundle and Weekly Sale.



Indie Gala Store
Deals are on the front page. They often do bundles as well. Rarely as good as the Humble Bundles, but worth watching as I've gotten a couple nice ones.



Desura
Sale games can be browsed via a tab on the front page.



Get Games*
Sale Items



GamesRocket*
Sale items all on front page. Also lets you sort by platform (Steam, etc)



Beamdog*



Shiny Loot*
Sale items



MMOGA (thanks, Morty!)


These last sites compile sale info from other sites. CheapShark tries to give you a one-stop place to look for deals. It's pretty convenient, especially if you want to see if a particular game is on sale somewhere. CheapAssGamer is similar, but a bit more elaborate and detailed. SteamGameSales only covers games that are on, or activate on, Steam. Nice since Steam doesn't let you sort that way! However, I wouldn't rely on these sites entirely. You have to hope they are being updated quickly, and some types of deals like the GMG vouchers aren't going to show up on them.


CheapShark


CheapAssGamer (thanks, JoyfulSanity!)


SteamGameSales.com


aaaaaaaannnnnnnnddddddd can I get a



I hope this guide is helpful to people just getting into PC gaming, or those looking for more places to find deals. Cheap games are one of the best parts of being a PC gamer, make the most of it! And if you have any suggestions, like sites I should add to this list, let me know in the comments.



-Jinx

Condensed Shopping Link List:
Steam
Green Man Gaming - Deals - Blog
GoG.com
Amazon.com - Sale Items
GamersGate - Sale Items
EA Origin - Deals Page
GameStop - Sale Items
GameFly - Sale Items
Uplay
Humble Store - Humble Bundle -Humble Weekly Sale
Indie Gala Store
Desura
Get Games - Sale Items
GamesRocket
Beamdog
Shiny Loot - Sale items
MMOGA
CheapShark
CheapAssGamer
SteamGameSales.com
.

.   read


9:51 AM on 09.12.2013  

GTX760 4GB OC - Unboxing & Mini-Review


 
So I picked up a GTX760 4GB OC this Monday. I didn't really need it, but I tend to buy stuff for my PC when I'm badly depressed – and September is a very bad month for me (no, not 9/11). If you came here to troll about PC gaming costs etc, go read my blog on that subject. That's not what this blog is about.

I'd been eyeing the 760 already, but I wanted at least 3GB of RAM on my next card. When I saw there was a 4GB model, I caved. It cost $300, which is $40 more than the 2GB version. It also came with a free copy of Arkham Origins. Here are links to where I purchased it (Newegg) and the manufacturer's website (Gigabyte):

GTX760 4GB OC by Gigabyte on Newegg.
GTX760 4GB OC - Gigabyte website page.

Why did I want a 4GB card? Two reasons. First, I wanted a card that surpassed the next-gen consoles, so having 4GB of video ram was important. In theory they could use more with their shared RAM pool, but it's very unlikely. Second, I wanted a card capable of running games decently at 2560x1440. 1440p is the next step up in HD resolution from 1080p. Monitors with that resolution are just becoming affordable ($390 for a 27" on Monoprice), and video RAM is crucial to running at higher resolutions. The extra RAM is also useful if you want to run multi-monitor, or if you like to run HD texture mods in games like Skyrim. It's possible higher-end versions of the Oculus Rift will need more video ram as well – I suspect it has to render 2 frames (one per eye) like other 3D devices, though I could be wrong about that.
 

1440p is four times the resolution of 720p.
 
I'm bothering with this article because this is the biggest jump in raw power I've ever experienced between card upgrades. My old HD6870 is a fine card and still runs most games on High easily. On less demanding games, it maxes them out with a steady framerate over 60. But the GTX760 is just massively more powerful from what I've seen so far.
 
The Unboxing
 
I've never done an "unboxing" blog or video before, but I thought it might be fun. So I here are some pics with brief commentaries.


I decided to go with the Gigabyte version of the card. My last two cards were also Gigabyte, and I was impressed with their quality, and with my Gigabyte motherboard. It's also the least expensive 4GB model, and has the highest factory overclock.




The 760's packaging is very nice. The slick black inner box and the soft black foam it's packed in give it a very "premium" feel. I laid it here as a reminder, but the Arkham Origins voucher actually came taped to the Newegg invoice in the box - so make sure you don't lose it!


