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Weekend deals photo
Weekend deals

Under $20 Resident Evil Revelations 2 and BF4 Premium


Rawr. Zombies.
Feb 21
// Dealzon
Couple of decent deals this weekend with next week's Resident Evil Revelations 2 Complete Season pricing in at only $19.50 for the PC (its also the last call on the pre-order bonus of the raid mode map pack). The even-mo...
Deals photo
Deals

Resident Evil Revelations 2 arrives next week with deals and two editions


Eye-poppin' deals! (Not really.)
Feb 19
// Dealzon
On February 25, 2015 Capcom will release Resident Evil Revelations 2 for PC in episodic format along with two editions (just to spice up the confusion level). On Steam, there's "The Complete Season" for $24.99, and then a ver...
RE HD photo
RE HD

Resident Evil HD paid off for Capcom, producer thanks fans


Ok Capcom now take the franchise in the right direction
Feb 11
// Chris Carter
Resident Evil HD sold like hotcakes, breaking records on PSN. As a result, producer Yoshiaki Hirabayashi has created a new video on behalf of the development team as a thank you to fans. Oh, and here's a Spencer Mansion...
RE HD photo
RE HD

Resident Evil HD broke all sorts of sales records


Cash cow classic
Feb 09
// Brett Makedonski
Given how much cash they bring in, it's tough to fault publishers for continually focusing on gussying up beloved titles instead of moving forward with new games. Resident Evil HD is just the latest example, as plenty we...
PSN Resident Evil sale photo
PSN Resident Evil sale

Re-enter the world of survival horror with the PlayStation Store Resident Evil sale


Stop it! Don't open that door!
Feb 03
// Jason Faulkner
Resident Evil is making a hell of a comeback with the recent release of Resident Evil HD Remaster and is poised to go even further with the upcoming first episode of Revelations 2. If you just can't get enough zombie and zomb...
RE 2 fan remake photo
RE 2 fan remake

This full remake of Resident Evil 2 in Unreal Engine 3 shows some real dedication


Enter the world of survival horror
Feb 01
// Jason Faulkner
While Capcom is spinning its wheels on the series (although Resident Evil HD Remastered was good and Resident Evil: Revelations 2 looks promising), YouTube user Rod Lima has finished a complete remake of Resident Evil 2 in U...
Resident Evil Revelations photo
Bearded Dads, Barry quotes, and playable The Matrix
Resident Evil: Revelations 2 is the latest episodic game series about a grizzled man with a dark past protecting a mysterious child survive a zombie or zombie-like danger scenario. Our own Alessandro Fillari recently had the...

Capcom photo
Capcom

Capcom FAQ clarifies everything you get with RE: Revelations 2's Raid Mode


Lots of maps
Jan 27
// Chris Carter
Resident Evil Revelations 2 will bring back Raid Mode, and Capcom has taken to its blog to explain everything. When you buy the initial episode, you'll get both the campaign and 54 Raid Mode missions on three difficultie...

Resident Evil: Revelations 2 brings Barry Burton and Raid mode center stage

Jan 27 // Alessandro Fillari
Resident Evil: Revelations 2 (PC,  PS3, PS4 [previewed], Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomRelease Date: February 24, 2015 (Episode One) MSRP: $5.99 per episode / $24.99 season pass (including DLC) / $39.99 retail disc Taking place between Resident Evil 5 and 6, Claire Redfield and Moira Burton (daughter of S.T.A.R.S veteran Barry Burton) have been kidnapped and trapped on an abandoned prison island filled with deadly creatures known as the Afflicted. Using their wits and teamwork, they fight their way through the facility and manage to send a distress signal to the mainland. Realizing that his daughter has been kidnapped, Barry Burton journeys to the island ready for battle. Once he reaches shore, he meets a young girl named Natalia, who possesses strange powers and close ties with the mysteries on the island. Barry and Natalia's story picks up about halfway through Episode One. Once Claire and Moira reached a certain point in the plot, the perspective switches over to the second duo. Though Barry is definitely up to the challenge, he'll have to combat with nastier variations of the Afflicted. Similar to Resident Evil's crimson heads, these new creatures are more aggressive and are far more mutated than the ones Claire and Moira encountered. Some use neat tricks such as invisibility, and some have pustules that explode after being damaged. Like its predecessor, Revelations 2 will show different perspectives to the story. With Claire and Moira leading the charge while Barry and Natalia witness the aftermath of their ordeal and make their own unique way through the island, you'll experience multiple sides of the story as it unfolds. Additionally, decisions and actions made throughout the story will have an impact on the other team. For instance, while in a room filled with traps, Claire and Moira used to them cover their escape from the Afflicted. Unfortunately, as Barry and Natalia enter the facility in an different way, and they find themselves on the receiving end of the traps and must deactivate them to proceed. Much like the dynamic between Claire and Moira, Barry and Natalia use their own unique skills together to overcome the odds. With one focusing on all the fighting, the other offers support with finding items and reaching spots that the first cannot. Things are a bit different for the second duo. As Barry has come to the island prepared and ready for battle, he brings with him a lot more firepower than Claire had. Moreover, Natalia possesses mysterious abilities that allow her to track nearby enemies, even through walls. One moment during Barry's trek outside the facility showed just how important teamwork was. While moving through a seemingly empty wooden storage house, the duo senses another creature nearby. Not knowing where its coming from, Barry pressed on. Once we got to a wooden door that was jammed, the creature began to get closer. Though I could have ignored it and continued with the door, I chose to investigate the surroundings. Eventually, I discovered the creature in the ceiling, which was a mutated version of the Afflicted known as the Revenant. Using Barry's arsenal, including his trusty Python, I was able to take down the creature. It was a pretty tense moment, and if I had chosen to ignore the creature, then it would've gotten the jump on Barry and Natalia. At this point, my time with the campaign came to a close. It was incredibly exciting to finally play as Barry Burton in a legitimate entry in the series. Yes, there's Resident Evil Gaiden, but that's regarded as non-canon, largely ignored on account of it being unceremoniously released on the Game Boy Color. Barry is such a bro, and seeing him take charge and kick ass was pretty great. Even though his side of the story feels largely the same as Claire's, it was still pretty exciting stuff.  My time with Revelations 2 didn't end there. After switching off the campaign, we moved right over to the new and improved Raid Mode. As one of the biggest successes with the original Revelations, Raid Mode was something of an experiment to see if they could try something new with the standard RE bonus mode. As an alternate take on the popular Mercenaries mode, Raid Mode tasks players with battling through a gauntlet of enemies while leveling up, acquiring buffs, and collecting new weapons. Think Monster Hunter, but with Resident Evil shooting and waves of enemies to take down. It was easily the most time I spent with the original game, and Capcom has decided to expand upon it in a big way. Now featuring a light story to offer some context to the chaotic battles, you play as an A.I. within a battle simulator from the Red Queen Alpha database. Within the digital HUB area, represented as a vestibule within a mansion, you're tasked with collecting data from different characters while running simulated battles against challenging foes. As you complete tasks, you'll find audio-logs that reveal more about Red Queen Alpha and its connection to the outside world. As you conquer challenges, the A.I. gains gold which can be spent on upgrades, new weapons, and new missions to engage in. Moreover, the A.I. can take the form of many different characters from RE's past and present (including Wesker and Hunk), and use their unique skills in digitally recreated areas from the main campaign, and even from previous Resident Evil titles. Instead of just running through a single gauntlet of missions, there are several different types to select from. Main Missions are the central focus in Raid Mode, but cost currency to take part in. In order to prevent players from repeated loot runs on specific missions, you'll have to take part in daily missions and event challenges to gain more cash to re-enter the main missions. Each main mission pack has six levels to fight through, each with their own medals and rewards to find.  Every playable character can level up (maximum level 100) and has individual perks to acquire and strengthen. Much like the previous titles, you can find new weapons and upgrades for existing gear. Just like the original, Raid Mode spices up the cannon fodder by making the foes a bit beefier. Some of them possess buffs that increase speed, strength, size, and even bestow them with force-fields that soak up damage. The stages I played in were set in Tall Oaks and Edonia from Resident Evil 6, and the objective was to clear waves of enemies while making it to the end goal. I had a blast playing through the Raid Mode in Revelations 2. Not only is it far more comprehensive than Mercenaries mode, but RE:R2 ups the ante with new features and content. It was great fun battling through Tall Oaks with Barry, and the variety of different enemies I faced kept things pretty interesting. Though I'm a bit worried that repetition could detract after the long haul, and that Raid Mode will not have online co-op play available until sometime after the release of the final episode, Capcom seems to be pretty headstrong with supporting the game. The idea of daily challenges and updates makes me look forward to what's to come. With the release of the first episode of Resident Evil: Revelations 2 next month, it's going to be interesting to see how Capcom's experiment with episodic gaming will turn out. The plot certainly feels as though it wants to evoke discussion and debate among fans, and coming off the win the publisher just had with Resident Evil Remastered, it's looking like there's a bright future ahead for the once troubled Resident Evil franchise.
Resident Evil photo
Sans Jill Sandwich
Capcom has been on quite a roll lately. With the announcement of Street Fighter V, new releases in the Devil May Cry series coming, and the recent success of its HD Remaster for Resident Evil, it seems like the once trou...

