hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts


Chris Carter's blog
destructoid  Reviews Director

9:29 AM on 08.09.2015

Is it ok to not like Goat Simulator yet?


9:27 AM on 12.30.2013

Dtoid GOTY 2013: Chris Carter's picks

I try to make a lot of time to play videogames. This year, I've played around 270 new games. That's new in 2013, as in, newly released this year, and doesn't include replays or retro titles. So as you can imagine, I had a lot to sift through until I could come up with a true "top 10," and this is the result.

As a general rule I don't order my lists, but number one is in fact my "Game of the Year." Feel free to check out all of Destructoid's picks at large as well!

10. Pokemon X and Y

What a lovely surprise this game was! I've already talked at length about how X & Y have rekindled my love for the franchise like never before, but Game Freak really deserves a lot of credit with the increased social and online features.

I can't really pinpoint my favorite aspect of the game, but the mere fact that tons of my former Pokemon friends from ages ago have come out of the woodwork to play X & Y speaks volumes about it. That's what Pokemon has always been about -- playing with friends -- and I can do that here more than ever before.

9. The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker HD

An HD remake of one of my favorite Zelda games ever made? It would take a lot to screw this up, and thankfully, Nintendo handled the restoration with grace. It's pretty much the exact same game as before, but with a few welcome tweaks to my last favorite part of the story (the Triforce Shard Hunt), and best of all -- GamePad map support.

Truly, I can't go back to any other version of the game after seeing how convenient an off-screen map is. I replay Wind Waker ever year generally, and now, the Wii U edition is my definitive version.

8. Tomb Raider

This is probably the most surprising title of the year for me. For many of these games, I had an idea of how they would go, but I fully expected to dislike Tomb Raider based on the generic trailers and information we had before release. I went in thinking it would be a poor Uncharted game, and it ended up being my second favorite Uncharted (behind 2).

The world is incredibly fun to play in, the visuals and gunplay are great, and I loved the brutality and ever present sense of danger. If this is the new Lara, I can't wait to see where she ends up.

7. Dead Rising 3 [review]

I'm a pretty big Dead Rising fan, but the first two base games lacked a bit of universal appeal due to a strict save system and other limitations. Dead Rising 3 eschews that in favor of a more streamlined experience, and best of all, you can just switch to Nightmare Mode if you want that hardcore feel. It's a win-win.

For once, I actually felt like I had to survive in a zombie game, given the power of the Xbox One and the sheer number of zombies it could render on-screen. It was glorious, and I'm eagerly waiting more titles from other developers that take advantage of massive amounts of in-game models.

6. Dragon's Crown [review]

I was excited for this the moment the words "Vanillaware" and "dungeon crawler" were uttered in the same sentence. I'm a massive fan of the studio, and I feel like they never really get the credit that they deserve. But with Dragon's Crown I feel like they really have crossed that plateau, and Atlus has done a great job at supporting the game post-launch.

It's still going strong with content, and considering the fact that it features deep combat and an expansive multiplayer component, this is an easy recommendation for any action fan.

5. Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance

As a massive Metal Gear and Platinum supporter, I knew I was going to pick this up on day one. Thankfully, I wasn't disappointed, due to the deep combat system and amazing replay value of Revengeance. The first week of release I beat the game seven times, and loved every second of it. There's so much to unlock, so much to discover, and the cheese factor is glorious.

At this point, I'm almost as interested in this sub-series involving Raiden as I am in the core franchise -- specifically, I would really love to see a Revengeance 2 on the Xbox One and PS4.

4. Guacamelee!

When you say the word Metroidvania, you pretty much "have me at hello." Guacamelee was an amazing showing for Drinkbox Studios, who perfectly captured the essence of the sub-genre, and mixed in their own signature charm to boot.

It helps that the game is filled with tons of funny references, secrets, and sports a fully featured co-op mode. Cross-Buy for the PS3 and Vita is the icing on the cake, and I heartily recommend it to any platforming fan out there -- given the price, it's one of the easiest impulse buys of 2013.

3. Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch

"Wow," is probably the best way I can describe Ni No Kuni. It's pretty much everything I could want out of a JRPG, and brought me back to an era where it's basically all I played. The elements of Pokemon basically took it over the top for me, and I completed every single sidequest and post game activity in the game.

I do own the DS version, and although it's wonderful, I think the White Witch storyline that's exclusive to the PS3 game adds a ton to my enjoyment.

2. Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon

This game kind of came out of nowhere and I loved it. It was perfectly priced, perfectly paced, and the world was scaled just right. There's hardly a dull moment in Blood Dragon's story, but the true enjoyment I got out of the game was wandering around the meticulously crafted wasteland and blasting the ever living crap out of everything -- oh yeah, and that's to a perfectly scored 80s/90s action movie soundtrack.

With a very simple level-up system, accessible hunting sidequests, and a base capture mechanic, it's so easy to just roam around in Blood Dragon and have fun. I'd love to see more games just like this.

1. Super Mario 3D World [review]

As you could probably tell from my review, I adored Super Mario 3D World. Initially, I pegged it as my second favorite 3D Mario after Galaxy 2, but after playing multiplayer with my friend, I've come to love it more and more. At first glance it looked like a mere continuation of 3D Land in HD, but it's so much more than that.

Power-ups like the multiplying cherry and the cat suit change things up considerably, and allow for a certain amount of technical depth that I rarely feel from a Mario game. Add in some solid level design and you have a winner -- a Game of the Year winner.   read

1:47 PM on 11.07.2013

Great things are on the way: I'm now heading up reviews for Destructoid

I'll keep this brief. Destructoid has had a few losses lately. Tony and Jim in particular are dear friends of mine (who I will follow across the ends of the internet), and it's sad to see them go. But make no mistake! They did leave on good terms, and they will always be a part of Dtoid. I still talk to them quite frequently, and there are no hard feelings involved, so don't think otherwise!

There will be some changes to Destructoid as well in light of the staff shifting, and all of them will be amazing. For starters, I am now heading up the reviews program (I can't say much at all right now, but an announcement is coming Monday)! I've been writing reviews for around five years now, and I've learned a lot from Jim in particular, so I'm very eager to get started -- expect a ton of big reviews on Monday (including Burial at Sea, which I've just completed). There will be some changes coming to the review system in the future, so stay tuned.