Underneath the card itself is a cardboard piece you can pull out to reveal a driver CD, manual, and power adapters in case your PSU doesn't have 6 and 8 pin video card power connectors.


At 11" long, this is not a card for small cases.


The 760 is the same length as my old 6870 (bottom), but even heavier (the thing is a brick). While the Windforce coolers are similar on both cards, if you look carefully you can see copper heatpipes underneath the regular aluminum heatsink on the 760. Between the excellent cooling and the fact that the GPU clocks down to only 135mhz (!) when not in use, the card idles at a cool 33C. The extra power it drains while gaming may well be made up for by this super low-power state. A word of warning, though - the card was revving up to full speed when the Ribbons screen-saver came on, so you might want to make sure you pick a screen-saver that doesn't "trigger" the card's acceleration mode.

The Benchmarking
 
I decided to do some benchmark comparisons with my previous card, an HD6870. Note that some of the older (HD6870) benchmarks were done when my system had 8GB of RAM vs 12GB, and may have had the processor clocked a bit slower. I don't think either of those had much of an impact on the results, though. They are probably outweighed by the fact that I knew the HD6870 and had it better optimized, and in fact I think some of these benchmarks were done with the GTX760 running higher settings.
 
In short, these are far from "professional" benchmarks. But they should give a rough sense of the performance difference I'm experiencing between the two cards.
 
Stuttering.
One thing these stats don't show is how much smoother games feel on the 760. With the 6870, when I loaded a game area in say Borderlands 2 or Skyrim, I would often get some lag initially as I first looked around. Usually it would be okay after that, though the 6870 still never felt as smooth as the 760 does. Even when the 760 is pushed down to 30fps in a game, it never feels laggy, you never feel any "stuttering" as newer game areas load or as you move around.

System Stats:
Phenom II x6 1090T 3.2ghz (overclocked to 3.6ghz usually)
12GB DDR3 1333 (recently upped from 8GB)
Gigabyte AM3 Motherboard
Windows 7 64-bit
 
Unigine Heaven:

HD6870: 29.5 fps – 742 score
GTX760: 53.5 fps – 1349 score
Unigine Heaven is a great free benchmarking program. It's designed to deliver a very heavy load of DX11 effects like tessellation. It's also absolutely beautiful, even on basic DX9 settings, and worth checking out just to enjoy.

S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Call of Pripyat:

The Stalker: Call of Pripyat benchmark is another free download. It's a strange game engine; in some ways it is antiquated, but they have tacked on a lot of DX10 and DX11 features. The benchmark results here really surprised me. I had always assumed my CPU was the bottleneck in these games, because they are optimized for only one core. The dramatic improvements here would suggest otherwise (though it might be keeping the 760 from getting even higher, of course).
 
Lost Planet 2:

DX11 benchmark A, 1080p, maximum settings
HD6870: 34 fps (stuttered considerably, too, while running)
GTX760: 106 fps
Lost Planet 2's benchmark uses a lot of DX11 and DX10 effects, so it's a nice way to gauge a card's capabilities in terms of advanced visual effects.
 
Dirt 3:

1080p, maximum settings
HD6870: 52 fps, min 41
GTX760: 89 fps, min 70

Arkham City:

1080p, max settings with FXAA High, no PhysX
HD6870: 57 fps (29 with PhysX normal)
GTX760: 86 fps (51 with PhysX normal)
 
Tomb Raider:

1080p, maximum settings except for high precision (TressFX on)
HD6870: 11 fps
GTX760: 52 fps (84 without TressFX)
 
Just Cause 2:

Dark Tower, 1080p, max settings (760 seems to have more HQ options)
HD6870: 45 fps
GTX760: 59 fps
 
Metro 2033:

"Frontline" benchmark, 1080p, High preset, no PhysX
HD6870: 53 fps
GTX760: 82 fps
 
Borderlands 2:

Title screen, 1080p, max settings
HD6870: 75fps
GTX760: 150fps
 
FINAL FANTASY XIV benchmark:

1600x900, Preset: Maximum, "Exploration"
HD6870: 42 fps, 5168 score
GTX760: 62 fps, 6706 score
 
Overall, the framerate improvement is somewhere between 50% and 300% in most of these. It's hard to quantify these things, but I'd loosely say the 760 is seems roughly twice as powerful as my 6870 overall. The lack of load-stuttering is a nice improvement as well.
 
