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Metal Gear Solid V launch details confirmed, Collector's Edition unveiled photo
Metal Gear Solid V launch details confirmed, Collector's Edition unveiled
by Chris Carter

After a leak involving the release date for Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, Konami has confirmed the date this morning -- September 1, 2015 (September 15 for Steam), with a few other details in tow.

Metal Gear Online is name-dropped in particular, which will go live the day of Phantom Pain's launch and is included in the base package. It will feature a "class system" and characters like Ocelot and Snake will make an apperance. Mother Base mode is also reconfirmed, with the ability to play online and raid other bases to steal items.

There will be a "Day 1 Edition" of the game and a Collector's Edition, which are priced at $59.99 on PS4 and Xbox One ($49.99 on Steam, PS3, and Xbox 360) and $99.99 respectively. The former will come with a physical map and a selection of DLC items.

The Collector's Edition will only be available for the PS4 and Xbox One, and will come with a half-scale replica of Snake's Bionic Arm, a collectible SteelBook, a behind the scenes Blu-Ray, the map, and a special box. It'll also ship with more DLC.

Catch the full version breakdown below. Thank God, all of the DLC so far seems to be cosmetic.

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Will Bethesda hurry up and announce Fallout 4? photo
Will Bethesda hurry up and announce Fallout 4?
by Nic Rowen

GDC is here, and as is the case with any big trade show or splashy industry event, I'll be on tenterhooks waiting to hear the one piece of news I care about -- When is Fallout 4 going to happen? For years I've expected the announcement “any day now” while Bethesda remains stubbornly tight lipped with every passing E3 and VGA ceremony. Still, like the child of a deadbeat father, I hold out hope that this time they'll surprise us and come through.

It's important to me because Fallout 3 taught me how to love open-world games. I thought I already did. Games like Oblivion and the GTA series were considered favorites even then. But in retrospect, I had a fondness for those games. An appreciation for them born out of respect to the jaw-dropping technical execution and the brass balls of the teams that designed them. When I actually played them, I was often a stressed out save-scummer, constantly scheming on the best way to tackle the game and maintain a perfect record. It wasn't until Fallout 3 took me, hand-in-irradiated-hand, on a guided tour of its desolate wasteland that I really learned to love.

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Review: Oreshika: Tainted Bloodlines photo
Review: Oreshika: Tainted Bloodlines
by Josh Tolentino

Like many games of its type, Oreshika: Tainted Bloodlines features a tiny graphic in its text boxes to remind players they can press a button to advance to the next line. Usually the graphic is of an X or O button pressing itself, but Oreshika's is of a little weasel pushing a button with its nose.

It's animated, and viewed from the side the little weasel can also look just like a person, sitting on their knees Japanese-style, bowing respectfully, over and over. That behavior's almost emblematic of the game's attitude, as it's so eager to let players do what they like (sometimes to their own detriment) that it almost comes off as desperate. 

But hey, they're gonna be dead soon anyway, so perhaps some deference is warranted.

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Review: Helldivers photo
Review: Helldivers
by Conrad Zimmerman

Mankind has expanded throughout the galaxy, having come together under one government, a "managed" democracy. From the Super Earth homeworld, humanity spreads its message of liberation and freedom to every planet they land upon; the liberation of their natural resources and freedom from human opposition, that is.

And if you don't like it, expect them to spread a whole lot of ordinance instead.

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ArenaNet: Guild Wars 2: Heart of Thorns 'is like Metroid and Zelda slammed together' photo
ArenaNet: Guild Wars 2: Heart of Thorns 'is like Metroid and Zelda slammed together'
by Chris Carter

Guild Wars 2 is one of the most accessible MMOs ever made. Eschewing the Holy Trinity of class builds, you can basically pick any character you want and still fulfill a role in any group. Everyone can heal, and everyone can contribute in some way.

As a result of that design however, a lot of opportunities for advanced tactics fell by the wayside, and the endgame was too simplistic to keep everyone interested. Can the upcoming Heart of Thorns expansion rectify that problem?

I had some time to talk to lead designer Colin Johanson and figure out just that.