In the meantime, you're going to see a lot more high profile reviews from me, and a lot more opinion pieces 100% about videogames, Chad Concelmo style. I'm on pace to play around 200+ games this year with no plans to let up in 2014, so expect a lot. In the past it was tough to juggle a number of other life events in addition to my duties at Destructoid, but now, I'm all in.

Here's the bottom line: I'm here for you guys, and I wouldn't be here if it still didn't feel like home. As I've said before, I came from the very bottom of the Destructoid food chain. I started off as a commenter, became the unofficial c-blog sheriff, got promoted to the front page a few times, was brought on as a trial period contributor, eventually was promoted to Associate Editor, and now, I'm ready to lead Destructoid into a new era of greatness.

As a side note, it's important to squash any rumors that are out there as to who is running the joint. Niero did not quit Destructoid. He has simply given control of the site over to Hamza, who is now the CEO, in favor of developing the infrastructure of Modern Method, and by proxy, Destructoid. Along with Dale he has some really interesting things planned, and I hope to contribute to that plan.

-Chris Carter
[Magnalon]   read

11:44 AM on 04.01.2013

IAmA writer for AMA

I like games. All kinds of games: indies, JRPGs, platformers, FPS thingies, you name it!

Feel free to ask my anything on Retoidded. The more videogame related it is, the more likely I'll respond <3

Proof:   read

6:50 AM on 03.25.2013

My wife surprised me by redecorating my game room when I was at PAX (shortblog)

So this one is going to be pretty short, but I just had to share it with you guys.

After working like crazy at PAX East this weekend, getting my hands on every game I could, I came back to an AMAZING surprise -- my wife and mother-in-law completely gutted and redecorated my gaming closet!

For reference, this medium sized closet had a ton of shelves on the wall (where Mega Man is battling Bomb Man) which were all removed, and replaced with bookshelves. My wife knows that I like to categorize all of my major franchises, so she made sure to buy ones that had lots of different sections on them.

As you can see, Ni No Kuni and Demon's/Dark Souls have already found new homes. There's still a few more finishing touches to do, as most of the other Robot Masters from Mega Man 1 still need to go up (and I've only moved around a third of my collection into this room), but man am I happy right now!   read

2:06 PM on 01.08.2013

Carter's Quest 2013: Every Splinter Cell game ever

[Read on for a description of every Splinter Cell game ever released in the US, and my completion of them all in 2013.]

2013 is going to be an exciting year. Now that I know you guys enjoy reading my Quests, I'm going to make an effort to do even more of them from here on out.

I hope that you guys have learned a bit about the franchises I've covered so far, as my plan is to inspire others to share their thoughts and feelings with the series of their choice as well (which many of you have done!).

In addition to Metroid, Mega Man Classic, The Elder Scrolls, Mega Man X, and the Mega Man Spinoffs, I also have another one ready to go for 2013: Splinter Cell.

Why Splinter Cell?

I was always intrigued by the Splinter cell series. Michael Ironside's incredible performance over the span of the entire franchise helped, but for the most part, it's the top notch gameplay and cutting edge aesthetics that put me over the edge.

My love of stealth games is incredibly obvious, having played every Tenchu and Metal Gear game ever (among many more), and Splinter Cell can easily be lumped into that group of quality stealth titles. Plus, with Blacklist coming out this year, now is as good a time as ever to take on Sam Fisher.

If you haven't joined me on my Quests before, the way they work is pretty simple. It's kind of like a retrospective, but rather than just give you an overview of a franchise, I'll generally let you know what I thought of the game when it was released, and what I think of it now.

If I didn't provide a complete vision of what the game is like before I replay it, I'll provide an "extended thoughts" section below each applicable entry. I'll update my progress in real time through my blog, and after I finish the entire Quest, I'll share it with you guys on the front page.

Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3 (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell Classic Trilogy HD), PC, Xbox, GameCube, Game Boy Advance [Owned], Mac OSX, N-Gage

The original Splinter Cell was a pretty unassuming release. I was a big fan of Tom Clancy properties beforehand (Rainbow Six), so the "TC" name kind of piqued my interest a bit, admittedly, whereas I probably would have given the initial release a pass. But after diving in, I was hooked.

Like the Thief series, Splinter Cell brought "light and dark" elements to the forefront. With the insanely detailed lighting physics compliments of the Unreal Engine 2, it made gameplay that much more immersive, and there's nothing more badass than a stealth-fiend who lives in the shadows.

Protagonist Sam Fisher's signature tri-eyed goggles were also incredibly cool, and helped catapult the game ahead as more than just a "generic spy thriller" aesthetic.

Like the early Resident Evil series, combat is not encouraged, and the lack of firearm utilization is the key to success. Non-lethal weapons such as ring airfoils and shockers were a large part of Sam's arsenal, which helped mix up gameplay a bit.

I've also never beaten the Game Boy Advance version of the game before, which I'll be playing here in addition to the original game.


Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3 (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell Classic Trilogy HD), PC, Xbox, GameCube, Game Boy Advance [Owned]

I was hooked in already after the first game, so naturally, I was there for Pandora Tomorrow day one. This time around the game was developed by Ubisoft Shanghai, as Ubisoft Montreal was already working on the third game (which shows how successful the first game was).

Although gameplay wasn't really changed that much this time around outside of the adaptive AI (Sam can shoot upside down, and other small mechanics), it was still a great entry in the series, and one of the best reviewed stealth games of all time. An additional multiplayer mode would also be incorporated, but it wouldn't be fully realized until Chaos Theory.

As is the case with the first game, I will also be playing the 2D Game Boy Advance version of Pandora Tomorrow, which I've never beaten before in addition to the original.


Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3 (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell Classic Trilogy HD), PC, Xbox, GameCube, DS, 3DS [Owned]

The Splinter Cell series would once again get a bump in lightning and get some graphical upgrades that would make the experience much more aesthetically pleasing, but that was just the tip of the iceberg.

Sam would now have to monitor not only the lighting of his surroundings, but his noise level as well. This would be extra imperative, because the AI was improved, but Sam had a few extra tricks up his sleeve to deal with them (such as a new combat knife, and enhanced weaponry options). The Optically Channeled Potentiator (OCP) was especially useful, as it allowed you to disable cameras and other electronics simply by pointing at them.

Also, that multiplayer mode I casually mentioned in Pandora Tomorrow? In Chaos Theory, it's fully fleshed out, and it's incredible. On top of the already solid seven mission long coop mode (featuring Agent One and Two), there's the vastly improved upon Spies vs. Mercenaries mode, which pits Shadownet against ARGUS, both of which feature two vastly different playstyles.