There are some aberrations here, though. I'd expected the 760 to blow the 6870 out of the water in Metro, Just Cause 2, and Arkham City, but that just wasn't the case. That could be a matter of me not setting up the card properly, and I am pretty sure some games like JC2 have Nvidia-only options (like GPU water physics) making the 760 work harder.
 
There's also the question of whether the Phenom II x6 is bottlenecking the 760 in certain games. I previously thought it was the bottleneck in Call of Pripyat and Skyrim, which are poorly optimized for multicore CPUs, but apparently I was wrong. However, it might be the culprit in the other mediocre scores. Overall, though, I think my CPU is aging pretty gracefully. My motherboard is an older PCI-E 2.0 model, too, which could create a bandwidth bottleneck for this 3.0 card.
 
Regrets?
 
This is going to sound weird, but my only regret is losing access to RadeonPro, an AMD-only 3rd party config tool I've come to rely on. Thus far I've found no comparable Nvidia tool, and I have yet to find a way to fine-tune the 760 the same way I could the 6870. I do have options, but it seems I'll need 3-4 programs to get everything RadeonPro provided conveniently in one package.
 
Conclusions


I didn't take comparisons in Skyrim, but the framerate is much improved and the game just feels smoother. Areas with NPCs, in particular, run far better.
 
The GTX760 is an awesome card, though you might want to wait for it to come down in price a bit – and for AMD's next line of cards to show up in a month or so. I wouldn't have upgraded yet if not for my need for a distraction in my life right now. If you have a mid-range card from 2-4 years ago like the 6870, 7870, or 560ti… this is a massive upgrade. It's not just newer, it's in a higher weight class. Still, those cards all perform great in most games, so I wouldn't feel pressured to upgrade right away.

If you do decide to get a GTX760, I recommend the 4GB model for future-proofing. You probably won't need more than 2GB at the moment, but that may change soon. Battlefield 4's system requirements were just released, and optimally they'd like you to have 3GB of RAM on your card. 4GB also seems a good choice for those of us who want to stay one step ahead of the PS4/One. Having a PC somewhat better than them assures you'll be able to play all the latest games nicely for quite some time.

For those of you who crave a score:
9.5/10, Would Bang


*ADDITION* 9-14-13

I'd originally wanted to included a comparison of 3DMark 11 scores. Unfortunately, due to some bugs in the program or Steam, I couldn't get the program running to bench the GTX760 - until today.



Pretty dramatic improvement. The odd surprise is in the Physics score. That score is supposed to purely measure CPU performance... but it goes up by almost 700 points using the 760. So I'm left wondering if the 6870 was somehow bottlenecking the Phenom II x6 somehow? Not really sure, as a lot of this is beyond my knowledge.   read


1:16 PM on 08.01.2013  

What PC Gaming Really Costs

I'm getting tired of people telling me how expensive PC gaming is. If it was, I'm pretty sure I'd know, seeing as I've been a PC gamer for 15 years. So I decided to write a blog to set the record straight.

To that end, I thought I'd see what building a from-scratch new PC might look like for me – on a budget, but with the aim of outgunning the PS4/One as well. This is a very quick and dirty build I'm throwing together in just an hour or so. There might be issues with it, but it should still serve to give a good idea, price-wise, what the initial cost of a (nice) new gaming PC would be.


My own PC. That humongous Antec server case was about $150... but I've had it 11 years...!

Three quick notes about overall costs before we start, though:
 
a) A PC gamer reuses parts. I'm still using the case and 2.1 speakers I bought 11 years ago. After the first investment, you never have to buy everything at once ever again.
 
b) A PC isn't just for gaming. You have to think of it as pooling your computer budget and your console budget into one machine. That isn't practical for everyone, which is cool. But don't buy a $600 desktop PC and a $400 console and tell me $1000 for a gaming PC is too expensive. Also, a gaming PC is more powerful than a generic PC- so the $$ you invest in it for gaming pays off in having a fast, powerful PC for every task.
 
c) Games on PC are cheaper. This should be considered in any long-term price equation. If you like to buy your games (vs rent) that savings adds up rapidly. I'm not just talking Steam sales, either.
Arkham Origins on PS3 = $60+tax, so about $66
Arkham Origins on PC = $50, no tax. Plus GMG gives you a $8 cash back or $12 credit toward another game.
Assuming you just take the cash back, you only pay $42 on PC. That's a $24 price difference on one game. And you often get even better discounts, or games simply release for less on PC.
 