Jill sandwich photo
Maybe Jill's bra is just filled with sandwich jam
I had a real weird night with Resident Evil HD. It's continuing as I look for screens to use as thumbnail images and stumble upon nude, pregnant Jill mods for Resident Evil 4. And here I thought I was making questionable use of my time.

Resident...boobs! photo
Resident...boobs!

Resident Evil HD did wonders for Jill's jiggle


You know, boobs!
Jan 22
// Steven Hansen
These Jill-ggle physics are making the rounds what with Resident Evil HD Remaster coming out. Turns out this jell-o oscillation is not a new addition. It's a carryover from the GameCube REmake, but a combination of...
Deals photo
Deals

All the deals for Resident Evil HD Remaster on PC


Tomorrow, back to the late '90s we go
Jan 19
// Dealzon
Tomorrow at midnight Eastern, PC gamers will be treated to the re-release of a re-release in the form of Resident Evil HD Remaster. The overhauled graphics and audio rate pretty well just about everywhere you'll find it ...

Review: Resident Evil HD Remaster

Jan 19 // Chris Carter
Resident Evil HD Remaster (PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomReleased: January 20, 2015MSRP: $19.99 So what is Resident Evil HD? It's basically a shot-for-shot remake of the GameCube version. As fans know, this iteration featured a remixed layout of the mansion, newly minted dialog, and of course, a brand new visual sheen. Said sheen has been severely upgraded for the modern era with HD, in addition to a few other tiny extras and a budget price. It's also available for pretty much everything but the Wii U. This review is based off the PC version, and I have to say, Capcom did a good job. In addition to the built-in options for a wide screen and original aspect ratio, there's also support for resolutions up to 1920x1080 natively, a 30/60 FPS toggle, and a few other bells and whistles. It's not going to excite hardcore PC fans in terms of enhanced functionality, but it gets the job done. You can get a full view of every PC option in the video below if you're curious. Although it's enhanced, there's still plenty of cheese in terms of the tone. The intro still evokes nostalgic feelings of old horror flicks, the dialog is still hilariously campy, and the "door opening loading scenes" are retained. While some may feel like all of this could have been updated to elevate it even further than the GameCube remake did, I'm glad that Capcom didn't alter the heart and soul of the franchise. One of the biggest problems of the recent games is the penchant for an attempt at serious storytelling, which doesn't mesh well with the amazing boulder-punching and teleporting Wesker action. [embed]285886:56814:0[/embed] You'll still get plenty of enhancements though, because the models look great, especially on a high-end PC with all of the settings jacked up. It blows the GameCube version out of the water, and looks incredibly smooth and fluid. This gels very well with the new controls, which eschew the "tanky" ones of old (though you can still toggle it on if you want), allowing for an instant directional switch and automatic running without awkwardly holding down a button (remember that?). For the longest time Capcom claimed that tank controls were a necessity, and added to the "tension" of the series. While I don't necessarily have a problem with them having grown up with the concept, I'm glad there's now the option to use modern handling for those who want it. Now everyone is happy -- and guess what? The tension is still there. Silly Capcom. Though in the end, it should be noted that the developers weren't so progressive as to add the ability to move and shoot. Also, items still need to be equipped manually by way of pausing, accessing the inventory, and selecting a new item or weapon. It's a fast process once you get the hang of it, but a bit of a relic, particularly since you need to still manually equip the knife. Fixed camera angles are also still a thing, which you can view as both cinematic or annoying. I'm somewhere in the middle. It's jarring to run forward, have the camera change, and become disoriented (if you keep holding the previous direction your character will still run in that direction, so it's not maddening), but I love that "last stand" feel when you square off against an approaching zombie at the end of a hall. The actual game is still pretty much perfect, and I truly believe that the mansion is still the best setting to date. Years later I still don't have every floor mapped out, and there's plenty of surprises in store even for veteran players. The fact that both playable characters (Chris and Jill) don't have the same story or layout still blows me away, because they feel like two fundamentally different playthroughs despite the fact that they're in the same location. Just when Resident Evil is starting to get stale, that's when Capcom throws a new concept, enemy, or shiny weapon your way. The pacing is spot-on by any standard, whether you're completely lost or know every path. If you so choose you can also opt for an easy, easier, or normal mode right off the bat, with hard arriving later. In this man's opinion, the new easy mode is probably the best introduction for newcomers in the entire series. There are also a few other modern fixins like a completion leaderboard, a movie gallery, an in-game manual, and some old-school unlocks like an invisible enemy mode. Given that the game should last you five hours on the low end and 10-15 on the high-end, and it's worth completing at least twice, there's a lot to enjoy here with Resident Evil HD. Although I'd love the chance to play a remastered Resident Evil 2 for the first time with updated controls, I'm glad Capcom decided to revive the first entry again. Resident Evil is truly is a timeless classic that every generation should enjoy, and a perfect example of how to do survival horror without decking players out with a full armory. Welcome back to the mansion. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
RE HD review photo
The legacy of the mansion lives on
Playing the original Resident Evil was an experience. The mansion, the campiness, the mystery of it all -- before walkthroughs were easily accessible from all corners of the internet, getting lost was practically a given...