I found myself and my group of friends favoring one group over the other, which would lead to a MAG-like favoritism of factions. Spies are more mobile, but must kill their prey through stealth. Mercs are more headstrong and aren't as limber, but they can kill Spies with reckless abandon, at both close and long range.

Multiplayer wise, Spies vs. Mercs was one of the most fun things I've ever experienced in all of gaming, and Chaos Theory is probably the series highlight for me.

Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Essentials - PSP [Owned]

I don't remember a whole lot about Essentials -- probably because it was a "here today gone tomorrow" PSP game that felt a bit broken at the time.

Given how great the first three games were, this is kind of a disappointment to see a "flashback" game given this little care by Ubisoft's development staff. In fact, it probably explains why there hasn't been a core portable Splinter Cell game in six years (Double Agent was ported to mobile platforms, and Conviction was ported to iOS and Android).

Either way, I'm looking forward to seeing what this can bring to the table: good or bad.


Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Double Agent - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3, PC, Xbox 360 [Owned], GameCube, Wii

Double Agent was a vast departure for the Splinter Cell series, for better or worse. The "seventh generation" versions of the game featured a wholly new engine that didn't feel like the first three games, and the gritty "double agent" storyline was a vast departure from the shadowy feel of the series.

To go along with the nature of the title, Sam could opt to side with the NSA or the JBA, depending on how you want the game to progress. Choosing one side over the other would change your weapon loadout, and your ending.

This is also one of the most confusing releases of all time. Strangely enough, the 360/PS3/PC versions are different than the Xbox/PS2/Wii versions -- Splinter Cell Conviction confirms that the 360/PS3/PC versions are canon. The development between these games was split between Ubisoft Shanghai and Montreal, just like the first two games.

I wasn't a big fan of Double Agent when it was released, so lets see if a fresh playthrough changes my mind.


Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction - Xbox 360 [Owned], PC, Mac OSX, iOS

After becoming a bit jaded by Double Agent, I was cautious of Conviction -- thankfully, my caution was unfounded, and I ended up loving the game. Although a fair amount of people weren't happy with the more action-oriented gameplay, I found the changes welcome, and a great way to introduce people to the Splinter Cell series.

The "Mark & Execute" mechanic, which allowed players to tag enemies or objects and pew pew them in rapid succession may have made the game a bit easier, but it was a ton of fun to actually utilize.

The "Last Known Position" mechanic creates a ghost of Sam, and shows players where the AI thinks they were located last. Again, this makes the game easier, but the mechanic itself is very well done, and very cool to watch in action. Visually, Conviction is also very impressive to look at, and is a more significant upgrade than Double Agent was (given that DA was essentially an upscaled Xbox/PS2 game for the 360 and PS3).

Multiplayer was also incredibly rewarding, as it focused almost entirely on coop -- even if the Spies vs. Mercenaries mode was nowhere to be found.

In an odd turn of events, Conviction is not available on the PS3 in any form, despite the fact that every other game in the entire franchise (including 2013's Blacklist) is available on a Sony platform.

Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Blacklist - Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC

I honestly have no idea what to expect from Blacklist, especially given the fact that Ironside is not returning to voice Sam (the reason given is because Ironside is unable to perform motion capture stunts), and the addition of possibly meaningless Kinect integration.

Still, I'm eager to see how the franchise can evolve, and the "Spy Vs. Mercs" mode will return, which could shake the multiplayer scene up in a big way if it succeeds.


Collection Photo:

Final thoughts:   read

10:11 PM on 01.01.2013

My top games of 2012

Hamza did it. Kyle is doing it. Brett, Holmes and Allistair are doing it. Heck, your mom is doing it. Everyone's making a top game list!

So I'll make one.

Of course, the hardest part is narrowing down all of the amazing games. This was kind of hard guys, because I played over 126 games. Yep, at least 126 games that I can recall when chronicling the mega year I had in gaming, and distilling it down to a few scant choices.

As for the year itself, 2012 was a great time to be a gamer. A lot of retro-only fans like to note how each year is increasingly worse for the gaming industry due to the over-saturation of AAA games. I heavily disagree. There are so many portables, consoles, indies, and big budget games each year, there's literally something for everyone.

Whether you're a fan of AAA or niche games, there's probably something anyone can enjoy in my top list of 2012.

The Walking Dead

There's really not much I can say that hasn't been said already. The Walking Dead by Telltale is my personal Game of the Year choice.

Despite some issues with Telltale in the past (the Wallace and Gromit games were alright, and Jurassic Park was pretty horrid), I feel like they've trumped their better previous efforts by far (Sam and Max), and they incorporated elements of all of their past games, and then some into TWD.

Coupled with amazing performances all around, I can hardly believe this game was sold digitally by a non-blockbuster studio/publisher. I even cried a few times, which pretty much never happens to me in a video game.

Great show, Telltale.

XCOM: Enemy Unknown

I was a casual fan of X-COM as a young child. Despite its complexity, there was something that really called to me as a strategy game fan.

Thankfully, XCOM not only lives up to the legacy of the old series, but it also incorporates many streamlined elements that newcomers will find extremely welcome.

Who can forget building bases for hours on end, without ever entering a mission? Or the nerve wracking decisions like choosing which countries to save, and which to plunge into peril?

The crux of my enjoyment from XCOM comes from one simple principle: you can't save everything, and nothing is permanent. Strangely, it made for one fun game and one of the best experiences of 2012 by far.

Also, who could forget putting your loved one into the game, only to have them blasted into oblivion a few hours later?

Halo 4

I was hesitant to get Halo 4 at launch. Despite the fact that I had a strong history with Halo as a Halo 1 and 2 tourney goer, I had a really negative experience with 3, and ODST and Reach really didn't do it for me.

I'm glad I listened to my friends and picked up Halo 4 at launch, because it was worth it. Everything feels new, yet classic, and developer 343 Studios really took the series by the horns and improved it.

I really felt like Bungie was getting too content, and continually making the series stale with each entry: 343's hunger bled into my experience with the game, and I loved it.


My wife and I play a lot of games together. But sometimes, developers design games that are too frustrating, or time consuming for her to get involved.

Spelunky, despite being one of the most difficult games of 2012, enamored my wife. There's something about the idea of jumping into a giant, sprawling cave together and forging our own adventures together that completely made her forget about how controller-throwingly hard it was.

We would spend hours cave crawling, figuring out new tactics together, and how to tackle every situation in the game. Weeks later, we were masters. You know what? It was all thanks to the amazing design choices of the developers.

