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Hotline 2 level editor photo
Hotline 2 level editor

Hotline Miami 2 level editor beta hitting next month

Happy murder maze designer
Nov 17
// Nic Rowen
It's been a little while since we last heard about the “almost ready” level editor for Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number. But good things come to masked murderers who lie in wait and our patience has finally been rewa...
Van Helsing Final Cut photo
Van Helsing Final Cut

Van Helsing's Final Cut is the most 'Incredible' yet

Unless you've already played
Nov 15
// Patrick Hancock
Recently, NeocoreGames released The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing: Final Cut on Steam, a compilation of the three games in the series. Past titles have varied in quality; the first game was good but buggy, the sec...
Smooth Operator photo
Smooth Operator

Sup Holmes shakes tongues with Beardo Games

Sup Holmes every Sunday at 2:30pm EST!
Nov 15
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Show's over every...

Review: Clandestine

Nov 14 // Patrick Hancock
Clandestine (PC)Developer: Logic ArtistsPublisher: Logic ArtistsMSRP: $24.99Released: November 5, 2015 Clandestine takes place in 1996, with the Soviet Union still fresh on everyone's mind. Players play as either Katya or Martin, field operatives who investigate bad guys who have done bad stuff. Honestly, a lot of the plot went over my head, generally because my friend and I were laughing so hard over voice chat that we missed just about everything. Clandestine falls perfectly into the "so bad, it's great" category with its cutscenes. Movements are rigid and imprecise, voice acting is god awful, and things clip through each other. In fact, the characters' boss has a goatee that clips through his face when he talks. Sure, this could be seen as a terrible oversight from the developers, but it's so in-line with the quality of the rest of the aesthetic that somehow it works. The game's structure has players walking around a headquarters between missions in order to get new information on what just happened, as well as what is coming next. It's nice to have legitimate downtime before each mission, and roaming around the building with a friend can yield wonderful things. HQ is essentially a playground that becomes a game of "what goofy position can I get myself into next?" In a way, it reminded me of walking around the base in Perfect Dark. [embed]320445:61104:0[/embed] Mission objectives often have Katya sneaking into specific areas to either interrogate someone for information, or set up a rootkit on a computer for Martin to hack into and download specific data. While boiling the objectives down to their core makes Clandestine sound same-y, the variation of maps and context keep things fresh from mission to mission. There are even some choices the players can make that affect specific plot elements and mission objectives. Gameplay entirely depends on which character players control. Katya's gameplay is third-person stealth, while Martin's is computer-terminal hacking. Katya's controls will be familiar to anyone who has played a third-person game before. She can stick to walls, which is a bit janky at times (but never janky enough to ruin a mission). Her job is to avoid detection from guards and cameras by not being seen or making too much noise. Katya players can approach a mission as they please; it's possible to go in and out without trying to make a peep, or bring a slew of firepower and kill anyone they deem necessary. The game rewards players for a variety of playstyles, and doesn't really encourage one over another.  Players controlling Martin have a completely different game in front of them. Martin's screen is split into four sections: hacking network, camera feed, tactical map, and console. The console is there simply to display mission objectives. The hacking network is a grid of terminals that Martin can hack into. Some are PCs in the map, others are locked doors, and some are miscellaneous objects around the level. Martin controls a little avatar in the network and moves along the grid with the WASD movement keys. Hacking a computer will reveal its login credentials, hacking a door will tell Martin the code, etc. The network admin also has an avatar that chases the player down, disabling them for about five seconds if caught. The tactical map is a blueprint of the level that Katya is currently in. If Katya comes up to a locked door, she can ask Martin to get the code. Martin can click on the door on the tactical map, it will highlight its node in the network, then Martin can make his way over to it and get the code, tell it to Katya, and Katya inputs it on her end. This is a simple, yet elegant asymmetric design that truly requires teamwork to pull off. Katya has a camera on her at all times, which Martin can use to see what she sees. He can also hack into cameras around the map, taking over their vision on his camera feed. If Martin controls a camera, it will not "spot" Katya, so she's safe to roam the area. This also allows Martin to scan a room before Katya enters, which is incredibly useful given the fact that Martin can also tag guards on the map, making them visible to Katya through walls. Players flying solo as Katya can switch between characters at will. While it works, it's missing the best element of Clandestine: working together with a buddy. When alone, the hilariously bad cutscenes are suddenly just...disappointing. The coordinated tactics aren't there. It feels like a much more shallow game in its single-player mode. Players can join random games online, but doing so will always make the joining player control Martin. This is especially frustrating if two friends want to switch roles. The best way we could figure was to send each other our save files when we wanted to switch roles, and then change who hosts the game. Despite the serious tone set by the plot, it's best to go into Clandestine with a light-hearted approach. The movement is a bit clunky, the animations and voice acting are stiff as a board, and there's plenty of visual issues. However, the core gameplay and asymmetric ideas work well together. Grab a friend (this step is very important), jump on to a third-party voice chat program, and go play Clandestine. I have no doubt you'll come away with a memorable gaming experience. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Clandestine review photo
An asymmetrically wonky good time
Asymmetric multiplayer is not an easy feat to pull off efficiently. Sure, it's relatively simple to create two gameplay styles within the same game, but to make them blend together to create a unique ebb and flow is something...

Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Doujin mecha shooter Steel Strider out now

Available for $6 via Steam
Nov 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Steel Strider, the sequel to Gigantic Army, is now available on Steam, Nyu Media has announced. The new shooter comes from Astro Port, the Japanese indie team behind this summer's Tokusatsu-inspired STG Supercharge...
Electronic Super Joy photo
Electronic Super Joy

Electronic Super Joy Wii U team talks self-censorship and the ESRB

Sexy sounds, slashes, & business reality
Nov 12
// Jonathan Holmes
It pains me that some game publishers and developers feel the need to arbitrarily add or remove sexual content to their games in order to make them more marketable, but that need is an inevitable part of any art business. If ...
Rocket League photo
Rocket League

Psyonix is 'looking at all kinds of platforms' for Rocket League

More news later this year
Nov 12
// Darren Nakamura
Thus far, Rocket League has seen some phenomenal success on PC and PlayStation 4 (in part due to the PlayStation Plus promotion), and developer Psyonix hasn't been shy about its desires to move onto other platforms in the pas...
Vermintide photo

Vermintide sold 300K copies since launch, here are details on future DLC

Survival, realism, and solo modes
Nov 12
// Joe Parlock
I really liked Warhammer: End Times – Vermintide. It lacks some originality, but what it presented was incredibly well-made and fun to play. Turns out a lot of other people liked it too, as developer Fatshark announced ...
Yooka-Laylee character photo
Yooka-Laylee character

New Yooka-Laylee character channels old school graphics

Nov 11
// Darren Nakamura
Ever since the announcement that Team17 would be publishing the Kickstarter-funded Banjo-Kazooie-like Yooka-Laylee, news has been pretty quiet on it. There have been a couple of backer updates, including one showing a cute sk...
Undertale photo

What does the developer of Undertale want to change about the game?

Surprising attention to accessibility
Nov 11
// Joe Parlock
Undertale caused major waves when it released back in September. The plucky little RPG quickly became one of the most highly-reviewed games of all time (Destructoid gave it a 10/10), and has already amassed a gigantic fanbase...
Dad Quest Kickstarter photo
Dad Quest Kickstarter

Close to home: dad throws son at foes in Dad Quest

Ah, the memories
Nov 09
// Darren Nakamura
I don't know why fatherhood has become such a prevalent theme among indie games lately, but I like it. There was Octodad, then Dad by the Sword, then Dad Beat Dads. Now there is Dad Quest, and it reminds me a lot of my own ch...
Indivisible photo

Here's how Shovel Knight and Nipples Juan look in Indivisible

Areolas added for your pleasure
Nov 08
// Jonathan Holmes
Skullgirls developer Lab Zero recently announced that its currently-in-crowd funding 2D RPG Indivisible will feature a bevy cameos from various guest characters, including faces from Super Time Force Ultra, Battle Chaser...
Runbow photo

Sup Holmes tastes the rainbow with Runbow's Alex Rushdy

Sup Holmes every Sunday at 2:30pm EST!
Nov 08
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Show's over every...
Skullgirls Vita photo
Skullgirls Vita

Skullgirls dev 'underestimated' PS Vita port job

It'll be ready when it's ready
Nov 07
// Kyle MacGregor
At one time, Lab Zero Games planned to ship a PlayStation Vita port of its latest fighting game Skullgirls 2nd Encore "a few weeks" after the PlayStation 4 version. However, it's been a few months since the title arrived on P...

