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Favorite game quiz photo
Favorite game quiz

Kill your darlings, create a definitive list of your favorite games

Sophie's Choice simulator 2015
Nov 29
// Nic Rowen
A test to sort your favorite games has been making the rounds on social media over the past few days. Normally I ignore this sort of thing, but when it seemed to push our own Jonathan Holmes into an existential crisis earlier...
Retro photo

Retro City Rampage sequel, 'Shakedown Hawaii' announced

Now 16-bit
Nov 25
// Chris Carter
Developer Vblank has announced a brand new follow-up to Retro City Rampage titled Shakedown Hawaii. It will be released on PS4, Vita, 3DS, and PC at some point, and updates the original aesthetic with 16-bit visuals. Th...

Review: Super Star Wars

Nov 18 // Chris Carter
Super Star Wars (PS4 [reviewed], PS Vita, SNES, Wii Virtual Console)Developer: Sculpted Software, LucasArtsPublisher: Nintendo (SNES) / Disney Interactive (PSN)MSRP: $9.99 (Cross-Buy with PS4 and Vita)Release Date: November 17, 2015 Despite the fact that a lot of 2D platformers in the '90s were keen on a linear format, Super Star Wars mixed things up considerably. It's a run-and-gun title at heart, but it has arcade elements, vehicular portions, and some exploration elements peppered in to keep you constantly on your toes. While the first stage (the desert of Tatooine) is straightforward, the game really starts to open up on the third mission, the Sandcrawler. Here, you'll face ridiculously tough platforming sections with hazards, enemies, and moving platforms constantly at odds with the player. Almost every stage has something new to throw at you. Whether it's auto-scrolling sections with platforms crumbling underneath your feet or all-out arena brawls, no one experience feels the same. I love the silly liberties taken with the story, which only loosely follow the film, like Luke fighting a sarlacc in the very first mission. I'm glad that the developers were given a lot of leeway here, especially when you consider the limited settings in A New Hope -- the crew essentially hangs out on Tatooine before heading directly to the Death Star. This change of pace is especially evident for the boss fights -- hulking, memorable masses that are some of the toughest challenges in the game. Speaking of challenge, Super rewards those of you who don't die, gifting a permanent health increase whenever you come across a giant heart power-up, as well as full-use of whatever power-up you happen to have equipped at the time. Oh, and there's one more thing -- checkpoints basically don't exist. [embed]321401:61152:0[/embed] It is missing a bit of variety gameplay-wise though, mostly due to the fact that Luke doesn't really start his Jedi training until the next iteration. Because of this adherence to the source material, Super Star Wars is a shooter through and through, with very little emphasis on melee combat or special powers beyond the Contra-esque power-ups and some ancillary use of Obi-Wan's Lightsaber. Having said that, roughly halfway in you'll have the option to swap characters (Han and Chewbacca join Luke), who bring in their own set of animations with them. As for the "enhancements" that accompany this re-release, they're pretty light. The biggest addition is probably the save state option, which allows players to snapshot their progress anywhere in the game -- it's extremely useful for saving your progress before a boss, or when you just have to pick up and leave. Sadly, it's only one slot, and I would have loved to have seen an option to catalog all of the game's wonderful boss fights. Other than that, you're basically getting a selection of three filters, border options, and leaderboards. You can get a better look at everything in the video above. Super Star Wars remains a classic over two decades later, and I'm happy to see it being reintroduced to a new generation. I sincerely hope this leads to the production of remakes for the superior Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi entries -- perhaps with a few more extras along for the ride. [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.]
Super Star Wars photo
As old school as the Force
I'm really surprised that Super Star Wars is getting a re-release in 2015. No, not because "it's old," but rather the fact that it's an exceedingly unforgiving retro game, which doesn't really gel with the hand-holding landscape of modern gaming. While some elements haven't aged all that well, it's still very much a classic.

Bubsy on Greenlight photo
Bubsy on Greenlight


I didn't even know he was sick
Nov 16
// Nic Rowen
Almost did a spit-take when I saw this slide into my inbox today. Apparently, Retroism is on the quest to save Bubsy (yes, the platforming feline with radical CATtitude) and wants your help to do it. They're re-releasing two ...