Like Demon's and Dark Souls, Spelunky makes you learn the game, and gives you the tools to do it. It doesn't hold your hand, and I loved it for it.

Gravity Rush

I really didn't know what to expect from Gravity Rush, but I was blown away. Kat, the game's heroine, was one of the most likable characters in all of gaming. Period.

People who want more positive female role models in gaming need to look no further than characters like Kat. I sincerely hope she becomes a staple mascot of the Sony brand going forward, because I loved sharing my adventure with her.

My love for Kat aside, the game was augmented with an amazing soundtrack, a beautiful open world setting, incredible art design, and fun gameplay.

Even if combat was lacking at times (it's like the developers felt like they needed to put in combat in some portions), this was one of my favorite games of 2012, and I still go back to it from time to time.

Xenoblade Chronicles

I used to play at least a few JRPGs a month back in my heyday -- I ate them up like candy. 20, 40, 60 hours? No problem -- bring 'em on.

But as a I grew up, I became disenfranchised with longer games -- especially if they were sloppily put together, and had bad, outdated mechanics.

Xenoblade changed all that. It was a JRPG for western RPG fans. Why no one had really done this as well as Xenoblade had done it before, I have no idea.

Somehow, it perfectly captured that whimsical feeling that I experienced so many times late at night staying up playing JRPGs, and then some. If you have a Wii, this is required reading.

Dust: An Elysian Tale

The often referred to genre of "Metroidvania" really isn't well represented these days. Outside of the occasional release like Shadow Complex, fans of the genre really don't get their fill.

Dust was basically a labor of love by one developer, and it scratches that itch entirely. I loved exploring random nooks and crannies, and engaging in the well made combat system, while challenging myself with the fairly amazing difficulty curve.

I just had to go play Super Metroid afterwards, and I owe it to Dust for letting me return to the golden age of 2D open world games.

Asura's Wrath

If you were ever disappointed by a Dragon Ball Z game and were left wanting more, you need to buy Asura's Wrath. Despite the fact that the game is mostly comprised of QTEs, Asura's Wrath presents an intriguing, and intoxicating narrative that you'll want to play out until the end.

It's like a giant anime episode that you get to play, and at times, if you jack up the difficulty, it can get really challenging (I LOVED the DLC Akuma boss fight on Hard).

Some people feel like Capcom's decision to sell the "real ending" as DLC is sleazy. If I had picked up the game at launch for full price, and had to wait for it, I would probably agree.

But getting the game months down the line for under $20 was a different experience entirely. I really, really liked Asura's Wrath, and it's a game that will stay in my memory for the rest of my life. If you like over the top anime, you need this game -- it'll put a smile on your face, guaranteed.

Sine Mora

What a surprise! Like our own Allistair P., I'm a huge fan of shoot 'em ups, and I can't get enough of them (specifically bullet hell).

Sine Mora delivered and more, as the developers were not only able to create a solid core shmup that plays great, but they also presented a well crafted, intriguing, and sometimes shocking narrative to boot.

Where else can you get a game where you're stopping time to dodge bullets, and dealing with substance and sexual abuse in the next moment?

Rock Band Blitz

What?! A rhythm game in my top ten? Yep, there were a ton of great rhythm games this year, but Rock Band Blitz takes the cake for me. The ability to incorporate your whole library of Rock Band songs is amazing, as is the fact that the game comes with songs that can be imported into Rock Band 3.

The scoring system is practically perfect, and the way Harmonix was able to incorporate social gaming into an asynchronous game was nothing short of brilliant.

I loved being able to compare and contrast my scores with fellow staff members, and Conrad's amazingness at the game left me with many long nights trying to play catch up.

Honorable mentions:

This is going to be lengthy, because I feel like there are a lot of phenomenal 2012 games that deserve credit.

Borderlands 2, Mass Effect 3, Need for Speed: Most Wanted, Darksiders II, Sleeping Dogs, Mark of the Ninja, Fez, Crashmo, Rhythm Thief, Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance, Theatrhythm Final Fantasy, Rayman Jungle Run, Hotline Miami, Guild Wars 2, World of Warcraft: Mists of Pandaria, Call of Duty: Black Ops II, PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale, Retro City Rampage, Rhythm Heaven Fever, New Super Mario Bros. 2, New Super Mario Bros. U, Nintendo Land.   read

10:14 AM on 12.11.2012

Carter's Quest 2013: Every main series Elder Scrolls game ever

[Read on for a description of every main series Elder Scrolls game ever released in the US, and my completion of them all in 2013.]

2013 is going to be an exciting year. Now that I know you guys enjoy reading my Quests, I'm going to make an effort to do even more of them from here on out.

I hope that you guys have learned a bit about the franchises I've covered so far, as my plan is to inspire others to share their thoughts and feelings with the series of their choice as well (which many of you have done!).

In addition to Metroid and Mega Man Classic, I also have another one ready to go for 2013: Elder Scrolls.

Why The Elder Scrolls?

Morrowind. Yep. Morrowind.

As I stated in my blog, the third entry in The Elder Scrolls saga is one of my favorite games of all time, and cemented my love for the series. No other open world game has replicated what Morrowind did for me.

In honor of that fantastic feeling, I'll be replaying every game in the franchise.

Yes, the first two series entries, Arena and Daggerfall, are fairly dated. But since I grew up on Wizardry, Kings Field, and many more classic dungeon crawlers, I think I'm up for the task. It also makes it easier knowing that the first two games are absolutely free on Bethesda's website.

For this Quest, I'll beat the main story of each game, and keep playing other content as I see fit. Since there are only five games in the core series, I'll be completing every bit of DLC to elongate the third, fourth, and fifth games.

I expect the first two to take quite a while, regardless of the lack of DLC. I'm also including The Elder Scrolls Online, which could also take up a lot of time to complete the main questline. I'll include extended thoughts on each game after I play them, since open world titles tend to provide you with different experiences every time.

If you haven't joined me on my Quests before, the way they work is pretty simple. It's kind of like a retrospective, but rather than just give you an overview of a franchise, I'll generally let you know what I thought of the game when it was released, and what I think of it now.

If I didn't provide a complete vision of what the game is like before I replay it, I'll provide an "extended thoughts" section below each applicable entry. I'll update my progress in real time through my blog, and after I finish the entire Quest, I'll share it with you guys on the front page.