Eight Days photo
Eight Days

Resident Evil: Revelations 2 delayed about a week


Eight Days
Jan 15
// Steven Hansen
No need for alarm. Resident Evil: Revelations 2 is still coming out in Fe-Barry (and, yes, Barry Burton is still in it). The the first episode ($6 each or $25 for a complete pass) of Revelations 2 was planned f...
Resident Evil Zero HD photo
Resident Evil Zero HD

Resident Evil Zero HD remaster might be happening


Did Capcom just tip its hand?
Dec 28
// Kyle MacGregor
It seems like a remastered version of Resident Evil Zero might be in the cards. Capcom recently updated the Japanese website for the Resident Evil HD remaster to display a pre-order theme featuring a PlayStatio...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

Resident Evil HD has PS3/PS4 cross-buy if you pre-order


Releasing January 20, 2015
Dec 24
// Jordan Devore
We're less than a month out from Capcom's Resident Evil remaster for PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One. I get the feeling it's going to do well for the company. Real well. We want more Resident Evil and, barring any techni...
Resident Evil dated photo
$19.99 on January 20
Capcom has just sent word over that Resident Evil remake will be available on January 20, 2015, for $19.99. It'll hit the PS3, PS4, PC, Xbox 360, and the Xbox One "all-in-one games and entertainment system from Microsof...

Revelations 2 photo
Revelations 2

Resident Evil: Revelations 2 is out in February, Barry is in


Here are some details
Dec 02
// Chris Carter
Resident Evil is one of my favorite franchises of all time, but I haven't been as excited for it recently. Although I didn't loathe Resident Evil 6 it didn't really deliver, and Operation Raccoon City was garbage. ...

Resident Evil: Revelations 2 brings the mystery back to survival horror

Nov 07 // Alessandro Fillari
Resident Evil: Revelations 2 (PC,  PS3, PS4 [previewed], Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomRelease Date: February 17, 2015 (Episode 1) MSRP: $5.99 per episode / $29.99 full release (including DLC) Between the events of Resident Evil 5 and 6, Claire Redfield and Moira Burton, daughter of fan-favorite Barry Burton, awaken to find themselves in an abandoned prison on an isolated island. With strange bracelets on their wrists, they discover they are under watch and in communication with someone observing them through security cameras throughout the facility. After getting situated, they soon learn the prison is inhabited by bizarre creatures known as the Afflicted, and they must fight to stay alive and uncover the truth about their kidnapping. As Claire and Moira delve deeper into the facility, they'll have to solve puzzles and take out these monsters while acquiring new items and abilities. But in typical Resident Evil fashion, things are not what they appear and the stakes are much higher than you would initially expect. The original Revelations was well-liked among fans because of its happy mix of action and horror elements from both modern and classic Resident Evil titles. Revelations 2 definitely aims to rekindle the same atmosphere and pace. When you're exploring the ruins with no enemies around, the eeriness and dread is more pronounced, as at any moment you can be attacked by the Afflicted. But during combat, action is tense and relentless, especially when fighting multiple foes. Though the beginning of this episode is fairly linear and doesn't leave much room to explore and find clues about prison, you'll have more opportunities to trek at your own pace as you continue with the story. One of the most talked about aspects of Revelations 2 is the release plan Capcom has in mind. Following the success of games such as The Walking Dead and The Wolf Among Us, Revelations 2 will release episodically. While the first game felt like binge-watching an entire season of television, the sequel plans to release an episode each week after its first installment launches. With four unique episodes covering different sections of the story, you'll venture across the island while also experiencing events from the past that have great significance. With the popularity of episodic gaming and shifting TV viewing habits, Capcom wants fans to engage in 'water-cooler' style conversations after each episode. As with the original, Revelations 2 will play with perspective and time, showing things through the eyes of another, which ultimately tie into the present events. Since each episode ends on a cliffhanger, the clues and references left behind should arouse discussion. Though, if episodic games aren't your thing, you can always wait for the full package, which coincides with the release of the final episode. It was great to be in the shoes of Claire again while also getting to see Moira Burton, whom was referenced all the way back in the original game -- though she was definitely a lot more foul-mouthed and punk-ish than expected. You haven't lived until you've heard someone in a Resident Evil game say "What in the cock did I just see?" I suppose Revelations 2 is aiming to retain the strange dialog from classic games. In order to survive the prison's dangers, Claire and Moira will have to work together. While Claire will handle most of the combat and action, Moira offers support abilities, such as using a flashlight to navigate dark areas, and finding hidden items. At any time you can switch between the two characters, as each has their own role. Oddly enough, Moira is adverse to guns and refuses to use them entirely, even during such trying circumstances. While Claire can definitely handle herself in high-risk situations, Moira will need to be cautious and avoid conflict, as the only defense she has is a crowbar and flashlight, which can momentarily blind the Afflicted. Each character has their own inventory menus, meaning you'll have to switch out resources and divvy up health items. Although Moira seems like she'd be an annoying character to escort, she largely stays out of danger during combat. In some cases, you can use neat tactics between the characters to get the upper hand on your enemies. Blinding the Afflicted with Moira's flashlight can allow Claire to deliver devastating blows to the stunned enemies. One thing that became apparent early on was how responsive the movement is. As one of the first RE games to allow both moving and shooting with expanded melee combat, Revelations definitely improved on issues that plagued past titles. In Revelations 2, movement and aiming feel much tighter, and with the addition of a dodge button, you'll no longer have to rely on the spotty contextual action dodge. Moreover, item management is far riskier than before. Inventory management is in real time, and using health items is no longer instantaneous. For the first time in the series, players will be able to use crouching as a means of navigation. While crouching, you can sneak past enemies or get the jump on them. This is especially handy during areas where you are vulnerable and need to evade the enemy. I got the impression that the danger is much higher in this title, and it seems the developers want players to feel more in control when it comes to how best to handle the situation. Of course, every Resident Evil game needs a set of creatures to fight, and the sequel has them in the form of the Afflicted. The former residents of the prison were infected with a virus that turned them into mutated creatures that stalk and hunt anyone who isn't under the influence. Resident Evil fans will recognize them as a mix between past series enemies -- the Ooze's muddy and melted exterior with the Ganado or Majini's brutality and resourcefulness. While they're a challenging presence in the prison, they felt derivative compared to other types of monsters from the franchise's past. But, this was just the beginning of the game; here's hoping they have more tricks in store. Though I was a bit disappointed to not get a glimpse of the returning Raid Mode, I was happy to hear that it will unlock after completion of the first episode. So, fans of the addictive, super fun action gameplay will be happy to jump back in early on. Moreover, Raid Mode will feature online co-op for those looking to take on the difficult challenges with a partner. The mystery surrounding Revelation 2's plot is one of its greatest strengths, and discussing the story with other fans after each episode should add intrigue to the experience. Given time to play the first episode for about half an hour, I very much want to know more about what led up to the events in the prison, and which other characters from the series' past are involved. This will be an interesting experiment for Resident Evil, and I'm keen on seeing how it'll unfold.
Resident Evil photo
To binge or not to binge...
There's certainly been intrigue surrounding Resident Evil: Revelations 2. Since its existence was leaked a few months back and several cryptic images of a derelict prison made the rounds, there has been speculation about what...

Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

New Resident Evil: Remastered video has four improvements to show you


The catch is it's in Japanese
Oct 30
// Brett Makedonski
Alessandro told us last week that Resident Evil was a difficult game to remaster. That's because it's more than a simple upgrade to HD. This Japanese video gives a bit of first-hand insight as to some of the features that Ca...
Promoted Blog photo
Promoted Blog

Fangs for the Memories: Two Way Mirror of Terror


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Oct 28
// TheDustinThomas
[Dtoid community blogger TheDustinThomas shares with us his memory of one of the best jump scares in the entire Resident Evil series. Want to see your own stuff appear on the front page? Go write something! --Occams...

Resident Evil was a difficult game to remaster in HD

Oct 23 // Alessandro Fillari
Resident Evil Remastered (PS3, PS4 [previewed], Xbox 360, Xbox One, PC)Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomRelease Date: Early 2015 Resident Evil Remastered is a high-def release of Capcom's 2002 remake of the original game from 1996. Set in a seemingly abandoned mansion in the woods, the elite police unit S.T.A.R.S. must investigate and uncover the mysteries behind a series of gruesome murders. Taking control of either Chris Redfield or Jill Valentine, players will experience the events from their unique perspectives and uncover a greater conspiracy that will haunt them for years to come. More than a decade after its release, fans still hold the remake as one of the best entries in the series. Blending enhanced visuals with greatly refined gameplay, RE devotees were yearning for more titles in this vein. But since the release of Resident Evil 4 in 2005, and along with the influence of the hugely popular live-action films, the series has steered toward more action-adventure gameplay and scenarios. While Revelations and its upcoming sequel are certainly a blend of the series' action and survival aspects, there's still a desire for the pure survival horror experience that came with Resident Evil. And that desire will undoubtedly be satisfied here. The most talked about aspect of REmastered is the updated visuals, and with good reason. Considering the unique circumstances of this HD reworking, many fans are worried that this might end up like a certain other botched remaster. Standard-definition televisions and the 4:3 aspect ratio were commonplace in 2002, but those aren't the only issues Capcom faced for the remake. Resident Evil blended 2D background images and in-game FMV (lighting, candles, and other 2D animated visuals) along with 3D characters and objects. As the 2D backgrounds were set in stone and obviously couldn't be reworked, this made creating an HD remaster with a 16:9 aspect ratio a difficult proposition. Original Speaking with producer Yoshiaki Hirabayashi, he described at length the challenges the team had to tackle in order to maintain the original style during the transition into HD. "The biggest challenge for us in raising the resolution was the backgrounds themselves and the effects in them. Originally, these had been created from still images, so there was a lot of work done by hand to the assets we had in order to raise the quality bar," he said. "If the original data had been large enough, this would have been a relatively easy process, but the assets we're working with were created for a game over a decade ago, so we didn't have a lot of high-resolution source material to work from. We had to find a way to take what we had on hand and work hard to make resolution and other adjustments bit by bit." In order to work around these limitations, the developers used editing and manipulation techniques to get the most out of the graphics, while retaining the 'look' of the original game. Most apparent of the changes are the use of cropping and pan & scan techniques. The former sections out the desired part of the image that serves as our visual focus, while the latter gives the illusion of a moving camera to keep the action and important aspects of the picture in focus. Remastered Initially, I found the HD look to be a bit jarring. Not because I'm a purist, but I was so used to original that it was noticeable where changes were made. The static look of the original is very much an element of the game's atmosphere, so seeing the focus shift around and certain areas of background cropped out was instantly apparent. Having said that, I did find the HD aesthetic to be remarkable. The screenshots don't do the visuals justice; in motion you see a number of the visual upgrades working at once, and it helps to breathe new life into the game. Granted, there are some noticeable places where the background looks slightly stretched out, but I still found they had a greater level of detail. In addition to this, I felt the new touches to the animated atmospheric details helped make the environments feel more terrifying and spooky -- which was yet another challenge for the developers. "As far as effects are concerned, these were all redone from scratch," said Hirabayashi. "Even then, we had the original designer on hand to personally look over all of these and ensure that they were in line with his vision. We used multiple techniques depending on the needs of a particular scene. Our goal was to preserve the feeling and atmosphere of a given scene while raising the resolution. Each scene, each cut, was judged on its own merits as we determined the best way to handle them one at a time. That was a tough process. There is definitely a sort of flavor or sensibility in backgrounds created as 2D pieces that can be very hard to replicate in polygons." Moreover, the 3D character models have been updated as well. The texture work on all the models is significantly improved, giving them some much-needed polish and detail. But sensing that graphical changes might upset purists, Capcom has included an option to switch back to the original visuals and 4:3 resolution at any time within the options menu. Not content with just offering updated visuals, the team looked to add gameplay tweaks and other content to the remaster. In addition to new costumes, specifically the Resident Evil 5 BSAA outfits for Jill and Chris, Remastered features a brand new control type called 'modern' mode. With it enabled, players can use the analog stick for auto-run and 360-degree movement without having to deal with the traditional and somewhat cumbersome 'tank' controls. Now when I first heard about the controls, I felt that a new movement method would undermine much of the terror by giving players too much freedom, especially when you consider enemy AI and movement was designed around players using tank-style controls. But Hirabayashi was well aware of the difference it would make and had the team behind the remaster rework the controls while maintaining a balance. "We spent a great deal of time fine tuning everything from the characters' movement speeds to the button layout in order to replicate as closely as we could the tempo and difficulty of the original control scheme," said Hirabayashi. "I think that people who have played the original iteration of this title will much prefer the original controls as that is how the game was initially designed. That said, we know that there is also a portion of the audience who will be experiencing the game for the very first time. For those uninitiated in this series who may be more accustomed to modern 3D games and controls, I imagine they might have a hard time wrapping their heads around the original scheme. By implementing both, we are able to bring new players in without making sweeping changes to the overall difficulty." As one of the defining aspects of classic RE was the...unusual control type, it certainly felt sacrilegious to use an easier method of movement. For better or worse, this also cemented its reputation as a punishing game that demanded precision. With that said, I found myself taking quite a liking to the new controls after some time passed. I appreciated not having to hold down the run button to move with haste, and I also liked being able to round corners faster. But I still found myself having to readjust my movement when moving out from a different screen, which was a common problem for classic RE. Though if you're not a fan of the controls, or want to go for an old-school run, then you're totally free to select the classic control type. What made me appreciate the modern setup more was how I would utilize both options at once. Modern mode also has the classic tank controls on the d-pad, and in some cases I preferred using those over the new type. While I used modern controls for basic traversal throughout the mansion, I mostly stuck with the d-pad for combat, as back-stepping wasn't available for modern mode, and the aiming wasn't as precise. After spending about an hour with the game, I felt right at home with the HD remaster, which I imagine must be the best compliment you give it. While I came into this series with RE4, I ended up playing the classic games to see how they stack up, and found a new appreciation for the series. With the release of REmastered, it certainly brings up a discussion for fans about which style of game is more faithful to the series. And while that debate can be worthwhile, Hirabayashi feels both types of Resident Evil experiences can coexist. "As for the RE series itself, we have fans on both sides of the fence. Each user has their own specific taste and things they look for in games. I don't think we can narrow this down to finding the 'right' answer since there are actually a plethora of 'questions' we're attempting to address," said the producer. "For me personally, the important part of this series is the survival horror aspect. Whether a game tends more toward the older style, focuses on action, or even breaks ground and does something entirely new, the important part is that that core element of survival horror is maintained. Put simply, the specific style of a given game is less important to me. What's important is that survival horror ethos." I'm quite liking the direction the franchise is taking. It's not too often you see publishers hold up both the past and present simultaneously, and with two upcoming releases showing the best aspects of the series' past, I'm very much looking forward to seeing what the future holds for Resident Evil. With the remaster set for release early next year, it's a great time for new players to take the plunge. But for those who want an excuse to re-enter survival horror, Resident Evil Remastered will rekindle that familiar feeling of dread.
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Capcom talks challenges of remastering a classic
With the rise of high-definition re-releases, many fans have likely made a wish list of titles they hope will eventually get the HD treatment. Whether they be classics from the '90s or 2000s, we're seeing a variety of games f...

