hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

things gamers do

Bloodborne map photo
Bloodborne map

This Bloodborne map sure would've helped


Curse the wretched woods
Apr 28
// Jordan Devore
First the patch for faster load times, now this fan-made map of Bloodborne -- damn, shouldn't have raced through the game like that. I'm missing out! There's always the inevitable fourth playthrough and beyond, I suppose. Thi...

The beauty and tragedy of a perfectly planned character

Apr 27 // Nic Rowen
I spent way too much time looking at screens like this. City of Heroes probably holds the dubious distinction of having the most skewed relationship in terms of “time spent planning characters VS time spent playing characters” in my life. I spent entire nights pouring over different power sets, ability combinations, and team synergies for a game that doesn't exist anymore. I devoted hours upon hours to figuring out the perfect stat progression for super villains that I knew in my heart of hearts I'd never take out of the starter area. The only crime they'd ever commit would be loitering. However, City of Heroes wasn't the only game to trigger this kind of obsessive cataloging, not by a long shot. I have a stack of character builds and ideas as thick as the Yellow Pages for Dark Souls PvP set-ups, gimmicky X-Com squads, and Darkest Dungeon dream teams. I have concept characters (complete with embarrassing back stories) sketched out for both of the modern Fallout games. All of their would-be perks, S.P.E.C.I.A.L stats, and fashionable item accessories already plotted out -- all that’s left would be to actually wander out in the wastes and find them, but who could be bothered after so much work? This goes way back, long before I had easy access to the internet where character planners and clever apps make it simple to plot these things out. Go back to the Precambrian era of high school days, dig through the fossil records of my notebooks and I'm sure you could find Diablo 2 skill trees scribbled in the margins of my English homework. The cave wall painting blueprints of a Hammerdin specced holy warrior looming above my predictable observations about MacBeth (probably, hopefully, accompanied by a cool doodle of a flying hammer crushing a zombie's skull).   When I step back and look at the sheer amount of go-nowhere ideas and try to tally up the time I've sunk into them compared to the relatively meager hours I've clocked into some of the games they're for, it dawns on me -- maybe this is kind of messed up. Maybe I've been living all wrong. Looking at it from a distance, it all seems quietly sad. I've spent more time in my head with some of these games (some of my favorite games, I might add) than I have playing them. There's a small critical voice in the back of my mind that is furious with me for squandering those hours, for not doing something more productive with the time -- both in the sense of actually playing the fucking games, and in the broader and more judgmental “what are you doing with your life?!” sense.  I have perfectly good reasons (or maybe I should call them “justifications”) for all the obsessive plotting and scheming. For one thing, there are just too many cool ideas out there and not enough time to see them through. For as much as I beat myself up for the papery death of my stillborn characters, I never really would have had the time to convert those dreams into reality even if I had the work ethic of John Henry. How long does a full play through of Diablo 2 take anyway? How many trips through Hell do you need to make to grind through the necessary experience points? If you're after a certain item set (and you know you are because you're the kind of crazy person who didn't stop reading three paragraphs ago) you'd probably need to go online to trade and wheedle your way into a full set to see it done. It's a hell of a lot more of a time investment than goofing off in English class, that's for sure. Sketching out those ideas for gimmicky Paladins and upstart Mages let me stave off the temptation to roll another character while I took my (unfortunately less imaginative) Barbarian to kick the shit out of the Prince of Lies. In a weird (insincere) way, I could even argue it helped me save time. Besides, an immaculately planned character can be satisfying in its own right. It's always good to get your intellectual hands dirty, to put your fingers into the putty of an idea, to roll it around and shape it. As far as pastimes go, you could do worse. Let's not forget all the situations where actually playing a game would be impractical. You can goof off a little at the office and play around with the Borderlands skill editor without causing much of a scene. But try and boot up your lv 30 Gunzerker at your desk just once and you'll never hear the end of it. Human Resources takes a dim view on bringing akimbo guns blazing justice to the wasteland during company hours, apparently.  Still, I look at the swollen and poorly organized folder where I dump all of my character ideas, filthy with PDF character sheets, webpage saves from online builders, .txt documents imported from PC to PC for games I'm not even sure I own anymore, and I wonder if I have a problem. I can justify all the characters I cooked up sitting in class or during lunch breaks? I know I spent just as many perfectly fine nights sitting in front of the same machine that actually displays and runs the games I was thinking about, tapping away at some poorly conceived concept character while utterly ignoring the game itself. At the same time though, I love those characters, I love those ideas. Yeah, most of them never made it out of the gate, but those characters had character. If videogames are mostly an exercise in mental stimulation, of burning off stressed out braincells and decompressing after a long shitty day, does it really matter if the satisfaction you get from them is through play or by tinkering with the ideas they present? If I could swap those hours around, gut about a quarter of that folder and take the time spent on the fantasizing about those ideas to actually playing out a few of them, would I be more satisfied? Or would it shake out to be about the same? I honestly have no idea. What I do know is that while writing this article, I did have an idea for another Dark Souls 2 character, and it's been all I could do to keep myself from drifting over to a wiki to start putting him together. There may be no hope for me.
Character building photo
I'm the man with the plan (and little else)
I've probably spent more time creating characters, builds, and dreaming up party compositions in my head than I have actually playing games. It seems odd to think of it in that way, but if I could somehow tally it all up I be...