The Elder Scrolls: Arena - PC [Owned]

DLC: None

Size of map: Undetermined, due to instanced design

Although it was far from the first RPG (that was about 20 years earlier), Arena came out the same year as the first King's Field game, cementing it into a gold age of PC RPGs.

Arena is unique in that you can explore all of Tamriel, and not just one or two areas -- Morrowind, Oblivion, and Skyrim are all at your fingertips, provided you can handle the dated visuals.

Speaking of the ability to explore everywhere, the way Arena handled the map is kind of odd. The map itself isn't a continuous, connected world -- it's actually instanced. You have to use fast travel to go between towns, so it's very hard to determine the exact size of the world map.

Like Daggerfall, the game is randomly generated. I hope it holds up somewhat!



The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall - PC [Owned]

DLC: None

Size of map: approximately 487,000 square kilometers

Daggerfall is a classic RPG game, through and through. It provides a number of graphical and engine enhancements over Arena, and starts to follow a more traditional Elder Scrolls formula that would help define the series in the years to come.

You could become a vampire, werewolf, and wereboar (the former two would be implemented in nearly every subsequent game), and the political system was incredibly well done, and pretty much unprecedented at the time.

The game was also controversial at the time as an M rated game, as it showed lots of blood, nudity, and had sexual dialogue (which could be removed through parental controls in the options -- remember those, PC gamers?).

Unlike Arena though, you weren't free to explore all of Tamriel. Instead, you were stuck with High Rock and Hammerfell, although the game is so large, that Morrowind is suggested to be 0.01% the size of Daggerfall's map.

Bethesda jumped through this hurdle by randomly generating most of the map, although that caveat makes it bigger than pretty much every game ever made outside of possibly EVE Online. The sheer scale of the game is so unimaginable that it basically isn't possible today.



The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind - Xbox [Owned], Xbox (Game of the Year Edition) [Owned], PC [Owned]

DLC: Tribunal [Owned], Blood Moon [Owned]

Size of map: approximately 25.9 square kilometers

What couldn't I say about Morrowind that hasn't been said already? The vast plains, the amazing mushroom forests, the detailed ruins and keeps -- it pretty much trumped every single open world game ever released at that point, and the fact that they were able to cram it onto an Xbox disc is nothing short of amazing.

I spent well over 300 hours on one character just exploring, crafting items, and making up my own quests (this is with zero time spent on the main quest). Speaking of crafting, while some may say it breaks the game, the ability to create pretty much any item or spell increased the game's enjoyment tenfold.

I was able to spend hours creating spells like "Cure, Cura, and Curaga," as well as a "Mario Jump" spell that allowed me to leap hundreds of feet into the air. You could levitate, craft "The One Ring of Invisibility," -- anything. If you could imagine it, you could probably do it in Morrowind.

The one major detractor from the game is the fact that it hasn't aged well. Without a solid texture pack on the PC, you'll probably feel the burn of jagged, dated visuals.

While I don't think Tribunal was anything to write home about, Blood Moon rocked, and I'll be doing both for this Quest.



The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion - PC, PS3, PS3 (Game of the Year Edition), Xbox 360 [Owned], Xbox 360 (Game of the Year Edition)

DLC: Knights of the Nine [Owned], Shivering Isles [Owned], Mehrune's Razor [Owned]

Size of map: approximately 41.4 square kilometers

Oblivion, I felt, had a much less interesting world, and premise, than any other TES game before it. There's something about the plain feeling of Cyrodil that just didn't resonate with me.

While the trademark sidequests had some pretty great storylines, the main quest was probably the weakest and most repetitive yet. The gist is that you're constantly trying to seal "Oblivion Gates" to prevent evil forces from bursting through into Tamriel.

The problem is, the Oblivion realm is dreadfully boring, and Bethesda tends to re-use assets and even layouts so often, that it really takes away from the allure of the game.

That "samey" feel kind of projects itself onto the game in general, actually. Unlike the previous games (Morrowind especially), sometimes it's hard to discern where you are unless you look at your map. For me, that's not a hallmark of an Elder Scrolls game in the slightest. Contrary to popular belief, Oblivion's map is actually larger than Morrowind.

Still, while I think Oblivion isn't a great Elder Scrolls game, it's a pretty solid RPG that pretty much every fan should experience at least once.

I'll also be adding on the fairly short and lackluster Knights of the Nine and Mehrune's Razor questlines, as well as the incredibly detailed, and amazing Shivering Isles expansion.

To be frank actually, Shivering Isles comes close to Morrowind's greatness and originality, and judged seperately as its own game, is probably one of the strongest Elder Scrolls titles.



The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - PC, PS3, Xbox 360 [Owned]

DLC: Dawnguard [Owned], Hearthfire [Owned], Dragonborn [Owned]

Size of map: approximately 40.0 square kilometers

Skyrim immediately grabbed me more than Oblivion ever did, basically within the first hour. Although Bethesda just substituted green plains for snow (which also got old sometimes), the "dragon" hook gave the game markedly more character right off the bat.

The concept of a "dragonborn" hero that actually feels heroic, and the mere fact that dragons constantly patrol the skies made for a much more interesting, and fun game.

As always, the sidequests were much more fun than the particularly drab main questline, but I probably wouldn't have it any other way, as a few of the sidequests had better narratives than full retail titles.

Although I think Bethesda could have done better, Skyrim is still quite an amazing game, and a great gateway into the Elder Scrolls series. In addition to the rather short main quest, I'll be playing every expansion released for the game to date, and will update this Quest should any more DLC surface.



The Elder Scrolls Online - PC

Size of map: Unknown

I have no idea what to expect from The Elder Scrolls Online. In some ways, I can see it ending up like my Old Republic experience: getting to max level, enjoying the story, then promptly quitting. In another breath, I can see the vast lands of Tamriel in glorious HD, and not just restricted to Morrowind, Cyrodiil, or Skyrim.

Subscription based models are pretty tough to run these days in tandem with Blizzard, but given the prestige of the series, I can see them trying it initially. We'll see what 2013 brings, but honestly, I'm just excited at the idea of being able to see Summerset Isles close up.



Collection Photo:


Final thoughts:   read

9:42 AM on 10.15.2012

Shortblog: Check out this awesome retro Skyrim DIY project

It's not often that I'm impressed by do it yourself projects, but this gaming relating one caught my eye. The perfect marriage of retro and contemporary gaming is what made me so interested -- I love it anytime there's reverence for old school (which is probably why I get along so well with Destructoid's Chad Concelmo!).