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Guild Wars 2: Heart of Thorns seeks to redefine MMO endgame progression photo
Guild Wars 2: Heart of Thorns seeks to redefine MMO endgame progression
by Chris Carter

Guild Wars 2 is an ambitious project. While ArenaNet's initial offering of Guild Wars was more of a social dungeon crawler than an MMO (the company called it a CORPG, or competitive online role-playing game), the sequel was a bonafide massive experience.

The kicker? ArenaNet was still able to cut out the subscription fee, effectively making Guild Wars 2 buy-to-play and allowing players to return at any time.

Here we are over two years later with the Heart of Thorns expansion on the horizon, and the developer continues to find ways to innovate.

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Review: Resident Evil: Revelations 2: Episode 2 photo
Review: Resident Evil: Revelations 2: Episode 2
by Chris Carter

I didn't expect to enjoy the first episode of Resident Evil: Revelations 2 as much as I did. It was nice to see Barry and Claire back in action, and the co-op elements were implemented in a neat asynchronous manner. Not to mention the killer Raid Mode that might be the best iteration yet.

The good times keep rolling in Episode 2 with a great atmosphere, more Raid levels, and an compelling-enough narrative.

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Review: Screamride photo
Review: Screamride
by Chris Carter

When I first saw the debut trailer for Screamride, I assumed it was a simulator. Growing up with Sim Theme Park and RollerCoaster Tycoon, I relished the idea of creating and managing my own commercial park and divining new and innovative ways to thrill people.

That's not what Screamride is. Instead, it's more like a series of minigames based on three concepts -- creation, destruction, and riding. You do that over and over, with mixed results.

In the end though, Frontier Developments' formula is a therapeutic way to spend an afternoon, even with its faults.

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Samus and Sagat: When Sagat met Samus photo
Samus and Sagat: When Sagat met Samus
by Jonathan Holmes

It's highly probable that an alien race, dwelling somewhere in outer space, has developed technology the likes of which we could only dream of, but lack something we consider mundane. For example, what if a race of magical bird-people from another planet had the ability to transport organic matter through thin air without any loss of quality, but had not yet discovered how to do the same thing with abstract content like "data"? How would they feel if the learned about the Internet? Better yet, how would they feel when they learned what most people use the Internet for? What would they think of terms like "social justice warrior," "lol," and "shitposting"? This special "Flashback to 19XX" episode of Samus and Sagat intends to answer those questions and more. 

This episode also marks the third time that Maddy Myers and I have gotten together to shoot Samus and Sagat, and things already feel different. It looks like we're through the "getting to know you" phase and already way off into the "drunk off each other's company so God knows what's going to happen next" phase. That definitely makes for a different kind of show. My acting in this episode is... really something. I'm not sure exactly what that something is, but I know it's true.

I also know it's true that making a collage of Maddy's various facial expressions is a lot of fun, and I hope to have the opportunity to do that again soon. We've got that collage in a wallpaper size right here, per the request of a few of my Twitter followers, so enjoy!

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Review: Blackhole photo
Review: Blackhole
by Conrad Zimmerman

There certainly have been a lot of creative 2D platform games releasing over the last couple of months, enough that there seems to be some genuine competition in the genre. If you're finding yourself in a position where it has become difficult to choose, allow me to make it easier. 

Get Blackhole. Problem solved.

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Beards optional: Embedded difficulty decisions in Fire Emblem photo
Beards optional: Embedded difficulty decisions in Fire Emblem
by Anna Anthropy

[Destructoid likes to invite game developers to write editorials for us from time to time. Their opinions don't necessarily represent Destructoid as a whole, but they sure are interesting. Here is a fun one on how Fire Emblem handles difficulty scaling from Anna Anthropy, the developer of Frog Assassin and Dys4ia.]

I want to introduce you to my boys. This is Marcus, Old Marcus, and Seth. They're from the Fire Emblem games on the Game Boy Advance: from left to right, Fire Emblem (the first game in the series to get an international release), The Binding Blade (the game Fire Emblem is a prequel to) and The Sacred Stones.