Dr. Capcom's monster: Resident Evil 5 blows

Oct 23 // Steven Hansen
Resident Evil 4, on the other hand, is a brilliant game. It eschews the tangled mess that is the Resident Evil series' canon for a camp romp that doesn't take itself too seriously and is peerless in its pacing. That's why it's so insulting that Resident Evil 5 tries to ape its predecessor, and so pathetic in the numbers of ways it fails. It's Resident Evil 4 sans creativity. In its stead, Capcom funneled in a healthy dose of blockbuster action and brown, war-torn homogeny in an attempt to echo the then-current zeitgeist. They didn't go full tilt, however, which is what's more depressing. The Resident Evil 4 framework is there, but in a sort of uncanny valley state of disrepair that makes everything that is bad about Resident Evil 5 more stark. It's an imperfect clone devoid of heart. It's Resident Evil 4, the stupid Resident Evil canon and Black Hawk Down thrown into a blender then dumped into a stew pot as a dozen different chefs seasoned it to taste. And it worked, as far as Capcom is concerned, which is the most disheartening part. It is their best-selling game. Yes, Capcom. While a couple years ago I might have been content to praise them for revitalizing the fighting genre with Street Fighter IV, since then even fighting game fans are sick of Capcom's nickel and diming and rereleasing of the same titles with new superlatives tacked on.  This is the same Capcom under which Lost Planet and Dead Rising—a bulk of their new IPs last generation and some of its most successful—essentially had to be developed in secret, according to former Capcom development head and Mega Man creator Keiji Inafune. He even said Capcom had a company-wide mandate that 70 to 80 percent of efforts were to be towards sequels and that the 30 to 20 left for making new IP would, in practice, never receive approval. This is the same Capcom that tried to absorb the posthumously beloved Clover Studio, makers of Viewtiful Joe, Godhand, and Okami, whose pivotal members preferred to abandon the Capcom-funded independent company than to cede creative control. But I already had a sad for Clover so I'll ignore the easy punching bag. Or, at least, restrict my jabs to the Frankenstein's monster it created. Just look at its opening. It's a Tarantino-level imitation of Resident Evil 4's, but with the action jacked up to eleven. [embed]282960:56065:0[/embed] Resident Evil 4 has an opening cutscene that lasts several minutes. In it, we've an unsettling fog creeping in and a camera set up lurking behind foliage in the forest, while one of the agents stops off to take a whizz at the side of the road. It lets us know that Leon and his escorts are being hunted. That they're unsafe. That you, the player, are unsafe. Easy telegraphs, but appropriate. Then, desolation. You leave the car, now in control of Leon, and have to walk up to a lone house in a creepy wooded area. You meet an unassuming and unsettling homeowner who yells at you in a foreign language and then tries to kill you. You have limited ammo and more of them are outside. You're alone and in a hostile environment. You run back to the car and see skid marks leading off the cliff; peer over the precipice to find the flaming wreck. Again, alone. Next is a desolate, eerie trek onward. You come to a lone shack right off the beaten path. There has to be something in it; either something ready to kill you, something you can use, or both. You whip into the shack, ready your weapon and find a strange mix of fear and relief at the woman impaled on the wall, suspending in midair by the pitchfork smashed through her face. Maybe you fire a few accidental shots out of surprise at the grisly scene. Next, of course, is the village center, in which disaffected, crazed people placidly go about their business while your driver burns in a funeral pyre with a hook through his chest. Just in case you were holding out hope that you weren't alone. Oh, and pretty soon—after you maybe feel like you're getting a handle on dealing with all of these enemies at once (or you're scrambling around for ammo)—a lunatic wearing a burlap sack over his head is going to come at you with a chainsaw. Resident Evil 5? No longer are you wandering into a quaint, eerie pueblo in isolation. You're running into a modern town that looks like it was ripped right out of Black Hawk Down. There's nondescript military personnel with covered faces saying military sounding things driving around in heavily armored jeeps with big guns. It is the middle of the day. Then Chris Redfield, driving a military jeep in the middle of the day in a wide open savannah, wearing chill bro sunglasses and expositioning like a motherfucker. He gets into the populated (by regular humans) city and then Sheva's ass eclipses the frame. Just her ass. The camera lingers for a while so you can ogle the sexy native temptress in a manner that would do Thomas Jefferson proud. When she moves, you realize Chris' arms and neck are bigger than his head. He is grotesque, but also strong, formidable. [embed]282960:56067:0[/embed] Once you get control, you don't have to wander into a creepy abandoned house. You just walk straight in a well-lit, politically unstable country until a cutscene happens; in it, they finally give you some spooky music and every regular citizen who was walking around is gone. Then you keep walking straight and a guy gives you some guns. Then you see some voodoo shit and animal sacrifice—hey, maybe it'll start getting creepy. Then a not-so-short load screen before you're finally in a room with a dude who runs at