One of my wife's co-workers had an awesome idea for his friend's birthday. His friend was a massive Skyrim fan, so he knew that he had to seize the opportunity, and make him something really special.

Initially, he considered ordering this custom Skyrim cartridge off of 72-Pins, but shortly afterwards he thought he would go the extra mile and make it a bit more personal.

After doing some internet matlockery, he came across a template, official Nintendo seals, a font that was as close as you could get to the NES cartridge style, and some laminate to protect the project's integrity. He ended up finding some awesome original retro-themed Skyrim artwork, and everything kind of just came together.

After doing some Photoshop wizardry he pared down the label for an NES cartridge, removed the old one and some yellow residue with Goo-b-gone, and BAM -- instant custom cartridge.

But he wasn't done there, because at this point, it was just pretty to look at -- and that wasn't enough. Using a guide from Instructables, he used a utility knife and a screwdriver to crack into the case and add some functionality to it.

All of this DIY madness makes me want to work on a project of my own -- I think Dark or Demon's Souls would be PERFECT for this.   read

12:39 PM on 09.18.2012

Impressions: Kirby's Dream Collection

Haven't you heard? Kirby's Dream Collection is out this week. Last Sunday, to be exact! Good old Nintendo Sunday releases. Jim will be covering it proper on the front page, but I figured I'd share my thoughts with you guys here.

Kirby's Dream Collection is very similar to the Wii's Super Mario All-Stars Limited Edition collection, but it has a little more "juice" to it, and it isn't hard to see why.

Not only does KDC contain Kirby's Dream Land, Kirby's Adventure, Kirby's Dream Land 2, Kirby Super Star, Kirby's Dream Land 3, and Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards, but it also has new challenge stages, a charming mini-booklet on Kirby's history, an in-game museum, and a soundtrack CD.

So how does it stack up?

If you're a hardcore Kirby fan, you probably need this collection. Although the included soundtrack and booklet don't go the extra mile to make this a "must have at all costs" type of deal, they are charming enough to add to the allure of the package.

The rather small booklet mostly contains factoids that us Kirby fanatics already knew, but seeing the original design proposal for the series, and a number of original designs all in one place makes for a great read anytime you want your Kirby fix.

The soundtrack is just one CD (which hilariously states that "you cannot play on your Wii"), and contains a mix of tracks from sixteen Kirby games, as well as three tracks that were recorded for the anniversary celebration. It would have been a bit nicer to get a more fleshed out multi-disc collection, but ultimately it is pretty enjoyable mix for when you just want to drop everything and get your Kirby-dance on.

The in-game Kirby museum is also cool, as it goes through every game throughout the years from 1992-2012 with random world factoids, but it's something you can do in fifteen minutes and never do again. That little adorable puffball has had quite a few games since his birth, but sadly, you can only play six of them on this collection: and the museum constantly reminds you of that.

So what if you're not a fan? Well, if you don't care about anything ancillary, and just wanted updated versions of the six classic games, you are going to be disappointed as hell. To be clear, these are direct ROM dumps and not remade ports on offer.

For instance, in the first Kirby's Dream Land, after clearing the game, you had to reset (turn off/on) your Game Boy unit to play again. Same deal here. If you're the type of person who can't stand lazy designs like this in updated packages, you'll most likely be fairly frustrated here. At the very least, there is GameCube, Classic Controller, and Wii-mote support.

Additionally, a number of these games can be found fairly cheap on the 3DS and WiiWare Virtual Consoles already, which means you wouldn't have to drop $40 on the package of six games to actually own all six. In fact, the only game not available right now is Kirby's Dream Land 2 (which is actually available everywhere but the US on the 3DS VC, and is coming to the US at some point).

The rest you can pick up for $3-10 each digitally, or perhaps even less online. If you're looking to get this for multiplayer, note that only three of the games support 2 or more players -- Kirby Super Star, Kirby's Dream Land 3, and Kirby 64 (and for the uninitiated, Kirby 64's multiplayer is for mini-games only).

Thankfully, unlike the Mario All-Stars Wii release, there is actual new content involved in the form of challenge rooms. These challenge rooms use the same engine as Kirby's Return to Dreamland, but involve all-new experiences. As you race through levels to get the best time and kill as many enemies as possible, you'll unlock more challenges, and even have the opportunity to race Magolor from RTD.

Races are a lot like the King Dedede gourmet races from Kirby Super Star, but a tad more enjoyable, as Magolor is a much more interesting opponent than Dedede ever was given his propensity to zap you while competing. The challenges don't offer a full game, but it's not a mini-game either: it's something more in-between.

All in all, I'm satisfied with the collection, but I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who wasn't a franchise fan. If you're a savvy enough consumer who just wants to casually play the series, you can easily just find these piecemeal for cheaper than the asking price. If you're a true fan however, you might want to pick this one up before it's gone forever.   read

8:33 AM on 08.30.2012

For the Community: My Story

I've already written two "10 things about Magnalon" articles, in addition to participating in a c-blog interview regarding myself. But in light of recent blogs, I feel like it's necessary to detail how I came here, what I've done with the many years I've been here, and what my plans are for the future.

When I was a community member, I always thought it was really important to get to know who the people on the front page are -- that was a key factor in drawing me to Destructoid, and as a result, I try to respond to as many people as I can, whether it's in the comments on the front page, via a PM, or in the c-blogs.

This is my extended response to all of those people who are looking to either break into the community, feel a lack of community, or want to know how to get involved in writing. Hopefully when you combine the above articles with this one, you'll get a clear Voltron-esque complete picture of who I am.

All of this is written fairly off-the-cuff with no preparation outside of the images -- but then again, that's my style baby!

Chapter 1: Jumping into the unknown

After lurking Destructoid since late 2008, I finally decided to join the community and write a blog under the username "Magnalon," which is a combination of Magna Centipede from Mega Man X2, and Shenlong, which is either a dragon or a Gundam depending on how you look at it. It was about Lord of the Rings Conquest: a game most people hated, or couldn't give a damn about.

It was literally the first gaming blog I ever wrote. Anywhere. Because of Jim Sterling and Jonathan Holmes, two staff members that are widely loved and still here, I was emblazoned to write that one seemingly insignificant blog. I felt like their editorial voices were extremely unique, and gave gaming websites a fresh coat of paint.

My original avatar was Wesker, from Resident Evil. I attempted to engage the community, and talk about the things I liked, and didn't like. I commented quite a bit, for better or for worse, and eventually, I started to learn what types of games nearly every community member enjoyed.

After a few months, I changed my avatar to Legato Bluesummers from the anime Trigun, which you'll see in my profile bar to the right to this day. My blog header has also stayed the same from day one (The Stampede is a Trigun reference, but it's also my old Mech Assault clan's name, which was #1 in the US).

Before I knew it, I was getting emails and comments asking me to grab a beer, or hang out and talk about all of the obscure games that I had talked about in my blog. It was an awesome feeling to say the least, as many other gaming sites' comment sections are just barren wastelands of discussion.

What would come next would lead to two E3s, publisher-paid preview flights, a truck load of review copies, many friendships, and of course, a full-circle employment with Destructoid.

Chapter 2: Magnalon

After writing a few c-blogs, I got a small handful of PMs asking if I wrote for any gaming websites. The answer at the time was "no," but I ended up looking for one as a result, and found Gamer At the time, Gamer Limit was a very small site ran by one of the nicest Aussies you'll ever meet.

Within weeks, I started reviewing games, and became the Editor-In-Chief and Co-Owner. After adding another incredible writer named James, who became a Co-Owner with myself and the Founder months down the line, things started rolling.

We were accredited by Metacritic and Gamerankings, with help from James, and the 100+ reviews I had written alongside of other staff. We started getting thousands of daily hits and got an ad deal. We attended two E3s, which I couldn't have done without the help of my fellow staff mates, and James, who heavily helped plan it and set up our business documents.

When I was at E3, I had the opportunity to give Jim, Chad, and Niero a hug, and meet Jonathan Holmes and Anthony Burch, among many others. In terms of coverage, I got extremely sick both years because I over-exerted myself and wrote around twenty previews each year. Despite my illnesses however, my passion for gaming still ran strong. If I went back, I wouldn't have done less: I would have done even more.

But running a website is really hard work. Eventually, we had a few writers who moved on to other publications -- AusGamers and Game Informer to name a few. With increasing responsibilities at home, there was no way I could continue to keep the site as flowing as it once was, and it became extremely stressful. Right now, the site is mainly a more relaxed venue, but I still really enjoy reviewing games on it while I'm not writing here. To date, I have reviewed around 165 games that are viewable on Metacritic and Gamerankings.

While this was all happening, I was still very active on Destructoid. I had my first c-blog promotion, and it felt great. While I was doing well at Gamer Limit, my community presence at Destructoid was steadily growing.

People started to identify me, and a lot of the staff would respond to my comments. I had a "Question of the week" on RetroForce Go!, I was referenced on Podtoid a few times (My obsession with Demon's Souls paid off!), I managed to actually get on the botched Podtoid 100, and I won a "Comment of the Week" contest when that was a thing on the front page.

Even though I'm staff, I still link my old avatar in my profile, which has lead to many people exclaiming "OMG you're Magnalon!?" after they click my profile link on the front page. It's a great feeling, as I've made many friends by clicking on their profile links and seeing that they have similar interests.

If you want a major tip when it comes to community integration -- fill out that profile page with as much information as you're comfortable with!

Chapter 3: Friendship and familiarity

But as I started to rise in both communities, more battles were ahead. As I started to spend more time on Destructoid, I eventually became known as the "c-blog sheriff," or the "c-blog police." This was a term coined by the community, because I would pretty much try and comment on every blog I could get my hands on.

If someone was new, and broke some of the unwritten rules, I'd try to steer them in the right direction. If someone was copying blogs from another site and stealing content, I'd try to investigate so the c-blogs could have as much original content as possible.

Funnily enough I had many arguments this way with various community members. I got into a few heated debates with EternalDeathslayer and SilverDragon in particular. Shortly after contacting them and hashing it out, we got along extremely well. Heck, SilverDragon and his girlfriend (now wife) even came and visited my wife and I down at Disney World!

After some time, I hung up the spurs and retired as sheriff. I felt like many others were rising up in my place, and I had to focus on other projects. But that doesn't mean I stopped interacting! I ran many contests as a community member, and interacted with my friends on a near daily basis. This became extremely hard after seeing some of my favorite people pack up and leave, or quit video games altogether.

So, I started a Twitter account specifically to keep in touch with some of the members who left the community. Over the course of a few years, I started to accumulate a ton of fellow Dtoiders on my account, as well as making connections with people outside of Destructoid, on just about every other gaming outlet on the web.

Chapter 4: Staff

Throughout all my years at Destructoid, I had developed a strong editorial voice, augmented by my knowledge and experience with pretty much every genre and era of gaming: from retro to Modern Warfare.

Dale North and Hamza noticed this, and brought me on as a contributor to Destructoid early in 2012. Due to my reduced role at Gamer Limit, I was able to easily start pumping out content for Destructoid, and it couldn't make me happier.

I don't really have a niche per se, as I pretty much enjoy everything, but I do try to make a point to highlight Nintendo content, as I feel like it was a bit underrepresented before I came in. To hone my skills, I started to freelance (literally for free, and for fun) for a few sites like the retro-centric

I feel like things have come full circle. Just a few years ago I was looking outside at the house Destructoid built, and now I'm in it. Yet, I feel like a lot of things have stayed the same: and that's a good thing. I'm still free to write things like this and slum it in the comments. I'm still free to PM people, hang out with some of you, and tweet back and forth with some amazing dudes and dudettes.

Initially, Jim and Jonathan were my inspiration, but eventually, all of Destructoid inspired me. You can easily see why I still love writing here. People have come and gone, but that happens literally everywhere: it's a fact of life.

No matter what happens, for those people I make the effort to keep in contact with: it's like they never left. In fact, some people who don't read the site anymore still contact me about my articles, just because they want to support me -- if that isn't an amazing feeling, I don't know what is!

In light of that, I want to formally say "thank you" to everyone here.

Chapter 5: ???

What does the future bring? I have no idea. What I do know is that I'm mostly in charge of my destiny. If something happened and I couldn't write anymore for the rest of my life, I would regret next to nothing, given how much this community has helped me grow as a person, and given all of the friendships I would still have.

I've gotten a few offers from some smaller websites, but I choose to write here given my history with Destructoid. While I can "never say never" when it comes to my future employment in the writing arena, I do know that I would never accept a job that didn't allow me to continue writing c-blogs, and comment on Destructoid. It's too important to me!

<3   read

1:11 PM on 05.21.2012

Some Diablo III Thoughts – Stay awhile and listen

I’ll give it to you straight: if you've played the Diablo III beta, you’ll notice that the game seems fairly limited and droll. Thankfully, the beta itself was probably one of the worst snapshots of the full game.