Bloodborne photo
Bloodborne

Bloodborne completed with Rock Band controller


Sweet music of death
Apr 20
// Glowbear
Have you defeated Bloodborne yet and patted yourself on the back? Well stop everything you're doing and reflect upon your life, because long time Souls fan bearzly went ahead and beat the grueling crimson plasma loving ...

A Guide To Recognizing Your Gamers

Apr 20 // David Houghton
#1 – The Back-Seat Gamer  Behavior “No! Leave that! Go that way! Kill that guy! Circle strafe, circle strafe! Jumpjumpjumpjumpjump! Chainsaw, chainsaw! Rocket launcher on the guy at the back! NOOOOOOOO! Told you you shouldn’t have done that. My go.” Think you’re a good gamer? Forget those aspirations my friend. You are not as good as this guy. He is at one with the games, symbiotically tuned with them in body and mind. He sees all, he knows all, and he will pre-empt any AI script created. Every map of every level of every game is seared into the very matter of his brain, and he can walk any section by simply closing his eyes and recalling his surroundings down to the pixel. There are no surprises. There are no challenges. He laughs at player’s guides and devours opponents by the crunching meaty handful. He is, quite simply, unstoppable. In his mind that is … You see unless he’s actually playing, this guy knows everything. In theory he can destroy any game, rendering it to a small quivering puddle of blackening disc plastic by his sheer presence. In theory he’s the guy you want, no, need on your side. In theory, he skips straight to the most punishing difficulty level on a new game and burns through it in no time with his legendary gaming insight and lightning-fast precision skills. In theory … In practice however, the only recorded noise in human history louder than his militant bestowing of “advice” and proclamations of his gaming qualifications is the sound of the servers emptying whenever he enters a lobby. You see, the simple fact is, he’s not actually that good … Oh of course, he can talk a good game. Some of his aspirations of game knowledge are probably even plausible. He’ll have played enough to learn level layouts, know where the power ups and weapons are hidden, and understand exactly where you’re supposed to hit the boss. That doesn’t however, mean that he can actually do it. Thus, he will make up for his shortcomings (again, in his mind) by making sure that you know he could do it. Oh sweet Ghandi on a hover-board, he’ll make sure you know. Every move you make, you can bet he’ll be watching you like a video gaming overlord Sting, correcting you every time you move a pixel off the exact course he would have used. Change weapons or power up a second after he recommends it and you’re playing the game wrong and will fail. Achieve the miracle of success without following his instructions however, and well, you can do it that way, but you’re supposed to. This is the reason people online know him and fear him. There’s no avoiding it if you have the miserable, Dickensian street-orphan’s luck to end up in a game with him. Whether co-op or versus, he’ll be the same. Whether commanding the team or merely controlling an underling, it doesn’t matter. He’ll let you know where you’re going wrong (and you will be going wrong, don’t doubt that for a second) for every step of the miserable, grinding, teeth-gritting, face-bursting, hernia-inducing, mind-raping, sanity-haemorrhaging way. And that’s nothing compared to the supernova of aural abuse you’ll suffer if his team loses. Which it probably will, as by that point his comrades will have thrown the match just for the spectacularly horrific comedy of seeing him go into meltdown. Games PlayedAnything. It doesn’t matter. He’s better than you at all of them. How To Deal With Them If you’re playing anything, from Solitaire to Gears Of War, it’s best to be out of visual and sonic range of a back-seat gamer. Preferably in another room. Or another house. Country even. Actually screw it, if at all possible, you should endeavour to be in a totally different area of the space-time continuum to any back-seat gamer. It seriously is worth travelling in time to avoid these people. And never play them at co-op anything, least of all FPS, as that way lies only Lovecraftian madness and despair. You’ll make it through three minutes of play at most before you end up shooting them. With an actual gun. You’ll go and buy a really big one specially, trust me. #2 - The Closet Gamer  BehaviorA tragically repressed game lover, the closet gamer has not come to terms with the modern, accepting gaming climate. It’s probably not their fault. Maybe they weren’t lucky enough to grow up with a supportive gaming crew around them. Maybe they were forced to spend their younger developmental years trying to fit in with an unsympathetic crowd, and had to hide their true urges by mocking the school geeks at lunch time. Or perhaps they had over-protective parents who fell victim to the tabloid hysteria of the early ‘90’s, and