Review: The Age of Decadence

Nov 06 // Patrick Hancock
The Age of Decadence (PC)Developer: Iron Tower StudioPublisher: Iron Tower StudioMSRP: $29.99Release Date: October 14, 2015  The plot of Age of Decadence largely depends on decisions the player makes. While this is par for the course for many RPGs, I want to stress how committed the developers are to this concept. There are decisions within the first half hour of the game that can completely remove characters and their quest lines from the game. In fact, I took one of the first situations pretty lightheartedly, only to have my character's mentor completely removed from the city. I quickly understood the tone set thereafter. There is no shortage of heavy decisions, either. Many times RPGs will pester the player with small-time decisions before laying on an obvious game-changing decision. Age of Decadence throws game-changer after game-changer at the player, and forced me to pull back and contemplate my options many times. There is a lot of gray area in these decisions as well, which even makes going "cruel and evil" or "pure and good" somewhat difficult. Instead of aligning between good and evil, players are more often forced to choose between the many "houses" and alliances already established within the world. Personally, I backstabbed just about anyone dumb enough to trust me, and switched alliances quite frequently. Other players may do the exact opposite and stay with one of the first leaders they come across. The game is truly what the players make of it. Likewise, the gameplay can alter drastically based on decisions the player makes. For example, as I tend to do in RPGs, I made my character a wise-talking son-of-a-bitch. I talked my way out of every fight I came across. Well, okay, sometimes I said the wrong thing and ended up fighting, but after dying almost immediately every time, I simply loaded up the most recent autosave and tried again. Regardless, thanks to my persuasion, streetwise, charisma, impersonate, and lore skills all being high, I was able to smooth-talk and flirty-wink my way past any aggressors I came across.  [embed]318681:61024:0[/embed] Those who choose to go down a more combat-oriented route are in for an almost completely different game. Just as I melodiously coerced my foes to listen to my brilliance, players can brute force their way to the end. Combat works on a turn-based grid, similar to many strategy RPGs. A character's stats and equipment are the deciding factors that go into miss percentage, movement turns, damage, criticals, and so on. In addition to weapon attacks, there are many status effects like bleeding or immobilized to spice things up mid-fight. Combat can feel a bit clunky at times, which is largely a result of the whole game being a bit rough around the edges. The bottom line is that the combat works as it should, once the player understands how the numbers affect the outcome. Death is permanent, but the game does a great job of creating a ton of auto-saves to make sure the player never loses too much progress. When fighting, death may come quickly for those unprepared, and some of the death animations are pretty slick. Each situation even has a small death blurb for the player to read, and they are genuinely interesting, even knowing that it means the player's character has been ruthlessly murdered in some way. Combat scenarios are often extremely difficult. There are a lot of stats to spread out points between, and players who are going a more hybrid route may find themselves dead in a lot of scenarios. Players are first given an opportunity to escape an encounter through words, but if the various speaking skills don't have enough stats in them, that will fail. Then, occasionally there's another way out, like brewing a potion or crafting something. Again, if the player doesn't excel at this, it will fail. Then, there's combat. Occasionally players will have help in battles, but there still needs to be a solid base of skills and stats to succeed. For those planning on spreading out their statistical focus, I'd recommend looking at online guides to prevent future headaches.  While part of me loves that there are so many ways to customize a character, it can get very confusing and frustrating. I knew I wanted to specialize in speech, but there are a handful of areas that affect it. Persuasion, impression, streetwise, lore, and etiquette can all factor in to talking your way out of a situation, but not every skill is always useful. In some situations, persuasion and streetwise are necessary while in others, just etiquette will be enough. It's impossible to know what is more important, so the only solution, to the player, is to spread them out evenly between them.  For anyone worried about the breadth of content: don't be. Due to the choices the player must make, it's impossible to see everything the game has to offer in a single playthrough. Just judging from the achievements available, I've only seen a portion of the content available within the game. Considering how different one playthrough can be from another, it doesn't feel like a slog to go through the game a second time; yes, many of the big events share commonalities, but there are still huge branching paths available to the player all throughout.  The quest design is a lot stronger than typical RPGs. Every quest has some weight to it, even if its not immediately apparent. Exploring some cave could lead to the discovery of a device long since forgotten, or talking with an outpost leader could lead to your next big betrayal. It's crucial to always read the well-written dialogue carefully! There are no quest markers, so if a quest says to talk to somebody, you better remember where they are! Players can fast travel from the very beginning, which took me a while to realize, so there's little downtime in between objectives. The graphic fidelity of Age of Decadence is, well, not great. Just as the gameplay hearkens back to the classic games of decades past, so do the visuals. The animations are hit-and-miss, as it's not uncommon to see every single stationary townsfolk scratch their leg at the same exact time, but as I've mentioned, some of the death animations are extremely well done. The music, on the other hand, is wonderful. Appropriately supporting the fantasy setting and giving powerful moments that much more "oomph," the soundtrack hits all the right notes.  Age of Decadence is an RPG to its core. It offers the player a wealth of choices, many of them carrying lofty consequences along with them. The core design element of player choice transcends simple dialogue choices, as players can progress through the game in a variety of styles. Many games offer up the illusion of choice while failing to actually deliver, but Age of Decadence serves up difficult and tangible crossroads with no looking back. It may have some rough spots, but it is one of the most well-designed RPGs I have had the pleasure of enjoying. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Age of Decadence review photo
Deliciously decadent
The Age of Decadence has been in development for quite some time. Hell, I listed it in my indies game list from 2013! Since then, I've been remembering that it exists every once and a while, only to find out it was still...

