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ColtonPhillips
12:57 PM on 12.17.2012

I'm a software nerd, not a word-ologist. I'd love to get some criticism on this piece.

It starts with something small.

A strike that lights the fire.
And the hunger burns.

If you do not ache,
Then do not light that fire.

Your first will be simple, almost laughably so.
From pure thought-stuff, you will build a castle in the sky.

You will build a snowman generator.
Or, something like that.

Your second will fail.
Nobody will know that you were supposed to go there,
nobody will see the thing, and nobody will
“kill dead dog”.

Your third will be brilliant,
If you are smart enough to know,
What it is that you know.
Broken in countless ways,
But with undeniable charm,
It will be your ugly duckling.

Your fourth will be a technical marvel.
You’ll have learned so very much,
yet nothing at all.
It too is broken,
But you can probably count the reasons why.

Your fifth will be deliberate, clean, and focused.
It might even be fun.
It might not be broken,
But you won’t finish it.

Your sixth will be a showcase of your creativity.
The pinnacle of your imagination.
You cannot make this game.

Not yet, at least.

No,
Before you can face the Colossus,
You too must build a castle in the sky.
And you will.
And it will be glorious.
Your growth will be exponential, and exhilarating.
Overwhelming.
A Katamari of creation.
An explosion of possibility.

But it will be hard.
And maybe even lonely.
You will work more for less, less often, more.
And if you aren’t aching, you’re not doing it right.








Artists are creepy ~ Jessica Paquette

Before I get into this, I'd just like to thank everyone that was involved with organizing the Concentric gaming convention. I'd especially like to thank KANO APPS for sponsoring the UVic Game Jam. Without our sponsors we would be nothing. If you're in the Victoria area next year, you should definitely check it out because it was a blast. We'll see you lot at GottaCon!

Recently, some of my wonderful UVic GameDev members (though mostly devoid of Destructoid's own Beyamor) recorded a podcast on Art, and the goings on of the Concentric gaming convention. The result was a fifty minute exploration into territories both lulz and cringe-worthy.

I actually had posted the podcast completely unedited to the Internet before I was aware of the #1ReasonWhy phenomenon. You may already be aware of the #1ReasonWhy hashtag represents, I'll give you this article to provide some context.

The #1ReasonWhy movement really speaks to me. I have unintentionally offended or disrespected women in the industry from my own careless words. I have organized a game development club nearly devoid of women. I have watched women come into our club, and subsequently leave. It breaks my heart.

"There's a lot of things, that if you're a woman and you want to go into it, if you have boobs... It's done. You're done. You better stop now" ~Jessica Paquette

I don't have too much to say on the subject of besides this:

"Creepy is a reaction to a behavior, not a behavior itself. If someone thinks you're being creepy, you are!"

I hope we can all find our own way to make women more comfortable around us while we continue to do what it is we do. At UVic GameDev we love and respect Jessica for her unique personality, her hard work, and her dedication to her art. We have so much to learn from her.

Remember - As game developers we're here to make you laugh and have a good time. But you can't make everyone happy all the time, and sometimes we will unintentionally offend people with our words and actions.

I could have strategically edited the podcast to remove any awkward areas but that sets a terrible precedent. Every action has a reaction. We have to monitor our own behavior.

The UVic GameDev Podcast is as art is - a reflection of life.

Let's just make a royal promise to do our best and talk it out. We can aspire to be build better stronger infrastructure where we are all comfortable to thrive.

Cheers,
C








I <3 Destructoid!

It was wonderful to meet you lot at PAX. You're a motley crue if there ever was one.

A month ago I started a simple campaign on Indie Go Go to help raise money to purchase a personal license of Game Maker: Studio. Game Maker is a Windows program that allows you to quickly prototype and distribute games to PC, Mac, web and cross platform mobile.



Game Maker is a ton of fun and I recommend it to any new game developers out there. It's actually a powerful 2D game engine and it seems to get better and better every year. If you get excellent at Game Maker and 2D spriting, you'll be a superstar game jammer in no time.

It's not all gravy and french fries, though. It almost never is.

Game Maker stores the entirety of your game (code and assets) in a binary file - basically just a big-ass dump of ones and zeros that GameMaker parses to initialize your project. This is not how software is typically constructed. In fact, it's pretty fucking ass-backwards.



Typically a game is stored/created in an entire file directory of game assets, game and engine code, and ya know, all that charm and whimsey. Anyway, without getting technical, making Game Maker games with a team is kind of a pain in the arse, and using helpful version control techniques is impossible.

I could have looked passed these shortcomings and embraced Game Maker fully, but my light copy of Game Maker Studio was unable to port games made with previous versions of Game Maker. Since a big part of the campaign was to port existing UVic GameDev Game Maker 8 games to web and mobile, I decided that Game Maker Studio was no longer worth the $500 price tag for me. I immediately stopped campaigning.

Let me be clear - I still intend to reward my contributors with the games they have paid for. I will be making them using Chevy Ray's Flashpunk game engine. I find that Flashpunk is just as fun as Game Maker, so I'm thrilled to use it. I'll be working on porting Flashpunk to mobile right away. Flash is actually really big in Victoria, so being able to teach UVic GameDev members will be a valuable use of my time.

Anyway, the whole point of the campaign was to sort of let you know that I'm a real dude, and I'm looking for contract work! I will code you lots of good stuff for $$$!!!

No, but seriously. If you want to make games, you need to a) make games, and b) tell people about 'em. Part b) is the greasier and scungier part of the process. It just feels so weird, ya know. "Hey Internet - Here's this half finished game project I made that sucks because I have just started making games and have no fucking clue what I'm doing." But you NEED that feedback. That is what my campaign was about. I guess. I still have no fucking clue what I'm doing sometimes.

Thank you so much to my contributors, you mean the world to me. With your sweet-ass cash and motivation I've renovated a lot of the house, and learned a hell of a lot about game development in a month. Thank you to Knut and Mags who let me sleep in their glorious house and eat their sandwiches during PAX. I'm so blessed to say that I am getting the feedback I need on a daily basis to continue what I am doing. Hell, I got a free couch the other day.

Being an indie-dude pays off in it's own ways. Some times you get sandwiches. Some times you get couches. What is most important is to keep giving.

It's important to make games.

Cheers,
C







ColtonPhillips
2:35 AM on 11.05.2012

Dear folks,

I'll keep this short for now, while I build my Destructoid profile, but I wanted to share this game:

http://eigen.pri.ee/shooter/

It's a multiplayer text adventure shooter game! I couldn't actually connect to a room, but if you can figure that out leave a comment and let me know what commands you used!

Reminder to the game developers out there: A console (As in Command Prompt, or Terminal in Linux) game is the best place to start. My first 2 or 3 games were all made entirely in the console. The concepts you will learn will directly transfer over to your future projects.

In high school I created a text adventure in QBASIC, and one of the commands you needed to execute to finish the game was "Kill dead dog". If you didn't kill the dead dog, it would kill you as you left the room.

Snoochi booches,

Colton Phillips