Quantcast
Community Discussion: Blog by Fame Designer | C-Blog Fan Fiction Chapter 1: IntroductionDestructoid
C-Blog Fan Fiction Chapter 1: Introduction - Destructoid






About
I've been working on developing video games for a few years now. I put up a blog on here to share what I hope will be sensible and interesting articles about game design. The "Fame Design" name came to me when I thought, "I want to be famous for only one thing: video games".

At the moment I'm developing new games in Flash. So I expect to share experiences in being an indie game developer. I often find myself wondering if I should be working in Flash, HTML5, XNA, or the iPhone/iPad SDK. Time will tell.
Player Profile
Follow me:
Fame Designer's sites
Badges
Following (60)  


This has been a long time in coming. I've been thinking a long time about what kind of story I wanted to write once I figured out I wanted to do fan fiction for the c-blogs. I've figured that part out and have finally written the first chapter of the story. I hope you guys like the story and the art. If I can possibly manage it, I want to try and do one chapter a week. But, we'll see. Special thanks to Kahla (my girlfriend) for helping me on the art!

With the shades and hat.


Business wasn’t booming. The need for tracking people and detective work was usually handled by other people. People were very proactive these days. Times have changed, and the human desire to survive motivated people to do their own dirty work. People feel more secure when they are doing things themselves. After all, being your own boss always gives a great sense of freedom. If you want to get the job done right, you have to do it yourself.

However, the job sometimes can be so puzzling that it becomes unique. James wasn’t necessarily good at solving puzzles. But he always had the most luck when tracking murderers, thieves, rapists, and anyone else that would take freedom and happiness from someone else – criminals.

He had an affinity for luck, so much that he could rely on it. It wasn’t something he tried to hide. This was the source of his power, and he was going to use it for the good of all people. There were plenty of tests the doctors had done to find out exactly why he was so lucky all the time. But since the Destructoid bomb had crippled the human race’s grasp of information and technology – there was no real good way to detect what was going on with James’s body. The only explanation was that it must have been old technology that no longer has any documentation about how it works.

James sat at his desk in the office one night, ready to close up shop and go back home to his bed. He rolled a pair of dice, called snake eyes. The dice stopped to show two ones. “Still amazing.” He thought to himself. Someday he would find out exactly why he had this ability. He was working with a friend in town by the name of Alphadeus Zarius to find out why.

Out the window, James saw a man looking in. He looked harmless, but a little worried about something. The man went to the office door. It looked like he found the right place. Anyone who would come into James’s office was always in trouble, of course. They were always lost, not knowing what a forward step would be. James thought of what mystery this man had for him to solve. By the look of him, he was in a hurry, whatever happened to him happened recently, and… interesting… when he entered, the humidity of the room changed. James’s skin felt damp. Everything felt moist. Whoever he was, he was like James. He has some sort of super human talent. You can always tell. Those abilities tend to emanate from the user. “What was his?” James wondered.

“I need some help. Someone told me you were a good detective.” He said.

“You heard right. Go ahead and sit.” James said.

“I need to find out what happened to my-” He said, interrupted.

“Hold on there. Let’s start from the beginning.” James said. “What’s your name?”

“I’m Beyamor.” He said. “Something happened to my village.”

“Okay Beyamor.” James said. “Nice to meet you, I’m James.”

“James,” Beyamor said, still feeling on edge. “Okay, I’m sorry, I feel like I’m losing it. I can hardly talk. I’m freaking out.”

“Just slow down.” James said. “We’ll figure it out. Tell me what the problem is.”

“My village south of here. South of here, off the old highway. My people there have completely disappeared. I only left for a day or so. I...” Beyamor said.

“You left for a day,” James said. “And you got back, and there wasn’t anyone there. Like they just left?”

“Yes, I mean, I didn’t see any evidence of a struggle. No one told me anything about wanting to leave. It was all so strange. I saw meals cooked and ready on the table in people's houses, but no one there to eat it. Some of the meals were still warm.” Beyamor said.

"Okay. Well, if I’m going to help you out, we have to go back there. So, I hope you're comfortable with that.” James said. “We need to find some idea of where these people went or what happened to them. We would need some sort of clue.”

“I brought with me the only thing that I thought was relevant.” Beyamor said.

He took a bag out of his pocket. There was a piece of cloth in the bag.

“May I?” James said.

Beyamor gave him the bag and James pulled out the fabric. It was a cut off of some pair of pants. The fabric was sliced straight through with one chop but there was no blood. There was no proving if the leg was wearing the cloth when it was chopped off, but James had a feeling it was. It was something about the angle that it was cut. There was no real reason to cut a piece of fabric that way, especially not from what seemed to be an already finished product.

“This is interesting Beyamor. The thing is: I can’t tell much by looking at this. I do get a gut feeling that something terrible happened. And I usually go with my gut. So, I think I can help you.” James said.

“Do you need payment? I don’t have much.” Beyamor said.

“Don’t worry about that. I have the ability to make my own luck. I have all the money I'll ever need. But, instead of paying me, you could satisfy something I’m curious about.” James said.

“Like why it’s moist in here?” Beyamor said.

“Yes.” James said.

“Well. That was one of the things that drew people to our village. The weather was controlled. We could make it rain when we wanted to. We could have sun when we wanted to. Our village was becoming a town, and we were extremely prosperous. That’s why I found it so strange that people would want to leave.” Beyamor said.

“And you were the one?” James said.

“The one what?” Beyamor said.

“The one that could control the weather.” James said.

“Yes, that. I can do that.” Beyamor said pointing outside.

James looked. And what he saw was something he hadn’t seen in all his life. It was snowing.

“That’s… Amazing.” James sat in wonder. “Here look, watch this.”

“What?” Beyamor said.

“Just ask me what number to roll.” James said.

“Oh no, that's okay. You're lucky. I believe you.” Beyamor said.

“Huh… Well anyway,” James said, disappointed. “I know someone who can tell us more about this piece of cloth. It has dirt or ash on it or something, so you’ll want to put it back in that bag to preserve it. Little things like dirt can tell us where something has been.”

“Okay,” Beyamor said, sealing the cloth back in the bag. “When do we leave?”

“Tomorrow we can visit Hugh. He owns an antique shop not too far away.” James said. “You can meet me there in the morning.”

“What’s the store called? Is there a sign?” Beyamor said.

“Yeah, on the front it’ll say ‘Occam’s Electric Toothbrush’.” James said.

“See you then.” Beyamor said as he left James’s office.

Without the hat and shades.
Photo Photo



Is this blog awesome? Vote it up!




Those who have come:



Comments not appearing? Anti-virus apps like Avast or some browser extensions can cause this.
Easy fix: Add   [*].disqus.com   to your software's white list. Tada! Happy comments time again.

Did you know? You can now get daily or weekly email notifications when humans reply to your comments.


Back to Top




All content is yours to recycle through our Creative Commons License permitting non-commercial sharing requiring attribution. Our communities are obsessed with videoGames, movies, anime, and toys.

Living the dream since March 16, 2006

Advertising on destructoid is available: Please contact them to learn more