Odin Sphere photo
Odin Sphere

Want to play an 8-bit version of Odin Sphere in your browser? Take to Twitter

28,888 tweets needed
Nov 14
// Chris Carter
Atlus of Japan has just announced a neat little promotion for their upcoming ports of Odin Sphere. If 28,888 people tweet out that they're interested, we'll unlock an 8-bit browser version of the game. Based on the footage i...
Rare console prototype photo
Rare console prototype

That Nintendo PlayStation works!

At least partially
Nov 06
// Jordan Devore
Real or fake, I was fascinated by that so-called Nintendo PlayStation. The system, a sort of Super Nintendo with a CD drive, was produced through a partnership with Sony but never saw a commercial release. The machines are ex...
Fan demake photo
Fan demake

What Fallout 4 might have looked like in 1984

Fallout 84 mockup running on an Apple II
Nov 02
// Steven Hansen
Eight more days 'til Fallout 4, Fallout 4. Fallout 4. Eight more days 'til Fallout 4, Sil-ver Shamrock! Chiptunes group 8 Bit Weapon decided to mock up what Fallout 4 might look like if it were made in 1984 open-source edito...
Gotta go fast photo
Gotta go fast

Is this new Super Mario Bros. world record a perfect run?

Looks damned close if not
Oct 22
// Jed Whitaker
A new Super Mario Bros. speedrun world record has been set (as seen above) and it looks damned near perfect. It's mostly a vanilla run, meaning the player doesn't use many glitches aside from one allowing access to the secon...
Wet photo

Tacky old porn sim fluffed for PC re-release

What the hell, 1998?
Oct 19
// Steven Hansen
I dislike this art sooo much. It doesn't look like an anime at all. But seriously, at least aim for Heavy Metal, right? This is 1998. Leisure Suit Larry did a better job 10 years earlier on noticeably more restricted tech. He...
Super Battlefront photo
Super Battlefront

Star Wars Battlefront looks so good as a 16-bit game

Thank the Force
Oct 09
// Brett Makedonski
Enjoying that Battlefront beta? It seems like plenty of people are thrilled to play in a Star Wars universe that looks as good as this one does. Bear with me here, but Battlefront has a pleasant charm to it if...
Nintendo 64 photo
Nintendo 64

Unreleased N64 game surfaces after 16 years

First footage of Viewpoint 2064 since 99
Oct 04
// Kyle MacGregor
History is littered with the bones of games like Viewpoint 2064, the unreleased sequel to Sammy's 1992 Neo Geo shooter Viewpoint. The Nintendo 64 project was first (and last) seen at Nintendo's Space World event in 1999, befo...
Microsnub photo

Microsoft snubs Mario, nods to Zelda on bullshit made-up holiday

Super Mario Bros. 30th anniversary
Sep 14
// Steven Hansen
Yesterday was the 30th anniversary of Super Mario Bros. Fine. But, also, the Internet keeps trying to convince me that it was also "8-bit Day," one of those bullshit, made-up holidays from the folks that brought you the insuf...

La-Mulana 2 will probably break me

Sep 05 // Zack Furniss
Since the interface and overall graphical style of La-Mulana 2 looks almost identical to the original, it's appreciated that the new character is distinctive enough that you'll know which game you're playing. Instead of inhabiting the Indiana Jones-alike Lemeza Kosugi, you'll be playing his (maybe) daughter Lumisa. Skill-wise, the only major change I noticed is Lumisa seems to have slightly more air control; instead of being locked into a forward jump, you can ease off a bit. Though I eventually acclimated to the strict leaping rules in the first game, I immediately felt more comfortable exploring the ruins in this demo. That comfort was obliterated in approximately one minute. While a jovial PR rep was telling me that puzzles aren't necessarily easier, so much as they have better signposting, I stumbled through trap after trap and wandered up to a boss. I was supposed to whack him in the face, but he kept charging through and knocking me down, killing me in a few quick blows. This happened about four times, until I gave up and went in a different direction. Another change is that there's a more noticeable sense of depth (at least in the stage that I played). La-Mulana 2 is built in 3D in the Unity engine, as seen above. Though this first area didn't play with this too much, I imagine the late-game ruins will use this newfound depth to their advantage. I'll be damned if clues to certain puzzles won't be hidden in the background. With such limited time and access to the demo, it's hard to get a sense of whether the signposting has actually been improved. The first game played a sound effect when you had advanced a step in a puzzle, but there was often no clear way to figure out what exactly had changed. The platforming and bosses still feel as tough as ever, but a series like La-Mulana really demands at least a few hours to see just how inextricable the labyrinthine ruins will end up being.  The PR rep ended our meeting by saying that when they polled players about difficulty, Japanese players overwhelmingly wanted the sequel to be easier and the Western players wanted it to be harder. They're trying to strike a middle ground here with tricky riddles that still require a sharp eye, and more forgiving platforming. We'll see how that turns out when it launches early next year.
La-Mulana 2 photo
And I look forward to it
I only recently finished La-Mulana, Nigoro's "archaeological ruin exploration action game." It tried its damnedest to make me quit at every turn; with its obtuse puzzles and tricky platforming, I don't feel it's hyperbole to ...

