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Assassin's Creed cumulative franchise sales cross 73 million


Ubisoft employs over 9,000 people worldwide
Apr 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Videogame detective superannuation recently saw that Ubisoft updated their worldwide cumulative franchise sales figures over on the corporate site. Top seller? The Assassin's Creed series with 73 million. Second place goes to...
Splinter Cell photo
Splinter Cell

The Bourne Identity director in final talks for Splinter Cell movie


Not a bad choice
Mar 20
// Jordan Devore
The Bourne Identity, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, and Jumper director Doug Liman is in final negotiations to direct Ubisoft and New Regency's Splinter Cell film, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The adaptation is expected to rel...
Ubisoft photo
Ubisoft

Rayman Legends, Splinter Cell didn't hit sales targets


The bad news keeps on coming
Oct 16
// Jordan Devore
I wanted Rayman Legends to sell well. Most of us did, hopefully. It's an already terrific game that looks even better when put up against some of the other stuff Ubisoft releases. During an earnings call, Ubisoft CFO Alain Ma...

Review: Splinter Cell: Blacklist

Aug 20 // Jim Sterling
Splinter Cell: Blacklist (PC, PS3 [reviewed, campaign], Xbox 360 [reviewed, online])Developer: Ubisoft Toronto, Ubisoft Shanghai (Wii U version)Publisher: UbisoftReleased: August 20, 2013 (NA) August 23, 2013 (EU)MSRP: $59.99 In a somewhat canned and pedestrian narrative, Blacklist's plot revolves around a terrorist organization planning to attack the United States of America. Sam Fisher is back -- no longer voiced by Michael Ironside -- to deal with a shadowy organization known as The Engineers. He's joined by the team at 4th Echelon, including a new sidekick in Briggs, whose sole job is apparently to make things feel as much like Call of Duty as possible.  Fisher's adventure will take him across the globe from Libya, to Iran, to Britain and the United States, but for all its globetrotting subterfuge, Blacklist's world feels small and isolated. As well as telling a rather mundane and predictable story culled from a thousand spy thriller movies, the plot is rather uneventful and seems unable to decide what it wants to say. That, and the ending comes off as total gibberish.  From the 4th Echelon's Paladin spy plane of mystery, Fisher can suit up, chat with supporting characters, and undertake missions. Story stages, co-op and challenge maps, as well as the competitive multiplayer are all selected from one digital map of the world -- known as the SMI -- and handily labeled for your convenience. With money earned and passive challenges beatable across every mode of play, there's a commendable attempt at blending all of Blacklist's gameplay offerings together into one cohesive unit. The use of one map littered with icons is a bit overly busy, but the sense of unity generally works out well.  [embed]260371:50134:0[/embed] With the ability to replay any mission and a selection of elimination, wave-based, and stealth-only challenges to choose from, heavy emphasis is placed on earning cash and powering up your perfect vision of Sam Fisher. There is a variety of outfit pieces to choose from, as well as new goggles, a respectable pool of weaponry, and wonderful gadgets including the nonlethal bow with interchangeable arrows, the remote-controlled Tri-Rotor drone, and the classic Sticky Camera.  The sense of personalization is carried over into the gameplay, with players graded on getting through levels using Ghost, Panther, or Assault tactics. Points for Ghost activity are earned by totally sneaking through a level without disturbing enemies -- the toughest prospect, with the highest reward. The Panther style is closer in spirit to Conviction, with Fisher actively stalking enemies to distract, outflank, and ultimately take out of the equation. Assault play should be pretty self-explanatory, taking opponents head-on with assault rifles, grenades, and melee kills. Ubisoft's done a laudable job of making Blacklist accessible without undermining what makes Splinter Cell enjoyable, and while Assault may seem like an attempt to make the game easier, it's actually a lot simpler to use Panther tactics, while Ghosting a section is ultimately the most satisfying route -- if it's pulled off well! While the flexibility is at least appreciated, the game does sometimes try and bottleneck players in a somewhat cloying contrivance of variety. As well as areas where sneaking by totally undetected is mandatory, there are also some overhead missile strike sections and even a first-person shooting stage, with any solo missions involving Briggs designed to look and sound like those military shooters the kids love so damn much.  In its attempt to bring more of Conviction into the Splinter Cell basics, Blacklist preserves the "Mark and Execute" ability, where you can use an Execute gauge to select and automatically take out targets in range. The "Last Known Position" feature also returns, with a ghostly outline showing players where enemies think Sam Fisher is. Interrogations are back, but are not as interactive as last time, with the "Spare or Kill" choices punctuating enemy encounters coming off as fairly meaningless and cynical.  