you and Chris has to kill him indiscriminately. The guy doesn't linger there to let you ponder whether killing him is okay. The scene doesn't let you think about anything. It forces you into reflex action and then it's over. A waste. Next you're funneled down more corridors with no threats present while the game feeds you ammo pickups. Then, finally, it strives to complete its rendition of Resident Evil 4's opening, but instead of wandering hesitantly into an eerie village, alone, where a man you were just talking to burns and placid monsters till soil, what is there? Well, there's the public execution of the guy who sold you weapons. Except that cutscene reveals the big baddie too early, dampening the impact when he finally shows up. You've also got a guy with aviators yelling into a megaphone and monster people sprinting around, eventually towards the house you're in. Instead of requiring you to take an unfortunate jaunt into the domicile of the killers, Resident Evil 5's opening just has them dash toward you, while you're in a nice, semi-defendable building as if you were playing Call of Duty's Nazi Zombie mode. Oh, and the scene ends with helicopters and rocket launchers. Being saved by a helicopter at one point in Resident Evil 4 felt like god himself was reaching down from the heavens to extricate Leon from this terrible place. This has no impact. It lazily progresses the plot in the explodiest way possible after the context-less, ill-thought-out, Resident Evil 4 aping set up. It doesn't establish any tension. It just assaults the senses and rewards you for your killflexes. If it wasn't so poorly done, along with the rest of the game, I could excuse this as some sort of nod to its predecessor. Instead, it just feels like the development team had absolutely no idea what to do, so they took Resident Evil 4's opening and turned the volume up really loud, hoping people would like it. Again, this speaks to the worst part about Resident Evil 5: it's a broken and homogenized Resident Evil 4. It's Gus van Sant's Psycho remake remade again by Michael Bay.  [embed]282960:56066:0[/embed] Resident Evil 5 needed to be even more exciting than its predecessor, so Capcom replaced Resident Evil 4's inventory system with something that remained in real time. And is broken. It's not about the realism angle. Resident Evil 4's inventory system just worked sensibly, with items taking up space relative to their size. In Resident Evil 5, an egg takes up as much space as a rocket-propelled grenade, body armor inexplicably takes up a spot instead of being worn (as it was in Resident Evil 4) and the co-op play, coupled with a smaller inventory, necessitates incessant inventory tradesies that is much more irritating than rearranging your attaché case. It's one thing for Capcom to reuse the Resident Evil 4 formula, another for it to take the formula and then noticeably break parts of it, making the screw-ups that much more uncanny. There are the obvious criticisms. Sheva and cooperative play. The most frequent excuse for Resident Evil 5 I hear is, "Well, it's a good co-op game." Why? Because it allows two people to play at once and it isn't too broken? Because that's the barrier of entry for a game to be a good co-op game. It's a lot easier to enjoy a bad game if you've got a partner. EA even built a trilogy around this idea. That doesn't make it good. I've played plenty of awful games that were made decidedly better just by having someone else present, there to share the misery firsthand. Resident Evil 5, for example, because we got to rip it in tandem for being stupid and bad. I'm not a jilted Resident Evil (1) fan who specifically hates the move away from the franchise's horror origins to action—I love Resident Evil 4 to death, after all. There is something unsettling about the conformity of it all. The co-op does undercut any sense of eeriness and tension. You either have an annoying AI partner who is frustrating enough to take you out of the experience or you have a friend with whom to talk about that asshole at work who forwards everyone "meme" pictures and threw out your curry because it "smelled weird." Isolation is scary. I'm sure there can be a frightening game with cooperative play, but not this one, not with two strong characters with fictional special forces training who are armed to the teeth. Not with Chris Redfield's stupidly enormous biceps and neck (remember when he looked like a human and the game had more colors than brown, tan and sepia?). It's not just that it isn't scary, though. Resident Evil 4 wasn't all that scary. It's that there is no finesse or direction. No unique style. No atmosphere. It's Resident Evil 4 hideously re-skinned in high contrast, war-torn brown HD. And abridged. Not just shorter, but with variety removed and no feel for pacing. The second half of the game just plays like Gears of War, with contextual cover thrown in and a lot of zombie monster things that shoot you with machine guns. It just tries to be as loud and exciting and rock punching as possible without reprieve or juxtaposition. Resident Evil 5 is technically proficient and playable, but it's creatively bankrupt. A soulless, cobbled together Frankenstein's monster with all the trappings of Video Games Circa 2009 stapled onto Resident Evil 4's spine. 
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COMPLETE GLOBAL SATURATION
Halloween approaches and my evenings have been filled with practical effects and Italian prog rock as The Thing, Inferno, Suspiria et al. grace my TV. Dale North recently wrote on why survival horror might just be old ha...

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Resident Evil goes manga, serves as a prequel to Resident Evil 6


New title from Viz Media
Oct 17
// Dale North
Resident Evil goes manga in a new series from Viz Media. Resident Evil: The Marhawa Desire serves as a prequel to Capcom's Resident Evil 6, created by Naomi Serizawa. The 5-volume series launches November 18 on Viz's Signatur...

Is classic Survival Horror considered old fashioned now?

Oct 15 // Dale North
[embed]282542:55979:0[/embed] Survival horror games aren't that old. I did enjoy several of the early graphical adventures that had scary themes. Clicking around haunted houses wasn't nearly as interactive as, say, Resident Evil, but the chance for creepiness was still there and that was worthy of a play for this thrill seeker. Alone in the Dark still holds up, I'd say. Back in the PlayStation/Saturn era, the genre was still shaping up. Resident Evil got us rolling, Silent Hill started a sick craving, and games like Clock Tower and D served as a sort of bridge between games that gave us the creeps and ones that would actually make us jump out of our seats. The scares were there, but some of the stronger hooks that were soon to draw so many fans in were still budding. When we really got going, back in the early 2000s, you could find legitimate scares in games. I look back at those times fondly. Between the prior console generation's titles I missed and the new ones coming out, I had a steady IV drip of freaky experiences to work through. I played them all, too. The big ones like Clock Tower and Resident Evil weren't any more important to me than the less popular ones, like Dreamcast games Carrier and the not-so-hot Blue Stinger. Remember Haunting Ground? Rule of Rose? Both the Fatal Frame and Silent Hill franchises had my heart. And, oh man, Siren.  [embed]282542:55980:0[/embed] Recent talk about how survival horror is dying and giving way to scary action games scares me. Yes, tastes change, gamers change, and sales results speak. But I'd love to believe that there's a number of fans out there that still crave checking fifty doors to eventually find that one that has gruel-covered, multi-limbed baddies behind it. I'd love to believe that there is a group of fans that think that we need to get back to basics. That being helplessly lost in the fog is a million times better than shooting aliens with an overgrown nail gun.  I blame Resident Evil 4. But before you come after me with your "muerte" chants and sharp implements, know that I love this game as much as you do. I don't need to tell you how well it balanced the scares and combat equally, or how it launched a thousand memes. Hell of a game. But the problem was that it sold so well that Capcom began chasing sales numbers over scares. And then, like a flashlight flipped on in the dark, all the other game-making ghouls came out for a juicy hunk of their own. The genre hasn't been the same since. I'm not out to write the same piece Jim Sterling shared some years back as he did a fine job then. But has the situation continued to decline since then? Fatal Frame—the first game—hasn't aged well, I've just found. Neither have its early sequels, actually. Not on a technical level. Not to this games professional that has spent most of the last year with his face in shiny, polished, high-definition games. But nostalgia goes a long way, as do dark, gritty textures. The low-res murk of the earlier survival games are my puffy Nintendo clouds and dancing trees. Good feels. Great memories.  So I've been screaming at night this past week during my replaying of these games, waiting for The Evil Within to come out. I'm usually playing late at night when everything is quiet and dark. It doesn't matter that these games are old and haven't aged well or that I've played them many times before. I'm still quietly giggling at myself when I get wrapped up in exploring the too-dark hallways or when the echo-y sound effects catch me off guard. I've wondered on several occasions this past week if I'm going to enjoy The Evil Within as much as I'm enjoying replaying these old PS2 games.  You can blame the market, or lazy developers, or disconnected management, but we've also changed. It feels like gamers are less open to being freaked out these days. I guess it's hard to ask players to come off their super powers, air strikes, and unlimited ammo and start playing something where your only defense is a camera. Or running away. I felt like the only person who liked Silent Hill: Shattered Memories back in 2009. While I was singing its praises, others were downplaying it for having no combat, or worse, for being on the Wii. Who cares?! I have fond memories of sweating, running (virtually) scared for my life. For me, that makes for an outstanding survival horror. I feel like a few bad eggs have people writing off modern-day horror games. Not-scary games, or scary-for-the-wrong-reasons re-releases. Resident Evil 5 was one of the biggest disappointments of the genre for me. Fun game? I guess. But not even close to scary. Nothing's scary about a co-op buddyfest. And that probably bummed out a lot of fellow survival horror fans off expecting another Resident Evil 4. But this doesn't make Silent Hill: Homecoming a bad game, does it? Amnesia: The Dark Descent is still brilliant, right?  It's a mindset thing, too. That inverted movement system from the older top-down games would be called broken or at least cumbersome by today's gamer. For me, the challenging movement added to the tension. And it's the same for the slushy and slow combat systems of some of the PS2 survival horror games. Some may have hated it. I thought that it made perfect sense that these grotesque horrors from the underworld would be that difficult to take down. That low-res grit? That's an asset, not a tech problem!  I sometimes worry that our reviews and feedback from those old games we loved served as nails in the classic survival horror games coffin. Aside from the change in focus or mechanics, maybe it's just  that current-day horror games are less scary. There are lots of reasons why, too. Remember how every room in Fatal Frame 2 had its own camera angle? What you couldn't see made you just as nervous as any monster would. It just felt lovingly crafted. Regardless of how you felt about Silent Hill 4: The Room, you had to at least give it that they went above and beyond in making it feel really fucked up. Even now, this many years later, that game had some of the most disturbing imagery I've seen in a game.  [embed]282542:55981:0[/embed] There was a nice bunch of independent horror games that hit recently that give this old-fashioned gamer hope. Outlast and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs filled voids that those action-y games didn't. Even Slender did something for me. This year hasn't been the worst. If Alien: Isolation doesn't make you feel like you're going to piss yourself, I don't know what will. The jury is mixed on brand new Mikami release The Evil Within (review coming soon!), but it's something, right? But I'm holding out for something a lot like the survival horror classics. The next Silent Hill 2, if you will. Something with the spirit of Fatal Frame 2. Something that's not scared to go weaponless/powerless. Maybe we can revisit Japanese horror a bit more. How about way less action and way more fucked-up storylines about horrible orphanages. Try an openness to there being gamers out there who loved walking down a seemingly endless staircase for five minutes. Have some faith, game makers. Ditch the guns and the HUDs. Get with the wiggly mannequins.  [embed]282542:55978:0[/embed] Don't let me down, P.T. I got more out of that "interactive trailer" than I have with any other full horror game as of late. Until then, I'll go on with the late night replays of all of my favorites, continuing to milk them for all their scares until another good fix comes along. It's less about being stuck in the past and more about just needing more of what I love so much. Scare me, someone. Please.
Is Survival Horror dead? photo
Not scary anymore
I like to be scared. I'm not some kind of dark-obsessed weirdo, though. I just really enjoy the feeling of being tense or terrified, so much so that I used to think that there was something wrong with me. Maybe there is. A fe...