Shutshimi photo

Shutshimi: Seriously Swole coming soon to Wii U

Choice Provision's great goldfish shmup
Sep 01
// Alessandro Fillari
Just last week, we were graced with the release of Shutshimi: Seriously Swole on PC, PS4 and Vita. In this bizarre tribute to classic shooters, players take control of a team of gun-toting goldfish with memory issues as they ...

Poncho is a mind-melting retro journey through post-robopocalypse

Aug 20 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]307084:60068:0[/embed] Poncho (PC [previewed], PS4, PS Vita, Wii U)Developer: Delve InteractivePublisher: Rising Star GamesRelease Date: September 24, 2015MSRP: $14.99 After the apocalypse, humanity has been wiped out by an unknown scourge, and all that is left are machines. With mother nature having retaken the earth, the machines developed their own society and culture in the ruins of the old world. But one day, a poncho-wearing robot longs to discover his origins, and seeks out his creator. Using perspective-warping abilities and his own platforming skills, the resourceful little robot will travel through the landscape and encounter other machines trying to find purpose in the new world. Over the course of his adventure, he'll not only discover the meaning his own creation, but also the truth behind mankind's destruction. In recent years, retro-throwback games such as Fez have become common. What these titles share is an increased focus on subversion and playing with genre conventions, all the while crafting a compelling story that goes beyond what many would expect from the genre they're paying homage to. Poncho is no different. With the ability to travel between different planes of the level -- from the foreground, background, and middleground -- the poncho-wearing robot will have to tackle challenging puzzles and action set-pieces. The developers cite classic platformers such as Super Mario World and Sonic the Hedgehog, which had richly detailed backgrounds, as inspiration. I was surprised by how quickly Poncho ramped in difficulty. Initially, it's a very atmospheric game that focuses on storytelling, but once you're let loose into the various stages, things take quite a turn. While there are no enemies or bosses to battle, the challenges come from figuring out how to navigate the multi-layered levels with the perspectives-jumping abilities. With platforms, switches, and other obstacles that call for quick jumps between the different areas of the stages, there's tricky twitch-based gameplay to the platforming and some genuine three-dimensional thinking to the puzzles. It's trippy while still playing on the 2D plane.  With its release approaching, I got in some quality time from the current build of the game. As you acquire new abilities and skills from schematics, you'll be able to travel back to past stages and explore new areas. These abilities, such as the robot stomp, open a number of new avenues of exploration. This mechanic did a lot to make me understand the true scope of Poncho. It's very much a throwback platformer with modern puzzle gameplay dynamics. There were several moments where I felt I was stuck, but once I figured things out, I was left immensely satisfied.  If you're itching for a puzzle-platformer that plays with the genre's tropes and conventions, then keep an eye out for this little title. While on the surface it looks like a rather humble platforming jaunt through a post-apocylyptic world filled with robots, Poncho quickly goes into mindfuck territory, and it'll raise questions you'll be dying to get answers to.
Poncho preview photo
Out on September 24
Last year, we got a sneak peek at a rather peculiar puzzle-platformer named Poncho. Launching on Kickstarter and debuting at EGX for attendees, it showed a lot of promise in exploring the earth after humans went extinct. Unfo...

Curses 'N Chaos photo
Curses 'N Chaos

Curses 'N Chaos coming out August 18

Tribute Games' next joint
Aug 10
// Zack Furniss
Last year at PAX East, Jonathan Holmes had a chance to interview Tribute Games (makers of Mercenary Kings, which Patrick liked a bunch) about their newest creation, Curses 'N Chaos. It's a two-button couch/online co-op s...
Mondays, am I right? photo
Mondays, am I right?

