Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around
hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

open world

Journey to the West photo
Journey to the West

Minecraft just got Journey to the West skins


For Pocket Edition and Windows 10
Feb 08
// Chris Carter
To celebrate the Year of the Monkey, Mojang just dropped some Journey to the West skins for the Pocket Edition and Windows 10 versions of Minecraft. "Red Boy" and "Guanyin" are free, but the rest (Princess Iron Fan, Lord Hund...
The Division photo
The Division

Ubisoft deliberately keeping PC version of The Division 'in check' with consoles


PCMR 4EVA
Feb 08
// Vikki Blake
[Update: Ubisoft has released the following statement regarding the PC version: "It has come to our attention that a comment from one of our team members has been perceived by some members of the community to imply the...
H1Z1 photo
H1Z1

H1Z1 is becoming two separate games


'King of the Kill' and 'Just Survive'
Feb 05
// Jordan Devore
Daybreak plans to split up its multiplayer zombie survival game H1Z1 on February 17, 2016. It's becoming two titles: H1Z1: Just Survive, an apocalyptic open-world experience with the usual scavenging and crafting, and H1Z1: K...
Rocky Horror Far Cry Show photo
Rocky Horror Far Cry Show

Far Cry Primal does the Time Warp


Oh, fantasy free me
Feb 04
// Brett Makedonski
Far Cry Primal has a new trailer and it's really well-produced. It's a reverse look at some of the major eras of combat in human history, all culminating in a showdown with a CGI sabretooth tiger. But, it also reminded me of "Time Warp," and now I've been listening to that all morning long. It's just a jump to the left, then a step to the right...

Review: Rebel Galaxy

Jan 20 // Nic Rowen
Rebel Galaxy (PC, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: Double Damage GamesPublisher: Double Damage GamesReleased: October 20, 2015 (PC), January 5, 2016 (PS4)MSRP: $19.99 Rebel Galaxy puts you in the boots of a space-faring renegade just looking to make a buck at the edge of the known universe. I mean, yes, you're estranged aunt mysteriously gifted you her old ship which was weird, and she also left you in possession of an alien artifact which, wouldn't you know it, happens to house an ancient A.I (don't they all) and you should probably look into that at some point -- but you also have to stack that paper! The main plot can be safely tackled at your leisure while you put time into building your personal net worth and outfitting the ship of your dreams. How you do that is up to you. As a kind of spiritual successor to Freelancer, Rebel Galaxy allows you to make your way through life on the rim anyway you like. As long as it involves shooting people. At every space station there is a mission board brimming with contracts from the various factions in the game. You can run drugs for a criminal cartel, bust up a pirate siege for the militia, provide some armed backup for the merchant guild, or pick up shady dead-drops for a cloak-and-dagger agency. Of course, let's not forget the most classic of all fictional space-faring economies: the glamorous world of asteroid mining. While there is plenty of outward variety in contract types, almost all of them will result in an inevitable shootout. Even the mining. Especially the mining. This is my ore and you can't have any of it. *pew pew* Thankfully, the space combat on tap is pretty damn cool. As I mentioned earlier, your ship in Rebel Galaxy performs more like a boat than a spaceship, locked on a single two-dimensional plane that you can steer around on left and right, but not up and down. Other capital ships are locked to the same plane, making standoffs with them feel like large naval battles (your most powerful weapons are actually broadside cannons, hammering home the effect). Meanwhile, smaller ships -- such as enemy fighters and your hired wingman -- zip around in a fully 3D space. They'll be coiling and wrapping around your larger vessel as you try to train your various mounted turrets on them, worry about the exposed shielding on your portside, and prepare to deflect an incoming volley of torpedoes. The battles become frantic, glorious displays. When you aren't manually aiming weapons yourself, the shipboard A.I will take over the unoccupied ones, making your ship a floating little ball of hell that is constantly spewing fire in all directions during a brawl. When you finally get a decent vessel that can mount a variety of laser turrets, homing missiles, and a full rack of broadsides, the spectacle of lights, colors, and exploding ships can be downright jaw-dropping. Active abilities like deflector shields and manually locking weapons (to make sure you don't just let auto-pilot do all the work) and different equipment set-ups can encourage some downright risky strategies if you like to roll the bones.  [embed]335426:61927:0[/embed] A reputation system governs how much each faction loves/loathes you. Taking a job from one faction pretty much always means screwing someone else over, so it is impossible to make friends with everyone. That said, it also never really came to much in my game. Space pirates hated me, the militia were kinda dickish but not overtly aggressive, and pretty much nobody else cared that I existed. It's a lot of numbers and systems that don't seem to really amount to much -- a theme that is repeated in many of the game's mechanics. Rebel Galaxy is built on a mountain of minutiae that seems important and interesting, and I suppose on an intellectual level it is, but amounts to little. For example, a living economy governs commodity trading at different stations. Not only do stations buy and sell different space tchotchkes and doodads, but the type of government that rules the station, current political situation, and other special events have an effect the market. Conditions like an arms race will bump up the price of salvaged munitions and weapons tech, for example. Where it gets really crazy, however, is that condition also spawns a treaty ship that will eventually make its way to the station to put an end to the arms race. If you'd rather keep hocking guns on a seller's market, you can go out and destroy that ship to prolong the conflict. That's all super cool but also, sadly, pointless. Those situations don't affect the plot or change anything else about the world. They just rearrange the stats on one of several dozen identical stations. While playing the market seems like a neat idea, it is also time consuming and inefficient compared to just going out and blowing stuff up. If I had to describe Rebel Galaxy in one word, it would be "broad," not "deep." There is a ton to do and all kinds of interesting interacting systems, but they only exist as curiosities. For a game that borrows so much from the likes of Firefly and the Millennium Falcons of the world, I was somewhat disappointed that there didn't seem to be any great options to play as a scoundrel, a lawbreaker with a heart of gold. You can take on illegal work and choose hardball dialog options of course, but I wanted to smuggle contraband and slick talk my way out of double-dealings. In Rebel Galaxy, walking the outlaw path has you trafficking space slaves and murdering random traders for their shitty cargo of worthless ceramic plating. It's good guy or Reaver, without a lot of gray in between. Speaking of the Firefly tone, Rebel Galaxy has a very distinct soundtrack of Kid Rock-esque tunes in an effort to capture that same space-western mystique. For the first little while I was really digging the vibe. A "dirty south meets final frontier" kind of thing. But as my time with the game stretched on and I was treated to the same three or four songs about being a "bad man" and sharing a train seat with Satan over and over again, I felt a little part of my soul chip away and drift into the void. The game constantly blares butt-rock at full volume, and every single song sounds almost exactly the same. Imagine being stuck at a NASCAR after-party that never ends and you'll get the picture. The soundtrack isn't the only thing that wears out its welcome. For as much as Rebel Galaxy wants to be a sort of deep-space simulation where you can be and do whomever and whatever you want, it all too quickly blurs together into a mushy pile of "bleh." Every mission is essentially the same, the only difference is the number and strength of the ships you'll be fighting. Every distress call is a fight with pirates (imperiled trader or "unexpected" trap, flip a coin). Every dialog interaction with bartenders, traders, and pirates run the same options and same canned responses. Enemies have such a limited arsenal of combat barks and threats I was actually hearing them in my sleep after spending a week with the game. The worse sin is that it somehow expects you to dig all of this repeated content for hours and hours on end. The game is every bit a treadmill as a typical MMO, only there is no one else to talk to and you can't make your ship dance. Every ship and piece of equipment costs exponentially more than the last. Small upgrades take half a dozen missions or more to earn, and you can forget about the high-end gear. You travel around the galaxy in real time, manually going to warp speed toward every destination, and coming to a dead stop every time a random piece of space junk floats in your way.  For a single player game that already has plenty to see and do, it feels needlessly padded. In space, no one can hear you grind. Yet, despite my many complaints, Rebel Galaxy did put a smile on my face. It's an ambitious little game that regrettably tries too hard to grab something out of its reach, but what it does get its hands on is excellent. The combat is spectacular, the atmosphere is charming (prolonged exposure to the soundtrack aside) and while there isn't as much depth to the game's systems as it would like you to believe, they are fun to poke and prod at when you get tired of blasting people with your lasers. Rebel Galaxy is the kind of game I'd want save for a rainy day when all I want to do is set my brain on auto-pilot and lose a few hours watching pretty colors and dreaming about being Han Solo. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Rebel Galaxy review photo
Aim to misbehave
I've heard people say space is an ocean. I've also heard it called the wild west of the future. With a background track of dirty butt-rock, a cast of colorful miscreants, and a movement system that feels more like steering a ...

The Division photo
The Division

New York's hippest borough axed from The Division's launch


[Twirls mustache passive-aggressively]
Jan 18
// Brett Makedonski
Jay-Z's gonna be pissed. Brooklyn goes hard, but not as far as Ubisoft's next Tom Clancy game is concerned. In fact, it doesn't go at all. In an interview with The Examiner, developer Massive Entertainment reveals that t...
Fallout 4 update photo
Fallout 4 update

The next Fallout 4 update makes settlements slightly better


It's in beta on Steam
Jan 15
// Jordan Devore
Update 1.2 for Fallout 4 was mostly concerned with performance issues, controller remapping, and some miscellaneous fixes. Update 1.3, available now in beta on Steam, has much more going on. Here are some standouts for today...
Subnautica photo
Subnautica

I want to scan everything in Subnautica


The H2.0 update is live
Jan 14
// Jordan Devore
Welp, I think they've done it. I think I need to get Subnautica and spend the weekend scouring the depths for weird alien creatures. It was a good run while it lasted! My original plan for this underwater exploration title wa...
Fallout mod photo
Fallout mod

Fallout 4 looks so much better with seasons


Good job, modders!
Jan 13
// Jordan Devore
Thanks to the modding community, Fallout 4 has a long life ahead of it. We've had fun covering assorted user-made gags, but it's stuff like this multi-person Seasons project that I most love to see. It introduces much-needed color and variation to the Commonwealth without going over the top. Spring, summer, fall, and winter are all represented. The side-by-side comparison is seriously impressive:
The Division photo
The Division

This new The Division trailer looks incredible


Well, I think it does anyway
Jan 13
// Vikki Blake
After a trailer accidentally went up too early, and then was pulled, and was then mirrored and shared and Streisanded all over the place, Ubisoft has now officially released yesterday’s leaked trailer for The Division. ...
The Division photo
The Division

I think this Division trailer is telling us to not lick our money


You're not my supervisor!
Jan 11
// Brett Makedonski
There's no small irony in Ubisoft, a company that very much likes getting money, releasing a trailer advising of the perils of handling money. Don't handle money, don't lick money, don't eat money. Do you want diseases? 'Cau...
Far Cry Primal photo
Far Cry Primal

Far Cry Primal's PC specs are a wild beast tamed


Not so brutal
Jan 07
// Brett Makedonski
Like its animals that can be turned into tender companions, Far Cry Primal's PC requirements had the opportunity to cause havoc. That has certainly been the case with some recent high-profile games, such as Star Wars Battlefr...
Just Cause 3 multiplayer photo
Just Cause 3 multiplayer

Modders are bringing multiplayer to Just Cause 3


They move fast
Dec 31
// Jordan Devore
If you expected the modders responsible for giving Just Cause 2 multiplayer to do the same thing for Just Cause 3, well, you aren't going to be disappointed. A month after the game's release, they are already far enough into production that there's a trailer offering an early glimpse at the mod. JC3-MP isn't available for download yet, and there's no ETA, but it's coming.
Ark on Xbox One photo
Ark on Xbox One

Ark: Survival Evolved has more daily players on Xbox One than Steam


The console port debuted Dec. 16
Dec 29
// Jordan Devore
Several developers have put their work-in-progress games up for sale on Xbox One. How's that initiative working out? In the case of at least one game, Ark: Survival Evolved, very well. According to Studio Wildcard co-founder ...
Terraria: Otherworld photo
Terraria: Otherworld

Terraria: Otherworld is coming along


Now releasing in 2016
Dec 29
// Jordan Devore
Re-Logic is keeping itself plenty busy with work on Terraria (content updates, mobile/console fixes, launching next year's Wii U version) and its new spin-off game, Terraria: Otherworld, which has shades of tower defense. It'...
Dying Light photo
Dying Light

Dying Light's Legendary Levels aim to keep you playing forever


Until the light (sun) dies
Dec 21
// Zack Furniss
Techland is doing their damnedest to make sure they're on your radar for most improved developer. Most people weren't happy with Dead Island (fun co-op romp, though!), but their continued support of Dying Light and ...
Arkham Knight photo
Arkham Knight

Arkham Knight's latest PC patch is drenched with fixes


A lot of rain being the biggest one
Dec 18
// Brett Makedonski
David Cage had nothing to do with the newest Batman: Arkham Knight PC patch, but you'd be forgiven if you mistakenly believed that he did. Not Heavy Rain but heavy rain is the most notable change made to the game am...
Mafia 3 gameplay photo
Mafia 3 gameplay

12 minutes of Mafia 3 gameplay show off beautiful New Orleans


The next Sleeping Dogs?
Dec 17
// Steven Hansen
Here's our first look at Mafia III from 2K and newly formed Hangar 13 since the obligatory Animals announcement trailer earlier this year. The sequel is a departure for the series, instead set in 1968 Louisiana and starring ...
Dragon's Dogma PC photo
Dragon's Dogma PC

Yep, Dragon's Dogma looks nice on PC


I'm excited for mods
Dec 17
// Jordan Devore
Capcom is bringing Dragon's Dogma: Dark Arisen to PC. After all these years, it's really happening. Patrick recently sampled the new port and he liked what he saw. There's a new trailer out today which, more than anything, is...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Walking across Just Cause 3 takes almost nine hours


I'd have probably caught a bus by now
Dec 17
// Laura Kate Dale
Just Cause 3 is a huge open world game that constantly throws parachutes, wingsuits, cars and any manner of other vehicles at you in order to speed up your journey around the world. Nobody doubts it's a pretty huge open world...

Review: Assassin's Creed Syndicate: Jack the Ripper

Dec 16 // Brett Makedonski
Assassin's Creed Syndicate: Jack the Ripper (PC, PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Ubisoft MontpellierPublisher: UbisoftMSRP: $14.99Released: December 15, 2015 (PS4, Xbox One), December 22, 2015 (PC) Assassin's Creed Syndicate: Jack the Ripper takes place 20 years after the main game ends. In that time, Evie has traveled to India and learned and perfected a non-lethal fear technique. With it, she's able to send her enemies into a panic, often causing them to flee in terror. Predictably, that's the main gameplay allure in this DLC. Both Jack the Ripper (he's playable) and Evie share this fear mechanic. The add-on nicely juxtaposes the two characters in alternating sequences. In one, Jack will callously and barbarically kill anyone in his way, sending those who see him running scared for their lives. In the next, Evie will use these same fear methods to mostly skirt combat in a completely different, yet equally effective, manner. Jack's sections are easily the most interesting this expansion has to offer. In them, haunting visual prompts pop up like "kill them all" and "leave no witnesses," as if they're coming straight from Jack's twisted mind. As he continues on his homicidal bent, the screen will briefly distort, adding another troubling layer of visual tension to the already disturbing scene. [embed]326720:61550:0[/embed] Evie, on the other hand, spends most of her time trying to unravel the mystery of Jack the Ripper, but always one step behind. Much of her focus is on crime scene investigation and pursuit. Like in Syndicate proper, Evie's tendencies are rooted in stealth and cunning. It's here that we learn most about The Ripper through examining his actions. This is where Jack the Ripper falls flat. Even though Ubisoft doesn't go too crazy in divulging his story, what is told feels contrived. Again, Jack the Ripper is best as a faceless boogeyman. It would've worked if Ubisoft simply sent Evie to protect London from Jack. Instead, he's unnecessarily shoehorned into Assassin's Creed lore, and the expansion is worse off for the artificiality of it all. Unlike main Assassin's Creed installments, Jack the Ripper benefits tremendously from a streamlined approach. The add-on quickly ushers the player from mission to mission, with little dillydallying in between. Ubisoft couldn't resist the urge to pad the expansion with some trademark side events, but they're not pressing, not in-your-face, and ultimately not really important. It's just three hours of mostly quality main story content. Jack the Ripper can't aspire to reach the heights that Syndicate did. But, it also doesn't suffer the same setbacks. In a game where open-world strain can become a serious problem, this add-on is a mostly-focused reprieve. Sure, there are some fumbling moments, but there are also some elegantly-handled ones. Given the difficult source material and the obvious danger of stumbling, Jack the Ripper mostly doesn't, and that feels like a best-case outcome. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Jack the Ripper review photo
Whodunnit?
The tale of Jack the Ripper is one of mankind's great enigmas. More than 100 years ago, someone savagely murdered at least five women in the Whitechapel district of London. He maimed his victims so unthinkably that his legend...

Just Cause 3 patch photo
Just Cause 3 patch

Just Cause 3 is getting 'significantly improved' loading times


Update for all platforms this week
Dec 16
// Jordan Devore
I'm playing Just Cause 3 far less than I thought I would, and that can be single-handedly attributed to the lengthy loading times. The initial one takes quite a while, but it isn't a huge pain considering it's up front -- you...
Starbound combat photo
Starbound combat

Starbound's combat update should make fighting more interesting


Secondary abilities, new weapon types
Dec 08
// Darren Nakamura
I'll admit: my hype for Starbound is nowhere near the level where it was two years ago. Being in beta for that long can do that. After my group exhausted the quest lines for the first iteration, we never really went back, des...
Far Cry Primal photo
Far Cry Primal

They call him Stompy McBigstompers, the best stomper in the land


Guess how he got that name
Dec 04
// Brett Makedonski
My trip to see Far Cry Primal wasn't completely filled with previews and interviews. I sto[m]pped working for a few minutes to see this giant dude crush stuff. Holiday decorations, gingerbread houses, and guitars were no match for this grade-A stomper. In between stomps, I reflected on my career arc that led to this particular moment in time. This job's weird, man; video games are weird.

Why Far Cry Primal is the purest form of Far Cry

Dec 03 // Brett Makedonski
It was a savage and brutal era, and those are the two adjectives that Decant repeatedly returned to when trying to sum up the feeling that any Far Cry game needs to nail. It's no coincidence that a game set in the Stone Age happened sooner than later. "The people behind the Far Cry brand have been dreaming of doing something like Primal for a really long time," Decant confessed. "I think it's just that we have people who are very good who are doing some crazy prototypes about fire population and about controlling animals and stuff like that. One day we just said 'we should do that.' The Far Cry brand is probably the most open brand at Ubisoft. You can really go in different directions with it as long as you remain savage and brutal in an open world." That flexibility is on full display in Primal. For all the elements of Far Cry 4 that are carried over (it's built on the same framework), it feels surprisingly not like a Far Cry game at times. It's an odd sensation knowing the title's roots, identifying them, but not being impacted in the same way. It's likely because what's new in Primal is enough to distract from anything that feels old. The Stone Age aesthetic of orange-like hues and primitive camps feel like a far cry (boo!) from the tropical islands the franchise is used to. Most notable, there's a new buddy system in the form of a beast-master mechanic. The beast-master system allows the player to tame animals in the wild (there are 17 variations), and call on them in battle. They're handy sidekicks whose worth is immediately validated. They're extremely helpful, as they show no hesitation in leaping into battle and taking on several enemies at once. When they're inevitably hurt, a slab of meat nurses them back to health. Decant didn't downplay his excitement for the animal control feature. In fact, he pegged it as Far Cry Primal's greatest strength. "It's the most exciting, most surprising feature I think we have," he said. Decant gave the spiel about Ubisoft's commitment to authenticity and remaining truthful to the era. However, that came with one caveat; liberties were taken whenever it'd make the game more fun. The beast-master mechanic is a shining example of that. But, despite all the historians consulted and research performed, it's not authenticity that'll make a Far Cry game. No, as Decant pointed out, it's that savage and brutal tone that's the staple. No period can claim ruthlessness quite like the Stone Age, and that's why Primal is the purest form of Far Cry.
Far Cry Primal photo
Light my campfire
Far Cry has always been very good at getting the player into an open world and letting them interact with nature. However, the reasons for arriving there haven't always been as strong. It's how you end up with frat boy turned...

The animals are the real stars of Far Cry Primal

Dec 03 // Brett Makedonski
At a preview event this week, I spent an hour with Far Cry Primal. Free rein to the game wasn't quite permitted, as there were no story missions available; Ubisoft seems to be keeping that under wraps for now. Instead, I was left to wander from campfire to campfire ticking off side objectives and open-world encounters along the way. No matter which direction I traveled, from the glaciers of the north to the swamps of the south, there were ferocious animals all along the way. At first, I'd actively seek them out. Sabretooth nearby? That sounds fun to kill, let's go. I never found out if they were actually fun to kill. My defeat was swift each and every time I encountered one. By the end of the hour-long session, I went out of my way to avoid them. I'd watch them chase around other animals, holding my breath until they were finally out of sight. Safe for the time being. [embed]324054:61365:0[/embed] The reason for being appropriately underpowered had everything to do with my arsenal. Primal is the first Far Cry game that doesn't prominently feature guns. Clubs, spears, and arrows are the weapons on-hand, and the adapting process isn't necessarily easy. No longer can you rely on spraying bullets until you're out of a sticky situation. There's a world of difference between unloading a gun's clip and throwing spears one by one when a mammoth is charging at you. To soften the cold, harsh reality of the Stone Age, Ubisoft has taken some liberties with man's connection to creature. Far Cry Primal features a beast-master system that allows for the taming of animals, which can then be summoned to help in battle at any time. There are 17 variations, but I only saw three: a small jaguar, a white wolf, and a bear. Not only do they serve as a great distraction in battle, but they actually take care of some enemies on their own. As seems to be the theme with Primal, your beasts are at their best when facing off against other humans. There are plenty of enemy people wandering the game's sizable map, but they never feel as formidable as the wild animals. Maybe it's because, like you, they also have to get into position to throw a spear. Whatever the reason, these interactions seem as if they pose a considerably simpler challenge than an unfortunate surprise encounter with a good number of the game's many animals. For all the animal-controlling Far Cry Primal asks the player to do, it's a more passive tactic that proves to be the most delightful. With the press of a button, an owl can be summoned to fly overhead and scout out the surrounding area. Basically, it's Primal's response to not having a camera to tag enemies. The owl comes in particularly handy when checking out human outposts. Once you feel satisfied that you've seen enough, you can divebomb an unsuspecting human and murder him. It's a great way to get a jumpstart on a camp before sending your next animal in. That owl is probably the least threatening thing in Far Cry Primal, but even it has no problem asserting its dominance over mankind. That's just kind of how it goes as Far Cry sees the tables turned for the first time; humans weren't yet the dominant force they'll eventually be. Emphasizing animals seems like a good direction for the franchise. It required turning the clock back a few million years, but consistently befriending and battling beasts feels right in line with the Far Cry spirit -- a savage and brutal affair that's more about surviving than anything else.
Far Cry Primal photo
Friends and foes
The Stone Age is a remarkable moment in history ("moment" meaning 3.4 million years, in this instance) because it was a period when mankind wasn't at the top of the food chain. Beasts ruled the roost and humanity had to tread...

Jack the Ripper photo
Jack the Ripper

Assassin's Creed Syndicate's Jack the Ripper DLC is probably imminent, maybe


Achievement lists light the way
Nov 25
// Brett Makedonski
It has only been a month since Assassin's Creed Syndicate launched, but the first add-on might be lurking in the shadows, ready to strike any moment. The compelling Jack the Ripper DLC is the biggest expansion that...
Dying Light photo
Dying Light

Dying Light's next DLC gets jacked-up in price, but you can make the most of it


Season pass to the rescue
Nov 25
// Brett Makedonski
In a surprisingly transparent moment, Dying Light developer Techland has decided to be upfront about raising the price of the game's next add-on, The Following. Back in August, it was originally announced that the DLC would c...
Just Cause photo
Just Cause

The first hour of Just Cause 3 is predictably wild


See it now, or just wait a week
Nov 24
// Jordan Devore
It's common for media to share the "first __ minutes!" of a new game release, but I don't recall too many big-name developers partaking in that practice. Avalanche has put up the first hour of Just Cause 3. If you are concern...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3's PC specs are a little high because Rico has a lot to blow up


Explosions in the sky
Nov 23
// Brett Makedonski
With just little more than a week remaining before Just Cause 3's release, the required and recommended PC specs come parachuting in. Right on time too, as some players may find themselves needing to take advantage of some Bl...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...