These features were designed for a different kind of stealth game, and don't always work so well in Blacklist. Levels don't feel designed with Mark & Execute or Last Known Position in mind, and they don't feel as useful as they did last time. Sometimes the predatory stealth fails, with enemies randomly spotting Sam as he lies in wait for an ambush, and A.I. in general fairly finicky on whether it can see players or not. Ultimately, the Conviction elements seem thrown in for their own sake, and offer no real value to the game.  This may be good news for fans of Chaos Theory, however, as Blacklist does boast some great level design, plenty of gadgets to play with, and the welcome return of night vision, which can be upgraded to full-on Predator-Robocop vision. Setting up traps, luring guards with noisemakers, and using pipes, ducts, and ledges to worm one's way around the environment make for some undeniable fun, though it can be jarring for stealthy players to suddenly find themselves in the cover-based shootouts and other action sequences sometimes tossed into the mix without warning.  One other issue with the game is how easy it is to earn cash. While there's a lot to spend the money on, it's given out so readily that you'll have upgraded the Paladin and gotten access to your favorite inventory items after a handful of missions. I obtained the exact loadout I wanted with hours left on the clock, and felt no further incentive beyond that. Too much cash, and not enough to spend it on, somewhat tarnishes what is otherwise a fun idea.  To be quite fair, the story-based campaign missions aren't all that enjoyable, suffering from a plodding pace and writing that's simply too cliched to be interesting. The situations Sam finds himself in are all fairly played out in the stealth genre already, and do very little to make themselves more exciting. The challenge maps are far more interesting, and surprisingly, it's the co-op (either local or online) that manages to make the experience more engaging. Playing through missions with a partner adds a sense of dynamism to the gameplay that the sterile and predictable solo mode sorely needs, and while it can often be more difficult to sneak through the environment as a two-person unit, it's altogether far more rewarding to pull off.  Online multiplayer is also a highlight, and while it may sadden Fisher fans to hear that, it must be said that Spies vs. Mercs is notably superior to the campaign. Once again, teams of players take turns as stealthy spies and action-oriented mercenaries, with the former attempting to hide from the latter and complete objectives without being found and blasted. The "Classic" mode is everything you could want -- two quick-witted spies pitting their non-lethal gadgets against slower, first-person shooting, lethal mercs. A new "Blacklist" mode further evolves the idea, however, with custom loadouts and four-on-four matches with a variety of game types. Using the money earned in all areas of the game, players can buy all manner of gadgets and weapons for their Spy and Merc, just like do with Fisher. Many of the tools are designed to counter the opposing team, such a mask for the Spy that can Counter the Merc's gas grenade, or a disruption field that Mercs can employ to jam Spy gadgets.  Spies vs. Mercs is where the real heart of Blacklist lies. It's more action-oriented and quicker paced than previous iterations, while the ability to customize means players can find their own unique style within the two fundamental classes. Sometimes the balance can be a bit off -- Spies in particular get big advantages over Mercs with the right tools -- but the overwhelming sense of paranoia involved makes the larger scale multiplayer more amusing than ever.  It's a shame, then, that Blacklist's visuals are pretty unimpressive, bordering on ugly. Cutscenes feature screen tearing while environments are marred by muddy textures. Animations are twitchy and most of the effects, be they lighting, explosions, or fire, are all fairly outdated. Loading times are also egregiously lengthy, making the poor visual quality all the more confusing. Sound design is fairly bland too, with droning music and voice acting that lacks any sort of verve -- especially the new and unremarkable Fisher. That said, whoever voices the main villain does a bang-up job! As with so many recent Ubisoft releases, how much you enjoy Splinter Cell: Blacklist depends on how willing you are to enjoy every feature it crams into the overall package. The campaign itself is fairly middling, and can be blazed through in the usual eight-to-ten hour timeframe, but if you talk to your supporting characters and access the ton of extra mission content, you can double the bang for your buck. With Spies vs. Mercs getting so much attention, you'll want to indulge in some multiplayer too if you really want to get the most out of what's on offer.  The good news is, if you're up for some cooperative stealth and mercenary antics, Splinter Cell: Blacklist is right up your alley. If all you desire is more Sam Fisher action, however, you may come away feeling a little shortchanged. 
Splinter Cell: Blacklist photo
Good, but lacks Conviction
Splinter Cell: Conviction was, in my opinion, a superb new direction for the Splinter Cell series, but a fair few fans were unhappy with the changes Ubisoft made. It's hardly surprising then, that Splinter Cell: Blacklist pul...


New releases photo
New releases

New releases: Purple is back in style


Plus, The Bureau, Splinter Cell, Disney Infinity, and more
Aug 19
// Fraser Brown
Bloody hell, this week, calm down. A slew of games are clamouring for your attention over the next seven days, some of them really rather good. At the top of the pile, however, is Saints Row IV. I didn't think the series wou...
Splinter Cell Blacklist  photo
Splinter Cell Blacklist

A refresher on all of Splinter Cell: Blacklist's assets


How about, instead, a war on terror cliches?
Aug 13
// Steven Hansen
This latest Splinter Cell: Blacklist trailer reads like the Cliff's Notes to all the previous Blacklist trailers, summarizing the game's various aspects. There's the silly, hyper-organized terrorist attacks on the United Sta...
Splinter Cell photo
Splinter Cell

Splinter Cell: Blacklist to skip offline co-op for Wii U


Yes, you read that correctly
Aug 05
// Jordan Devore
While Batman: Arkham Origins is passing on multiplayer for Wii U, Splinter Cell: Blacklist is going in the other direction in terms of missing functionality. Ubisoft's Wii U port will not support offline cooperative...
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Ubisoft announcing a new next-gen title at gamescom


Plus they're bringing their rest of the lineup to the German show
Aug 01
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Sure, Ubisoft is skipping their usual gamescom press conference this year, but that doesn't mean they're going to have a light lineup at the show. In fact, Ubisoft will be unveiling a new next-gen game! On top of that, they'l...
Splinter Cell photo
Splinter Cell

Get acquainted with Splinter Cell's Merc and Spy


Here are rundowns of both classes
Jul 31
// Chris Carter
One of my favorite multiplayer modes of all time is returning to Splinter Cell: Blacklist in the form of Spies vs. Mercs, and these two new videos will give you a rundown of each class. If you're itching for information, Com...
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Sam Fisher enforces ALL the laws


No is safe from the Splinter Cell!
Jul 26
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Don't litter, scumbag.