were beaten senseless with warnings of social ostracising and the deadly gaming-transmitted diseases of psychosis and epilepsy. Whatever the reason, the closet gamer is a troubled self-hater, constantly struggling with his or her inner desires to break out into open gaming, for fear of the recrimination of a cold, cold society that just doesn’t understand. I have a friend like this. His is a sad story, but it needs to be told, if only for the hope that it will help others in his situation. He’s been game-curious for years, having the occasional quiet dabble in casual games when they were presented to him, but never allowing himself to be seen actively seeking them out. He’s always loved a bit of Tetris or a quick blast of Street Fighter II, but he’s never owned a console. However a couple of years ago while he was at university, his guard slipped and his true nature started to show itself for the first time. Living in a house with an N64-owning friend, Mario Kart 64 became his gateway game and things began to change for him. Of course at the time, he passed it off as a mere temporary phase, a bit of harmless experimentation with an accessible party game. He was just trying it out to see what it was like, and of course, it didn’t mean he was a gamer. Over the course of the year however, the inner depths of the game began to take hold, and something inside him began to stir. His hardcore side slowly but steadily awakened, and after a prolonged diet of daily binges he was talking about power slide physics and correct item usage like a pro. Though he still wouldn’t admit to anything.It all came to a head last Summer. His parents were away and he had the familial home to himself, so he invited me round for the evening. However what he proposed shocked me. “Come around, bring the SNES, and we’ll get drunk and stay up all night completing Mario World”This was unprecedented behaviour for him. Maybe it was the opportunity of being safely alone in his own house, away from the prying judgemental eyes of his university friends, and maybe the planned heavy drinking was his way of building up the courage to go through with it. Whatever the reason, it was clear that this could well be the night of his outing, and if it was going to happen, he’d need a sympathetic guide to help him through the process. Obviously, I deigned to be the friend he needed. Everything went brilliantly. After a couple of beers, his inhibitions dropped quickly, and in no time at all we were ploughing through the first island. By 3AM we were well into the Vanilla Dome with all secrets unlocked, and a whole new world was opening up for him. His future life looked to be one of well-adjusted self-acceptance and healthy, peaceful happiness. The next morning however, it was a different story. With sobriety and the cold light of day came his previous guilt and repression, worse tenfold now following our nocturnal activities. I don’t mind telling you it was an awkward morning. He couldn’t even look me in the eye for the first few hours, and even later in the day conversation was stilted at best. Still clearly trying to come to terms with the events of the previous night, he’d fallen back on his safe-zone of denial rather than embracing who he is, and my disappointment for him was crushing. Things are getting better now, and we are talking again, but it just isn’t the same. I still have hope for his future happiness though. I’m currently using the casual fun of the Wii and DS to get him back on the horse, and the news that his new housemate is buying a 360 has warmed my heart. A bit of experimental co-op over Live, taken at whatever pace he’s comfortable with, and hopefully we’ll start seeing some progress. Games PlayedAnything casual and quick, and easy to hide if interrupted. The odd bit of Tetris or Minesweeper at work is okay “just to unwind”, and retro games give them the excuse that they’re “just laughing at the graphics”. The advent of the DS is a major help for these people, given how quickly it can be closed and pocketed in standby mode should prying eyes arrive. How To Deal With ThemDon’t push them. Try to subtly bring them into more overt gaming over time, but do it with games and a pace that they feel okay with. Too much too fast and they’ll retreat into their shell faster than an agoraphobic snail at a rave. And never use leet-speak around them. Simply being in the presence of someone who uses the word “owned” will sent them spiralling down into more counselling sessions than anyone can afford. They’re not going to be ready for that kind of heavy exposure to the hidden world they crave for a good long time, so don’t rush them. -- Next week: Chavs!  (view all chapters)
Recognizing Gamers photo
Told you you shouldn't have done that. My go
[Originally published in 2007, one of my favorites from Destructoid's Golden Archives! -Niero] It used to be a lot easier to stereotype a gamer. It used to be that all that was needed was some greasy hair, thick glasses, and ...

