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Battleduty Modernfield 3 looks pretty legit


Dec 27
// Jim Sterling
This hot looking iOS game was released earlier in the month and I can't believe I missed it until someone showed me a link. It's called Battleduty Modernfield 3 and, despite 2/5 average user rating, it looks pretty awesome.&n...
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OMG: Jetpack Joyride free on iOS devices right now!


Dec 19
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Jetpack Joyride is free for a limited time right for the iPod, iPhone and iPad! The runner style game sees you avoiding obstacles and collecting coins through the use of a jetpack that happens to be a freaking chain gun. Seriously, Jetpack Joyride is stupidly addictive and you're a horrible stupid face if you don't even try the game. You jerks.
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Grand Theft Auto III now on iOS


Dec 15
// Jim Sterling
Celebrating its tenth anniversary, Grand Theft Auto III is now available on iOS for $4.99. The game that popularized the sandbox craze is regarded as a classic these days, and while later GTA games would replace the silent Cl...
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Batman: Arkham City Lockdown pops up in iOS


Dec 08
// Jim Sterling
If you're finished with Batman: Arkham City and sad that you've got no more bat-themed gaming to do, fret not. Batman: Arkham City Lockdown appeared on iTunes last night without herald, and is yours to download for $5.99. Ar...
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Bejeweled 2 removed from iTunes in order to go freemium


Dec 07
// Jim Sterling
Those wondering what Electronic Arts' acquisition of Popcap means for the studio's stable of popular games have had their questions answered today. Bejeweled 2 + Blitz will be swiped from iTunes and its two modes split into t...
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Art Juice: Ream Park


Dec 07
// Jim Sterling
[Every week (until I get bored), Art Juice takes a recent videogame story and provides an unremittingly artistic slant, telling us a little something about ourselves in the process ... whether we want to know the truth or not...
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Fruit Ninja toys are actual things you can buy


Dec 06
// Jim Sterling
I still remember Halfbrick when they were just a tiny little Aussie studio with an obscure game about skeletons. Nowadays, these guys are mobile powerhouses, with Fruit Ninja being one of the most recognized games on the mark...
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EA's new Theme Park game is a rotten scam


Dec 06
// Jim Sterling
Electronic Arts is resurrecting Theme Park on iOS, but if you think that's Bullfrog's charming little simulation game has returned, you're in for a sour awakening. EA has made it a "freemium" game, which wouldn't be so bad if...
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The Jimquisition: Hardcore Hypocrisy


Dec 05
// Jim Sterling
There are hardcore gamers out there so proud of their self-styled character trait that they shall defend it jealously. For indeed, it is they who get to judge whether or not others are worthy of being called gamers, it is th...

Review: Infinity Blade II

Dec 02 // Jim Sterling
Infinity Blade II (iOS)Developer: ChAIR EntertainmentPublisher: Epic GamesReleased: November 01, 2011MSRP: $6.99 The first Infinity Blade had a story that was merely hinted at, shrouded in mystery and vague allusions. This time, there is a lot more meat to the plot, but despite fully voiced cutscenes and a cast of actual characters, much is still left to the player's imagination. Infinity Blade II picks up where the first game left off, with the God King defeated and the hero in possession of his titular sword. To go literally any further than that would be to spoil things, but rest assured that things get very shadowy, very quickly.  Cutscenes are now voiced in English, rather than the invented language of ChAIR's fantasy/sci-fi universe. In some ways, this leads to a disappointing loss of mystery, as familiar voices lead to a less exotic and alien world. Nevertheless, the acting is impressively strong, and one particular character (who shall remain nameless) is performed with such delicious pompousness that it makes up for any letdown that might be felt. In any case, there's still plenty of oddness to go around, fake languages or not.  ChAIR has evolved the gameplay to provide a very recognizable base, but expanded in every single way. Infinity Blade II presents another series of one-on-one duels against increasingly challenging monsters, with players blocking, parrying and dodging until breaking the enemy and fighting back with elegant touch-based swipes. This time around, however, the minions of the Deathless have taken off their gloves and put up some real resistance, with punishing new attacks and varied patterns that make them far harder to predict.  [embed]217089:41944[/embed] The player's defense tactics have been given a bit more balance to ensure that players that safe, familiar routines cannot be depended on. If players dodge too much, the hero can become exhausted and grow far less effective. Opponents will also frequently attack with fists and shields so parrying is no longer completely trustworthy, and many attacks can also break through shields to stop anybody planning to "turtle" their way to victory. The penalty for sticking to one tactic is ever-present, and an impressive job has been done of ensuring that each battle feels less formulaic and more dynamic. Tougher creatures are not afraid to feint at times, perhaps raising a sword and tricking the player into parrying, only to surprise with a sneaky boot to the face. These moments test the player's ability to break free of instinct and muscle memory, yet again keeping would-be heroes on their toes.  The more intense combat is appreciated, but it doesn't come without its share of fresh grievances. For one, the difficulty spikes can become quite a surprise once the first "real" boss has been defeated, and the need to grind increases exponentially as a result. Enemies do far greater damage than usual, even with decent armor, and it's not long before they get access to powerful elemental weapons that sap one's life swiftly. Not to mention, the shield becomes practically useless in the latter stages of the game, as almost every single enemy will attack through it and do major damage. This wouldn't be problem if it didn't happen so quickly, encouraging players early on to start a whole new game while retaining their character progress, just so they can be strong enough the second time around.  Fortunately, players do still keep all their equipment, levels, and boosted skills upon death, respawning into a new "Bloodline" to begin each quest anew. After all, nobody is expected to beat Infinity Blade's bosses on the first encounter, with a potentially infinite cycle of death keeping players going until they're strong enough to conquer the latest challenge. Instead of simply going through a palace and defeating the God King, players must this time go through a castle with multiple paths, taking down over four major Deathless before rescuing a "man" known as the Worker of Secrets. As it was with everybody's favorite God King, the defeat of any one of these Deathless is accompanied by a sense of jubilant satisfaction and a feeling of accomplishment, especially if it's one that's put you in the ground several times running.  Outside of combat, there is now a ridiculous amount of new equipment to find, alongside old favorites like the Holiday Helm and Ladyfinger. As before, each piece of equipment collects experience points which are drained into the player characters' XP pool, allowing him to level up until the equipped item is "Mastered" and can gather no more. The balance between collecting powerful gear while collecting experience points remains, and with so much more stuff to grab, dedicated gamers will take a damn long time before having a hero at maximum capacity.  Weapons are now split into three types, with the familiar sword and shield being joined by dual blades and heavy weapons. Dual blades attack more swiftly, allowing for greater combos, and allow the player to duck incoming attacks rather than block them. Heavy weapons include axes and maces, and deal huge amounts of damage. Players won't be able to dodge with heavy weaponry, but can block attacks in multiple directions to better stagger the opponent. Gear now comes with various shaped slots that can be fitted with gems, because we need even more loot to gather. Gems possess extra perks, such as improved item drops, elemental damage, or greater defense bonuses, and can fit into any slot of the corresponding shape. They can also be removed from discarded weapons at the cost of gold.  The inventory has been given a slight overhaul, with items now split into better category menus for easier browsing. More powerful items are bought with in-game gold, which can be purchased for real-world money or earned honestly throughout the course of battle. New "supply" items, such as health regen potions and prize wheels, provide a little more aid and can -- if bought for a very high price -- make the boss fights far less difficult. As if that wasn't enough, there are new locked chests that can be opened by finding keys in the game world. It's a small addition, but the fact it was tossed in just to make things interesting speaks volumes about how serious ChAIR took this sequel.  At first glance, those unfamiliar with the game will think Infinity Blade II is more of the same, but the sheer level of improvements made to every facet of the game is quite staggering. ChAIR could have likely released little more than a glorified Infinity Blade with a few cosmetic changes and gotten away with it, but Infinity Blade II has expanded and deepened to a laudable degree. Battles are tougher, exploration feels less linear, and new items to discover make a game that feels much more like a role-playing adventure then ever before. Few console sequels could claim such consistent and thorough improvement, let alone an iOS one.  Of course, no Infinity Blade II review could be complete without a mention of the graphics, which are more gorgeous than ever. When not played on an iPhone 4-S, it has to be said that the animation can get a little choppy, but rarely does it take away from just how beautiful everything looks. The only time the framerate truly aggravates is when the obnoxious Game Center pop-up welcomes you back to the game in the middle of a fight and completely throws the timing off, otherwise I had few issues on a humble iPod Touch 3G. Infinity Blade's delightfully bleak artistic style has returned in full force, with a series of wonderfully decrepit environments and a selection of monsters that range from intimidating to utterly bizarre. Weapons and armor are a sight to behold as well, coming in a variety of weird and often ridiculous fashions. It takes a real man to roll up to an immortal demi-god wearing only a metal Santa mask and a loincloth, but players can do it if they so desire.  Gamers who were not sold on the original's "Punch Out!!! with swords" gameplay will likely remain unimpressed with Infinity Blade II, but fans are sure to be completely thrilled by the amount of upgrades and improvements on offer, not to mention the developments of its increasingly enigmatic story. The sudden upshot in difficulty can take one by surprise, but the flexibility allowed when restarting Bloodlines means that it's never a real issue. Otherwise, this is the same kind of great combat found in last year's title, but with absolutely everything ramped up to magnificent degrees. If Infinity Blade was proof that mobile games could be taken seriously, then Infinity Blade II is that very same proof biting any and all detractors on the genitals.
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When our future selves look back on the time mobile gaming truly earned its place in this industry, there is no doubt that Infinity Blade will be seen as the first major turning point. Its critical acclaim and commercial succ...

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Dizzy: Prince of the Yolk Folk trailer is egg egg egg egg


Dec 02
// Jim Sterling
Egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg egg e...
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Oh, EA: Subscription charges added to Tetris mobile app


Dec 02
// Jim Sterling
Oh, EA! What have you cheeky scamps gone and done now? It would seem you've added a subscription service to a Tetris app of all things. Now why would you go and do something as positively zany as that? Electronic Arts has rel...
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The Dark Meadow now on sale for one pathetic dollar!


Nov 23
// Jim Sterling
If you were interested in The Dark Meadow but felt its original asking price was a bit too steep, you've got no excuse now. Phosphor Games' darkly humorous slash 'em up is now a measly dollar on iTunes, so if you've got a buc...
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Sigh: 'New' Dizzy game is an iOS/Android remake


Nov 23
// Jim Sterling
Seems the "eggciting" Dizzy adventure promised yesterday isn't very eggciting at all, with Codemasters revealing that the egg's grand return will actually be a remake of Dizzy: Prince of the Yolkfolk on iOS devices and Androi...
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PoleRiders is a game that involves riding poles


Nov 08
// Victoria Medina
PoleRiders is a flash game, and the only way to really understand it is to play it. It is better with two people, and playing alone is far less interesting. Now that I have your attention, PoleRiders takes the idea of pole va...
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Prototype 2 comes to iOS with Protoslice


Nov 04
// Jim Sterling
Prototype 2 is getting some extra promotion in the form of a free iOS games. Protoslice is a puzzle game in which you have to move Sgt. James Heller's mutant virus blades out of the way of a panic button without getting cut. It doesn't look all that hot, but it's free! I think you should watch the video above, whether you get the game or not. It's incredibly dynamic.
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XIII: Lost Identity is an interactive story, not an FPS


Oct 27
// Jim Sterling
BOO! BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! Over a week ago, it was revealed that a new XIII game was in the works for iOS and PC. This week, our hopes and dreams have been crushed with the reveal of XIII: Lost Identity. Turns out it's n...
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Shantae comes to iOS this week, have some wallpapers


Oct 25
// Fraser Brown
Genie lovers rejoice! Shantae: Risky's Revenge is making the move from the DSi to iOS later this week. Even if you are one of those terrible genie racists, you should still check this gem out. Gorgeous visuals and great music...

Talking to Women about Videogames: Going mainstream

Oct 25 // Jonathan Holmes
Probably the most common reason why people want tech and gaming to gain acceptance is the desire to be accepted. Most people want to be normal, to be one of the gang/herd/team, to avoid stigmatization and ostracization, and to gain a breezy, criticism-free, friction-less life. When gaming rubs up against the mainstream media and culture, there tends to be a lot of friction, which leaves fans of videogames feeling burned. That friction often comes in the form of shaming fans of videogames by calling them immature or "stunted." That's part of why it's so easy to sell the Xbox 360 to teenagers as something more "grown up" than the Wii console. Teenagers hate being thought of as kids anyway, so the last thing they want is "kid-friendly" game console. Move up a few years and the pattern continues. I know quite a few people in their mid-20s who bought a PS3 because it was more "adult" than their "teen-bait" Xbox 360. I know even more people traded in their PS3s for Wiis once they hit their 30s. They've decided to "move on from bachelorhood, spending hours gaming alone in their basements," and to start families where they still game but only a couple of times a week and only as a brood.  Come to think of it, a few of those people have kids who are just turning 10 and 11, and naturally, those kids are now begging to "upgrade" their Wii to Xbox 360 or a PS3 this Christmas. With that, the cycle starts again. Though all their choices are different, all these people are running from the same thing: the idea that there is something "age inappropriate" about the games they're playing. Generally speaking, you don't see that kind of age-connected stigma to Apple products, or any stigma at all for that matter. Apple products (and the games people play on them) are more or less considered to be universally appealing and "appropriate" regardless of your age, gender, or cultural background. The crafting of that brand was no small feat, but once you have that brand reputation, it's very easy to start a "blockbuster" chain reaction. When everyone thinks that everyone is supposed to like something, then everybody suddenly wants one. That's why so many ads brag that their film is the "#1 movie in America." Once people hear that something is #1, they feel that it must be the best. Otherwise, why would everyone go and see it, right? The more people believe that the movie is #1, the more people will see it, which will lead to more people's thinking it's worth seeing, and so forth. That's just as true for phones and computers and videogame consoles as it is for movies. That's why companies like Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft fight so hard for mainstream acceptance. They want that built-in mind share because that's where the money is. If they can convince people that they can become better human beings by associating with their products, then they can pretty much write their own checks. It's especially interesting to me when this plan backfires, when people strongly do not want tech and videogames to go mass market. There are people who hate how Apple, Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony have all had their moments where they were beloved by the mainstream. Isn't that weird? Why do they care? My guess is that they have fallen into the trap of counter-conformity and have come to believe that the stigma carried by their respective interests is actually a badge of honor. It makes sense that if you're mocked by the majority for your interests on a regular basis, then you'll eventually come to hate the majority. If you've come to hate the majority, then of course you're going to want hate what the majority loves and further embrace the things that caused you to be shunned in the first place. Is that how hipsters are born? I'm not sure, but I can tell you what I've observed.  With videogame hipsters, there seems to be a solid progression. At first, budding hipsters looks to separate themselves from the mainstream by shunning games with mass market appeal like Mario and Angry Birds. From there, they often develop a hatred of Halo, Call of Duty, and Resident Evil, and they instead choose to embrace only small indie titles or obscure classics. From there, I've seen gaming hipsters go full circle into loving Mario again or reject all conventional games for text adventures or games that are made on a strictly non-profit basis. One thing I have never seen is a gaming hipster who wasn't missing out on some great games due to his obsession with keeping up his image. As for me, I'll admit that I have an agenda of my own. I hate it whenever anyone says that something worthwhile is only appropriate for people of a certain age, gender, or other demographic. It's not because of how I think their opinion may reflect on me but rather how their opinion limits them from appreciating something that deserves respect. When you say something is a chick flick, a kiddie game, or butt-rock, it implies that the thing in question is not truly worthwhile.  That's why I am quick to point out to people who say that videogames are just for "boys" or "nerds" that they too enjoy videogames. I'll remind them that, at the very least, they must have enjoyed a game of PC Solitaire and then work from there. Again, I'm not here to establish that it's OK to be a "gamer." In fact, there is nothing I'd like more than to show both "gamers" and "non-gamers" that those brands shouldn't exist. Your level of interest in videogames should rightfully have nothing to do with how you define yourself. Once it does, you'll inevitably fall into the trap of either being a blockbuster chaser or a first-class hipster. What matters is tossing out your preconceived notions and biases and honestly looking at the world around you. To do otherwise is to shortchange yourself out of really... living. I don't mean to sound judgmental or to have overly high expectations. I know that videogame culture as a whole is currently dominated by products made to sell death, darkness, and war (with some occasional bouts of nostalgia and dancing). Based on that that, I understand why so many people assume that games aren't for them, which in turn leads to game publishers and developers to not even bother trying to make games for people who don't already like what gaming has to offer.. It's an ugly pattern that keeps gaming and society as a whole from reaching its full potential. That's why I'm happy that Steve Jobs worked so hard to show the world that technology (and the videogame industry that's associated with it) is potentially for everybody. It's not because he helped me to feel like less of a nerd. It's because it's just... true. Technology is for everyone! Everything is potential for everyone, as long as we are willing to keep an open mind and to not limit our options. Apple may have used some trendy tricks and slick marketing to show the world that truth, but if that's what it takes for our current model of human evolution to get with the program, then so be it.  OK, enough out of me. What do you think? Does it matter to you what the mainstream thinks of technology and videogames? When was the last time you said, "You dun be a gamer now gurl"? Please tell me it was today. If not, it's not too late. Turn to the person closest to you, let the words out, and make that change. Past Episodes: Talking to Women about Videogames: 3DS 2nd nub panic Talking to Women about Videogames: Gears 3 isn't perfect? Talking to Women about Videogames: Sexy vs. sexist? Talking to Women about Videogames: What makes you want? TtWaV teaser: Sony's online sucks now? Talking to Women about Videogames: I'm not a real gamer? Talking to Women about Videogames: Fear for the future
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[Talking to Women about Videogames is a series where Jonathan Holmes talks to different people who are women about the biggest videogame news of the week for some reason.] Steve Jobs spent countless hours working t...

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Ninja Pong to steal hours of your life on October 27


Oct 25
// Harry Monogenis
Cute, little ninjas. This has been something that many of us have wanted to see because let's face it, the concept is too damn cute to ignore. It's now finally happening thanks to Poland-based Alien Worm Studios with their u...

High Flyer Death Defyer has Charisma

Oct 24 // Conrad Zimmerman
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Which is to say that the game has a character named Charisma, a free-falling freedom fighter trying to save her people. She's the female lead of High Flyer Death Defyer and can be purchased as a playable character in th...

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One of my favorite shooters of the last generation, XIII, is getting a followup game after nearly eight years of complete silence. The comic-based conspiracy FPS turned many heads in 2003, but sales weren't spectacular and it...

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The Jimquisition: Steve Jobs and iOS - Game Related


Oct 17
// Jim Sterling
Over the years, I have seen many gamers proudly proclaiming their disinterest in Apple products and smugly questioning why such products should be considered videogame related topics. This only intensified when Steve Jobs died and those same people demanded answers -- why is Steve Jobs related to videogames at all? Well, the Jimquisition will answer!
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Layton spin-off to bend minds on iThings


Oct 16
// Tony Ponce
You can never have enough Layton in your life! That's the rule. With that thought, Level-5 has announced Layton Brothers: Mystery Room for iOS devices. Instead of assuming the role of the ol' professor, you'll take command o...
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Gameloft copies Red Dead Redemption with Six Guns


Oct 14
// Jim Sterling
I've given up trying to defend Gameloft. It knows what its doing and doesn't need the protection, so here's yet another shamelessly "inspired" game coming soon to mobile devices -- Six Guns.  This open-world cowboy game...
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Infinity Blade heading to arcades


Oct 13
// Jim Sterling
The success of Infinity Blade knows no bounds, with news that it will be joining Fruit Ninja and Flight Control as the next iOS game to hit a big screen. A 46-inch arcade screen, to be exact.  Infinity Blade FX will come...
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Naughty Zelda rip-off invades iOS


Oct 12
// Jim Sterling
The mobile platform is a hive of unfettered development that is only vaguely policed. While this can lead to some inventive and unique ideas, it all too often leads to lazy developers looking for a quick buck. Enter Ultimate ...
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Scribblenauts comes to iOS as Scribblenauts Remix


Oct 12
// Jim Sterling
Cult hit DS game Scribblenauts has made its way to the iOS platform as Scribblenauts Remix. Costing $4.99, it features forty of the best levels from both Scribblenauts and Super Scribblenauts, plus ten iOS-exclusive challenge...
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Sony to make movie about Steve Jobs' life


Oct 11
// Jim Sterling
Sony Pictures has spent a reported seven-figure sum acquiring the rights to make a movie about Steve Jobs, based on his authorized autobiography.  The autobiography is due October 24 and is written by Time Magazine ...

Review: The Dark Meadow

Oct 10 // Jim Sterling
The Dark Meadow (iOS)Developer: Phosphor GamesPublisher: Phosphor GamesReleased: October 6, 2011MSRP: $5.99 (standard) / $8.29 (HD) The Dark Meadow's similarities to Infinity Blade are numerous and obvious, needing to be mentioned. Like ChAIR's smash-hit iOS title, The Dark Meadow takes the form of a timed combat game in which players must dodge or block incoming enemy attacks and swipe the screen to hit back once the opponent's exhausted itself. It's a tested system, one that still works very well, although Phosphor doesn't include parry attacks as Infinity Blade does.  As well as melee combat, The Dark Meadow throws in ranged assaults. Each enemy starts at the end of a corridor and staggers toward the player. During this time, players must dodge incoming projectiles while aiming and firing a crossbow using very simple touch controls. Once the enemy gets close enough, the crossbow is automatically replaced with a sword for close quarter dueling to take place.  Obligatory role-playing elements are on offer, with experience earned at the end of each battle and forty levels to gain. With each level increase, stat points can be sunk into various attributes, improving ranged or melee damage, crossbow reload speed, defense or health. A huge variety of swords, crossbows, and health-augmenting amulets can also be bought with gold found scattered throughout the environment. Exploration is a big part of the experience. The Dark Meadow is set in an abandoned hospital consisting of rooms connected by corridors. Rooms contain loot and background story elements, while monsters spawn in the corridors. Pulsing green icons on the floor indicate the next position players will move to once touched. It's a very simple navigation system, and while some may not appreciate the on-rails nature of movement, I find it perfectly suited to the all-touch control scheme.  As stated, the game owes a lot to Infinity Blade, but where it really stands out is with its exemplary story and atmosphere. The game starts with players waking up in the ruined hospital and meeting a mysterious man in a wheelchair. This man becomes the only guiding voice in the game, constantly communicating with the player via loudspeakers set up in each room. It quickly becomes apparent, however, that he isn't all that he claims to be, and his increasingly mad commentary -- as well as his instructions that you are to kill the beautiful "witch" who barricades important sections of the hospital -- paints a picture of an insane and malicious individual.  However, he's also an incredibly funny character, one very reminiscent of Portal's GLaDOS. Each of his broadcasts is a treat, as he regularly struggles to win your trust while pathologically demonstrating just how untrustworthy he is. He'll thank you for being smart enough to invent the Internet before taunting you by claiming to have just found a huge amount of food. He'll claim the mysterious woman of the hospital is pure evil while admitting that half of what he's said about her is a lie. He is, at times, utterly hilarious, and sometimes he's rather creepy.  This focus on storytelling is the real drive of The Dark Meadow, making it something more than a slightly less polished Infinity Blade and giving it something truly special. As players uncover notes from torn diaries, newspaper clippings, or the insane doodles of madmen who seem to know what's going on, a very strange and eerie world is created. It's a funny game, but an altogether foreboding one. A mysterious world that never gets too convoluted or obtuse, and provides just enough information to keep one hungry for more.  There are definitely some issues that hold it back. Loading times can be lengthy and the frame rate sometimes gets spotty. The combat system isn't quite as refined as the game it's borrowed from, either. The dark visuals can make incoming attacks a little difficult to see and the dodge button seems incredibly forgiving, with attacks that should hit the player passing through so long as a dodge was activated at some point in the enemy's animation.  My other big problem with the game is the store. Every single item of equipment is available from the start, provided one has the gold for it, and it seems to defeat the object of collecting any loot. Furthermore, this seems designed to encourage in-app purchases of gold. Players can buy their way to the top with gold purchases starting at $0.99 and climbing to an outrageous $49.99! Of course, these purchases are totally voluntary and gold can be achieved through simple grinding, but it will take a lot of time to save up for the most powerful gear.  The best equipment isn't needed to experience the full game, and it's still a very fine game indeed. Designed very well around the limitations of iOS and featuring some of the most disturbing creature designs this side of Silent Hill, Phosphor has created a very atmospheric and engrossing game with a delicious streak of dark humor coursing through its veins. The Dark Meadow is worth picking up for anybody with an interest in iOS gaming.
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Phosphor Games is a studio pulled together from the ashes of Midway. When the company went under, it left behind an open-world superhero game, one that the developers didn't want to see die. They reformed as Phosphor, and reb...


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