Cooperative mayhem in Splinter Cell: Blacklist

Jul 11 // Casey Baker
Splinter Cell: Blacklist (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)Developer: Ubisoft Toronto / Ubisoft Shanghai (Wii U)Publisher: UbisoftReleased:  Ausgust 20 2013 (NA) / August 22, 2013 (EU) / July 25, 2013 (JP)MSRP: $59.99 A group of monitors at Ubisoft's Splinter Cell: Blacklist event were set aside specifically for co-op missions, and as a PR rep pointed me and another random journalist towards opposing monitors, we 'suited up' with our headphones, tested our audio connection, and jumped into the game proper. We had never met before, and now we were to rely on each other's judgements to make it through the mission. Cue immediate anxiety about screwing up and pissing off my teammate, or vice versa. The game started in Mirawa Iraq, and I played as a supporting agent (I believe it was Isaac Briggs, but without any real investment in the character it could've just as easily been Charlie Cole, whose missions revolve around assault tactics) while my co-op partner played as Sam Fisher. We began at the top of a precarious mountain trail leading towards a small outpost and a bridge, tasked with taking out the bridge with C4 after clearing the outpost of hostiles. What immediately became apparent about the co-op missions is that stealth is still pretty necessary, although not to the point of frustration. At one point, as I aimed my gun over a fallen tree to get a clean shot on an enemy -- I somehow misfired, alerting everyone in my area. "Oh. Shit," I spoke over the headset. "We're probably screwed. I alerted them." "I got it," my co-op partner said, and then as I became the perfect decoy, I watched him take down each surrounding enemy one by one, until I could dispatch the last couple near me. A few kills later, and a guy with a riot shield appeared from nowhere and began trudging towards my partner. I took the opportunity to sneak around and snap the guy's neck. This scenario actually replayed itself a couple of times throughout the mission, with our roles reserving each time. After we took down the bridge by planting the C4 on the trucks parked on it, we began heading to a village filled with snipers, and each of us took different routes to distract our enemies. My co-op buddy soon got overwhelmed and cornered from within the village, and I took the opportunity to become Rambo Sam Fisher, blasting enemies from above the rooftops, before slinking off into the shadows to stealth kill the last couple that were giving him trouble. Curiously, the next large segment of this mission became a lot less focused on stealth, even as day turned to night. While one of us was tasked with making our way through a heavily guarded segment of the village, the other was required to support with UAV drone bombings from above. This segment absolutely required one partner to mark enemies for execution, as not all enemies appeared in the UAV radar, and several heavies in the area needed priority marking for a nice bomb blast to deter them. After getting halfway through this area, the roles switched so that each player got a turn at either support or making way through the village. While this area was a lot of fun, it played a lot more like an entirely different Tom Clancy game -- Ghost Recon: Future Soldier, to be exact. While other editors have mentioned the homogenization of genres that Ubisoft seems to be going for in this latest Splinter Cell game, nowhere has it been more apparent than in this particular section that really had little to do with stealth and everything to do with tactical bombing strikes. Soon after this portion of the level, our mission ended and unsurprisingly our approach was deemed primarily 'assault' by the endgame stats meter. My co-op buddy and I congratulated each other on a job well done and wandered off our separate ways. I have to give it to Ubisoft for making co-op accessible and fun enough that two strangers could become strong teammates without either getting overly frustrated at the other's incompetence. While the gameplay may not be the approach to stealth that diehard fans expect out of the series, it's still solid and enjoyable enough on its own merits to be worth a look. Oh, and if you're not a fan of co-op but still want multiplayer in your Splinter Cell, at least Spies vs. Mercenaries is still as tense as ever. I played a couple rounds as both the Spies and Mercs, and found myself dying a ton because of my lack of stealth ability and/or aiming my weapon against my foes. So there's that.
Splinter Cell preview photo
Not quite stealthy, but still fun
In a recent hands-on with Splinter Cell: Blacklist, I had a chance to see exactly what our other editors have been excited about regarding both the game's single- and multiplayer components. I spent a little time with a coupl...

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Free Splinter Cell Blacklist with new GeForce GTX cards


Nvidia hooks us up
Jul 09
// Dale North
My GeForce GTX 580s are still doing okay, but I'd love to upgrade. The expected performance increase is incentive enough, but Nvidia has added more incentive with a newly announced deal that gives purchasers of a a GeFor...
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Splinter Cell: Blacklist walkthrough gets a little gassy


My jokes are horrible
Jul 09
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The latest look at Splinter Cell: Blacklist features Sam and team storming a gas plant that's been taken over by terrorists. The place is set to blow, but after a little hacking Sam's team is able to turn on the fire suppres...
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PSA: 40% off all Splinter Cell and Assassin's Creed games


Season Pass on sale as well
Jul 04
// Abel Girmay
Ubisoft is giving 40% percent off all Assassin's Creed and Splinter Cell games, with 50% savings if you buy two or more. The Assassin's Creed III season pass is also part of the sale, so if you're feeling up to it, you c...
Blacklist photo
Blacklist

How not to die in Splinter Cell's Spies vs. Mercs Classic


Fan-favorite mode returns for Blacklist
Jun 27
// Jordan Devore
In talking about the Splinter Cell franchise, fans are quick to bring up the Spies vs. Mercs multiplayer mode, and for good reason -- it rocks! Players are either a spy presented in third-person view or a first-person, gun-t...
Ubisoft E3 photo
Ubisoft E3

Ubisoft's E3 plans include South Park: The Stick of Truth


And all the other games that you expect
May 29
// Brett Makedonski
At the beginning of the month, Ubisoft came out and said that it hadn't forgotten about South Park: The Stick of Truth, despite very little promotion after acquiring the game in the THQ fire-sale. That apparently still holds...
Splinter Cell photo
Splinter Cell

Splinter Cell: Blacklist's co-op is where it's at


And there's splitscreen support!
May 20
// Jordan Devore
This trailer showing Splinter Cell: Blacklist's cooperative mode reminds me that, of all the things to get me interested in the game, it sure isn't the single-player campaign. Spies vs. Mercs and co-op, on the other hand, ha...
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Spies vs Mercs: Which side are you on?


A live-action take of Splinter Cell's most famous mode
May 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Splinter Cell: Blacklist will see the return of Spies vs. Mercs. If that news didn't get you excited at all then maybe this live-action take by the gang at CorridorDigital will. Their film production and editing keeps getting better with every video, and I'm beyond impressed with their latest efforts.