Botched Pokemon tattoo becomes newest beloved internet meme

Apr 17 // Steven Hansen
[Vaughn Pinpin, 2012] But that out-there "blackface Charmander" design wasn't the result of a handful of pills and a Smirnoff Ice. It was a crudely drawn recreation of work done in artist Vaughn Pinpin's Tim Burton x PKMN Project collection, in which Pinpin drew Charmander, all its evolutions, and about 70 other pocket monsters in this style. We covered them almost three years ago. They're all on Pinpin's Tumblr. And while reddit was busy making fanart of this assumed addled original creation as fast as it designs amiibo mock ups, credit to the original artist fell by the wayside. Even the reddit top comment, "Looks like a Tim Burton Pokémon," links to an Imgur upload of the original Charmander drawing that points to the URL of a site that seems to aggregate and talk about art. The reply to that reply, the "full list" is a low quality, not-full collage featuring 25 of Pinpin's drawings. Finally, the third nested reply, after being edited, includes a link to Pinpin's Tumblr. One website actually posted Pinpin's original work under the impression that it was fan art of the tattoo, which is a bit like saying The Beatles sounds like Oasis. Lack of credit on an internet where it can feel as if things just materialize is a big issue today for people who create things. Artwork is passed around (sometimes watermarks maliciously removed, or added by outside parties), jokes are stolen, and people expect (and get) an endless influx of free stimuli. In this case, it went beyond fans giggling over a meme, as some folks started making and selling products -- necklackes, t-shirts -- with the tattoo's likeness. Pinpin responded to the situation on Twitter: "I'm cool with you guys getting tats of my dang Burton PKMNs, but try not to profit over it please. That's not entrepreneurship, that's theft." That was about as close to positive as Pinpin got about the situation, saying, "This just in: dumb kids did a dumb thing and everyone's laughing about it in the cesspool that is reddit. This is news!" before following up with, "I think I feel better about the whole situation now. But I don't think I can laugh with reddit. It's sort of like laughing with the school bully when the joke was punching me in the face." We all carry varying degrees of guilt for this sort of thing. I take shiba pictures and animal gifs for a public good. I tweeted out a still from A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night last week without naming the film, director, actor, or cinematographer. While you enjoy the fun times with friends you have on the net, it's good to remember that some of the things you enjoy -- web comics that end up as images in comment threads, photo galleries that get linked to on Facebook -- come from people who worked hard to make them. Sometimes someone just took a picture of their dog at the right time. Still, crediting the source is always a good move.
Charmander tattoo photo
'My friend was drunk and on Xanax when he decided to tattoo a black face Charmander'
If there's one thing my grandfather fought for in World War II, it was the right to monetize memes. Of course, he was in the Italian army, the side that rightfully lost the war, because all your grandfathers were fighting aga...

Speedrun photo
Speedrun

Pillars of Eternity, beaten in less than 40 minutes


Speedrun
Apr 15
// Steven Hansen
Conrad lost a lot of his life to Pillars of Eternity when he reviewed it. Clearly the poor sap was playing it wrong because Jiseed beat the damn thing in less time than it takes to watch the newest watercooler TV episode. Sk...
Super Mario 64 photo
Super Mario 64

Stretching Mario's face will never get old


We're all guilty
Apr 10
// Jordan Devore
Now that it's downloadable for Wii U, Super Mario 64 has entered my life again. It wasn't my favorite Nintendo 64 title -- heck, it wasn't even my favorite 3D platformer on the console -- but it was a formative game and, com...
Game of Hyrule photo
Game of Hyrule

Watch Hyrule spring from the ground ŕ la the Game of Thrones intro


A Link to Game of Thrones
Apr 07
// Brett Makedonski
Millions of fans know the overworld of Game of Thrones due to the map depicted in the intro of each episode. However, to many, this video's overworld will be instantly recognizable upon first viewing because of decades ...
Gross Sonic statue photo
Gross Sonic statue