Sonic 2 handles stubborn stains!

Embarassing bald spots, no problem!
Aug 03
// Jordan Devore
If I were allowed to make commercials for video games, I'd want them to look like this:
Rare Replay photo
Rare Replay

Is 30 games in Rare Replay not enough for you?

What would you like to see added?
Jul 30
// Vikki Blake
Although Rare is packaging 30 of its biggest games together with the release of Rare Replay, turns out 30 retro Rare games might not be enough. During a special Twitch livestream, Rare's James Thomas said that whittling ...
Yes, really photo
Yes, really

The NES just got a brand new competitive shooter

Star Versus the next big NES eSport? Nah
Jul 29
// Jed Whitaker
The Nintendo Entertainment System's last officially licensed title released in December of 1994 (name that game!), but that hasn't stopped chiptune artist and now homebrew NES game dev Dustin Long from releasing a new title....

3D Streets of Rage 2 is a return to classic brawler action

Jul 22 // Alessandro Fillari
Released back in 1992, Streets of Rage 2, called Bare Knuckle II in Japan, was an immediate hit with Genesis owners and still stands as a favorite among beat-'em-up fans to this day. Set a year after the events of the first game, our street-fighting brawlers have to take back control after the sprawling criminal empire the Syndicate kidnapps one of their allies and plunges the city into chaos. Teaming up with pro-wrestler Max, and a young rollerblading brawler names Skate (the brother of SoR1's Adam), Axel and Blaze have to scour the city while scrapping with vicious thugs that work for the ever-elusive Mr. X. I spent many hours with Streets of Rage 2 when I was a kid, and the flashy neon lights and bombastic atmosphere -- along with Yuzo Koshiro's bumping synth score -- are imprinted in my memories of those glorious Genesis days. Surprisingly, there's a strong focus on plot in these titles. While most beat-'em-ups settle for the save X from Y plot and call it a day, SoR goes a bit beyond that by wrangling in government conspiracy and even throwing in some crazy sci-fi angles. Though the narrative is pretty much on par with B-level action movies, it still goes a long way with setting the tone and atmosphere. While there was another follow up with SoR3, the second game is my favorite and holds up remarkably well. Fortunately for us fans, Sega agrees and it's since been ported over to many different platforms, including Xbox Live, PlayStation Network, and even iOS. However, with its upcoming release on the 3DS, this marks the first time you'll be able to play the game in 3D. "Streets of Rage 2 was the most popular of the three games in the series, so we actually had 2 slated as a conversion candidate from the very beginning," stated producer Yosuke Okunari. "However, when we first starting the development on these games, there were technical issues around getting this game into 3D, and it was deemed an impossible task so we gave up on it. If you've spent time playing the game, you've probably noticed that these sorts of side-scrolling beat-'em-ups are extremely well-suited for stereoscopic 3D (we actually call them 'belt action' games in Japanese because it's like being on a conveyor belt). The benefit of being able to visually confirm that you are lined up with your enemy and thus avoiding whiffing is huge." Coming off the original, the sequel featured a number of innovations and upgrades that made it stand apart from its predecessor. Aside from the obvious visual upgrade, which features sharper graphics and more detailed environments and character designs, the combat mechanics were greatly expanded to include new character-specific moves and super attacks. While I'm sure there were many who missed the police backup from the original, the focus on character diversity and growth was what made Streets of Rage 2 a true upgrade. During their work on the original's 3D remaster, the developers overcame the challenges of translating the unique visual style to bring over its sequel. "The graphics in these games were not like modern 3D, so there's a lot of pseudo-3D going on [referring to the diagonal side-scrolling stages], and when you take that and apply real stereoscopic 3D to it, you get conflicting visuals. So at the time, we thought we wouldn't be able to get the game into 3D," explained Okunari. "That said, because we were able to get the first game in the series into 3D, the staff's ability and know-how around 3D conversions saw huge improvements, and we found ways to work around these sorts of conflicting situations, and thus making the project a reality." After several playthroughs with the 3D remaster, I was impressed with the quality of the port. I can assure you that the pictures do not do the game justice. The side-scrolling visuals really pop with the 3D enabled, and many of the animations and action sequences feel more pronounced. The visuals on the 3DS feel sharp and with no slowdown or loss performance, which is great for when things get really hectic. While the game is largely as it was, gameplay feels just as precise as it was back in its heyday on the Genesis. It's a true testament to the design of the game, and it feels right at home on the handheld. As with the other 3D Classic releases, Sega has decided to do fans one better with the addition of new gameplay modes. In 3D SoR2, players can now experience the new mode called Rage Relay, which gets people playing as other characters during their run. Upon death, your starting character will switch over to the next one from the roster. For instance, if you start out playing with Axel and you get taken during a tough encounter, then you'll switch over to Max upon respawn. Initially, I found it to be a pretty odd gimmick, but I'll admit it came in handy during tough bosses or enemies which called for a bit more brute force. The developers included this optional mode as a way to encourage trying out the other characters after noticing how often players would stick with their favorites. "The original development team that worked on SoR2 was heavily influenced by Street Fighter II when making this game, so rather than a normal beat-'em-up, they really wanted each character to have their own feel, so each character has a very unique play style associated with them," said the producer. "However, unlike competitive fighting games, people tend to only play with the character the choose first for beat-'em-ups, and we didn't think most people strayed from that initial choice. There's four characters here, each with their own play style, so we wanted to make sure every character got a shot and make it interesting by giving players a chance to try characters they didn't really used back in the Genesis era. Our answer to this was Rage Relay." To say I had a great time with 3D SoR2 would be an understatement. I was pretty damn happy with how this remaster turned out. Not only do the new features help liven up the experience, the core gameplay still shows that simple beat-stuff-up action can be a ton of fun. And with local play available, you'll be able to team up with friends to take down Mr. X. With its release approaching, I can tell that many fans of Streets of Rage 2 will feel right at home with the 3D remaster. Not only has this title held up well, but it makes some impeccable use of the 3DS hardware. Once you fire up the game, and Koshiro's synth score reverberates through the opening title crawl, you'll be hooked. It's a total blast from the past, and it'll get your adrenaline pumping in no time.
Sega 3D Classics photo
Taking back the streets on July 23
Growing up, one of my favorite genres was the side-scrolling beat-'em-up. From Final Fight to Double Dragon, I was quite fond of the action found in traveling through different stages and kicking the asses of gang members and...