One of the most deceiving things about the beta is how limited the rune system was at the time, which lead to player outrage for limiting certain skills to certain quick-slots. Essentially, this required a rigid construction of your character, to the point where people called Diablo III “dumbed down”, and vowed to ignore the retail release. This assessment couldn't be farther from the reality.

Most people probably aren’t aware of the game’s “Elective Mode”, hidden tactfully underneath the veneer of the gameplay options menu. This allows you to put any skill in any slot you want, and completely customize your build the way you want it. Hilariously enough I was included in that naive group, as I didn't even discover the option until after I beat the game for the first time.

In addition to the robust skill system (which gives you more abilities as you level up), you’ll immediately notice that the “Rune” system and passive ability system allow you more customization than any dungeon crawler to date. This mechanic would be tiresome if it weren’t for the fact that Runes utterly change how each skill plays out.

For instance, a skill that replenishes your mana may be further augmented to replenish your health as well, changing when the skill is best used in the middle of a hectic boss fight. Alternatively, it could be modified to give you a mana increase over time after activation, which can be helpful in more attrition-oriented fights.

Another Rune may make a non-damaging skill like a trap or an evasive move inflict damage, or root enemies instead of just slowing them; and so on. You can respec instantly at any time (respeccing changes your abilities – this usually costs in-game currency and the use of an NPC in most RPGs, but it is free and clear in D3).

Respeccing mid-fight can be extremely exhilarating, but Blizzard cleverly rewards players at higher levels of difficulty by giving them a stacking “magic find” (a statistic for finding better loot) buff for NOT respeccing during a certain amount of time – genius.

So what good are fancy skills if there are no interesting boss fights to be had? Thankfully, D3 delivers on that front. Bosses are no longer kite, kite, kite, kite, kite, kite; don’t get hit. They’re basically full-on raid encounters, a la your standard MMO – but in a good way.

Unlike most MMOs that require you to have a guild or assemble a swarthy crew, pretty much every boss in the game outside of maybe Inferno Mode can be soloed, provided you have the skill-set.

Typical MMO boss tropes like “stay out of the fire” apply here, but there’s also a number of different circumstances that will require quick thinking, split-second reflexes, and most of all – the drive to keep moving, to avoid various traps. Unlike Diablo 2 (or most dungeon crawlers in general), pretty much every fight is environmental, which means that some sort of other-worldly hazard is out to get you while you’re locked in combat with your foe.

It makes for a pretty interesting gameplay experience, and honestly, the higher levels of difficulty really change the way developers should look at dungeon crawlers as a whole.

To clarify, there is a Normal, Nightmare, Hell, and Inferno Mode, with a maximum player level of 60. At the end of Normal, you should be around Level 30. At the end of Nightmare, you could be anywhere from 45-50 or higher. At the end of Hell, you should be 60, ready to tackle the 60-only Inferno Mode. Right away in Nightmare, I noticed a stark contrast in terms of difficulty – I can’t wait to see what Hell and Inferno are like.

My main character right now is a Demon Hunter. I’m nearly finished with Nightmare Mode right now at level 48, and I’m feeling really good about my first character choice. The Demon Hunter is essentially a ranged rogue of sorts, and is the very definition of a glass cannon. He can get in (and out) of danger at a moment’s notice, but if he’s overrun, that’s pretty much it.

Thankfully he has a ton of traps, slows, escapes, and various other tricks at his disposal to be a more effective force on the battlefield. You don’t have to go the traps/trickery route though, as you can go full DPS by changing up your passive skills to accommodate.

Although the Demon Hunter is the only character I have above level 30, I do have one of every class above level 10. So far what I’m noticing is that the Barbarian just utterly dominates. He has a ton of abilities to hit groups and single targets, and the fact that him and the Monk take 20% less inherent damage than all other classes is pretty insane. I can't complain of course because he can't do *everything*, as every class has their unique signature on group combat. I especially can't complain because I plan on having a level 60 Barbarian myself on day!

The Monk is more of a group-centric character (he has mantras and the like that can heal, and buff the group), but he’s still viable on his own depending on your build. The Witch Doctor is similar to the Demon Hunter in that he’s a major glass cannon, and has a bunch of tricks up his sleeve.

Tactically, the Wizard is just about what you’d expect out of a typical Diablo spell caster, but he has a few really cool abilities (like a time slow dome) that sets him apart from the rest. Surprisingly, although there seems to be a bit of a slant towards the Barbarian (based on my higher level play with my friends), every class is fairly balanced, and I’ve seen success with every type of player.

I also had an opportunity to do Diablo III’s “Cow Level” (I don’t want to ruin it here): suffice to say, given that I spent three hours of preparation grinding for the materials and the 150,000 gold to do it, it was fairly disappointing. Despite the let-down, however, it’s nice to know that you can enter it an unlimited amount of times; unlike Diablo II, where you had to sleaze the system by refraining from killing the Cow King, and could easily do it accidentally with an errant Frost Orb.

So what about the DRM issues you've no doubt been hearing about? Well, as I've stated above, in less than a week I've nearly beaten the game approximately 6 times. I honestly haven't had major issues with the "always-on" requirement, as I've only been dropped from games a few times -- thankfully, my checkpoints were always extremely close by and I only lost 5 minutes of time at maximum (although my XP and gear were completely fine; it was just my short amount of progress that was lost).

I'm not one of those people who generally believes that "even the most minor inconvenience is unacceptable", but I completely agree that always-on DRM is pretty absurd for the single player portion of the game. At the same time, I haven't seen any evidence of duping or account training, so I'm willing to put up with this inconvenience in exchange for the ability to play one of the best dungeon crawlers to date.

Additionally, Blizzard has a good habit of supporting their games, and if Warcraft III and Starcraft I are still being supported, I'd say Diablo III's future is set in stone. If you're taking a stance against the game on principle, I have no issue with that, but at least try the soon-to-be-available free trial if you aren't keen on giving Blizzard any money at this point in the game.

All in all, I’m extremely happy with Diablo III. I plan on playing with all five classes to supplement my Demon Hunter, and I have a swarthy group of friends who plan on doing the same. I’m very excited for Torchlight II, but at the same time, I’m thrilled to see that D3 clearly has legs past the first month of play. If you like dungeon crawlers, you may not be blown away by Diablo III, but you will probably enjoy it.   read

Back to Top

We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -