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Journey to the West photo
Journey to the West

Minecraft just got Journey to the West skins


For Pocket Edition and Windows 10
Feb 08
// Chris Carter
To celebrate the Year of the Monkey, Mojang just dropped some Journey to the West skins for the Pocket Edition and Windows 10 versions of Minecraft. "Red Boy" and "Guanyin" are free, but the rest (Princess Iron Fan, Lord Hund...
Hitman photo
Hitman

The Hitman beta starts this week, get a quick look at it


Oh that Agent 47
Feb 08
// Chris Carter
Hit "don't call it a reboot" Man is set to arrive in March (but not fully, since it's episodic -- gaming!), but before then you can get a taste of the beta. It drops on February 12 on PS4, and PC on February 19. Sorry Xbox On...
Dark Souls III photo
Dark Souls III

Come watch Dark Souls III's opening cinematic


Scholars of the First Spoiler
Feb 08
// Joe Parlock
Bandai Namco and From Software have released the opening cinematic of Dark Souls III. Be warned, though, as it obviously contains massive spoilers for both the story and, presumably, at least some of the bosses. They're ver...

Review: Unravel

Feb 08 // Caitlin Cooke
Unravel (PC, Xbox One, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: Coldwood InteractivePublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: February 9, 2016MSRP: $19.99 Unravel’s story begins with an elderly woman making her way up to bed as Yarny, the game’s darling protagonist made from red yarn, comes to life downstairs. His adventure begins just outside of the cottage, roaming through the garden and into the beyond in search of lost memories made by the family that once inhabited the house, unraveling himself along the way. Yarny is able to roam freely throughout the cottage, a landing area for the ten chapters in the game which are accessed through framed pictures. Each photo transports our hero to the area it was taken where he encounters fragments of lost family memories, pictures frozen in time. At the end of each chapter he places the memories into a photo album that starts to come to life, weaving pictures into a story. [embed]339641:62166:0[/embed] To capture all the memories you guide Yarny through various terrain and strategize on how to make it past obstacles without unraveling him too much, as he only has limited amounts of yarn before reaching another spool. At first the game throws a lot of yarn techniques and mechanics at you quickly, but with time they start to become second nature. Coming up with clever solutions using environmental props along with grappling, swinging, climbing, rappelling, and tying knots for points of resistance are key to making it through. The yarn puzzles are fairly easy to figure out without being too simple -- each task is fairly small and broken up, not requiring long chains of thought but at the same time being challenging enough to feel rewarded when making it through. There were a few areas I was stuck on for longer than I’d like, but for the most part I found them to be fun and clever. Surprisingly, the levels never felt repetitive and the game was kept fresh by experimenting with the yarn’s mechanics in new environments. Outside influences also give a bit of flavor, requiring additional thought behind the puzzles -- for example, landslides, animal chases, and active machinery all play additional parts to the game beyond the yarn. Because the yarn is finite and will stop unraveling if you use too much, being cautious with solutions is critical to making it past obstacles. Yarny will get visibly distressed and emaciated if you pull too far away -- but don’t worry, you won’t kill him, he just won’t stretch any farther. If you find yourself in a particular bind (literal or no) you are able to reset back to the last save point by holding the down button. This is an extremely useful and necessary feature as it is quite possible to accidentally get yourself in an unsolvable situation. Spools act as save points along with providing the additional thread, and are fairly regular throughout the levels, however there are some small stretches that can wear thin if you’re not careful and make too many mistakes. Unravel as a whole is a whimsical and endearing adventure, pulling you further into the atmosphere through the intricate textures and bright effects. In one of my favorite levels you make your way through a snowy farm, rolling pine cones to make snowballs. The environment was so realistically captured and joyful that I felt I was right there with Yarny rolling around in the snow. Textures and light within the environment are slightly exaggerated, but in that magical way that makes fond memories stand out brighter. Everything from a log to a puddle comes to life beyond what’s contained in reality, almost like watching the most beautiful sceneries replay in your head. There’s a certain sadness to the experience that I can’t quite explain, perhaps lost nostalgia and a lingering familial longing that tugs at the heartstrings. It’s not necessarily "sad" or depressing in the traditional sense, but a thoughtful tale that brings forth various emotions throughout that will vary depending on the player’s personal history and connection to the story. These emotions are certainly drawn out even further by the sepia tones and lovely violin accompaniment, along with the self-discovering nature of the game. Unravel cherishes the best moments in life while recognizing the hard battles we sometimes face as families, all wrapped up within delightful gameplay and stunning scenery. The atmosphere is so compelling that I couldn’t help but feel like a piece of my own story was wrapped up in the game with the rest of the photo album. It’s rare but a special thing when a game manages to impart a story that touches strings deep in the heart, and Unravel manages to meet and exceed this feat. Get ready to have all the feels. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Unravel review photo
Simply beautiful
At first glance Unravel feels akin to LittleBigPlanet with its adorably miniature yarn-clad mascot, but don’t let it fool you. It’s a heartfelt story with little communication beyond imprinted memories, woven with...

3DM photo
3DM

Pirating group 3DM had an internal meeting, decided 'not to crack for a year'


To see the impact
Feb 08
// Chris Carter
After an "internal meeting," piracy group 3DM (the same group that couldn't crack Just Cause 3) has decided that it will not crack any single-player games "for a year," so that it can "look at the situation in a year's t...
The Division photo
The Division

Ubisoft deliberately keeping PC version of The Division 'in check' with consoles


PCMR 4EVA
Feb 08
// Vikki Blake
[Update: Ubisoft has released the following statement regarding the PC version: "It has come to our attention that a comment from one of our team members has been perceived by some members of the community to imply the...
Battalion 1944 photo
Battalion 1944

Is it about time to revive the WW2 shooter?


Apparently so
Feb 07
// Kyle MacGregor
Years ago, World War II shooters were everywhere. Then the bubble burst. Activision, EA, and all the pretenders trained their sights on more contemporary settings, quickling transitioning series like Call of Duty, Medal of Ho...
Visage photo
Visage

Visage is attempting to expand on P.T. at a much deeper level


The Zackest game there ever was
Feb 07
// Zack Furniss
If you want to get Zack Furniss's attention, mentioning Phantasmagoria, Silent Hill, and P.T. while having a Babadook-lookin' homie in your game is sure bet. SadSquare Studios is attempting to crowdfund Vi...
Titanfall photo
Titanfall

Report: Titanfall 2 will include single-player mode


Retelling American war stories in space
Feb 07
// Kyle MacGregor
Titanfall 2 hasn't been revealed yet, but a sequel to Respawn Entertainment's 2014 shooter is in the works and is planned for release "sometime late this year or early next," according to the series' lead writer Jesse St...
Street Fighter photo
Street Fighter

It looks like Street Fighter V whitewashed Sean


From Sean Combs to Sean Astin
Feb 07
// Jonathan Holmes
Though we likely won't know for sure until the full game is released on February 16th, right now it appears that Brazilian Street Fighter III brawler and little brother to Street Fighter V's Laura has gone through a radi...
Song of the Deep photo
Song of the Deep

Thirsty for details about Song of the Deep? Drink up this video


Not my best headline
Feb 06
// Zack Furniss
Us folks at Destructoid didn't attend PAX South this year, so we've been keeping our collective eyes on any information that continues to dribble out now that it's over. Windows Central attended the event, and was able t...
DCUO cross-play photo
DCUO cross-play

DC Universe Online rolls out cross-platform play


PS3, PS4, and PC
Feb 06
// Jordan Devore
As of this week, DC Universe Online now supports cross-platform play between PC, PlayStation 3, and PlayStation 4. That means you'll be able to play alongside folks who own the game on a different platform, "including in grou...

Review: A Boy and His Blob

Feb 06 // Brett Makedonski
A Boy and His Blob (Linux, PC, Mac, PS4, PS Vita, Wii, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: WayForward TechnologiesPublisher: Majesco EntertainmentReleased: October 13, 2009 (Wii), January 20, 2016 (Re-released on other platforms)MSRP: $9.99 WayForward's take on A Boy and His Blob is intentionally vague and that's possibly its best quality. In an opening sequence reminiscent of EarthBound, a child is woken in the middle of the night to a crash outside his window. After a brief bout of exploration, Blob is discovered. From there, it's just adventuring for the sake of adventuring, and saving the world for the sake of saving the world. Blob is billed as the greatest asset, a shapeshifter who can perform about a dozen different functions. For example, Boy feeds Blob a jellybean and Blob turns into an anvil. Or a soccer ball. Or a trampoline. Over the course of 40-some levels, variations of this sequence play out hundreds (maybe thousands) of times as the main function of this puzzle platformer. You wouldn't think it from the game's title, but Blob is actually a tertiary character. If it were named more accurately, this would be called A Boy and His Jellybean Wheel. A disconcerting amount of time is spent in a time-frozen state clumsily navigating a menu of the level's eight-or-so pre-assigned jellybeans. After a jellybean is thrown and Blob (hopefully) performs his duties, it's only a matter of seconds until you're forced to again pull up that menu. That process sucks the life out of A Boy and His Blob. Even though most of the game's levels are notably short, they often feel like arduous endeavors because the pace grinds to a crawl. Puzzle solutions are usually easily identifiable -- in fact, there are often giant signs pointing out the answer -- but their execution is needlessly slow and sluggish. [embed]338372:62152:0[/embed] Making matters worse, there are many many instances when Blob simply won't do what you want. Blob has a tendency to shift shapes just ever-so-slightly not quite where intended. It's annoying at first, but becomes a detriment in later levels. That combined with stiff and unresponsive platforming controls often leads to starting the section over from scratch.  And, that's all when Blob is actually on-screen. It's not uncommon for Blob to be missing altogether, either because it was left behind or it hopped into an abyss. When this happens, the game would like for the balloon jellybean to be tossed, causing Blob to eventually float to your position. Mercifully, however, there's a call button that can just be impatiently pressed over and over until it balloons your way automatically, slowly but surely. What A Boy and His Blob has on its side are intangibles, of sorts. They're plucky attributes that significantly and understatedly enhance a game, but don't necessarily make a game. For instance, there's no denying A Boy and His Blob's innocent aesthetic, unspoken emotion, or charming spirit. Those are the qualities that make the game more tolerable than it would otherwise be. Without much option of anything besides leaning on the NES version's method of using Blob (a non-playable character) as the means of gameplay execution, WayForward's take on A Boy and His Blob is frustratingly imprecise and inaccurate. But, by deviating a bit and adding the jellybean wheel, it killed any momentum and turned the game into a slog. That is truly the worst of both worlds. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
A Boy and His Blob review photo
Blah-b
A Boy and His Blob, a 2009 "re-imagining" of the NES game of the same namesake (and recently re-released on current platforms), is an interesting case study. When does retro game design and a devotion to source material becom...

Umihara Kawase photo
Umihara Kawase

Umihara Kawase has returned to Steam


That didn't take too long
Feb 06
// Kyle MacGregor
The Umihara Kawase trilogy is now back on Steam, Degica has announced. The trio of bizarre platformers disappeared from Valve's store in December after their publisher Agatsuma Entertainment went out of business earlier that ...
Deals photo
Deals

Spicy weekend deals on XCOM 2, Doom, and Bayonetta 2


Something for everyone
Feb 06
// Dealzon
After last month's lull, it's weekend for games. New titles are launching left and right, like XCOM 2, which seems to be fairing well with critics and regular folks alike. If you're looking to pick it up, the best deal i...
Corgi gun photo
Corgi gun

Why yes, yes there is a corgi gun in XCOM 2


Thank you based mods
Feb 05
// Steven Hansen
Shout out to the ravioli-date-owing boo Dalé and shout out to XCOM 2, which, damn, I want to be playing right now and shout out to JonTerp whose mod turns a gun into a cute-ass corgi. It fits fight up there with the th...
TrackMania photo
TrackMania

TrackMania Turbo hits PC and consoles in March


Back on the radar you go
Feb 05
// Jordan Devore
At some point during the past several months, TrackMania Turbo slipped off my radar. Which is a shame, because it looks super good. You can air-drop from a helicopter into a race and drive upside down on magnetic rollercoaste...
Rise of the Tomb Raider photo
Rise of the Tomb Raider

First Rise of the Tomb Raider PC patch mostly just makes sure you can go 'sploring


And murdering too, I guess
Feb 05
// Brett Makedonski
Rise of the Tomb Raider is quite the good showing from Crystal Dynamics. Good enough, in fact, that we awarded it our Best Xbox Game of 2015. But, when we put it through its paces on PC, we found performance to be lackin...
H1Z1 photo
H1Z1

H1Z1 is becoming two separate games


'King of the Kill' and 'Just Survive'
Feb 05
// Jordan Devore
Daybreak plans to split up its multiplayer zombie survival game H1Z1 on February 17, 2016. It's becoming two titles: H1Z1: Just Survive, an apocalyptic open-world experience with the usual scavenging and crafting, and H1Z1: K...
 photo

Friday Night Fights - Snuggie time


Game with the Dtoid Community!
Feb 05
// Mike Martin
I feel like hot garbage. Woke up just... blech. I feel like the inside of Andy's asshole after a NARP. Heavy, floppy, and grossly wet. Anyway, games. We should play them. I still have to drag my carcass to work, so I won't be on until late, but... I don't even know. Bah, play games, make love. Eat chicken soup. *falls over* 
Steam Chinese New Year photo
Steam Chinese New Year

Steam Lunar New Year Sale has thousands of discounted games


8,910 games on sale all week
Feb 05
// Steven Hansen
Steam has a massive new sale going on through next Friday, February 12, in honor of the Lunar New Year (known 'round San Francisco as Chinese New Year). You can get hits like Romance of the Three Kingdoms 13 for only $90! The...