Plan Be photo
Plan Be

Plan Be is a free, voice-controlled stealth game

Yell at scientists to get them to safety
Nov 06
// Joe Parlock
You’d think a stealth game that relies on you making a lot of noise would be pretty counter-intuitive, but that’s exactly what Valentina Chrysostomou is doing with her upcoming free game, Plan Be. Plan Be is contr...
Vinyl photo

Everybody's Gone to the Rapture's soundtrack is being released on vinyl

I'm in love. This is what love is
Nov 05
// Joe Parlock
Plenty of people didn’t for various reasons, but I absolutely loved pretty much every second of The Chinese Room’s Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture. One of the key things that made my time with that game so e...
Smashing the Battle photo
Smashing the Battle

One man made this big-breasted PS4 brawler

Smashing the Battle
Nov 05
// Steven Hansen
A new, comic book styled 3D action game was announced at the recent Sony Korea press conference. Smashing the Battle comes from one-man Korean developer Studio HG. It started life as a mobile game, but a PS4 version is in th...

Contest - Verdun

Nov 04 // Mike Martin
Win one of 10 copies!
Verdun is a realistic multiplayer FPS, set in WW1. You don't see those every day. The game is inspired by the Battle of Verdun France in 1916 and features authentic period weaponry (and realistic bullet physics). Squad based,...

Indivisible photo

Among others, a goddamn dinosaur on a skateboard is coming to Indivisible

Oh, and there are others too... I guess
Nov 04
// Joe Parlock
Indivisible, Skullgirls developer Lab Zero’s latest game, has managed to build up a lot of popularity recently. It seems like I can’t go 30 seconds on the Internet without hearing about it at the moment. With the ...
Undertale on TV photo
Undertale on TV

Undertale is too demonic and evil for the 700 Club

Sans has been giving people a bad time
Nov 03
// Ben Davis
[Header image by Nibroc-Rock.] Undertale, one of my favorite games released this year, made a very unlikely appearance recently on the 700 Club, a Christian television program hosted by Pat Robertson. The show received a ques...

Contest - Trigger Saint

Nov 03 // Mike Martin
Win one of 10 copies!
Hello my pretties! Today (courtesy of Undergroundies Inc. ) We have a contest for recently released Trigger Saint. Trigger Saint is an isometric, shooty, permadeath, beautiful, interesting game. I've enjoyed my time with it a...

Failsafe photo

Failsafe wants to inject Mirror's Edge with a bit of Studio Ghibli

Not to mention sweet grappling hooks
Nov 03
// Joe Parlock
I’d never realised how much I needed Mirror’s Edge with a Studio Ghibli coat of paint until I saw the Kickstarter for Failsafe. Developed by Game Over, it appears to combine Mirror’s Edge, Studio Ghibli, Sh...
Angels with Scaly Wings photo
Angels with Scaly Wings

How to bang your dragon: Dragon dating sim revived

Angels with Scaly Wings
Nov 02
// Steven Hansen
"I'm imagining the beginning to Stand By Me, but, instead, 'Hey, kid, you ever plow a dragon?'" Crude. But that's what I had to say about Dragon Dating Simulator last year. The project ultimately missed its funding goal, onl...

Review: Poncho

Nov 02 // Laura Kate Dale
Poncho (Mac, PC [reviewed], Vita, Wii U)Developer: Delve InteractivePublisher: Rising Star GamesReleased: November 3 (PC, Mac), TBA (Vita, Wii U)MSRP:  $14.99, £10.99Rig: Intel Core i5-4690K @ 3.5 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, Nvidia GeForce GTX 960, Windows 7 64-bit Having witnessed the end of the world, robotic protagonist Poncho sets out in search of a gigantic tower, in the hopes that tracking it down will allow the world to be saved. Poncho is a side scrolling, pixel art, 2D platformer with a twist. While parallax layers are generally only aesthetic, in Poncho you play an adorable robot who can leap at will between foreground and background environment layers. Jumps between layers take into account your vertical height. Momentum is conserved during the layer jump, so the challenge is getting yourself into the perfect gap at the perfect time. The biggest problem with Poncho, as well as the biggest strength it had going for it, is the way puzzles are designed to incorporate switching layers. When the puzzles work they are fantastic. Jumping off a foreground platform, timing your layer switch perfectly so you land on a background platform, continuing your movement to leap and mid-jump switch again to catch yourself in box, before switching forward one layer further to drop a small distance to safety. When layer switching puzzles are well thought out, they are a joy to play through.  [embed]318651:60965:0[/embed] When those puzzles fall apart in execution, the game tends to become a frustrating mess, where progress is arbitrarily slow, and lengthy twitch challenges are presented with minimal safety nets. Vertical jump puzzles that go on far too long, with failure resulting in starting from scratch. Horizontal jumping challenges where numerous platforms switch layers at differing speeds, without the ability to study all of them in advance of attempting the challenge. Solid platforms that incorrectly register as having been landed on, causing infinite falling loops. A good chunk of Poncho's level design stopped being inventive and ended up simply frustrating. Also of note, often Poncho feels like its reaction-based platforming and slow, methodical exploration gameplay are at odds. Keys hidden through the world need to be collected to progress, but often I missed hiding places in the world because I was too concerned with managing to complete a lengthy, safety net-free challenge. When the only chance to collect information on a puzzle is while half way through it, searching for progression-unlocking keys was the last thing on my mind. Ultimately I'm left at a little bit of a loss with Poncho. It's a great concept, and when it's working it's a great inventive challenge, but when it goes downhill, it put a huge damper on my experience as a whole. I wanted to like it, but it was tough given some of the rough puzzle and level designs on show. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Poncho review photo
Adorable concept, poor execution
The first time I played Poncho was at EGX around two years ago. Its unique visual identity, compelling set of gameplay mechanics, and endearing protagonist drew my attention among the crowd of other indie games playable at th...

Crowtel photo

Crowtel is cute and pay what you want

Pay for it with a (bird) song
Nov 01
// Nic Rowen
I've only spent about 15 minutes with Crowtel and it's already winning me over. Released earlier today by indie developer Sinks, Crowtel is a sweet little platformer about a Crow trying to tidy up his surreal hotel before a p...
Lovers in a Dangerous photo
Lovers in a Dangerous

Sup Holmes embraces nothingness with Asteroid Base

Sup Holmes every Sunday at 2:30pm EST!
Nov 01
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Thanks so much to...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

A look at the evolution of the games industry with 3 veteran developers

Sup Holmes every Sunday at 2:30pm EST!
Nov 01
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] Hope you all survived Hall...
Indivisible photo

Lab Zero to launch Indivisible PS4 demo on Nov. 3

It takes a golden calculator
Oct 30
// Mike Cosimano
Today, Lab Zero Games and 505 Games announced a PS4 version of their Indivisible prototype, to be released on November 3 for all PlayStation Network users. If you have a computer and want to play the prototype right away...

Review: Human Resource Machine

Oct 30 // Laura Kate Dale
Human Resource Machine (PC [reviewed], Wii U)Developer: Tomorrow CorporationPublisher: Tomorrow CorporationReleased: October 15, 2015MSRP: $9.99, £6.99 Human Resource Machine is a game that functionally aims to teach its players basic visual programming logic. You are a human, programming analogue tasks need completing on a day to day process. Players will need to create a visual programming loop that will allow you to mindlessly complete your task over and over. The reason you need to do your job in an efficient, automated, programming manner? Robots are coming to take your job. Initially, these programming tasks are accessible enough for non coders to wrap their head around quickly. Need to transport all inbox items to the outbox in an unchanged order? Take an item from the inbox, take it to the outbox, loop back to the start until everything has been moved. Need to take a pair of inbox items and take them to the outbox, but in the opposite order? Take the first item, place it on the floor, take the second item to the outbox. Pick the first item off the floor, take that to the outbox. Jump to the start and repeat. The problem is, around half way through the game starts requiring you to understand programming logic concepts it hasn't taught you before. Reading up on these concepts online can be complex, and working out how to build a programming function after only short while being hand held through basics can be rather frustrating. [embed]318222:60916:0[/embed] Here's one: build a machine that recognizes zero sum strings, then add up everything in the string, then create a Fibonacci sequence up to but not exceeding the value of your zero sum string, and place all values from the resulting Fibonacci sequence into the outbox using a limited set of tools. You can copy from or to limited memory spaces on the floor, add held and stored values together or increase a memory value by one. That kind of logic takes several considerable leaps, on top of trying to master a technique you only just learned for the first time. I think ultimately this is my biggest problem with Human Resource Machine. It's presented in advertising as a step by step tutorial on learning programming logic, but for newcomers to code some of the logical leaps are to complex to get through any method besides trial and error. For those who already program, much of the early game will likely be too easy. I feel like Machine doesn't really commit fully to being a game for new coders or for experienced programmers. It tries and fails to straddle a difficulty line. The game's plot is also essentially non-existent. The trailer tells you robots are coming for your job, which would clearly be better performed by a robot. Eventually, robots arrive and are better at your job than you. Some of the hints of an interesting story are there, but there is no pay off at all. Considering the subtly delivered narratives in World of Goo and Little Inferno, this was a real shame. Still, let's talk a little about what Human Resource Machine gets right. For those who keep up with the programming challenges as they are introduced, there are also a pair of optional optimization challenges for each puzzle -- such as, "have fewer than X instructions in your program," or "completely process the data in less than Y moves." Often it's impossible to complete both challenges with a single program, so it pushes you to re-optimize processes rather than just finding a solution that works. Learning where you could cut dead weight from a programming string felt hugely rewarding. The game also encourages players to not just successfully process a given set of data, but behind the scenes multiple sets of data are run through your program to ensure it works for every set, not just the current set. If a data set exists for which your program would break, that data set is provided to you, so you can debug the program step by step and see where it falls apart. The inclusion of step by step debugging tools to watch where your program's holes are was really beneficial, and encouraged understanding how your solution works, rather than just being content with the success itself. I came out of Human Resource Machine unsure who it was really designed for. It's at times too simple for experienced programmers, and often made leaps too large for beginners to overcome without obtuse outside research. While I had a sense of accomplishment every time I made progress, said progress at times felt like I was an infant thrown into water and expected to swim straight away. I might manage it, but it's not the ideal teaching method to leave me feeling comfortable going forward. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Human Resource Machine photo
My brain is not a machine
Tomorrow Corporation, the studio behind World of Goo and Little Inferno, is one of my favorite indie developers of the last couple of years. Known for creating polished indie games with accessible mechanics and interesti...

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