Make an unholy shrine to Sonic out of bones


Preferably chicken bones, but whatever works
Apr 06
// Jordan Devore
In this episode of Craft Lab, hosts Anna Akana and Greg Aronowitz craft a Sonic the Hedgehog statue partially out of chicken bones. It's cut down the middle to show his insides. Eww. If I went into someone's home and saw one of these on display, I wouldn't expect to leave alive. Would've been less creepy if they had kept Sonic's legs nice and lanky.
BioShock photo
BioShock

BioShock's opening moments recreated in CryEngine 3


It doesn't go beyond the sea
Apr 06
// Jordan Devore
I was all ready to freak out when I saw this homage to BioShock's opening sequence created in CryEngine 3. I figured, perhaps naively, that it would go beyond the lighthouse and deep into the ocean, all the way down to Raptu...
Insane Bloodborne run photo
Insane Bloodborne run

Guy 'gits gud,' beats Bloodborne without leveling


No guns, either
Apr 03
// Jordan Devore
YouTube user BOYvsVIDEOGAME decided to beat Bloodborne without leveling up or using a gun, and he's done it. Somehow -- with a lot of patience and practice, I'd imagine -- he's done it. He went with the Waste of Skin origin f...
Super Mario 64 HD photo
Super Mario 64 HD

A fan's HD recreation of Mario 64 was great until Nintendo took it down


Bob-omb Battlefield's never looked better
Mar 31
// Brett Makedonski
Unity developer Erik Roystan Ross took one of the most iconic and beloved levels in videogames and gave it a makeover. Ross recreated Bob-omb Battlefield, the first stage in 1996's Super Mario 64, in HD from scratch. Ev...
Metal Gear lore photo
Metal Gear lore

Brush up on all of Metal Gear's history before MGSV: The Phantom Pain comes out


It's what Kojima would've wanted
Mar 27
// Brett Makedonski
Whether you're a complete newcomer to Metal Gear or a seasoned vet just shooting to glaze over a few things that you probably already know, it's not a bad idea to take a look at this top-secret document. Okay, it doesn't...
TIEght photo
TIEght

Wow! TIE Fighter makes for a good Star Wars anime


TIEght
Mar 24
// Steven Hansen
Paul Johnson spent "[four] years' worth of weekends" drawing and animating this '80s anime-inspired Star Wars TIE Fighter short film focusing on the Imperial pilots. It's like a cleaned up, rock and roll backed Legend of the Galactic Heroes.
Zelda shield photo
Zelda shield

Man at Arms crafts Legend of Zelda shield


Wow, this thing HYRULES, GET IT?
Mar 23
// Steven Hansen
Another Man at Arms, then? Though it seems the series spun off since I've last seen it (last year) with a new team of blacksmiths. Still, this one goes well with the recent trend of cool craftspeople making cool Legend of Ze...
Dark Souls drums photo
Dark Souls drums

Guy beats Dark Souls with DK Bongos


You're a shining star
Mar 23
// Jordan Devore
That was a scary couple of minutes there while I dug through storage to confirm that, yes, my DK Bongos and copy of Donkey Konga have not vanished in recent years. My drum-whacking abilities have since dried up, though. Big ...
Dark Souls photo
Dark Souls

Prepare to scroll: This Dark Souls illustration captures the complexity of Lordran


It just keeps going
Mar 20
// Jordan Devore
Uncovering the mysterious, unforgiving, crazy-but-believably-crafted world of Lordran is one of the greatest pleasures experienced in not only Dark Souls, but in the last decade of videogames. I'm still wrapping my head aroun...
ASMR photo
ASMR

Tingling your joypads: ASMR and videogames


A brief introduction on how gamers can relax
Mar 17
// Glowbear
There’s a trend sweeping over YouTube at the moment, one that went unnoticed by me up until a few months ago. It's called ASMR (or if you want to kill time and sound fancy, autonomous sensory meridian response). I don&r...
Stop-motion Link photo
Stop-motion Link

That time Link savagely killed a monster for Vine


More stop-motion Legend of Zelda fun
Mar 12
// Jordan Devore
Holmes passed along this "stop-motion animation Zelda thing" by Johnny McHone earlier today and I put off watching it for far too long. Don't make the same mistake! The video borders on amateurish at times, but that ends up ...
Hungry Hungry Crossfire photo
Hungry Hungry Crossfire

