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Reach exceeds grasp. Not that I lack skill, I just have small arms.

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"Yo, Chummer. You wanna set up a run? I got what you need right here. See my crew over there? That elf ain't just fo' show. He's one of the fastest Matrix runners in the city. That boy will slice for ICs like it ain't shit. The scary bitch next to him? She slings magic like a dealer slings BTLs. You need someone ta watch their asses, you got 350lbs of orc muscle right here. So what da ya say, Mr. Johnson, gotta deal?"

-Jackson Bonebreaker, six hours before his death.

The Shadowrun universe has close to 25 years of history behind it. The pen-and-paper RPG is just as recognizable in some circles as Dungeons & Dragons. Its fans can recite the history of the sixth age from the Awakening all the way up to the "current" year of 2050. Dozens of books have expanded the universe beyond the core system and added to the already deep lore Jordan Weisman created in the late '80s.


Never stops raining in the City of Dreams.


Clearly this cyberpunk universe lends itself well to the idea of a video game and there have been a few attempts at bringing the table-top to the screen. Fans recall the SNES and Sega versions fondly while lambasting the 2007 FPS multiplayer focused remake as having no heart. Since then, the guys at Harebrained Schemes (led by original creator, Weisman) launched a Kickstarter to right the ship. Enter Shadowrun Returns, a carefully crafted throwback to those golden days of the 16-bit age.

Fans of the older games will have plenty to celebrate. Shadowrun Returns goes back to its roots with a story that tries to not only maintain the spirit of the previous games, but also tries to bring them both into the current pen-and-paper edition of Shadowrun. Weisman does a good job of trying to tie everything together in Shadowrun's ten hour campaign, packing each moment with the style and flair fans love. Sadly, this also is one of its greatest weaknesses.

Weisman tries to make sure a little bit of the entire lore toolbox makes its way into the game. The problem, however, is that to give the world the attention it deserves, it requires a game much longer thanthis one. By trying to fit everything into such a small package, nothing ever feels expanded on. I was left wanting more from the game, which is to its credit, but I also had a lot of the gaps filled in from prior knowledge. If you have never experienced anything from Shadowrun, then things will be confusing at best.

The game is NOT friendly to newcomers when it comes to the setting. Shadowrun Returns assumes the player is familiar with its world. Terms like SIN, Lone Star, and Tír Tairngire are tossed about casually with little to no explanation. For long term fans, admittedly the target audience, not having to explain itself with each time new slang is used is great and keeps the story moving along. For those not in the know, it can be extremely frustrating trying to piece together all the different terminology. There is a small glossary that explains some of it, but it could easily be five times larger to fit in everything thrown at you.


This is the 7th time I've seen this, damn right you do.


Equally aggravating is the complete lack of a manual save system. The entire game relies on autosaves. Nothing induces a keyboard-snapping rage in me faster than having to repeat the past 30 minutes of a mission because of a couple lucky blasts from a group of shotgun wielding orcs.

The combat is a lot like the also recently re-booted XCOM: Enemy Unknown, and that's a good thing. Each runner gets a set amount of action points per turn to accomplish whatever it is they need to do, be it shooting, reloading, casting, etc. The cover system is also heavily influenced by Enemy Unknown as well. The interface gives you an idea of exactly how well that rickety crate will shield you from a corporate mage's fireball. Here is a tip: Find something bigger to hide behind.

Shadowrun is a game that will get better with age. It comes with a robust level editor and Steam Workshop support for the modding community to play with.  Already in the works are full conversions of the SNES and Sega games as well as several player-driven stories. While the campaign the game comes with, Dead Man's Switch, is well told and full of your typical Shadowrun intrigue, I'm personally looking forward to seeing what will be crafted by the franchise's rabid base.

Another satisfied Lone Star customer.


At the end of the day, I really enjoyed Shadowrun Returns, but I have reservations about recommending it to all but the most hardcore fans of the universe. There is just too much left unsaid through out the game. From it's complex, unexplained
lore down to the inefficient tutorial Shadowrun is just not welcoming to strangers. If you are just interested in solid, turn based combat without having to worry about story or how everything works, this game is great. Those looking to draw a bit deeper from the well, however, will find themselves at a loss unless they make the effort to look outside the game for answers. Fans, however, will be pleased with just how much is packed into the experience. Shadowrun Returns is a welcome sight for sore eyes with a bright future ahead of it if the content keeps coming.

Cheers, Chummer.
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Capitalistpig
12:49 AM on 07.17.2013

So you have this stockpile of gold trophies from all the PlayStation 3 games you beat and nothing to show for it other then an impressive user score?

Well Sony is looking to change that with its Bid For Greatness campaign.

What exactly is it? Well, a few weeks back Sony launched their "Greatness Awaits" PR blitz with the following trailer.




Now that the trailer as been out for a few weeks, Sony is giving its most hardcore fans a chance to win some of the props used in video. Between now and the end of July, PlayStation 3 owners can log into bidforgreatness.com with their PSN accounts and use the gold trophies they have earned as currency to bid on props or concept art all the way up to the full outfits worn by Deslin Rowe (inFamous: Second Son), Edward Kenway (Assassin's Creed IV), and others.

Much like an eBay action, those willing to throw their hat in the ring will sign-in, make an offer, and outbid each other until the time runs out. Don't worry, the disclaimer on the front of the page says your trophies won't be lost in the bidding.

Sounds like an excellent chance to get some cool gear as well as finally have a practical use for achievements. Go forth, eager Sony fans, go forth and show your devotion.

And if anyone reading this DOES happen to win something, please let me know. I'd be interested in seeing what they look like in the wild.








With next generation consoles from Sony and Microsoft just around the corner, it seems that GameStop is pulling out of the PS2 business to make room for the upcoming systems. As of June 1st they will no long be taking in anything related to the PS2 for trade so if you've been waiting to get enough money to buy that lunch at McDonald's for all of your stuff, better start pulling it from your closets now.

If you are a collector or just like to revisit the past, however, keep an eye out for deep discounts that tend to follow such moves.



What a long, fun trip its been



What are your favorite PlayStation 2 memories? I still remember thinking how beautiful Final Fantasy X looked and how Silent Hill 2 showed me you can tell a mature story in a video game. With any luck, the next generation will bring the same sense of wonder the PS2 did for me.
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Music has been a part of gaming history almost since its inception. There are few out there who can't at least hum the opening bars of Super Mario Bros. main theme and most would at least recognize the intro to Sonic the Hedgehog or the crystal theme to any of the Final Fantasy games. Music, or the lack of it, can set the tone of the entire experience.

A horror game might place the protagonist in a silent, darkened hallway where only the sounds of his footsteps and labored breathing can be heard, creating an atmosphere of being completely alone. A knocked over paint can followed by an unintelligible chattering can cause the paranoia of being watched set in without having to show anything at all.

Licensed music can have the same effect as original efforts if done properly. One of the last missions of Saints Row the Third presents Bonnie Tyler's "I Need a Hero" in such a way that it matches perfectly with the game's overall satirical and over-the-top tone. Both Borderlands' intros capture the viewer's interest with the first game in particular, setting the pace for the game's irreverent feel. The right song can also give a scene emotional weight, much like in World in Conflict, where Audioslave's "Shadow on the Sun" accompanies a group of marine helicopters attempting to retake Governors Island from the invading Soviet forces.



FarCry 3 highlights just how important music can be during a scene. Early on in the main campaign, Jason Brody has to burn down a field of marijuana in an attempt to create chaos and disrupt the flow of drugs for the island's despot, Hoyt Volker. As he closes in on the crops, the music starts to slowly change into "Make It Bun Dem", an appropriate mix of reggae and dubstep by Skrillex and Damian Marley. The upbeat, almost surreal tune emphasizes the glee that the once hesitant-to-kill Jason has further devolved as he excitedly destroys the crop and murders anyone in his way, laughing and cheering the entire time. This scene, one of the highlights of the game, would have been easily forgettable without the song playing in the background.

Play this scene with the music off and you will know exactly what I mean.


While the right song can make a good sequence great, it can also save what would have been an otherwise boring stretch of gameplay. During the climax of Max Payne 3, the game reaches a moment where Max has to cut his way through seemingly endless waves of hired goons down a long airport terminal hallway. What would have been a generic showpiece is made into something memorable by HEALTH's haunting theme to the game hanging in the background as Max slaughters his way from one end of the hall to the other. The music flows perfectly with the bullet-cam and slow down mechanics saving what would otherwise have been a frustratingly long turkey shoot.

"One second, let me turn on my iPod."


Sometimes in a game, it's not a single song, but a soundtrack as a whole that brings the entire thing together. It would be easy to point to the massive licensed discography is that is the Grand Theft Auto series, but I would argue that those games stand alone just well enough without the music. There are those games, however, that when they are mentioned one of the first things brought up is the amazing soundtrack. Katamari Damacy wouldn't be anywhere near as beloved without its catchy, lounge singer crooning, absurd beats. Anyone who has played this is already thinking about their favorite tune from Katamari just by naming it, it's that infectious.

In a similar vein is Persona 4. The entire breadth of Persona's soundtrack serves to help one embrace the culture of a high school student in a small Japanese town. From the J-pop battle music to the cheery tunes that play while exploring town, the music serves to pull the player into the world itself. By immersing someone so fully it makes what happens to the characters have a greater impact. These aren't just some nameless NPCs made to give quests or act as cannon fodder, but living people with lives that are cared about. In combination with a great translation, the music helps breathe life into what would be nothing more than another JRPG in a modern setting.

Sometimes it can just suck you in.


And then there is Bioshock: Infinite, where the music in the game in part of the plot itself. While wandering around the floating city of Columbia, barber shop quartets sing covers of songs which are several decades from being released. 80's pop hits are changed into carnival music and ragtime tunes hinting that there is something very off about the entire setting. Anachronistic uses of well known songs like this do far more to build a world mythology than any cut scene could have conveyed.


Best use of licensed music ever.


As games continue to grow as a storytelling medium, it's important that all aspects the experienceare covered. The most amazing action packed set piece can fall flat without an appropriately epic musical score driving the player forward. Likewise, a forgettable moment can be given an extended life by simply choosing the right song to play alongside it. The atmosphere of a game can be completely ruined if something breaks the immersion, pulling the player out of the experience and killing any emotional attachment that might come along with the game. Much like how a good meal can be made exceptional with the right combination of spices, the right music can make a mediocre game better or a fantastic game into something that will truly be remembered.

Steven Brown falls asleep listening to the Skyrim soundtrack every night. You can listen him on Twitter to hear his thoughts on damn near everything.
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Seems like Ubisoft is moving on to the next chapter of Assassin's Creed rather then expand on the previous games protagonist Conner as they did with Ezio.

A few quick thoughts on this:

1. To me this shows just how unlikable Conner from Assassin's Creed III was by not handing him the lead role this time.

2. The whole pirate theme of Black Flag seems to suggest the sailing segments of AC3 must have been given a lot of positive feedback.

3. Who would have guessed that Henry Rollins supported the Assassin Order.

4. Given how AC3 ended, how the HELL are they going to introduce this one?

5. Please give me a fully controllable, customizable ship to serve as my base of operations as I travel the rumored Caribbean setting.

Feel free to add your thoughts/hopes/complaints below.








It's late so I'll be somewhat brief here. At midnight PST Sony had a live stream conference about the Vita and its plans for the next few months. For the most part nothing new was announced as far as games go. Everything here should be considered for the Japanese market ONLY. If I get something wrong, PLEASE let me know.

1. The Vita is dropping roughly 20% in Japan. IF that price drop comes to the US, that would be
from $249.99 to $199.99.

2. The Vita REALLY wants to have a Monster Hunter-esque game. Losing Monster Hunter 4 to the 3DS was a major blow to the system and they are desperate to find a replacement.

3. Dragon's Crown still looks really pretty, much like any other Vanillaware game does.

4. Final Fantasy X HD is STILL in development with no real trailer shown, just a few character models of Tidus and Yuna. The lack of anything else on this makes me believe that this game is STILL months, if not a full year away.

5. While this conference was focused on games that will be released over the next few months, the lack of anything new being announced is troubling to me. At least tease something at the end to give us hope. To me this just shows that the Vita is struggling even in its homeland.

Let me know what you took away from the conference below.