Commodore 64 and Amiga photo
Commodore 64 and Amiga

There's a Commodore PET smart phone that emulates old games

Jul 15
// Steven Hansen
I never had a Commodore, 64 or otherwise, on account of all the poverty, but if you wish to relive the halcyon days of youth (or just be trendier than everyone by not having a standard iPhone/Galaxy smart phone), a pair of It...
Super Disc photo
Super Disc

Video of rare Sony Super Nintendo prototype

SSNES? Nintendo PlayStation? SNES-CD?
Jul 03
// Steven Hansen
Just in case you weren't impressed by a few pictures of what is allegedly one of a small number of prototypes units developed by Sony for Nintendo prior to Nintendo's surprise partnership with Phillips. And so birthed the PlayStation, all praises to it. I like SSNES for its snakey sound, but Nintendo would never go for that, obviously.
Sony SNES photo

Did someone just unearth a Sony SNES?

Looks a lot like it
Jul 03
// Laura Kate Dale
Many of you will have heard the stories of a Sony and Nintendo crossover console that never was. Nintendo wanted a CD drive add-on for the SNES and initially approached Sony about making it. The deals never worked out and Son...
GameStop photo

GameStop opens up sales for 'retro classics'

NES, SNES, Genesis and more
Jun 23
// Chris Carter
GameStop has opened up a program that involves selling and taking in retro consoles games, including classic systems like the NES and Dreamcast. "Select stores" are actually taking the trades physically, but you can peruse th...
Or buy other 360 games photo
Or buy other 360 games

Get one of the best Xbox 360 puzzle games for free on Xbox One

Hexic HD
Jun 21
// Jed Whitaker
Hexic HD has a peculiar past: It was originally only available on Xbox 360 hard drives closer to launch and was only released for download on Xbox Live years later. If your hard drive died and you didn't have a backup - ...