But who are they really? Just some dudes with weird anime hair? (Except for Seth. Seth is a dreamboat.) They're actually DIFFICULTY MODES.

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Very Quick Tips: Homeworld Remastered Collection photo
Very Quick Tips: Homeworld Remastered Collection
by Jason Faulkner

Although Homeworld Remastered Collection is classified as real-time strategy, there are some elements that set it apart from its brethren. The 3D camera and movement add another whole axis to worry about that some may find disorienting, and the fairly strict strengths and weaknesses of the units may lead to defeat if a cohesive unit strategy isn’t considered.

These tips are geared primarily towards online multiplayer gameplay, but can also be applied to campaign or vs. the A.I.

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Review: Homeworld Remastered Collection photo
Review: Homeworld Remastered Collection
by Jason Faulkner

In 1999, I was 11 years old. It was a time when every video game purchase was a gamble. The best you could do was to read a review or watch a grainy, minute-long Quicktime video that you spent an hour to download on 56k while hoping your $50 wasn't spent in vain. I discovered some of my favorite games with just the blind promises of the back of a box. Starsiege: Tribes, Suikoden II, Half-Life, Giants: Citizen Kabuto and more were all stabs in the dark that paid off with hours of enthrallment in front of the glow of a CRT.

As a young sci-fi fan, all anyone had to do back then to wrestle my hard-earned money from my wallet was throw some spaceships on a box. More than likely, if my mom allowed me, I'd fall in love with the simple promise of being whisked away to the stars. Sometimes my gambles paid off, like with Star Trek: Klingon Academy and Freelancer, and sometimes I'd get a dud like Allegiance, which was a good game, but one whose servers had been shut down before I even bought it. However, none made a bigger impression on me than Sierra's Homeworld did. The top-notch writing and 3D playing field etched themselves into my memory and left me clamoring for a sequel. 

Although the story continued in Homeworld: Cataclysm in 2000 and Homeworld 2 in 2003, the series went dark and new copies weren't even available. THQ's bankruptcy in 2013 led to the franchise's rights going up for auction. After acquiring the IP with the winning $1.35 million bid, Gearbox announced it would be bringing an updated Homeworld and Homeworld 2 to a new generation in the form of the Homeworld Remastered Collection.

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Here's what's been happening in the Dtoid community photo
Here's what's been happening in the Dtoid community
by Mr Andy Dixon

You Dtoiders have been on an absolute tear lately! Not only are you kicking out awesome new community projects at breakneck speeds, but you're doing so with an enthusiasm and positivity that I haven't seen in years. Seriously, I am so f*cking proud of you all I just want to pick you up and keep squeezing you forever! (But I won't, because we all know how Of Mice and Men ends.)

Anyway, you're doing a great job, and I hope you keep it up! Here's some highlights from the last month.

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Experience Points .06: No More Heroes photo
Experience Points .06: No More Heroes
by Ben Davis

Experience Points is a series in which I highlight some of the most memorable things about a particular game. These can include anything from a specific scene or moment, a character, a weapon or item, a level or location, a part of the soundtrack, a gameplay mechanic, a line of dialogue, or anything else about the game that is particularly noteworthy and/or awesome.

This series will no doubt contain spoilers for the games being discussed, so keep that in mind if you plan on playing the game for the first time.

This entry is all about No More Heroes. Feel free to share some of your own favorite things about the game in the comments!

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Final Fantasy XIV's Gold Saucer is amazing if you like Triple Triad or Chocobo Racing photo
Final Fantasy XIV's Gold Saucer is amazing if you like Triple Triad or Chocobo Racing
by Chris Carter

The Gold Saucer is finally a part of Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, and it's glorious. That classic music returns, as do the iconic Triple Triad and Chocobo Racing activities. It's amazing how much content Square Enix has added to its newest MMO over time, more than justifying the subscription fee. It is living proof that not every MMO has to go free-to-play.

I had a chance to take the Saucer for a spin this week, and was pretty happy with what I found. So long as you buy into the two big draws, you will be too.

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