Review in Progress: XCOM 2

Feb 05 // Nic Rowen
XCOM 2 (PC [reviewed], Mac)Developer: Firaxis GamesPublisher: 2K GamesReleased: February 5, 2015MSRP: $59.99 I'm a sap. A total and complete sap. If a game has an option to individually customize characters, I will always engage with it to the exclusion of everything else until I'm happy with what I've done. Even more so in a game like XCOM where the stakes are high and characters run a high risk of dying a horrible, and permanent, death. What better way to make that loss feel real? When a squadie gets flayed by an alien soldier wielding a rail gun in my game, I'm not just out a decent Ranger, I've lost one of my friends. I'm guessing I'm not the only one who does this, because Firaxis leaned into the character creation element hard in XCOM 2. Before you even begin fighting the alien menace, you can hop into the character creator and start making your dream squad, filing them away to show up organically in your game as fresh recruits and VIP extraction targets. As I said, I know I'm a sap, but that didn't stop me from being positively giddy when I found a grizzled rifle-toting version of my brother in my first randomized squad. Unlike XCOM: Enemy Unknown, which had fairly limited customization options, there are tons of small, silly, character-establishing quirks to fiddle with in XCOM 2 when you should be plowing through missions and writing a review. Sunglasses, tattoos, cigarettes, scars, camo patterns, accents, all sorts of small ways to make your squad feel like yours. It does make me wonder why there are only a handful of possible faces to round out all these options, but that is a minor quibble. XCOM 2 seems harder than Enemy Unknown, but in a satisfying way. Whenever a game builds up a reputation as punishing, there is always a risk that the developers will take it too far in the sequel, ramp up the difficulty in ways that don't seem fair. So far, that doesn't seem to be the case. The challenge is stiffer, but it comes from a more varied and tactically interesting set of options and enemies than a brute force buff to enemy stats. While the aliens have always outnumbered the XCOM force, the imbalance is even greater here. Even in early missions you'll run into stacked odds. This is mitigated by the new concealment mechanic which allows your squad to move freely in stealth to setup a devastating ambush before the fight begins in earnest. Play your cards right, and you can trap the aliens in a crossfire straight out of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. It's almost unhealthy how satisfying it feels to drop three aliens on your very first turn of combat. Not that you'll always have time to get that ambush in motion. Timed missions and pressure conditions are more common in XCOM 2, urging you and your squad to overextend and take stupid risks in an effort to beat the clock. In these situations, trying to set up that ideal ambush situation can hamstring you in the end when you run out of turns to complete the mission. You have to get a feel for when you need to rush and when you have time to get cheeky. I've already managed to lose a couple of squad members (including Jane Kelly, the named tutorial character with spoken dialog; hope she's not supposed to show up in more story stuff later on!) and I expect they are far from the last. Despite playing hundreds of hours of Enemy Unknown and Enemy Within, XCOM 2 has done enough to change up the formula to make fighting the aliens an unpredictable, surprising, and scary experience. I wouldn't have it any other way. I'm going to need more time to beat the game, test the other difficulty options, and try out multiplayer before I'll be able to issue a final verdict. (2K Games only provided us a copy on the day before launch for some reason so unfortunately we're playing catch-up. Sorry!) So far, though, XCOM 2 is an impressive feat. A total improvement to a game that I already thought was pretty damn close to perfect. I've yet to pull out its guts, but if the first few hours are any indication, this is going to be one hell of an alien autopsy. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
XCOM 2 review in prog photo
Welcome back, commander
I've only had a few hours with XCOM 2, Firaxis Games' follow-up to its 2012 XCOM: Enemy Unknown and I can already tell it's a different beast. At its core, it is still the same isometric turn-based strategy game it has always...

Humble Monthly Bundle has 70K subscribers

Feb 05 // Jordan Devore
Graham says subscriptions are at a point where "we can make meaningful deals with game developers to secure great content, we get to write our featured charity a $30,000+ check, and, because we can predict revenues fairly accurately, we've even started funding some small gaming projects, Humble Originals, that you won't find anywhere else and that our subscribers will get to play first." Supporting charities is a big part of the company's identity, whether it's giving back ten percent of proceeds from the Humble Store, five percent from Monthly subs, or left up to the user to decide in name-your-price bundles. I asked how they arrived at that amount for this service. "It's always tricky to craft a new business model," said Graham. "When we launched Humble Monthly, we had to do a lot of guesswork about the best way to frame everything so that we could get the product off the ground. By giving ourselves more flexibility with which we can use to pay for game content, I think we have helped the product be more successful and more sustainable, which I believe will actually mean more money for charity in the long run." Today is the first Friday of the month, which means February's games are unlocked for existing members. The full lineup is Alien: Isolation, Titan Souls, Broken Age, Volume, Penarium, Dropsy, Elephant in the Room (one of the "Humble Originals" made specifically for subscribers), and a "sneak peek demo" of Planetoid Pioneers with custom content. The early unlock for next month's bundle is Ark: Survival Evolved, that open-world game with ridable dinosaurs. Folks who sign up now will get immediate access to the title, but it's too late to secure February's offerings.
Humble Monthly Bundle photo
February's games revealed
Last year, Humble began a new monthly bundle service. The basic idea is that on the first Friday of each month, subscribers receive a batch of undisclosed PC games. One of the featured titles is always announced and made avai...

Review: Tachyon Project

Feb 05 // Chris Carter
Tachyon Project (PC, PS4 [reviewed], Xbox One)Developer: Eclipse GamesPublisher: Eclipse GamesReleased: July 15, 2015 (PC, Xbox One), Jan 19, 2016 (PS4)MSRP: $9.99 Tachyon, as the name probably suggests, is housed upon a foundation that involves a cheesy cyberpunk hacking plot. Players are placed into a dystopian future of sorts, hacking police stations and corrupt governments by way of a tiny ship. In a way, it's kind of like the setup for the Sly Cooper spinoff Bentley's Hack Pack, but a lot more serious. And really, there is a bit of charm there, especially if you dig the cyberpunk aesthetic. I commend Eclipse Games for trying something other than the "menu to shooting" approach, and it helps ground the campaign a bit and give the whole affair meaning. Some light commentary during missions also helps make things interesting while you're blasting away. The soundtrack, like the story, has a muted, chill feeling to it, which I dig. While Happy Hardcore songs during bullet hell dodging is great, I like the low key electronica soundtrack here, as it meshes well with the game's dark hues and not-too-bright neon visuals. Gameplay-wise, Tachyon operates on a twin-stick control method, with two sets of power-ups mapped to two buttons. That's all you really need to know, and once you start progressing on your journey, more options will open up. The shooting bits in general work well, and I like how using your normal cannon has a recoil effect (but not jarringly so) -- forcing players to course correct and get to know their ship a bit better. Players can also min-max stats by choosing a new chassis to suit their own style of play. I'm more of the defensive health-conscious player myself. Levels primarily stay engaging because of interesting enemy types. It's mostly stuff you've seen before, but black holes that suck up bullets, kamikaze ships, and generally aggressive AI will keep you on your toes. It's also easy to tell everything apart and identify its logic, so you don't have to constantly guess what a specific enemy type is. Tachyon Project isn't a remarkable shooter, but it's well-designed on several levels. There's no multiplayer to speak here, but with a decent campaign, lots of customization, and New Game+/Endless modes, you'll be perfectly fine going at it solo. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Tachyon Project photo
Hackin' like Jonny Lee Miller
While the shoot 'em up genre isn't the king it once was, more and more gems are coming out every passing year. New development studios are taking to Steam and mobile, and even Cave is coming out of the woodwork to become rele...

Dragon Ball photo
Dragon Ball

Dragon Ball Xenoverse sold the most in America


Europe was second
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Europe may love its One Piece, but North America loves its Dragon Ball. Bandai Namco has shared the sales statistics for Dragon Ball Xenoverse, and they clock in at a massive 3.13 million copies shipped. Shipped, sold, whatev...
Destructoid Rocket League photo
SW33T!
Mr. Destructoid has been around for almost 10 years now (!!), and in that time his cold steel frame has graced a few video games. First there was Bomberman Live, then came Raskulls and BurgerTime World Tour. Heck, the green m...

Undertale photo
Undertale

Indie dev offers support for bringing Undertale to Wii U


The more platforms the better
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Even though just about any PC can run Undertale, folks are still wanting to play it on consoles. It turns out that a Wii U port just isn't in the cards though for now, as the developer isn't exactly sure how to go about ...
Grand Theft Auto Online photo
Grand Theft Auto Online

GTA Online is still making shedloads of money


So don't expect a new GTA game just yet
Feb 05
// Vikki Blake
If you thought the hype around Grand Theft Auto V - and specifically, the multiplayer component GTA Online - was over, think again. Addressing an earnings briefing (via Gamespot), CEO of Rockstar’s publisher Take-Two sa...
Unravel photo
Unravel

EA and Origin Access subscribers can play the first two levels of Unravel right now


Oooh Yarny, kumbayaaaa
Feb 05
// Joe Parlock
It’s not long now until puzzle-platformer Unravel is launched. On February 9, the world will be too distracted by how adorable Yarny is to notice many of the world’s ills, and we will at last have achieved global ...
Godus Wars photo
Godus Wars

22Cans removes microtransactions from Godus Wars after they made everyone angry


Never mix early access and paid-for DLC
Feb 05
// Joe Parlock
It’s only been a few days since Godus Wars launched on Steam Early Access, and it’s already managed to cause an uproar. As 22Cans’ early access follow-up to the infamously abandoned Godus, Wars has the diffi...

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