Splinter Cell: Blacklist is full of multiplayer goodness

May 07 // Abel Girmay
Splinter Cell: Blacklist (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC, Wii U)Developer: Ubisoft Toronto, Ubisoft Montreal, Ubisoft ShanghaiPublisher: UbisoftRelease: August 20, 2013 One of the first things you'll notice about Splinter Cell: Blacklist's presentation is how it integrates its multiplayer pretty seamlessly into it's single-player presentation. Speaking with Ubisoft Toronto co-op lead designer Richard Carrillo, "In Conviction, and a lot of other games, you see the main menu listing solo here and co-op there. You create this artificial split, and when you play those modes, it feels like a different game. We want to break all that down and make it part of the same experience." The solution to this problem comes in the Paladin hub area. From this giant warplane, you can initiate solo missions, dive into co-op, launch a game of Spies vs. Mercs, or just have a friendly conversation with your crew. "We want to have narrative ties across all of our different modes, tie everything back into Fourth Echelon." [embed]252941:48484:0[/embed] Co-op missions are broken down into sets, each given to you by different characters, and meant to reflect the characters you received them from. In practice, this means different sets of stipulations placed on the players. Missions handed down from Grim, for example, may harken back to earlier Splinter Cell games since she is a long time character. There's a greater emphasis on ghosting your way through these missions, with levels restarting when detected. A number of these hardcore variant missions are essentially one big I-told-you-so from Ubisoft to fans who doubted stealth could work in daytime environments. Remember when they re-released the E3 2012 stage demo but as a ghost playthrough instead of assault? Well the team is still out to prove that point to the last remaining hold outs. "We're wanting to prove once and for all that all of our daylight maps are real stealth and can be ghosted," Carrillo told me. The mission I played, Missile Plant, was one handed down from Briggs, a new character to the series, who player two will be taking control of during missions, with player one as Sam. Since Briggs is an up and comer in Fourth Echelon, this mission placed more subtle, gentler requirements. Sneak into an Indian missile silo, completely undetected, and with non-lethal weapons. Many of you will remember the big design ethos of Blacklist revolving around three common play styles: Panther, assault, and ghost. Well, that didn't seem to make the jump over to the co-op very well, but it's not necessarily a bad thing. As mentioned, missions are tailored with their own stipulations which, naturally, encourage certain ways to play. I can't exactly play this mission as assault if I can't use a gun, but this mission did free up towards the end when my partner and I were allowed to use lethal means to take out Voron mercenaries. But even this pushed towards more of an assault/panther role due to the sheer number of mercs and the tenacity with which they rush you down. All told, Blacklist's co-op looks like a welcome evolution of what was in Conviction. You'll still mark and execute, make good use of your gadgets, and stay in constant communication with your partner for a smoother playthrough. Still, I do have one gripe to level against it. It's a small one, and more of a pet peeve, but why did this mission need to end with a set-piece moment? Coming off of a mission with a great balance of traditional stealth, and more aggressive play, the whole things ends with a sequence that has you running out of an hangar as Voron agents and the Indian military shoot it out, and of course explosions are going off everywhere as the camera shakes and you rush towards evac. Call it a sign of today's increasingly homogenized approach to design, but I just call it jarring and honestly unwarranted. One of the more ingenious takes on adversarial multiplayer, Spies vs. Mercs, makes a return in Blacklist after a notable absence in Conviction. Remember when I said I had an inexplicable obsession with Chaos Theory? Well Spies vs. Mercs certainly fed that. The mode is largely the same in Blacklist as it was in previous iterations. Spies have access to fancy flash bangs, EMPs, recon goggles that can tag enemies, among other goodies, and have exclusive access to the more vertical elements of a map. Vents, ledges, and rooftops are all fair game as hiding spots. Mercs on the other hand, play from a first-person perspective touting large guns, mines, and insane amounts of body armor. They can't climb or run particularly fast, but are walking death for any spy that tries to take one head on. If you're a spy, you will want to wait for the opportune moment to come in for a close instant kill. The objective is simple each time. Spies have to hack three data terminals, keeping their hacker alive as the upload goes on. If your hacker is killed, you have a narrow window to resume the hack without a hard reset. Mercs need only kill the spies and protect the terminals. New to Blacklist's iteration is a a progressive leveling system, allowing you to make custom classes to spec out your spy and merc. We didn't get to mess around with the customization though, so I can't say from first hand knowledge how deep it goes. The most notable addition has to be the fact that games can now be played with up to eight players in four versus four matches. This makes the game, to say the least, considerably hectic. There are changes that come into play depending on the number of players, namely an increased emphasis on light and shadows. If you're playing a classic two versus two game, maps are dimly lit, with key areas and objectives marked with bright lights, and Merc flashlights that carry considerable range. If you have a full eight player game going, maps are generally much more lit throughout. This simple change does an admirable job of preserving the core hunter killer gameplay, but classic two versus two is still my preferred option. Matches simply get to hectic playing with eight people, and a considerable amount of tension is lost. Playing classic is the same snatch and grab, seek and destroy goodness you remember. Darker environments means a slower, more methodical pace, as opposed to the shooting galleries that eight player matches started to devolve into. Hopefully a three versus three mode will provide some sort of tolerable medium. Still, I have to say I was very pleasantly surprised with Blacklist's multiplayer offerings. Spies vs Mercs is still a blast to play, and if you were a fan of Conviction's co-op you'll find plenty to love here.
Splinter Cell: Blacklist photo
Spies vs. Mercs and co-op are back in full effect
Confession time ladies and gents: I'm not a big Splinter Cell fan. I didn't much get into the first two, had an inexplicable obsession with Chaos Theory, largely passed on Double Agent, and only dabbled in Conviction. A disgr...

Spies vs. Mercs returns! photo
Spies vs. Mercs returns!

Splinter Cell: Blacklist Spies vs. Mercs revealed!