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Resident Evil: Revelations 2 release date is Feb. 17, says PS Store [Update]


Maybe
Oct 14
// Dale North
[Update: The official Resident Evil Twitter calls the date a placeholder and says that the true release date is still unconfirmed.] Are these things usually wrong? Wait, don't answer that. But the PlayStation Store is at leas...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

Here's a little more footage of the Resident Evil remaster


It's not much, but it's something
Oct 01
// Brett Makedonski
Remember that time that we all collectively contributed to the complete downfall of Raccoon City and got rewarded with some sweet costumes? You should, it was only a few days ago. Well, we're also getting rewarded with a lit...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

Here's our Resident Evil reward for infecting Raccoon City


It's costumes because of course it's costumes
Sep 26
// Jordan Devore
Well, we did it -- the contagion spread and now Raccoon City is 100% screwed up. Go us. As a reward for essentially just registering with Capcom's site for the upcoming Resident Evil remaster to help "spread the virus," Chris...

Resident Evil: Revelations 2 raises more questions than answers

Sep 19 // Brett Makedonski
After enemy numero uno had been dealt with, Moira tapped into her inquisitive side and questioned "What the COCK did I just see?" She's kind of awkward at cursing. Just a bit earlier, she outwardly said that she "didn't give a moist barrel of fucks." Maybe she'll grow into it; she's still young, after all. As the girls traversed the overrun scientific facility (that had jail cells, for some reason), Claire keenly observed that it's sort of a dangerous place. She tried giving Moira a gun, who firmly declined and declared that she "won't hold a gun again, not after what happened." Okay then. However, she's comfortable holding a flashlight, so she's relegated to light duty and spotting resources for Claire to pick up. Along the way, I found a gem tucked inside a desk that obviously acted as some sort of currency. I asked PR what purpose that served, to which I was given the response "we're not talking about that yet." Of course. However, Capcom alluded to the fact that it'd be used to purchase "character-related stuff." That's better than nothing, I guess. Continuing forward, Revelations 2 made the executive decision to throw a whole lot more enemies at me. This was a bit of a problem, because it also puts an emphasis on resource management, meaning that I needed to make every shot count. That's easier to do than I initially figured, because Revelations 2 actually controls decently. That's not always the case in survival horror games. [embed]281060:55605:0[/embed] However, control competence aside, I still managed to find myself in quite the snafu. With three aggressors and not nearly enough bullets (the knife doesn't do a whole lot of damage), I had trouble either fighting them or running away (those bastards can climb ladders faster than I can). With a fortunate combination of dodging, healing, and finding more ammo, I eventually cleared the room, but in critical condition. I didn't want to continue. I knew one of these dudes was going to jump out, scare me, and then kill me. Cautiously, I proceeded, knowing that my fate was all but sealed. Turns out I was wrong. The demo ended shortly thereafter, as the two ladies questioned what the deal was with the glowing green bracelets they were wearing. Lucky me. My introduction to Resident Evil: Revelations 2 continually did that -- raise questions. Why were these two imprisoned? What happened at this facility? Why are we wearing bacelets? The list goes on and on. Something PR was happy to talk about was the way in which the game will be released. On Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3, PS4, and PC, it's episodic and priced at $5.99 per installment, with four "core" episodes planned. Each episode is estimated to be two to three hours in length the first time through. In early 2015, Capcom will start releasing weekly over the course of a month. There's a season pass for $24.99 that offers some extras, and a physical retail version for $39.99 that has even more additional content. Even though not a lot was divulged, this brief look gave some insight as to the base facets of the game. So far, it seems as if the atmosphere and combat are on-point, even if the swearing isn't. That's a perfectly acceptable start.
Resident Evil preview photo
And, Moira's really awkward at swearing
My time with Resident Evil: Revelations 2 at Tokyo Game Show was brief -- maybe 20 minutes if we're being generous. Swiftly dumped into the beginning of the game, I was left to try to unravel the mystery of what exactly ...

Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

Here's your first look at Resident Evil: Revelations 2


Get angry, because Capcom
Sep 11
// Kyle MacGregor
Capcom has unleashed the debut trailer for Resident Evil: Revelations 2, the newly announced episodic survival horror adventure starring Claire Redfield and Moira Burton.  The clip outlines the first episode's premise, ...

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