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Evolve photo

Turtle Rock gives the lamest PR answer about Evolve's pre-order DLC

'We understand [it] was confusing'
Sep 08
// Brett Makedonski
Evolve's pre-order campaign was, without hyperbole, a shitshow. Jordan weighed in when the game was first announced, and opined that it was way too early to pre-order the game. By the time it released, there was more than $60...

Bleszinski: I never said LawBreakers wouldn't come to consoles

Sep 07 // Brett Makedonski
But, Bleszinski's adamant that his studio, Boss Key Productions, is too small to handle a console version. Someone else would have to do it. "We're 40 people. Even if we wanted to do a console version, we couldn't right now," Bleszinski commented. "If one of those potential console partners (Sony or Microsoft) reaches out -- and they reach out all the time -- we meet with them, and let's keep the dialogue going. It's just that we wouldn't be able to do the port ourselves. We'd need a really great partner that could knock it out of the park, keep it 60Hz, nail the controls, and make it fantastic." Consoles might seem like an odd destination for LawBreakers, as its roots are firmly planted as a keyboard and mouse shooter. Bleszinski originally thought so too, but realized that there may not be many necessary concessions for it to come to consoles.  Bleszinski elaborated on this realization by saying "Some of the Epic engineers came over and we had a conversation where I was like 'Good luck porting this to consoles.' One of them looked at me and said 'Titanfall's crazy wall-jumping, wall-running, and verticality, and that works on PC and console.' With the right amount of aim-assist and the right amount of little tricks, I could see it working. I wouldn't want to do the cross-platform play, though. I don't think the effort's worth the outcome there." Any amount of success for LawBreakers doesn't seem like it'll be enough for Bleszinski and Boss Key to take on any sort of console port. He wants to stick to that size of 40 employees. "I want to keep the company as small as humanly possible. There may be a time where if this becomes League of Legends big, fingers crossed, where we would need to grow, but that would be a few years out. That would be a best-case scenario. That would be a very good problem to have, but if that's the case, the first 40 to 50 employees will be very happy because we will have crushed it. But, we're going to stall as long as we can on that." Bleszinski justified this mindset by saying "The bigger a company gets, the more accountability happens, the more things get overthought. When that happens, creativity suffers. I'm not saying great things can't come out of big companies, but I'm saying that it's harder than in small companies."
Cliff Bleszinski photo
But Boss Key won't do it
Ever since Cliff Bleszinski announced he was working on an arena shooter, it has had "PC-only" in most people's minds. It's definitely PC first and foremost, but that doesn't mean that it's restricted to PC. Bleszinski's very...

Rexxar spotlight photo
Rexxar spotlight

Newest Heroes of the Storm character is a two-for-one

Everything is better with bears
Sep 04
// Nic Rowen
What's better than throwing giant axes in your enemy's face? Throwing giant axes in your enemy's face while a huge freaking bear mauls them to death. Rexxar will join the Heroes of the Storm roster next week on the 8th and he...
Castle Crashers photo
Castle Crashers

Castle Crashers Remastered is free if you own the original on Xbox 360

Releasing September 9, 2015
Sep 04
// Jordan Devore
I like Castle Crashers a lot, but I wasn't planning on nabbing the remaster for Xbox One. Now I am. Castle Crashers Remastered releases on September 9, 2015. If you own the original game for Xbox 360 and have an active Xbox L...
Killing Floor 2 photo
Killing Floor 2

Killing Floor 2 is free to play for the weekend

Play with me, maybe
Sep 04
// Zack Furniss
I write about Killing Floor 2 perhaps too often, but considering it's the main game I play whenever I have free time, my eyes are always searching for relevant news. If my raving about it hasn't been enough to convi...
Rocket League photo
Rocket League

Rocket League is giving names to the nameless

New patch coming soon
Sep 03
// Jordan Devore
Psyonix is prepping patch 1.05 for Rocket League. While the full notes aren't ready just yet, the developer has talked about some of the changes coming in "two weeks or less." Notably, there will be a Find New Match option in...
LawBreakers photo

Here's a long video showing what LawBreakers really looks like

22 minutes, if you want all of that
Sep 02
// Brett Makedonski
We sat down with Cliff Bleszinski at PAX Prime last week to talk about his studio's new game LawBreakers. We chatted about the gameplay mechanics and the free-to-play model. There's still more to come from that intervie...

Atlas Reactor's competitive turn-based play shows promise

Sep 02 // Jordan Devore
Atlas Reactor is turn-based, but players have a limited time (30 seconds by default) to lock in their decisions, and everyone's turns are simultaneous. That goes for your allies and enemies. It's quick and chaotic and not unlike rock, paper, scissors. After committing to a strategy, your actions (attacking, shielding, buffing, trapping, moving) play out across three different phases. There's an order of operations to keep things fair, in other words. During any given turn, you have to get into your opponents' heads and try to predict how they'll behave. If you're sure an enemy is going to dodge, don't plan to fire a shot that will inevitably miss -- lay a trap instead. If you're guaranteed to be hit hard and have no escape, set up a shield. It's a system that borrows from fighting games (reading your opponents), tactical games (grid-based positioning), and MOBAs (varied characters, free aiming). The end result is a promising fusion of genres that, at least to my knowledge, has never been explored quite in this way. [embed]308953:60233:0[/embed] "Once you have the basics, it's pretty interesting," said executive producer Peter Ju. "You want to play one level above your opponent. If you play two levels above your opponent, you're just going to out-think yourself and you basically are going to seem like a noob compared to the guy who doesn't do anything." Out of nowhere, another Trion Worlds employee, who was not a part of my demo, chimed in. He said he had far better results early on when he first started and didn't really know how to play. No one could predict his strategy because he simply didn't have one. I can relate. Atlas Reactor is only now entering alpha, and while the core mechanics are set and seem solid, there's still stuff to figure out. Which modes to create, for one. The match I saw was pretty standard: two versus two, first to four kills wins. Based on what players do with custom games during alpha testing, Trion will adapt to their preferences and "make more of that." I liked the sound of lighting rounds, where you have a precious few seconds to plan your moves. As for cooperative play, challenge maps of some sort are planned. "I really want to play XCOM with buddies," said lead designer Will Cook, "but I can't do that. This is the key to that." I'd be down to play with Steven. Between this, Hard West, and XCOM 2, there's a lot of love for turn-based strategy on the horizon. As long as Trion Worlds doesn't mess up the free-to-play aspects of Atlas Reactor -- I suspect it'll charge for skins and taunts -- it should turn out well.
Preview photo
I'm pleasantly surprised
Signing up to see an unannounced title at a gaming convention or expo can be risky. I've never been burned before, but I'm aware my streak could end in an instant. I went into my PAX appointment with Trion Worlds (Rift, Defia...

Bloodborne PVP photo
Bloodborne PVP

Let's see someone top this Bloodborne triple kill

Nobody does it better
Aug 31
// Jordan Devore
Despite not touching Bloodborne in quite a while, the game kept coming up in conversations (some sober, some not) at PAX this past weekend. Kyle and I tried to sell Steven and Brett on it. Zack and I talked at length about ga...

Cliff Bleszinski: 'I respect that core gamers see free-to-play as a dirty, dirty thing'

Aug 30 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]308383:60188:0[/embed] At this point, LawBreakers co-developer and Killzone series director Arjan Brussee chimed in "If you have a small barrier of entry like an early access fee, then I think that can work. For us, if you look at the game, it's definitely a triple-A type of experience. We don't want to charge $60, but our fans are used to paying money to play games with the Killzone and Gears of War stuff. So, I think we can leverage the free-to-play thing and do cool stuff in that space." Brussee's right in saying that this is a segment of the gaming population that doesn't have a problem coughing up some cash for games. The challenge comes in getting them on-board with free-to-play -- especially those who are distrustful of the model. But, Bleszinski wouldn't want to go back to the traditional sales metrics. "Yeah, for me, that's completely dead. That's pre-orders, that's 'how many do you get in the first two months' and then it's an exponential curve downward after that," Bleszinski said about the idea of his metrics for success suddenly shifting. "People who are still doing that: have fun. For me, that's old. For us, it's about a ramp." Bleszinski continued "We may not make a lot of money in the first couple months. But, in the first year, we may start to ramp up. These games are like a locomotive where they get going and going. Once they get momentum, you look around and say 'How did this game get so damn big?' The marking is a steady launch over the course of a bunch of different beats throughout the year as opposed to blowing the wad at Christmas while everyone else is blowing their wad. Or, the Super Bowl where you try to get Liam Neeson and Kate Upton to do goofy ads. We're in it for the long-run here."
LawBreakers free-to-play photo
But he's done with the traditional model
When Cliff Bleszinski formed Boss Key Productions to create the game now known as LawBreakers, he always knew that free-to-play was the model he wanted. That statement's not as black and white as it sounds. There's a lot of i...

Cliff Bleszinski: We want players to actually use verticality

Aug 29 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]308291:60187:0[/embed] "I don't mean to slag any other games, because those core loops of getting a lot of kills quick are what kill streaks and kill streak rewards are built on," Bleszinski said. "With us, we want to have a little bit of that dance, a little more like Halo where if someone gets the drop on you, you at least have a shot at either getting away or at least taking a dent out of them so they might die by your teammate." The hook that allows LawBreakers this freedom lies in the world-building. Because of a cataclysmic event known as "The Shattering," Earth is left with pockets of low gravity in certain areas. Conveniently enough, LawBreakers' maps are set in some of these areas, which should make for interesting and varied gameplay. Bleszinski was visibly excited about this. "We see these moments where there's this giant zero-gravity pocket where everyone's vertical and people are actually knocking each other around with rockets. One of the comments on Twitter was someone asking if rockets actually propel people. Since you have a rocket jump now, you actually have a radius. We found that with rockets not being a one-hit kill (because we don't really want them to be), even with Kitsune who's a very light character, once we have the law equivalent of her, she probably might be a couple rockets minimum. Still, it's a light character, but we want you to juggle." There's a reason he wants players to juggle. "When you introduce low gravity and the concept of juggling as well as a rocket that you can air-burst with the alt-fire, you see somebody flying through the air blind-firing propelling themselves, and you can suddenly send them over to the other side of the map by air-bursting a rocket and then follow through with your stomp move and kind of chain your moves together. We want the FPS dance to kind of come back." That FPS dance means that players stay alive longer and actually get to make use of the game's vertical axis. "It's a lot greater than your Call of Duty grind. It's a little bit faster than your Titanfall one. It's somewhere around Halo-ish is what I like to say," Bleszinski ultimately said of Spencer's original time until death inquiry. Figuring out exactly how to properly execute all that action is the tough part. LawBreakers' gameplay trailer showed a handful of different characters, each with their own abilities and traits. Bleszinski and his team are now in the position of getting all of those characters work in conjunction with one another without any of them sticking out like a sore thumb. "Perfect balance is nearly impossible to get," Bleszinski commented. "We're still working on it. Right now, in the current build that people are playing off-site, it's very asymmetrical -- two unique classes on both sides. The Law has all sorts of weapons whereas the Breakers have like area-of-effect stuff. That's been really hard to balance. One of the first things we're going to do when we get back is, you have Breacher on the Law side, we're figuring out who the Breacher equivalent is on the Breaker side. That's something that when we go back to symmetrical gameplay, I think it's going to be easier to balance. But, it'll still be slightly asymmetrical." It may not be exactly what he's shooting for, but Bleszinski made reference to a revered fighting game when talking about balanced gameplay. "I saw a graph where they're pointing out the Smash Bros. characters from the original that we've used over the years. Smash Bros. may be the most perfectly balanced game ever because they kept finding a new character and a new exploit without the game ever being patched or updated." An interesting analog, but LawBreakers won't take that approach. Bleszinski continued "Thankfully, we're going to be a living product so we can keep introducing updates, hopefully every couple weeks. Pump that shit through, have test kitchens and things like that. Basically, if we find an exploit that breaks the game, fix it. But, also recognize when there's an exploit that adds to the game. You know, rocket jumping is one of those accidents that actually is cool." Bleszinski and Boss Key can expect to find a lot of those exploits given the combination of possibilities between several unique characters and maps with variable gravity. There are a lot of factors at play. Some exploits will evolve into part of the game, some will get squashed. Those that make verticality more enjoyable and contribute to the FPS dance (as Bleszinski put it) have a better chance of surviving.
Bleszinski interview photo
Doing the FPS dance
Just this week, Cliff Bleszinski and Boss Key Productions pulled back the curtain on LawBreakers -- the free-to-play arena shooter that has been in development under the codename Project BlueStreak. It's more than just the co...

LawBreakers photo

Cliff Bleszinski's arena shooter is LawBreakers

Releasing next year
Aug 26
// Jordan Devore
Cliff Bleszinski (Unreal Tournament, Gears of War) and Arjan Brussee (Guerrilla Games co-founder) have been off building something called Project BlueStreak at their new studio Boss Key Productions. It's a futuristic first-p...
Killing Floor 2 photo
Killing Floor 2

You can play Killing Floor 2's Incinerate 'N Detonate update right now

Go forth, my child
Aug 25
// Zack Furniss
Killing Floor 2's Incinerate 'N Detonate update is playable now via an opt-in beta. The changelog can be found right here. There are two new perks, Firebug and Demolitionist, two new maps, a reworked audio system, and al...

So, how's Gears of War's multiplayer at launch?

Aug 25 // Brett Makedonski
Between last night and this afternoon, I have a fair sample size of matches under my belt. I'm maybe one percent of the way toward the "Seriously..." Achievement, which doesn't sound like much, but it is. The only issue I've encountered was about five seconds of lag at the beginning of one match. Otherwise, everything's been silky smooth. There's one non-performance issue that I have a problem with, however. The War Journal offers multiplayer statistics, but not on how close you are to earning the different Achievements. (If I'm not mistaken, this is a feature that Gears of War 3 implemented quite nicely.) Likewise, Xbox One's "snap an app" feature doesn't track that progress either. The sole indicator is a counter that pops up after a match in which you've hit a milestone toward that Achievement. Hopefully a fix is coming for that. That one insignificant complaint aside, this game holds up its end of the bargain with regard to multiplayer. After the Halo: The Master Chief Collection snafu (that may still be on-going to some degree), it was important for Microsoft to emphatically stick the landing on this one. Fortunately, it lives up to the excellent standard set by the rest of Gears of War Ultimate Edition.
Gears of War photo
Silky smooth so far
I have a novel concept for you: What if a major video game releases and its multiplayer component just works? Like, there isn't a bunch of drama and patches and updates and apologies; instead, you get to play the game immedia...

Destiny photo

Hear the new Nolan North-voiced Ghost in Destiny

RIP Dinklebot
Aug 25
// Jordan Devore
It's a single line of dialog, but here's what Ghost sounds like in Destiny: The Taken King now that Nolan North is voicing the character instead of Peter Dinklage. Time to get worked up! Or not! Resident Destiny fanatic Vikki Blake says "Northbot sounds just like Dinklebot." I'd tentatively call North's performance an improvement based on, again, just this one line, but we'll have to see.

Review: Capsule Force

Aug 25 // Jed Whitaker
Capsule Force (Linux, Mac, PC [reviewed], PS4)Developer: KlobitPublisher: Iron Galaxy StudiosRelease Date: August 25, 2015MSRP: $14.99 Two-on-two multiplayer matches make up the meat of Capsule Force across eight stages that each have an unlockable alternate variation. The matches consist of pink and blue teams working against each other to ride a tram to the other team's galaxy, which is trapped inside a -- you guessed it -- capsule. The first team to touch the other team's capsule wins. Capsule Force is easy to pick up and play. Grasping the controls fully takes maybe a match or two at most; you've got double jumps, an air dodge, normal shots, charged laser shots, a shield, and what I'd call blast jumping. Blast jumping can be performed by shooting the ground and then instantly jumping in the opposite direction for a faster and higher jump, which is vital for perfecting the game's single-player missions. Using the shield requires precise timing, but puts a bubble around your character preventing them from being harmed. Eventually you'll find out that air dodging allows you to double jump right away again, essentially allowing entire battles to take place mid-air. When attempting to kill other players, you've got two choices: normal shots or charging your shot to shoot a laser all the way across the screen, killing anyone it its path if they don't put up their shield. When using the laser, your character freezes in the air, allowing you to focus on aiming your shot. It is really satisfying to get a perfectly aimed mid-air laser shot killing both of your opponents and taking over the tram they were just riding.  [embed]306824:60087:0[/embed] Matches in Capsule Force are intense and hectic the whole time. Even if teams are pretty evenly matched, eventually the tram speed increases a great deal, allowing a quick turnaround for one side or the other. There were times when myself or my friends got a bit lost as to where we were on the screen due to this hectic nature, but it is all part of the fun. I will note, however, that some stages are similarly colored to the characters which can make it easier to get confused in than others. When not laughing your ass off in multiplayer, you'll tackle over thirty single-player missions. These consist of either rushing through stages as quickly as possible, or rushing through stages as quickly as possible while shooting targets. The target-shooting missions are reminiscent of the "Break the Targets" mode from the Super Smash Bros. series, and are just as fun. While it is a multiplayer-focused game, the single-player missions do add a nice distraction and practice, and those who complete them all will unlock stage variations, alternate costumes, and concept art. Giving single-player a purpose other than practice was a good choice, but locking multiplayer content behind it wasn't considering the limited amount of stages to begin with. The eight variations you unlock are essentially all new stages that just use the same backgrounds as the starter arenas, so they are certainly worth unlocking. Unlocking all the multiplayer content won't take more than an hour maximum for most players, so it isn't such a drawback.  If you're the kind of person who has friends over for couch competitive games, Capsule Force is easily recommendable as the multiplayer is a colorful, frantic, hell of a good time, but if you're a loner, give this one a pass. The limited single-player content won't hold your attention for long. I know I'll be playing Capsule Force at many of my shindigs in the future. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Review: Capsule Force photo
Blasting off again!
It is the far future, the year is 1999, and everything looks like a 1980s space anime; no, you're not tripping on mushrooms and having a flashback to your childhood, you're playing Capsule Force.   Capsule Force&nbs...

Review: Gears of War Ultimate Edition

Aug 24 // Brett Makedonski
Gears of War Ultimate Edition (PC, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: The CoalitionPublisher: Microsoft StudiosRelease: August 25, 2015 (Xbox One), TBA (PC)MSRP: $39.99  The developers of Gears of War Ultimate Edition have called this "the first at its best." Turns out they aren't wrong, but they also aren't quite precise enough. This is Gears of War -- entire franchise included -- at its best. Gameplay at a steady 60 frames-per-second does wonders for the naturally clunky movement. These soldiers now feel less like the tanks they resemble. That's not exactly the case in the campaign, however. Multiplayer over Xbox Live runs at 60FPS, but solo and cooperative play is locked in at 30. Regardless, it's a vast improvement over previous installments. It's immediately noticeable as soon as you pick the controller up. The Ultimate Edition is running on a mature version of Unreal Engine 3 -- the same engine the original Gears of War was built upon -- so this improvement can likely be chalked up to optimization and more powerful hardware in the Xbox One. This newfound fluidity makes everything less frustrating. Cover-based shooting works as it always has, but moving from spot to spot isn't as likely to end up with your character stuck to a wall you didn't intend. Navigating the game's many battlefields is quicker and more enjoyable. [embed]306974:60086:0[/embed] While a slicker movement system is easy to appreciate, it's the combat -- the actual shooting of guns -- that's the real meat of Gears of War. Almost everything about it is perfectly intact. As many bullets as the enemies can soak up, there's resounding satisfaction anytime an enemy gets tagged with a torque bow or a pistol takes a head clean off. Hip-shooting with the Gnasher is still a frustratingly inaccurate prospect, as it seems like things work out in your favor about half the time. But, the greatest compliment you can give Gears of War (and it holds true in Ultimate Edition) is that it makes fighting fun. That shouldn't necessarily be the case for a game that features pop-up shooting gallery one after another, but it is. Active reload is one of the better game mechanics of the past decade in that it constantly keeps the player's attention during a process that they'd otherwise be uninvolved in. The Lancer (a/k/a "chainsaw gun") is iconic and unironically cool. It's on the back of the combat that the rest of Gears of War gets by. A lot of the level design feels dated now. Settings are distinct through the game's five acts, but they're all used the exact same way. Rarely is there clever subversion to keep the player on their toes. More often than not, it's predictable what lies just ahead. To be fair, there are attempts to break this mold; the second act holds two examples. A large swath of this part of the game asks the player to pathfind by blowing up propane tanks in order to illuminate the road. When mixed with fighting, these are some of the best moments in Gears of War, as it adds a puzzle-like element. Conversely, the end of this act dedicates a chapter to vehicle driving. It's poorly executed, and it comes off as a forced and transparent bid at shaking up monotony. Gears of War can be linear to a fault, but that's a trade-off for its cinematic nature. Chapter length is generally short, and a new cutscene is always just around the corner. Setpieces come about fairly frequently, but they're somewhat subdued when compared to other installments in the series. Rather, this Gears of War is the game that set the tone for the over-the-top action to follow. Despite all the cinematics, Gears of War is notably light on narrative. The story details the human struggle against the invading Locust on the planet of Sera. Things are bleak. Humanity has its back against the wall. Everything feels so down and out. This coalition of well-trained troops is the good guys' last chance. For those who actually care, Gears of War's plot can be effective yet simple. It lacks a lot of nuance, as does the dialogue. Most exchanges between characters are gruff one-liners, either overtly aggressive or sarcastic. To be blunt, the dialogue hasn't aged well but this was never the game's strong suit. The greatest disconnect comes from the superb gameplay and the subpar narrative. It's not only the disparity between the two that rings obvious, but also how they fail to work hand-in-hand. Gameplay often feels less like a means of accomplishing a story-specific goal, but more like a means to trigger a cutscene to advance the plot. Pacing is also an issue, as stakes are high and chaotic at all times. There are plenty of faults, but Gears of War's greatest trick is that you don't notice them while you're playing. It's just a good time from start to finish. On a personal note: my roommate and I played through the entirety of the campaign cooperatively on Insane difficulty in two sittings in one day. I couldn't tell you the last time I dedicated that much of a day to a game. That speaks volumes. For anyone looking to boil the Gears of War experience down to its purest and (arguably) most enjoyable form, competitive multiplayer again serves a big role. There are 19 maps and nine modes (including newcomers team deathmatch, king of the hill, and two-on-two with shotguns). It's undeniably quite the large offering. Again, Gears of War is fantastic when it's just unadulterated combat. By today's standards, eight-person multiplayer should seem tiny, but it really doesn't. There's always plenty of fray to be found. Maps are designed in a nice, symmetric way so that everything's balanced. Although, the majority of weapons are immediately disregarded by most people in favor of constant use of the Gnasher, which feels like the way to go at almost all times. Whether the campaign or multiplayer, Gears of War undoubtedly succeeds in constantly entertaining. The Ultimate Edition takes that to a new level through optimized gameplay, smoother controls, and updated visuals. Most importantly, it makes this classic relevant again. Microsoft has a lot riding on the continued prosperity of Gears; after all, it is one of the publisher's largest properties. Gears of War Ultimate Edition effectively reminds why that's the case, just as it reminds why this is the game that partially influenced an entire generation of gaming. It just took a makeover to help us appreciate it again. [Editor's note: At time of writing, the multiplayer component wasn't live for the general public. A handful of multiplayer games were played in a private room hosted by the developer. We'll report on the state of online play at launch and thereafter. If this aspect of the game sees significant problems in the weeks following release, we'll cover those issues.] [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Gears of War review photo
At its best
For better and for worse, Gears of War helped shape the past generation of gaming. Bursting onto the scene in 2006, it helped solidify now-common tropes like chest-high walls, brown and gray shooters, and muscle-bound sp...

Deals photo

There's finally a deal on Rocket League for PC

Save some money for the happy meal
Aug 21
// Dealzon
Rocket League, one of the current top-selling games on Steam, finally made its way onto third-party retailers. The game is now listed at UK-based Green Man Gaming, and you know what that means: discount time! Rocket League (...
Chivalry/Killing Floor 2 photo
Chivalry/Killing Floor 2

Chivalry and Killing Floor 2 will have crossover weapons

You got your Zeds in my LARP session
Aug 20
// Zack Furniss
Two dismemberment-focused multiplayer games on PC, Chivalry and Killing Floor 2, are joining forces to release new content for those who own both titles. I already talked about the Knight character and his Zweihander weapon e...
Left 4 Dead photo
Left 4 Dead

Left 4 Dead survivors return for Zombie Army Trilogy

Typical Valve
Aug 20
// Jordan Devore
The survivors of the Left 4 Dead series are back for a cameo in Zombie Army Trilogy on PC. Folks who own Rebellion's Nazi zombie-shooting game can download a free update through Steam that adds Bill, Francis, L...
Two month delay photo
Two month delay

Ubisoft delays Rainbow Six: Siege into December

Two months
Aug 18
// Steven Hansen
Ubisoft's upcoming improbable trailer dialogue game Tom Clancy Presents (RIP) Rainbow Six: Siege will miss its October 13 release date, the company announced. The closed beta will still start September 24, but the pushed back...
Gears of War photo
Gears of War

Gears of War also redid its Mad World trailer for the re-release

We all knew this would happen
Aug 17
// Brett Makedonski
Microsoft is putting the finishing touches on Gears of War Ultimate Edition, an upgraded remake of the 2006 title. It's extending those duties a bit beyond the game, though. It's also recreating some of the original marketin...
Black Ops III photo
Black Ops III

This is how Black Ops III has the moves like Jagger

Aim for the heart if you feel like it
Aug 14
// Brett Makedonski
Wait. I don't actually know how Jagger moves. That dude is super old. It's probably not like this now that I think about it. Disregard the headline, but retain all the flashy running, hurdling, swimming, and boosting you can do in Black Ops III. That's what it looks like if you're good. If you're bad, it likely looks more akin to Mick Jagger running around a battlefield.
Not that Dollhouse photo
Not that Dollhouse

Dollhouse is bringing spooky noir multiplayer to PC and PS4

Close beta sign ups open now
Aug 13
// Jed Whitaker
"A horror game that pays homage to film noir with an intricate Stephen King like narrative" is how the description on the Steam page for Dollhouse starts, which could mean basically anything, but I kind of like that. Th...
Star Wars photo
Star Wars

EA on Star Wars Battlefront: Most people would've skipped single-player

'That's what the data points to'
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
Do you play the campaign in games like Call of Duty and Battlefield or head straight to multiplayer? During a wide-ranging interview with GameSpot, Electronic Arts COO Peter Moore commented on the lack of a campaign mode in ...
Heroes of the Storm photo
Heroes of the Storm

Heroes of the Storm's Monk sure is versatile

Here's the rundown on Kharazim
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
I'm excited for Kharazim to join Heroes of the Storm next week. If you haven't yet played as the monk in the Public Test Realm, Blizzard's spotlight video is a crash course on his versatility. Kharazim can focus on extra dama...
New Splatoon mode photo
New Splatoon mode

Splatoon's Rainmaker mode looks fantastic

Launching tomorrow at 7:00pm Pacific
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
I'm not usually one for capture the flag, and I've stayed away from Splatoon's ranked battles for the most part, but I'm loving the look of the upcoming Rainmaker mode. Teams compete to shatter the Rainmaker's shields, then s...
Rainbow Six Siege photo
Rainbow Six Siege

Breaking Bad's Gus really likes Rainbow Six Siege

Or says he does for a paycheck
Aug 12
// Brett Makedonski
Gustavo Fring, international meth lord, loves Rainbow Six Siege. That's what he said in this Ubisoft-released video wherein a handful of celebrities say a lot of nice things about the game. Maybe take this with a grain of sa...
Eco photo

Eco is like Minecraft for environmentalists, and it's on Kickstarter now

Hug a tree while you saw it in half
Aug 11
// Joe Parlock
Survival sims have gained a bit of a bad reputation. When it’s not something that’s just fundamentally terrible like The Slaughtering Grounds, it’s yet another early access zombie-in-a-forest survival sim l...
Rising Thunder photo
Rising Thunder

You don't need a code to test out Rising Thunder

Open alpha
Aug 10
// Jordan Devore
Nic's silly tier list introduced me to Rising Thunder as something I might enjoy, but I'm only now following through. You should, too! The fighting game is holding an alpha test and there's no waiting around for access -- jus...

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