Quantcast
Community Discussion: Blog by BrunoDeckard | Changes: Learning all kinds of new stuffDestructoid
Changes: Learning all kinds of new stuff - Destructoid

DestructoidJapanatorTomopopFlixist





About
Player Profile
Follow me:
BrunoDeckard's sites
Badges
Following  



I am brazilian. The official language around these parts is portuguese, not english. Sure, many people know other languages, but at daily life we pretty much use only portuguese. It was among the first things I learned, right there with eating by myself and walking and whatnot; I began studying english at 11, almost a decade later (I am 21 now). When I turned 6, my dad gave me an SNES, bundled with Super Mario World.

I played through it in complete ignorance of the minimal plot and the in-game details. I knew Mario, but Bowser was just a nameless evil turtle and Peach was just a nameless princess in a pink dress; I didn't know many things about video game lore back then. Next, I turned my attention to Donkey Kong Country 2. It was a lot like Super Mario World: creatures showed up and I smashed them. Donkey Kong kidnapped? Clueless about that. The games I played at this point required no knowledge except the ability to press games like Super Mario Kart, Super Street Fighter 2, Super Bomberman - not exactly rocket science.

When I was 11, I began studying english (grammar only) a I am brazilian. The official language around these parts is portuguese, not english. Sure, many people know other languages, but at daily life we pretty much use only portuguese. It was among the first things I learned, right there with eating by myself and walking and whatnot; I began studying english at 11, almost a decade later (I am 21 now). When I turned 6, my dad gave me an SNES, bundled with Super Mario World. I played through it in complete ignorance of the minimal plot and the in-game details. I knew Mario, but Bowser was just a nameless evil turtle and Peach was just a nameless princess in a pink dress; I didn't know many things about video game lore back then. Next, I turned my attention to Donkey Kong Country 2. It was a lot like Super Mario World: creatures showed up and I smashed them. Donkey Kong kidnapped? Clueless about that. The games I played at this point required no knowledge except the ability to press buttons: games like Super Mario Kart, Super Street Fighter 2, Super Bomberman - not exactly rocket science. When I was 11, I began studying english (grammar only) at a school. At the same time, I was given a PS1 and 10 games. Platformers, racing games, fighting games, and a little gem that will always be in my heart as one of the greatest games ever: Legend of Mana. http://bulk2.destructoid.com/ul/files/assets/000/027/009/header_wide/gfs_50597_1_1.jpg.jpg?1288025665 Legend of Mana taught me that videogame characters don't go running and blasting everything and doing other crazy stuff for no reason; they have backgrounds, emotions, goals, flaws; they interact with each other and belong to a larger, cohesive world. Strangely, the main character is the one we know less about; the NPCs are the ones fully fleshed out. They are many,  they are completely different both in looks and personalities, and they are the ones who get into the weird situations. The main character merely watches in silence and helps when necessary (which is all the time), rarely getting directly involved - he (or she) just sees the troubles to the end and departs when all is well. But it didn't end here. I haven't been studying english for long, there were things I still didn't understand. My desire to know everything about the quirky characters I had just met made me study english harder and harder. I studied it for two years before quitting the language school, enough time for me to talk, write and read properly (I still make some mistakes but no one is perfect). As the first game I played with a better understanding of what's going on, I didn't analyze the tales Legend of Mana offered, I just swallowed everything. It was on my second playthrough (a year later) that I began paying attention to the meaning of the events. The relationship between Matilda and Irwin is among the best love stories in any medium: if you take it too far, love can be dangerous and you may destroy yourself - Irwin and Matilda are like Romeo and Juliet, without the sugar-sugar stuff. This is just one of many examples I could have pointed out. When you become a storyteller, there are so many things you can say, right? Considering the number of games out there with solid characters and interesting events, I had boatloads of stuff to think about, relating to life, society, culture, politics, psychology, philosophy, religion, history and all that. The list of everything I learned is far too big and detailed to describe here. Videogames became an important way for me to look at the world. I never stop learning new stuff, too; right now, I'm studying japanese so I can play Catherine next year, possibly the first game that will treat sex as it should be treated: a completely normal activity that everyone has been doing since ever. http://bulk2.destructoid.com/ul/files/assets/000/027/010/header_wide/loud_sex.png.png?1288025911 What did you learn playing videogames?



Is this blog awesome? Vote it up!





Comments not appearing? Anti-virus apps like Avast or some browser extensions can cause this.
Easy fix: Add   [*].disqus.com   to your software's white list. Tada! Happy comments time again.

Did you know? You can now get daily or weekly email notifications when humans reply to your comments.


Back to Top




All content is yours to recycle through our Creative Commons License permitting non-commercial sharing requiring attribution. Our communities are obsessed with videoGames, movies, anime, and toys.

Living the dream since March 16, 2006

Advertising on destructoid is available: Please contact them to learn more