Crossing Souls is a stellar tribute to the 1980s

Jun 19 // Alessandro Fillari
Set in a small town during the summer of 1986, a group of friends stumble across an ancient artifact that allows them to connect with the world of the dead. Interacting with ghosts of former residents, both long-past and recently departed, they begin to learn that things are not what they appear to be in their boring, quiet town. But soon after, they discover that several forces want control of the relic for themselves, and they must evade police, the U.S. government, and other supernatural entities in order to keep it out of their hands. The developers behind Crossing Souls cite '80s films and TV, along with '90s video games like EarthBound and A Link to the Past as their major sources of inspiration. During my half hour with the game, it was clear that this was a love letter to the era. It not only exudes style channeling the playful rebelliousness of E.T. and The Goonies, but also the sense of adventure found in SNES action/adventure titles. Stylistically, it's a charming game featuring VHS-esque distortion during many of the animated cutscenes. And with music from Timecop1983, one of the Internet's more well known Snyth-Pop artists, Crossing Souls pulls those nostalgia strings hard, and it does so in an evocative way. As the group must keep the balance between the world of the living and the dead, they'll have to explore both realms simultaneously. Each of the five friends possess their own strengths, which necessitates switching between them. Some have certain skills for climbing and heavy lifting, while others have access to ranged attacks. While exploring the town, you can freely interact with the folks from both the living and dead realms. It's completely open, and you can uncover side-missions and events that will have you explore the furthest reaches of town. My favorite part of the demo was exploring the town square and seeing ghosts from the past comment about 1980s culture. It was interesting to see the changes between the two. In one world you could be relatively safe in a populated area, but in another you might get swarmed by vengeful ghosts looking to attack anything alive. Also featured in the game will be an Arcade mode. Throughout your adventures, you'll come across mini-games and special encounters that will have you take part in a trial of wits and timing, and after they're completed you can play them again at any time within this mode. During one segment, I had to evade the police on my bike in style very reminiscent of Battletoad's infamous speeder bike sequence. Thankfully, this one was a lot more fun and less stressful. I wonder what else the game has in store. The mini-games were a cool diversion from the core gameplay, and I'm sure most players will find one they'll gravitate to. I wish I could've spent more time with Crossing Souls. I'm a huge admirer of 1980s culture and entertainment, and it hit all the right nostalgic notes. This was totally the type of game any '80s and even '90s kid would want to experience, and it recalled all the cool moments I had playing video games or watching cartoons back then. Fourattic channels that sense of wonder and awe of experiencing something so fresh and charming. I can't wait to see more from this title in the coming months, and with its release next spring, you'll get to re-experience an era of exuberance soon.
Devolver Digital photo
Releasing on PC and Mac in spring
In recent years, Kickstarter has opened the doors for a lot of developers looking to make things happen. It's a real pleasure to see titles that would've never been greenlit by publishers find an audience willing to put up ca...

Microsoft photo

Microsoft announces Rare Replay, a collection of 30 classic Rare games

For $30
Jun 15
// Chris Carter
Rare Replay will hit Xbox One on August 4 for $30, Microsoft announced today. It will include 30 games as an anthology of sorts, including Perfect Dark, Blast Corps, Battletoads, and even retro classics like Snake Rattl...
Diddy Kong goes to Europe photo
Diddy Kong goes to Europe

Nintendo trademarks Diddy Kong in Europe, new game incoming?

Diddy Kong Racing 2 anyone?
Jun 10
// Jed Whitaker
A new trademark filing for Diddy Kong in Europe was discovered by those super sleuths on NeoGAF that could point to a pending announcement at E3 next week. There have been rumors making the rounds about Diddy Kong Racing...
Metroid photo

If a new Metroid is announced at E3, I will get this obnoxious haircut

And I will be disowned by all
Jun 10
// Zack Furniss
Super Metroid is my favorite game. I've always loved the series, and though Other M tried its hardest to tarnish that, my passion remains strong. So when Retro Studios tweets something, and it doesn't even sound Metroid-...
Shawshank photo

Would you play this 8-bit Shawshank Redemption game?

Hell yes
May 29
// Chris Carter
Who doesn't like The Shawshank Redemption? It's one of those films where the mere mention of it will light up a room -- before you get to chatting about some of the more somber parts, of course. Thanks to CineFix, you c...

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