These three things are important, because comparing the price of a gaming PC to a console is an apples and oranges kind of thing. Obviously a PS4 is cheaper than a gaming PC if you are starting from scratch and comparing prices directly. But a PS4 would be kinda shit for writing this blog on, or editing all the images that are in it, or researching hardware prices with 12 tabs open in Firefox.


The Castlevania demo on PC. It's shiny. (I need filler pics, okay?!)

Anyway. There are some recent build guides on sites like  Ars Technica. While my own PC is an upgraded version of Ars' budget build from a few years ago, I don't agree with their current build choices. So I'm making my own, based specifically on surpassing the next-gen consoles.
 
This is not the cheapest PC you could possibly build for gaming. You could easily shave $200 off and still have a solid machine. But I'm building one with a bit of headroom. Often it's worth that extra $20 here or there to get a component that will be useful longer. Also, if you buy parts over a period of time (even a month) you may be able to get better deals, or better parts for the same price. I'm just using Newegg as it is today, though Amazon isn't bad, especially if you have Prime to cover shipping.
 
Essentials: The Tower and What's in It
 
$49.99 – Antec One Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Case
* Good balance between quality, price, and internal space. Hard to go wrong with Antec.
 
$54.99 – Thermaltake TR2 TR-600 600W
* Plenty of power for this build with a bit to spare probably. A 700W wouldn't be much more.
 
$84.99 ($10 rebate) – ASUS M5A97 LE R2.0 AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard
* Full ATX motherboard for more expansion. MicroATX would be cheaper, but limit you later on. Dual x16 slots (for multi-GPU) would be a little more.


 
$159.99 – AMD FX-8320 Vishera 3.5GHz (4.0GHz Turbo) Eight-Core Processor
* Why an 8-core AMD when everyone recommends 4-core Intels? Because future games will use more than 4 hardware threads, especially with next-gen consoles having 6-8 AMD CPU cores. Intel CPUs run better in current-gen games (4 threads max on them) if you have a high-end video card, but the 8-core AMDs are more future-proof imo and won't bottleneck a mid-range video card.
 
$259.99 – GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 760 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 Video Card
* These bad boys just came out and are quite kick-ass for the price (reviews are excellent). They beat out everything else in the price-range, and should tromp the GPUs in the PS4/One. My only reservation is that I'd prefer 3GB of video ram. If you aren't buying till this Fall, though, there may be 3GB versions of this or other cards. And AMD's new cards still haven't dropped. The price for this card will probably drop when they do, you'll probably be able to get one for just a little over $200 then.
 
$58.99 – Kingston HyperX Black 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1600
* 8GB is more than enough system ram for now, and getting two 4GB modules leaves two RAM slots open for upgrading later.
 


$69.99 – Seagate 1TB 7200RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Hard Drive
* 1TB is the minimum you'd want for a PC, since you need to do full game installs. Don't waste money on an SSD, a regular hard drive will give you very fast load times and more capacity. It's still much faster than the 2.5" laptop drives consoles use.
 
$15.99 – ASUS DVD/CD Writer
* You'll barely use it, but you still should probably get one. There are Bluray drives for PC, but they are a pain (you need special software to play movies). Better to buy a cheap Bluray player and hook it to your monitor if you want BD playback.
 
$99.99 – Windows 7 64-bit OEM or Windows 8 64-bit OEM
* Most of us like Win7 better, but at this point I'd probably go with 8 for future-proofing as the next version of DX11 will have features only supported in 8. Either way, make sure to get the 64-bit version. The 32-bit can't properly use over 3-4GB of RAM. Btw, if you are a college student you can probably get this free.


 
Total Cost:
$854.91
Probably more like $950 with tax and some shipping.
 
That's about what I'd go for if I was building a system from scratch right now. You could cut that down considerably with a cheaper video card, for example, and by going a little cheaper here and there on the case, power supply, etc. But I wanted to build a system that was a good investment, would exceed the next-gen consoles, and be easy to upgrade.
 
Obviously this doesn't include things like a monitor, speakers, a mouse, a keyboard, a headset, a 360 controller, etc. Those would probably add about $200 assuming you owned none of them already. I was going to itemize those, but this is getting a bit long as it is lol. Again, many of those items you'll keep for a very long time.
 
Let's put it in perspective, though. Say you were going to buy a pretty average PC, because, well, you need one to post stuff on Destructoid, right?!
 
$498 Dell Inspiron 660s
* Yeah, you could spend less… or more. And it's just a tower, so like our build you still need a monitor etc.
then add
$400-$500 – for your PS4 or Xbox One
 
You're already at $900. That gets you a mediocre PC and a pretty decent console.
 

This picture of Strike Suit Zero is totally unrelated to this blog!

Which is the best way to go? It really depends on you, and your situation in terms of finances, needs, and interest in hardware.
 
If you can put the money into the initial investment, and will use the PC for more than gaming, a gaming PC is a good deal. Once you have a system, upgrades are typically gradual and you can reuse the parts you have. Plus you'll get great deals on games, and a very fast regular PC to boot.
 
If you don't have the money for the initial investment, or prefer a laptop to a desktop, or just don't need a new PC… yeah, it might not make sense for you. And hey, that's just fine. The new consoles, especially the PS4, look pretty damn good.
 
What I want to show, though, is that for many PC gamers it is actually cheaper in the long term for us – and very practical. We are people who already use our PC a lot and would like it to be fast. So we'd already be buying pretty good systems. And we also save a lot of money over time because games are much cheaper on PC.
 
While you do see people spending a lot of money on gaming PCs, either pre-built like Alienware or overdoing it on their own system, none of that is necessary. A pretty modest gaming PC will get you performance better than consoles, access to cheap games, and a great system that's fast as hell for everything else. I think Alienware has done more to damage PC gaming than anyone else. Their overpriced systems are all console gamers see. If all you saw were advertisements for $150,000 cars, you'd probably assume you couldn't afford a car at all, right?
 
Anyway, I hope that clears things up a bit. Gaming on PC is not for everyone, but for some of us it's a fantastic deal in terms of price and performance. And if you see us talking a lot about console hardware, too, it's because we like gaming hardware of every kind!


Another Castlevania pic! Don't pics make bland tech blogs exciting? I think so!   read


11:49 AM on 07.30.2013  

Game Soundtracks Part 1: You Have More Than You Think



I've been on a game soundtrack kick lately. Since my ex-girlfriend died two years ago, I have had difficulty concentrating and it's made getting schoolwork done almost impossible. Listening to game music seems to help, though, especially when I bring my super-nice Audio-Technica headphones with me (I tend to study/write at cafes with my netbook). Even before she died, the Shatter soundtrack was one of my favorite pieces of study music.
 


Anyway, I've found myself not only buying the soundtrack editions of games like FEZ, They Bleed Pixels, and Fly'N lately, but digging around for free soundtracks as well. It turned out that I had access to far more music already than I realized.

Some soundtracks are simply available as free direct downloads, which I'll cover in a separate blog next week. First, though, you should know that you probably already own way more game soundtracks than you think, especially if you game on PC. There are a few ways you might already have access to them, and that's what I'm here to share.
 

 
GoG.com

Many games on GoG include the game soundtrack along with the other extras. Just double-checking my catalog there netted me a few I'd missed. Gamers on GoG have also made some lists of games with free soundtracks you can get elsewhere:
GoG Free Soundtracks List (original thread)
 

Game Installation Directories and Steam

While most games don't officially include a soundtrack, you can frequently find the music sitting in some folder in .mp3, .ogg, .flac, or .wav format. These aren't always ideal – they may not be properly named, or require conversion to a more practical format – but if you really like a game they can be great, especially if there is no official soundtrack to buy. If you don't see the files, they may be "packed" with other game files in a large, .zip-like file. You can sometimes open these with a program like Winrar, or by downloading the game or engine's mod tools.
 

 
Retail games install to different locations, and GoG lets you choose, so you're on your own looking for those. Steam game installs are a bit easier to find. To check a specific Steam game's directory, right-click on it in your library and select "Properties" from the drop-down menu. A box will pop up. Select the "Local Files" tab. Then click the "Browse Local Files" button, and the game directory will pop up.
 
