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Noby Noby Boy photo
Noby Noby Boy

Noby Noby Boy has finally reached Pluto

Now, on to the Sun!
Nov 23
// Kyle MacGregor
It's been nearly seven years (2468 days in total) since February 19, 2009, the day Bandai Namco unleashed Keita Takahashi's demented brainchild Noby Noby Boy upon the world. Since then a dedicated community has been...
One Piece photo
One Piece

Now that's a video game screenshot!

One Piece: Burning Blood
Nov 23
// Jordan Devore
You don't need to know the first thing about One Piece to enjoy this screenshot from Burning Blood, Spike Chunsoft's upcoming fighter for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PS Vita. A colorful robot fighting a dashing dinosaur? Thi...
JRPGs photo

PS Vita RPG Ray Gigant heads west next spring

Playable at PlayStation Experience
Nov 21
// Kyle MacGregor
PlayStation Vita dungeon crawler Ray Gigant is coming to North America and Europe next spring. The role-playing game comes from Operation Abyss and Demon Gaze studio Experience, and while it was published by Bandai Namco in ...
Saint Seiya photo
Saint Seiya

A Saint Seiya: Soldier's Soul PC port will be released this month

Previously exclusive to Sony platforms
Nov 13
// Chris Carter
The Bandai Namco trend of porting to PC continues. Saint Seiya: Soldier's Soul is next up on the block, and is slated for a November 27 Steam release in North America. Previously, it was exclusive to the PS3 and PS4 plat...

Review: Sword Art Online: Lost Song

Nov 13 // Josh Tolentino
Sword Art Online: Lost Song (PS4, PS3, PS Vita [reviewed])Developer: ArtdinkPublisher: Bandai Namco GamesMSRP: $39.99 (Vita), $59.99 (PS4)Released: November 17, 2015 (NA), November 13, 2015 (EU), April 28, 2015 (SEA), March 26, 2015 (JP) [Note: This review is based on the English-language version of Lost Song released in Southeast Asia on April 28, 2015. While there may be some differences between this version and the North American/EU ones, we expect the core experience will be highly similar, if not identical.] Let's not mince words: Like its predecessor Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment, Lost Song is meant for existing fans of Sword Art Online (or at least of Hollow Fragment), and few else outside that sphere. In fact, Lost Song's main plot virtually ensures that only those invested Kirito and the gang's adventures and interactions will find fulfillment from the game's narrative.  But first, an aside: When it came to the anime and novels, the reason the ALO-set story arcs felt so weak was the overriding sense that the show was treading water. In contrast to original's grand hook of "dying in the game means death for real", the goal of Kirito playing ALO to search for Asuna carried not nearly as much weight. This was exacerbated in the second season, which followed up an excellent murder mystery set in Gun Gale Online with Kirito and his pals literally just doing a raid and some quests in ALO for a nice sword. It came to pass that when ALO was onscreen, Sword Art Online became less about exciting adventures and speculative future game design than essentially watching a bunch of nonexistent Let's Players play a nonexistent game. Lost Song falls afoul of ALO's curse as well, with even its central story afflicted with the same sense of meandering and lack of stakes. Still placed in Hollow Fragment's alternative timeline (which saw the cast stuck in SAO for much longer than in the "canon", and adding characters like Sinon under different circumstances), Lost Song sees Kirito and his posse moving to ALfheim Online right on time for the game to debut "Svart ALfheim", its first expansion, consisting of five massive floating islands. Being the top-class gamers they are, the crew resolves to be the first to burn through it. [embed]318569:61096:0[/embed] The quest for "world-first" (a motivation familiar to anyone who's played an MMO) eventually brings them into conflict with Shamrock, a massive guild run by Seven, an idol/scientist (!) who's taking the opportunity run a big social experiment within ALO. If the whole premise of Lost Song's plot sounds like the kind of inter-guild "drama" that plays out on forums and social media feeds for actual games today, one wouldn't be too far off. This puts the bulk of the game's narrative appeal in the interactions between cast members new and old, told via entertaining Tales of-style vignettes, in-game events, and lengthy personal quests, some of which adapt storylines from the canon like the well-received "Mother's Rosario" arc. In a nice touch, these events are mostly encountered semi-randomly and often without explicit prompting. A minor thing, to be sure, but one that channels the "live" qualities of MMO play, where impromptu encounters and stories grow even against otherwise static environs and content. Ultimately, though, those invested in seeing the characters of Sword Art Online again, sporting their ALO-styled redesigns and touting long-running in-jokes, will get their fill, but players seeking epic adventure or the kind of JRPG saga that ends with the heroes saving the world will come away disappointed. It doesn't help, either, that Lost Song doesn't work very hard to introduce players to the characters themselves. In some ways that's to be expected, seeing as this is a sequel to Hollow Fragment and mostly features the same faces (with a few more added), but curious folks who just want to know what the fuss over Sword Art Online is all about would be better served by picking up Re: Hollow Fragment (the "Director's Cut" PS4 port of Hollow Fragment), or just watching the anime. Narrative pitfalls aside, Lost Song is at least less of a slog to play, mechanically, bringing some new, entertaining gimmicks to the table. The combat system ditches the auto-attacks, casting times, and menus of Hollow Fragment for a straightforward, directly-controlled action-RPG setup. Players can string together combos of light and heavy attacks, controlling any three of up to seventeen playable characters (they can even replace Kirito as the leader!), each wielding a number of weapons with signature skills and magic. Special moves and magic can be triggered by combining shoulder and face buttons. New attacks, spells, and passive effects can be unlocked by leveling up their weapon skills through use, and assigning them to preferred button combinations. A Union gauge fills up in battle, and when triggered enables devastating "Switch" attacks involving the whole party. While simpler and arguably less deep than Hollow Fragment, the new system is more engaging and wastes less time. Most low-level foes can be dispatched in seconds, and fighting large bosses rewards mobility and effective use of buffs and debuffs to chop away at their massive, stacked health bars. AI companions fight and support effectively, and need little in the way of handholding unless severely under-leveled. New gear can be found in the field, or bought, identified, and upgraded at Agil and Lisbeth's shops while Side Quests and Extra Quests can be accepted at the hub town's tavern. Side Quests usually fall into the "Kill X number of Y enemy" category, but Extra Quests usually pose an additional challenge, involving big takedowns of one or more boss-class foes for better rewards. And then there's the flying. Being a fairy-themed game, ALO plants wings on all its characters to enable long-distance travel and a level of verticality rarely embraced in the RPG space. Lost Song gladly obliges, featuring huge, open-world maps populated by roaming enemies and dotted with dungeons at varying altitudes. Players can switch from running on the ground to hovering to racing through the air with a flick of the D-pad. While a bit fiddly at first, this mobility quickly becomes second nature and makes a genuine difference when fighting outdoors, as aerial dashes can be used to set up powerful charging attacks, and hovering up high can put safe distances between players and ground-bound foes. Fighting indoors, however, is more of a chore, as most dungeons prohibit flying and often take place against large numbers of enemies spawning in ways that cause the combat camera and lock-on function to freak out unpleasantly. Worse still, the dungeons themselves are so bland and unimaginative that I initially mistook them for being procedurally generated. Having players visit these dungeons in order to progress just hammers home the apathetic level design. And there's even multiplayer, making Lost Song the only Sword Art Online game that's actually, well, online. Local and online play sessions are available, including a PVP versus mode, and team battles against roided-out versions of the single-player bosses. It's an alright option to have, but there's little compelling reason to engage with it. Players can use custom characters, but the customization options are so limited that anything created just resembles the generic NPC characters littering the hub world. For better or worse, Sword Art Online: Lost Song replicates both the highs and lows of its predecessors. Existing fans of the series will find plenty to like in the further adventures of Kirito and his MMO pals, despite a dull main story. The revamped mechanics also support a steady drip-feed of Sword Art Online fan service mainly by not getting in the way too much. Unfortunately, Lost Song stumbles hardest when trying to engage players outside that sphere of pre-existing investment, and in some ways ends up an even less suitable jumping-off point for newbies who want to get in on enjoying the franchise. My advice to those folks would be to watch the anime or try out Hollow Fragment first. If they're still jonesing for some more of this motley crew of irredeemable MMO nerds when they're done, then Lost Song will be music to their ears. [This review is based on a retail copy of the game acquired by the reviewer.] Fallout 4 (PC, PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Bethesda Game StudiosPublisher: Bethesda SoftworksMSRP: $59.99Released: November 10, 2015
SAO: Lost Song Review photo
Familiar Tune
Ask most folks who watched the Sword Art Online anime series, and they'll likely tell you that the show's weaker moments usually coincided with events set in ALfheim Online (ALO), a fairy-themed virtual reality MMO that ...

Pokemon photo

Pokken Tournament strikes Wii U spring 2016

Japanese debut slated for March 18
Nov 12
// Kyle MacGregor
The Wii U version of The Pokémon Company and Bandai Namco's fighter Pokkén Tournament will debut in Japan on March 18 and sometime in the spring across Europe and North America. An amiibo card for Shadow Mewtwo will be included with first-run copies of the game worldwide. Nintendo says the creature can also be unlocked sans card "after you fulfill certain conditions."
Dark Souls III photo
Dark Souls III

Here's a better look at the statue in Dark Souls III's $500 edition

Well, maybe $500
Nov 12
// Brett Makedonski
If you're dropping $500 bones on a collector's edition of a game, you likely want to know what you're getting. Like, you really want to know. You're gonna want multiple angles and up-close shots to know that everything in it ...
Dark Souls III photo
Dark Souls III

Dark Souls III looks to have two collector's editions, each with a statue

And a possible release date leak
Nov 09
// Brett Makedonski
Thanks to yet another retailer slip-up, we have new information that a publisher was trying to guard. This time it comes courtesy of Geekay Games, and it seems as if we now know about Dark Souls III's collector's editions and...
Pokemon fighter photo
Pokemon fighter

Dark Mewtwo is actually Shadow Mewtwo

Adjust monogrammed towels accordingly
Nov 03
// Steven Hansen
Just a bit of housekeeping. The new Mewtwo form copped over the weekend is officially Shadow Mewtwo, not Dark Mewtwo as early sleuths sussed. Makes sense what with its "Shadow ___" moves. Not too much else revealed in the ch...
Pokken Tournament photo
Pokken Tournament

Mewtwo gets a new form in Pokken Tournament

Sweet baby Jesus he looks awesome
Oct 31
// CJ Andriessen
Watching livestreams of video games is something I've never been able to get into, but perhaps it's time I start trying to learn how to enjoy them. Last night during a Japanese stream of Pokkén Tournament, Mewtwo was unveiled as a fighter in the upcoming Bandai Namco game. With crystals bulging from his body, this form of Mewtwo is unlike any we've seen before.
More Tekken photo
More Tekken

Tekken 7 will use PlayStation VR

But how? And why?
Oct 27
// Jordan Devore
When I slid out of bed this morning and started prepping for Sony's press conference at Paris Games Week, I didn't imagine the event would be home to so much Tekken stuff. First, there was a cute bit in which series producer ...
Tekken photo

Yep, Tekken 7 is headed to consoles

'Most complete version'
Oct 27
// Jordan Devore
[Update: Following Sony's conference, Bandai Namco confirmed the game will release on "home systems." So, Xbox One, too.] Tekken 7 is coming to PlayStation 4. Officially! We heard the news earlier this year in an Unreal Engin...
CyberConnect2 photo

CyberConnect2 is tapping into .hack for 'New World'

Here's some gameplay
Oct 26
// Chris Carter
CyberConnect2 and Bandai Namco have teamed up for New World, an upcoming Android and iOS RPG. It's really going for a .hack feel through and through, which you can plainly see from this newest gameplay trailer. This first ti...
Dragon Ball Z photo
Dragon Ball Z

Free DLC is coming to Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden

Tie-ins with the series
Oct 22
// Chris Carter
If you're itching for more stuff to do in Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden, you might be in luck. As revealed by the newest issue of V-Jump, the game is getting more content in Japan by way of extra online battles. Some of them...
Oh noes? photo
Oh noes?

Pokken Tournament is so unpopular in one Japanese arcade, it's being removed

Meanwhile Pac-Man is going strong
Oct 20
// Jed Whitaker
One popular Japanese arcade has announced it is removing Pokkén Tournament due to lack of popularity and profitability, and the fact that the game will be releasing on Wii U next year. A redditor reports...
Pokemon fighter photo
Pokemon fighter

There's a Gardevoir in this Pokken Tournament trailer

Know your audience
Oct 20
// Steven Hansen
Sure, this general Pokkén Tournament trailer is a little less balls to the wall exciting than seeing Luchador Pikachu doing a Stone Cold Stunner, but, hey, there's some Gardevoir action going on, eh? The Bandai Namco-...

Review: Tales of Zestiria

Oct 20 // Chris Carter
Tales of Zestiria (PC, PS3, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: Bandai Namco Studios, tri-CrescendoPublisher: Bandai Namco EntertainmentMSRP: $49.99 (PC, PS3), $59.99 (PS4)Released: January 22, 2015 (JP), October 16, 2015 (EU) October 20, 2015 (US) If you've played a Tales game before, you pretty much know what to expect. This is still very much a hero's journey affair, with the main character Sorey embarking upon an epic quest to become a Shepard and save the world. This is complicated by two warring nations, the evil Heldaf, and the Hellion -- monsters created out of pure evil energy. Along the way Sorey will conscript new companions into his crew, including his childhood friend Mikleo. For the most part, the story stays on point and doesn't stray from its primary goal of a fantasy epic. Just when you think it's starting to get crazy with the juxtaposition of humans and the heavenly Seraphim race, Zestiria quickly grounds things with Sorey as a tether, who was raised by the latter but is still a human. It's all very straight-forward, partially to a fault, and is easy to follow. Zestiria houses a stable of interesting, memorable characters, but they don't necessarily grow over time. Sorey also sports a bit of a drab persona, but again, it helps that he's at least likable. As you may have heard, Zestiria has generated a fair bit of controversy over in Japan when it was released earlier this year. The crux of the issue stems from a character named Alisha, who was heavily promoted before the game's release, and then relegated to a side character that wasn't in most of the game -- and later sold as DLC. The games producer even apologized for it. This in no way effects the review, but it's something to be aware of in case you might have heard something negative about Zestiria in the past. Ultimately, I'm ok with this being Sorey's tale. When it comes to exploration, Zestiria walks a fine line between open environments and too many linear dungeon-like settings. It's actually more open than both Xillia games, but don't get the impression that they're as sprawling as say, Xenoblade Chronicles. I'm ok with this compromise though, as the developers have stuffed a ton of secrets into the game's universe, including monoliths that grant you information, and cute hidden creatures called Normin that grant you rewards the the effort of finding them. The concise focus also helps make the dungeons less of a slog, and allows them focus more on a centralized theme or puzzle element. [embed]316377:60788:0[/embed] Combat is easily the most meaningful advancement Zestiria has made, however. It's now a lot more action-oriented, and relies on SC (spirit chain) energy, which adds a new strategic element to the mix. At first players will start off with just 4-hit combos, which are essentially a mash session, but the game quickly ramps up into something much more interesting. For starters, your attacks get stronger as you expend SC, but unloading all of it will leave you vulnerable. To recharge SC you'll have to guard or stay idle, leaving you open to attack. It's interesting, as sometimes you'll want to go all out on a foe if they're stunned or if you're attempting to finish them off, but it can completely backfire. It's a nice risk-reward system that's present in every fight, not just boss encounters. Other advanced arts like quickstepping (dodging) come into play on a constant basis. Oh, and certain characters can actually fuse, Dragon Ball style, with Seraphim companions to supercharge their abilities, which is just as fun as it sounds. Everything having to do with character customization is supercharged this time around, actually. Players can stack skills for each party member to make them stronger, or diversify their elemental loadouts to create new skills. There's also a host of meta-abilities like snack preparation and discovery, which recharge party member's health bars and present icons on the minimap respectively. You can even further augment characters with abilities like auto-guard, and alter your AI's strategic tendencies when you're not in control. They really went all-out when it comes to the game's core mechanics. Like most Tales games, Zestiria has a beautiful art style in tow, with plenty of bright colors and endearing character designs. It has its limitations however, as it is a PS3 game at heart, and longshots typically don't have the same impact. Also, the camera angle is insufferable at times, especially indoors, and can't be easily manipulated. Thankfully dual audio comes standard with the western release, and both the dub and sub are well done. You can also alter the battle difficulty at any time, lengthy combo input windows, utilize fast-travel, skip cutscenes, and even skip individual lines of dialogue. Oh, and players can save anywhere with a quick save system, which is convenient. Tales of Zestiria plays by the book in a lot of ways, particularly when it comes to its cast and narrative. But it's still a great entry into the series, and a welcome return for old fans, especially as far as the battle system is concerned. In fact, it's even inspired me to go back and finish both Xillia titles -- that's the magic of the Tales series at work. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Tales of Zestiria review photo
A tale of two Shepherds
My history with the Tales series is sort of akin to an on again, off again relationship. I was introduced to Phantasia by way of a friend's import copy, and immediately fell in love. After that I only dabbled in a f...

Review: Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden

Oct 15 // Laura Kate Dale
Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden (3DS)Developer: Arc System WorksPublisher: Bandai Namco GamesReleased: October 16, 2015 (Europe), October 20, 2015 (North America)MSRP: £22.99 / $29.99 So, let’s get the core info out the way. Extreme Butoden is a 2D sprite brawler for 3DS set in the world of Dragon Ball Z. All playable characters have the same core controls, similar to games like Smash Bros. where the inputs don’t vary, but the moves produced do. Dashes double as teleports into counter positions if timed correctly, while characters string together basic combo strings, ranged projectiles, and launchers. You fight each match with a team of characters, built up of mains and non-playable assists, with the player able to switch between team fighters at any time. Characters mainly vary in terms of plot-specific special attacks, power, and speed. If all this sounds a bit dry and by the numbers, it’s because that’s how it feels in game. It’s by no means an incompetent fighting game, far from it, but it just plays everything too close to the chest. There’s nothing about the combat that feels particularly new for fighting game fans, or particularly exciting for Dragon Ball Z fans. Visually, Extreme Butoden has turned out pretty nicely. While not the peak of 2D sprite work, they certainly hold their own with some of the better examples of 2D sprites on the system. Sprites are crisp, expressive, and fluid in their animations, which leaves little room for complaint. It is worth noting that with 3D on the system switched on, some of the special attacks do look rather spectacular, with a lot of work clearly put into effective 3D layering. In terms of a story mode, Extreme Butoden’s initially available story mode sees you playing through a truncated version of the events of Dragon Ball Z. Events are skipped over and dialogue is shortened in such a way that a lot of the drama, emotion, and investment is stripped away. Much of the engagement with Dragon Ball comes from the long, drawn-out exposition screams, and that isn’t really replicated here. Imagine the plot, heavily abridged, and told through mostly still character portraits, lifeless dialogue text, and the occasional brief plot-related battle that doesn’t go on nearly long enough to justify its build up. It’s a bit of a disappointment. After completing the main story, you do unlock some alternative storylines to play through that offer interesting spins on the narrative, as well as an additional adventure mode that sees Goku face off against many of the enemies from the main story in a slightly contrived narrative. It’s fun to do fight bosses in new combinations, but the overarching story attempting to string that together feels like an afterthought developed to excuse the gameplay content. One of the more disappointing aspects for me was the limited playable roster. While many of your bigger-name characters are playable, most of the supporting cast of fighters is relegated to support assist roles. Past Dragon Ball Z games have allowed a very wide selection of characters, down to some of the most useless, to be playable, so this feels like an unfortunate step back. Unlocking these additional assist characters is also a bit of a lengthy chore, as they have to be unlocked by attaining high ranks throughout other modes. Many of these character unlock requirements do not feel like the reward unlocked is really worth the effort put in. Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden does feature a local multiplayer mode, but unfortunately no online multiplayer. If you couldn’t tell from my less-than-enthused review, I really couldn’t muster up feelings either way on this game. It’s a competent fighter with nice sprite work, but it also does very little interesting with narrative presentation, combat mechanics, or gameplay modes. It all feels very safe, and I didn’t really feel much by the time I was done. Time to scratch my Dragon Ball Z itch with some Budokai Tenkaichi 3. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Dragon Ball Z photo
Competent, but not excitingly so
When it comes to Dragon Ball Z fighting games, I am one of those people who loves them for the over-the-top spectacle more than the technical fighting specifics involved. I know when a fighting game feels responsive and plays...

Champ-yons! photo

Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth launching February 2, 2016

North America-exclusive preorder content
Oct 13
// Steven Hansen
Bloodborne insights photo
Bloodborne insights

There is a friendly carrion crow in Bloodborne

And other assorted tidbits
Oct 12
// Jordan Devore
YouTuber VaatiVidya is back with another Bloodborne lore video. This time, he examines a slew of smaller discoveries that didn't make it into his prior videos. A few of them surprised me. Pebbles being eyes, for one, because ...
Tales of Zestiria photo
Tales of Zestiria

Tales of Zestiria has a mountain of DLC waiting for you

A new chapter, but mainly bikinis
Oct 12
// Joe Parlock
Bandai Namco has announced a landslide of DLC for the upcoming Tales of Zestiria, which doesn’t release until October 16. Fortunately, some of that upcoming DLC is free for a limited time, but other bits aren’t. F...
Project X Zone 2 photo
Project X Zone 2

Can you sit through this 14-minute Project X Zone 2 trailer?

It's pushing it
Oct 08
// Chris Carter
I liked Project X Zone 2 well enough. It's basically another edition of the first game with more characters -- so it's going to be pretty easy to tell on paper if you're going to want to pick it up. For those of you on ...
Tekken 7 photo
Tekken 7

More hints drop regarding Tekken 7's console future

We kind of know, but we don't?
Oct 07
// Chris Carter
Every so often Bandai Namco drops hints as to the timeline of Tekken 7 on consoles. I mean, we know it's happening, but we don't have a window or full confirmation yet. Antoher hint dropped at Madrid Games Week, where ma...
SAO photo

New Sword Art Online announced for PS4, Vita

Hollow Realization coming next year
Oct 04
// Kyle MacGregor
Today at the Dengeki Bunko Festival in Tokyo, Bandai Namco revealed Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization, the latest role-playing game based on Reki Kawahara's popular light novel series. The story takes place within "Sword Art: Origin," a new MMO modeled after the world of Aincrad.
One Piece mobile photo
One Piece mobile

One Piece: Thousand Storm is a new free-to-play mobile game

Coming to Japan next year
Sep 28
// Chris Carter
When I was in Japan, One Piece was absolutely everywhere. From ads on trains, to stores full of Tony Tony Chopper figurines, to a host of Pachinko machines, you couldn't avoid the Straw Hat Pirates. Now they're about to ...
Disney Magical World 2 photo
Disney Magical World 2

Disney Magical World 2 is pushing the Frozen property pretty hard

Much to my chagrin
Sep 19
// Chris Carter
So, Frozen. I must be one of the only people on the planet who doesn't like it. I mean, I love Elsa -- it's about time Idina Menzel and her amazing voice got the respect she deserves -- but the rest, including most of th...
Project X Zone 2 photo
Project X Zone 2

Nintendo characters join Project X Zone 2 cast

Chrom, Lucina, Fiora, oh my!
Sep 19
// Kyle MacGregor
Project X Zone was a nice bit of fan service, and the sequel seems to be taking things up a notch. In addition to featuring a procession of familiar faces from the vaults of Sega, Capcom, and Bandai Namco, Project X Zone 2 wi...
Dark Souls photo
Dark Souls

Get in on the Dark Souls III beta

You'll need a PlayStation 4 and PS Plus
Sep 18
// Jordan Devore
My favorite part of this beta sign-up page for Dark Souls III is that you can shake the guy by wiggling your mouse from side to side. Life's a lot more fun when you treasure the little things. Anyway, the actual beta registra...
Dark Souls @ TGS photo
Dark Souls @ TGS

Dark Souls III looks good at Tokyo Game Show

Albeit familiar
Sep 17
// Jordan Devore
I'm with Chris in that I don't see myself getting tired of From Software's action-RPGs anytime soon. Fatigue hasn't set in yet. That said, the opening areas of Dark Souls III aren't exactly fresh. See for yourself! This footage from TGS 2015 covers the same stuff Steven and Chris previewed.

Star Wars Battle Pod is an immersive, flashy, and elaborate arcade cabinet

Sep 17 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]310990:60396:0[/embed] It's not just the game that impresses here -- the actual cabinet itself does, too. Blowing air vents and rumble features that are synchronized with the action add to everything. The overwhelmingly large convex screen taking up the entirety of your peripheral vision certainly helps too. For the third time in this article, I'm using the word "experience" because Star Wars Battle Pod is more that than a game. Unfortunately for me, I'm kind of bad at it. Giving it a few different shots, I couldn't manage to clear any of the (approximately) three minute missions. Everything was going smoothly enough until "Mission Alert" flashed across the screen, meaning that there's an objective to fulfill -- defend a transport, blow up the Death Star...that sort of thing. I failed here each and every time. Oh well, it was still a hell of a ride. My go at Star Wars Battle Pod was at Bandai Namco's headquarters in Tokyo, where a free cabinet was set up. Those in the United States can give it the old college try, as it's in several Dave & Busters locations. That won't be gratis, of course; online reports seem to indicate that it's $4 per play. Steep, but maybe worth it for Star Wars fans to at least check out. There are likely diminishing returns across more runs, as Battle Pod shows its hand immediately. But hey, if the force is strong with you, who am I to stop you?
Star Wars photo
And fans will probably love it
While everyone's waiting for that one Star Wars game this fall, there's another new(ish) experience meant to transport you to a galaxy far, far away. It won't scratch the same itch, but it's immersive, flashy, and unabas...

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