The classic faction-based mode is back
May 02
// Chris Carter
I have very fond memories of Splinter Cell's Spies vs. Mercs mode. The gametype debuted in Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow (and was refined in Chaos Theory), and featured two distinctly different types of teams pit against e...
Splinter Cell photo
Splinter Cell

Wii U version of Splinter Cell: Blacklist demonstrated


New trailer walks through GamePad features
Apr 22
// Jordan Devore
When we heard that Ubisoft would bring Splinter Cell: Blacklist to Wii U, few details were given other than the day-and-date release date with other game versions and brief mention of GamePad features. That last bit was not ...
Splinter Cell: Blacklist photo
Splinter Cell: Blacklist

The choice is yours in Splinter Cell: Blacklist


Stalking the shadows
Apr 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Players will be able to use all sorts of skills and abilities to get through Splinter Cell: Blacklist, and this latest trailer shows you some of your options. Attacking from above, running straight at targets, or using fancy...
Splinter Cell Wii U photo
Splinter Cell Wii U

Splinter Cell Blacklist confirmed for Wii U, for realsies


Hopefully we'll get some cool GamePad functionality
Apr 10
// Chris Carter
Rejoice, Splinter Cell fans! After a fleeting leak in February by Ubisoft, Nintendo has confirmed the existence of a Wii U version of Splinter Cell: Blacklist. It will be launching on August 20th, the same day as the PS3, 360...
Future of AAA games photo
Future of AAA games

Jade Raymond: AAA games will need more user content


"What I think people want is their own custom experience, in anything."
Mar 31
// Fraser Brown
Jade Raymond, Ubisoft Toronto's Managing Director, doesn't believe that the continually expanding budgets and costs of AAA game development are necessary, in fact, she thinks they need to stop. Speaking with Gamasutra at GDC,...
Splinter Cell dev video photo
Splinter Cell dev video

Splinter Cell: Blacklist video shows off more gameplay


Hey, it's the flying thing from Black Ops II
Mar 21
// Chris Carter
You saw the return of the night vision goggles, in Splinter Cell: Blacklist, and now you can get a little more in-depth with this eight minute developer walkthrough from Ubisoft Toronto courtesy of IGN. It shows off qui...
Splinter Cell footage photo
Splinter Cell footage

Splinter Cell: Blacklist night vision footage emerges


Watch Sam get down in the dark
Mar 14
// Chris Carter
Once we saw footage for Splinter Cell: Blacklist, everyone was worried that it would be a bit too action oriented. Well, this video is here to set the record straight, and confirm that at least some of the experience will al...
PAX East photo
PAX East

Ubisoft's big PAX East lineup won't be playable by fans


Assassin's Creed IV, Watch Dogs, Splinter Cell: Blacklist and more
Mar 08
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Ubisoft's biggest titles for 2013 such as Assassin's Creed IV, Watch Dogs, and Splinter Cell: Blacklist will all be at PAX East, but you won't be able to play any of them. There will only be controlled demo presentations, wit...
Splinter Cell photo
Splinter Cell

This is one impressive live-action take on Splinter Cell


I'm a big fan of long shots
Mar 01
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Filmmaker Warialasky and friends made this live-action movie based on Splinter Cell: Conviction and it's pretty damn cool. There are several scenes in the film that's just one big long shot, which is no easy task to do. The ...
Wii U is pro torture photo
Wii U is pro torture

Is that a Splinter Cell: Blacklist on your Wii U?


Or are you just happy to see me?
Feb 25
// Allistair Pinsof
In today's "not officially announced but it's on some dude's LinkedIn profile so I guess it's a thing" game release news, Splinter Cell: Blacklist is listed as a Wii U title on Ubisoft line manager Pascal Allançon's pr...
Splinter Cell photo
Splinter Cell

Splinter Cell Blacklist RC plane takes flight


Promotional video proves flight capability for pack-in item
Feb 23
// Conrad Zimmerman
As you may recall, Splinter Cell: Blacklist will be available in a limited edition which includes a working remote-controlled plane. The plane is based upon the design of the C-147B Paladin which Sam Fisher pilots ...

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