The best thing I saw at PAX was not on the show floor


A true blend of genres
Mar 11
// Patrick Hancock
Let me set the scene: Day 1 of PAX has come to a close, or at least the show floor has. My friends and I have just finished dinner and are on our way back into the convention center to check out the Super Smash Bros. tou...
Five Nights at Freddy's photo
Five Nights at Freddy's

Animatronic Freddy Fazbear is creepy as all hell


Nope, not sleeping any time soon
Mar 09
// Laura Kate Dale
Love them or hate them, the Five Nights at Freddy's games have been incredibly popular. Big surprise, people find slightly uncanny animatronic animals universally creepy. Now, thanks to Youtube user Dr. CreepyPasta, we get t...
Mario x SotC photo
Mario x SotC

Mario meets Shadow of the Colossus again


And a bonus GameCube family piece
Mar 06
// Jordan Devore
Hooray! Illustrator Jason Lupas has come out with more Mario and Shadow of the Colossus mashups following the pieces we covered last month. I'd love to see a game follow this concept. There's a finished version of the prior Donkey Kong sketch, an underwater scene (shown above), and a cool four-legged reimagining of the Chain Chomp. Good stuff, Jason. Jason Lupas [Tumblr]
Videogame music photo
Videogame music

New Dj CUTMAN album of remixed videogame music out now


33 excellent songs for your earholes
Mar 01
// Ben Davis
Web musician Dj CUTMAN has created a ton of awesome remixes of videogame music over the years. Today, he released his newest album, Volume III, compiling selected works from 2012-2015. There's a lot of great stuff in here, re...
Sonic X-Treme photo
Sonic X-Treme

Fans cobble together playable demo for abandoned Sonic X-Treme


Canceled for being too extreme
Feb 26
// Steven Hansen
The titled epitome of '90s raditude done in by hubris, Sonic X-Treme, was meant to be the first full 3D Sonic -- a Mario 64 colleague -- and the first of SEGA's star series for its Saturn system. Like so many subsequent 3D S...
Offbeat photo
Offbeat

Chainsaw-carved Majora's Mask is authentic as it gets


Got wood?
Feb 26
// Steven Hansen
Now that's a one of a kind collector's item. Forget the gaudy gold New 3DS XL. Artist Griffon Ramsey works with the most delicate brush of all, the chained saw, and with it she sculpted this beautiful Majora's Mask out of a ...
Custom amiibo photo
Custom amiibo

If I didn't know better, I'd think these custom amiibo were Nintendo authentic


There's some talent in this community
Feb 25
// Brett Makedonski
I think it's fair to say that amiibo are quite a tour de force in certain communities. In fact, some might even point a finger at this very website and accuse us of being mildly caught up in the craze. But, a talented few are...
Pokémon speedrun photo
Pokémon speedrun

This guy caught 'em all in Pokémon Red and Blue quicker than you'll ever hope to


This is definitely an impressive speedrun
Feb 14
// Jason Faulkner
Back in Pokémon's heyday, it was difficult enough to catch 'em all with legitimate friends, additional cartridges, and link cables, let alone do it in record time. One talented 21-year-old speedrunner from Ohio who go...
Pokeplate photo
Pokeplate

This Pokémon plate belongs in a museum (and is now in one)


Willow pixel
Feb 09
// Steven Hansen
Very dang good artist (and current Firewatch art director) Olly Moss, whose work we routinely enjoy, made these pixel art Willow plates a while back. These classically-inspired works are now on display at the Victoria and Alb...

