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Community Discussion: Blog by Caelas Powdery Cheese Shadowfoot | Caelas Powdery Cheese Shadowfoot's ProfileDestructoid
Caelas Powdery Cheese Shadowfoot's Profile - Destructoid

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About
I am a 360/Pc gamer, and I play Shooters, Rts's, Action Rpg's, and the occasional sport or racing game. Despite these narrow tastes, I'm willing to try any sort of game, as long as I can enjoy it or appreciate it. And the Ps3 is a great console as well, I just can't afford it.

Top 15 Games: (In no particular order)

Fallout
Fallout 2
Fallout 3
The Elder Scrolls: Oblivion
Company of Heroes
Medieval II: Total War
GTA IV
Call of Duty 4
Black and White 2
Age of Empires 2
Dawn of War
Dawn of War 2
Assassin's Creed
Shadow of the Colossus
Jedi Knight Academy

I'm an avid writer and reader, and I aspire to work for the (British) Government one day, and perhaps knock some sense into the twats. Please comment on my posts, I enjoy writing truthful, recognizable, dry humor laden material.

My proper Pc Specs: (They're well proper 'n that)

Gateway FX 6800-1
Radeon 4850, 512mb
Intel Core i7 920 2.8 Ghz
3 Gigs of DDR3 RAM (god knows what brand)
Windows Vista Home Premium (WHY WON'T FALLOUT 1's BLOOD WORK!!??)
LG 22" Widescreen Monitor

That's all the interesting stuff, please add me as a friend on Steam, I'm Caelas. Oh, and Twitter if you like.
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Thanks to the "new" E3, we have witnessed some truly fantastic games. SOme of the most notable so far in my
opinion, have been Mass Effect 2, Modern Warfare 2, God of War 3, Splinter Cell: Conviction, Assassins Creed 2,
and Dragon Age Origins. It seems to me that games are taking a step forward this year, perhaps not with release
dates (LOL) but in terms of focus on details, these games are creating more and more immersion. Games are
becoming more fluid, the gameplay has more weight to it, and they are really addressing problems with original
games. (Which is really important)

While it does feel like it's the year of the sequel, I can't help but notice how far these games have come, not only in
terms of graphics, but also gameplay. Assassins Creed 2 looks to be a much smoother game, there are a lot more
combat moves, choices to be made, and less gimmicky crap. Modern Warfare 2 looks like Call of Duty 4 on
steroids, which in my opinion is a great thing. If it aint broke, you better not try and fix it.

Anyways, what do you guys think about these new games?








Quantum, a new 3rd person shooter from Tecmo, looks EXACTLY like Gears of War, check out the reveal trailer,
and tell me what you think. This game is going to bomb because it's so fucking GENERIC.

Linky: http://ps3.ign.com/dor/objects/14288075/quantum-
theory/videos/quantum_trl_e32009trailer_60409.html








Ok, while the Ps3 is still 400$, their new line up has ASTOUNDED me. God of war 2 looks fantastic, Agent is
being developed by Rockstar and is about Cold War Spies (AWESOME). Along with the other fantastic titles that
have been announced, Sony has finally given me a reason to purchase a Ps3.

Anyone else have a similar response?








I've had this idea for a few months now, and its reviewing games, by giving them a score out
of their retail price. We're in a recession, people can't buy as many games, so clearly, we
need to have some idea of where to spend our hard earned cash in terms of games.

For example, a game such as Call of Duty 4, which retailed for 60$ initially, would probably
score at 60$, because it is worth every penny thanks to the variety of fun missions in the
single player, along with the insanely good multiplayer that kept me playing for 8 months.
However, a game such as Ninja Gaiden 2, for example, would score around th 45$ mark,
because despite its fun gameplay, its bloody hard, and lasts about as long as your patience.
Gamers can prioritize their purchases, based on their tastes and their income.

The main issue is the biased nature of any review. Some people don't like Rpg's, others
hate Shooters, but most people can see that "Oh, this game would be fun if I liked the
genre, and I can tell it's really deep, or it's really long and involving." Those are some of the
qualities that can make a game really worth the money.

I'm going to refine this idea, and perhaps post a review of the indie game "Cortex Command"
using this untested (to my knowledge) method.

At least I can't rate it a 7.








Hello my fellow gamers. Being one of the "nerdcore" (as I like to call us) in highschool is pretty bloody hard, especially when you're trying to fit into a new school as a 16 year old "intellectual".

Now, it's not that I don't like being a gamer, I just don't enjoy connecting it with my life (Synonym: School). \

Take this for example:

Teacher: "Um, what are you listening to?"
Me: "Oh it's just a podcast."
Teacher: "Oh really, I listen to them too!"
Me: "Oh, right, that's er... cool."
Teacher: "What's it called, may I listen to it for a second?"
Me (as she takes the earplug and inserts it into our ear): "Uh wait a second!"
Jim Sterling: "I aplogise for misrepresenting you, you're a right fucking cunt!"
Teacher (mouth agape, eyes wide): "That is quite possibly the most crude, juvenille 5 seconds I've ever wasted me time listening to."
Me: "That's why I like it."

And you can probably guess the rest.

This conversation works perfectly as a metaphor for my situation, people don't understand why I and many others love videogames. It's not that we love sitting in a sweaty chair, crisps (chips) on our chests, whilst sucking every pixel into our corneas as we stare at a screen. The reason I like videogames, is because they let me escape the boredom of day to day life. I'm not defending my classrooms for terrorists on Mondays, or leading massive historic armies on Tuesdays, or trying to scrape a living in a post-apocalyptic nuclear wasteland on Thursdays. Videogames make life a little less real, and for me that's a good thing.

I spend most of my waking hours either worrying about schoolwork, or doing it, the rest of my time is spent doing Judo (2 hours at least 3 times a week) and playing videogames.
Sounds sad? Admittedly, it is, but to be honest, I couldn't care less.
Does it affect my social experiences? If I'm stupid enough to bring it up.
Why the hell am I writing this? Because this is a place where I can put all of the crap that I don't want to talk about with anyone else.

And that brings me to the conclusion of this post, which is game related, so you don't get to flame me.

Games and "mainstream" social lives cannot mix. That is the truth for the majority of gamers. I don't go to parties, most people don't get my jokes, and I still haven't had a girlfriend (although that's a different story all together). Of course, I could rationalize these problems with common sense, such as "I don't like alcohol" or "Americans don't understand my sense of humor". But instead, I'm going to blame videogames for influencing my actions, because to an extent, they do. If I didn't play videogames I'd probably be out drinking on Fridays with friends, instead of playing Left 4 Dead with random buggers. And if I hadn't discovered hilarious videogame podcasts such as "The Podcastle", "Podtoid", and some machinima, my sense of humor would make a lot more sense to the average person. And perhaps I'd have a job, and my driver's license, and the patience to get to know a girl before asking her out. (I'll get into that some other time.)

So when you try to balance gaming with a socially accepted life, please remember my new slogan.

G.R.O.P.E

Game Responsibly Or Pretend with Expertise.

Good luck.
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