If you want to go through all your installed games manually, Steam games are installed to this directory (unless you changed it), and sorted by name:
C:\Program Files\Steam\steamapps\common\
 
There are a couple compiled lists on the Steam forums of games with accessible music tracks:
Steam games with music 2010
Steam games with music 2012
I included both links because I'm not certain the second includes everything in the first.



It didn't take long to find an example on my own. Ys I includes three versions of its soundtrack – the original, a 2000ish version, and a contemporary mix. In the game installation was a "music" directory with 75 files. They had three different prefixes, 25 in each group. That's right – all three soundtracks in .ogg format, right there for the taking! No proper names or anything, but sometimes you can find those elsewhere if it matters to you.


Humble Bundles

 
Most of the Humble Bundles have included the soundtracks to their games. I slacked on downloading these when I was first buying the bundles, so when I went back to get them all it was pretty crazy how much music I owned but had neglected to claim. Definitely double-check any bundles you own, and remember to take the soundtracks into consideration the next time one comes up!
 
 
YouTube


While hardly ideal, YouTube can be a useful place to find soundtracks, particularly for older titles from the 80s and 90s. Someone put together a playlist, for example, with a lot of 8-bit tunes. Sometimes people put up an entire soundtrack as a single file; other times they break it up track-by-track, just like you'd expect for a regular soundtrack. You can listen to them right on YouTube, obviously, or download and convert them to a preferred format – a lot of work, but worth it for your favorite games.
 
The downside is that quality on YouTube is a mixed bag. Also, old game music was generated through .midi files by the console itself, so it sounds different on different players. Ideally, you would want music recorded directly from the console itself. Even then there is variance; later models of the Genesis had inferior sound output, for example.
 
 
Fansites

 
Often if a game's music is available, fan sites will either host it or link to it. If you like Metroid, for example, you can find some of the music on Metroid Database. Look around and you'll find similar sites dedicated to many of your favorite games.
 
 
File Conversion, Downloading, etc.
 
I use DownloadHelper to download YouTube videos, and SUPER or an old (when it was free) version of dbPoweramp to convert between formats. If anyone could suggest some good conversion software (flv/ogg/wav/flac/mp4 to mp3 mostly) that's readily available, leave a comment and I'll add your info here.

 
Coming Next Week
 
In Part 2 I'll be linking to some free, legally available soundtracks that you can just go download directly. I only know so many, though, and that GoG Free Soundtrack List is pretty impressive already. Anyway, if you know any I should include, mention/link them in the comments and I'll be sure they are included. I'll probably list some game soundtracks that are flat out worth buying, too.   read


6:07 AM on 07.23.2013  

Make Blogs Not War

This started as a blog about me personally, but I think what I've learned – that blogs are a better place for debate than article comments – applies to everyone.


 
Those of you who know me well on here – by which I mean from my article comments and my blogs and blog comments – have probably noticed a dramatic difference in how I present myself in both places. For example, I was an infamous Wii U hater for a while, and I pissed off a lot of people for making fun of the system at every opportunity. But when I take time to write up my thoughts, instead of a spiteful argument we get great conversation. I am generally a nice guy in real life (seriously!), and I think that comes off in the blogs. But for some reason the article comment sections turn me into a total freaking monster. I'm not sure why, but I want it to stop.
 
The thing is, I also notice similar behavior in other people (though not to the same extreme). Maybe it's something about how quick and fleeting the comments are? The need to get out quick jibes because there's less time/space for conversation? Again, I'm not sure why. There are people I've had ugly arguments with in the article comments, but great discussions with in the blogs.
 


In any case, I've decided to retire from commenting on articles, aside from the occasional positive comment anyway. Blogs lead to better discussions, and I tend to articulate my thoughts better there. I put a lot of work into my blogs, and I don't want people ignoring my stuff because they're expecting something snarky. I especially don't want people avoiding the Sunday C-Blog Recaps, because that affects people who wrote on that day, too. And I put a lot of work into those, too.

I'd suggest that other people also consider the blogs as an alternative to arguing in the article comments. If you write a blog, you can really detail your point of view before people respond. It leads to good discussions, adds good content to the site, and adds to your own profile and general rep around the site. It's just healthier for everyone in general, I think. Even if you don't have the problem of being a jerk like I do, blogs are still a more worthy place for your more in-depth thoughts.

Besides, why get upvotes when you can get FAPS. Amiright?

  read







Back to Top