Jacob 'Humble' Browe talks Minelands: Call of the Border

Feb 07 // Brittany Vincent
Minelands: Call of the Border, from Triple-A Developer Entertainment, is Browe's baby, the product that's single-handedly responsible for his rise to prominence. It's received dozens of perfect 10/10, 5/5, 3/3, 2/2, and 1/1 scores from outlets just like this one, and none of us have even gotten to play the game yet. It's a thrill ride to be sure, but the game isn't the only reason he's becoming a household name. After putting out a series of daily developer diaries, a photo documentary series with stills from each minute of his day (including videos from each of his Starbucks jaunts), Browe has gained a following with fans as well. His Twitter features up-to-the-minute news and opinions sponsored by now-defunct "energy" soda Vault, where he speaks only in lowercase, using bizarre syntax and phrases like "v cool" and "p sure." When it comes to the industry he grew up shunning to ensure he could still impress vapid women in high school, no detail can go overlooked. Browe was the picture of patience and humility during our chat in the Gaylord Hotel suite he so lavishly recommended that I reserve with my credit card. I had requested my own room, but he was gracious enough to suggest we share the executive suite because, as he put it, "There's way too much space in here for one lonely guy." He spent much of the interview posted up at the minibar alternating between downing shots like a fish desperately seeking the glistening life force of water and checking his iPhone 6 Plus, making moves on his fantasy football team roster. It's like I wasn't even there, which actually allowed me to capture an even more intimate portrait of one of gaming's rising stars. When he did talk though, I definitely felt a sort of camaraderie I hadn't felt in some time from other devs. Chatting in the dimly-lit suite's makeshift "living room" area felt a lot like, well, home. Over a steaming cup of hotel brand coffee, Browe opened up about Minelands: Call of the Border, and why he thinks it has struck a chord with reviewers, who were privy to fifty 30-second trailers over the course of a three-month period before release. "Obviously everyone's excited because my game is taking creative risks like no other company out there. Minelands is doing something completely and totally new," Browe gushed, with a twinkle in his eye that could have been all the booze he had taken in before and during our talk. "For the first time in history, players can use two weapons at once. So if you're trying to kill an enemy and make sure he's dead, you could use your shotgun and your AK at the same time to dual-wield. You can even reload independently. And you don't even have to hold two weapons at a time if you don't want to. It's not required at all. " Technically, Browe reminded me earlier on when we met, Minelands is a first-person shooter, but its host of envelope-pushing features ensure that it defies classification. For instance, you'll be able to save your progress anywhere in the game. Rather than waiting for checkpoints, you can go to the menu at any time -- whether on PC, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, or N-Gage -- and save. Female characters, I was told, would play a major role as well.  "Commander Hua Wei is a fellow operative from China, and as you play through the game as Captain Guardevoi she's by your side every step of the way. She'll give you waypoints from her command center, and appear before you as a hologram of sorts for in-game interactions. This is the first time there's ever been a female commander in a shooter, let alone one that gives you orders as you go along. Of course, there's still plenty of time for romance in the game. Hua Wei may be your colleague as you trek across the Minelands to defeat the nefarious Hangdog Mack at the Border, but there's no battlefield too big to let love in." Though he didn't share much else regarding the title that's launched him into the gaming celebrity stratosphere, Browe did invite me out for dinner next week, where he's ordered that I come dressed in heels and a revealing dress so that we can talk about his creative process. But what about how the players feel about the actual game? I'm dying to know myself. Minelands has been released to the public already, but technically won't be going on sale for another couple of days, and then only at retailers like GameStop and Bed Bath and Beyond. Some members of approved media outlets who've seen the multitude of trailers are keeping mum about the game thus far other than the quotes okayed for the promotional materials: "Fantastic!" proclaims a prominent games magazine. "Brilliantly!" exclaimed a digital publication. Browe had quotes on hand, but he wasn't so forthcoming about sharing them with me, keeping silent so as not to give anyone a taste of what's already being called Game of the Year material. I did see something along the lines of "Brilliantly terrible," but I'm almost certain the "terrible" was a typo and it was something like 'Brilliantly, terribly genius" from Video Diversion Educator Magazine. But they wouldn't get the last word on things. That pleasure belonged to Browe as he gave me his parting words to pass on.  "Please subscribe to my Patreon and support independent video game development. Buy me a vanilla bean frappuccino if you end up liking Minelands: Call of the Border. I also accept major credit cards. It's all for the fans, and I'm planning on making something even bigger soon involving player choice. Two words: Branching dialogue options." Browe had wiggled his eyebrows seductively toward me after divulging this information, and even as I pen this piece now I'm astounded. Truly, Jacob "Humble" Browe is a visionary.
Minelands photo
A rising star speaks
Jacob "Humble" Browe is a visionary. He's just shipped a multi-billion dollar game to hundreds of retailers across the United States and Canada, with additional release dates staggered across the world. After running a succ...

New Guinness Game Editio photo
New Guinness Game Editio

Guinness' Gamer's Edition 2015 lets you know how to make mom finally love you


Play Minecraft for 25 hours to make those years up
Feb 06
// Jason Faulkner
Wanna know what you have to do to be the best? The new Guinness World Records 2015 Gamer's Edition hosts a diverse listing of various gaming records. Wanna have the largest Tomb Raider memorabilia collection in...

  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter?
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -