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Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

EA opens more Stars Wars Battlefront PC servers

Trooper or a rebel?
Oct 09
// Vikki Blake
Electronic Arts are opening more PC servers to cope with demand for the Star Wars: Battlefront open beta. In a recent tweet, the official Star War: Battlefront said that owing to "a lot of interest around the beta", it will s...
Battlefront beta photo
Battlefront beta

The Star Wars Battlefront beta starts today, here's how to get in

It's free and easy
Oct 08
// Brett Makedonski
Any way you slice it, Star Wars Battlefront is one of the most highly-anticipated games releasing this fall. But, you don't have to actually wait until the November 17 launch date to get your hands on it. There's a ...
Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

Han Solo, Emperor, and Leia heroes datamined through Star Wars Battlefront beta

You'll find them quite operational
Oct 08
// Chris Carter
Thanks to a dedicated dataminer, we now know that Star Wars: Battlefront will sport three additional heroes -- Princess Leia, Han Solo, and the Emperor. Files have been located similar to the other announced heroes so fa...

I'm not too impressed by the Star Wars Battlefront beta

Oct 06 // Chris Carter
Today, I had the chance to play the beta on PS4, and I came away with some mixed thoughts. Right now in the beta there are three modes available: Drop Zone, which supports 16 players, Walker Assault, which supports 40, and Survival (a two-player gametype that can be played offline or online). The former is a gametype that sees two teams of eight battling it out for pods, which randomly drop from the sky and inhabit the battlefield one at a time. It's up to each side to locate the pod, capture it, and maintain ownership until a timer runs out. Once it's done, power-ups will pop out, and it's onto the next one. I actually liked the objective-based feel of Drop Zone quite a bit, and the timers feel spot-on to add some form of tactical depth to each match without feeling like a slog. Walker Assault might be 40 players, but it will allow 10 in a lobby to initiate a match. It's here that I witnessed a fairly keen matchmaking system, which drew in players gradually and located games that were mostly full first before dropping me into an empty lobby. This asymmetrical mode sees rebels defending Uplink objectives to call in Y-Bombers from imperials. It has more of a classic Star Wars feel to it, most notably due to the inclusion of AT-ATs, AT-STs, and Tie Fighters (which are essentially killstreak power-ups now, picked up on the battlefield) into the proceedings. Although we only started with 10, it gradually escalated to a crazy 20-on-20 match, and that glorious Battlefront entropy was in full force. As for the gameplay, again, there are no microtransactions, and you'll have to unlock everything through credits. There is some rank-gating involved, but not nearly as bad as other online shooters (at least, so far), and the credit system allows you to buy, for the most part, the exact equipment you want -- from rifles, to thermal detonators. The game uses a card system for equipment (which isn't nearly as kooky as Titanfall's Burn Cards) that lets you customize which slot each piece of gear falls into (L1/LB or R1/RB, with an additional slot for Triangle/Y). I really dig the option to default to first- or third-person at any point as well. I don't miss classes or squads. [embed]314178:60645:0[/embed] The game feels...a bit cheap at times in terms of its gunplay. It looks beautiful (it can go 4K on PC) and runs smoothly, especially when you're gazing up at the sky and watching ship battles take place before your eyes, but there's a certain clunky feel to combat. Weapons really lack impact or "oomph" all around, and I experienced a bit of lag at times. You can chalk part of that up to being a beta, but the game is right around the corner after all. Survival mode lists four potential locations on the menu (Hoth, Sullust, Endor, and Tatooine), but only the latter is playable the moment. AI battles are also shown, but aren't active in the beta as well. It's horde mode, in essence, with a gradual ramping up in difficulty with each wave. It's here that I was able to experience most of the perks (which are unlocked from the start), such as a vertical jetpack boost, grenade launcher, and a temporary boost for your primary, all of which have cooldowns involved. To be blunt, without a second player, this mode gets old quick. After just three waves I wasn't really feeling it, as there isn't a whole lot of deviation from the horde formula, and the fact that you're a grunt rather than a hero character really puts a damper on things. I don't expect to get much play out of this outside of the occasional session with a friend or my wife by way of local co-op. For diehards, though, you'll probably enjoy tackling the various challenges like "no death" runs. So there's the Star Wars: Battlefront beta so far. It's not bad by any means, but I'm not sure it's worth the full asking price. When the actual game launches next month we'll have a better idea of all of the different modes involved, but again, solo players will probably want to wait for a price cut straight out of the gate.
Star Wars Battlefront photo
But I'm not disappointed either
There seems to be a healthy amount of skepticism surrounding the upcoming release of Star Wars Battlefront, and I don't blame people. After all, EA is involved -- always lurking in the shadows, ready to strike at consumers. T...

Battlefront PC specs photo
Battlefront PC specs

Why the hell does Star Wars Battlefront recommend 16GB of RAM on PC?

That seems excessive
Oct 06
// Brett Makedonski
The Star Wars Battlefront beta starts in just a couple of days, and everyone's invited; there's no barrier to entry. Well, let me clarify. There's one barrier to entry if you're on PC -- you need to have a rig that'...

Review: NHL 16

Oct 06 // Brett Makedonski
NHL 16 (PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: EA CanadaPublisher: EA SportsRelease: September 15, 2015MSRP: $59.99 In a genre plagued by incremental increases, this is NHL 16's greatest offering: An on-ice trainer that goes above and beyond. Hockey is a sport that's notorious for its inaccessibility to newcomers. Putting the biscuit in the basket is easy enough to understand, but where should my forwards be positioned when in the defensive zone? What kind of check should I execute when skating backward toward my goal? This training aid helps refine gameplay on-the-fly. It kind of teaches hockey, but more importantly, it teaches how to play NHL 16. For instance, when skating into the offensive zone, a cone will appear that indicates what part of the shooting lane is open and what part is blocked. A target may show up in the corner of the goal to tell you the smartest place to aim. Or, when playing defense, a box will cordon off part of the ice at your zone. Sticking to this area and covering the man in the box is what you're supposed to do. That's how hockey is played; NHL 16, simulation of hockey as it is, wants you to play it just like hockey. Those are two examples, but this on-ice trainer permeates every second of gameplay until you don't want it to anymore. It's a good thing too. I imagine EA had grown tired of players wildly out of position trying to line up huge hits. That's not how hockey looks, and it's not how a digital representation of the game should look. [embed]314010:60626:0[/embed] To its credit, the trainer doesn't stick to a low-level understanding of hockey. If it detects a seasoned player is at the helm, it'll start to adapt so as to offer more nuanced and advanced suggestions. Basically, everyone has something they can learn from this feature and it's incredibly unintrusive despite constantly being on the screen. It's the best part of NHL 16 because it actually enforces an understanding of doing what you're doing. The rest? Well, it's what NHL 15 should've been. Maybe it's unfair to hearken back to a previous game as a reference point, but fuck it. We make the rules around here. The on-ice product in NHL 16 is again solid and it includes the modes that last year's game should have shipped with. The actual hockey-playing in NHL 16 feels extremely similar to NHL 15. There are surely some physics and AI tweaks making ever-desired strides toward realism, but they feel mostly nominal. The game still plays well outside of the occasional rare physics bug. And this. Whatever the hell that was. With regard to the modes, they were mostly done right this time 'round. Be a Pro allows the simulation of shifts until it's your time to hit the ice again. (Curiously, the coach-assigned goals and ratings often seem off. Like, how do I have two goals and an assist, but a "C" ranking on offense for the game?) Likewise, the EA Sports Hockey League has been largely straightened out. Gone are the days of maxing out player skill through real-world currency. Now, everyone has to define their aptitude via a class of player that they pick. It's a smart design decision for the game's leading cooperative mode -- not to mention a surprisingly ungreedy one. Be a GM rounds out the most interesting modes that NHL 16 has to show. In it, you eschew the skates for a suit and tie. You're in control of an NHL franchise, and it's up to you to trade, manage, and motivate players. Games are simulated via a coach's drawing board where major events become markers like a "G" for a goal scored. The fascinating facet of Be a GM lies within the morale system. It's a bit paper-thin, but NHL 16 asks you to make unique speech decisions for different players. Over time, you learn what motivates your guys. Your star's ego might be too fragile for you to just outright yell at him; you may have to baby him instead. NHL 16 isn't perfect, but it's a substantial improvement over what released last year. Mind you, that's not some sheer brilliance; it's just because of general competence. The NHL franchise seems back on track, and it has even introduced the wonderful on-ice trainer. But, that trainer aside, it's tough to shake the feeling that NHL has just caught up instead of innovating. EA Sports spent this iteration making up ground. It was a necessary move, but not one that instills confidence that the developer has grown comfortable with the generational shift in consoles. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
NHL 16 review photo
Training wheels
In the mandatory initial matchup in NHL 16, I was forced to choose between last year's Stanley Cup Final contenders. I had to back either the Chicago Blackhawks who I very much dislike, or the Tampa Bay Lightning who I am ver...

Mirror's Edge: Catalyst feels different to the first game, but still fun

Sep 30 // Joe Parlock
The demo for Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst started off with an exposition cutscene. I play as Faith (same protagonist as the first game), and am being released from a prison in the city of Glass (not the same city). If I don’t find employment within two weeks, I will be re-arrested and taken straight back to the slammer. The setup felt a lot more in-your-face than the subtlety the original game’s backstory had; gone is the covert government surveillance and governmental corruption, and in are the contact lenses which project advertising into your eye. But whatever, I had running to do and only 13 minutes of demo to do it in. After a short tutorial, I was let loose on a small area of the map. The area itself wasn’t too big, with the rest of the city available and open in the full release of the game, but it was still an order of magnitude bigger than any space I’d seen I the first game. It was almost daunting, being presented with such a big space when I was used to the linearity of the first game. I was given the choice of three different missions: I could hack a billboard to put my own pro-Runner propaganda up, I could deliver a memory stick for the criminal underworld (and fight a load of guards at the same time), or I could just race Icarus, my new runner buddy. The map system is nicely done, and it gives the game’s iconic runner vision a whole new lease of life. Faith’s ability to see where she needed to go in the world has always been designated by objects tinted red. Catalyst takes that originally fairly useless but still pretty effect from the linear first game and puts it to great use in this open world successor. A lot of previews of Catalyst have said the game feels more or less exactly like the first game. The controls have been retweaked slightly, but other than that I’ve been led to believe Catalyst just expands what the first game did. While that may be true for those who only played Mirror’s Edge a few times, I did notice some very big differences in how it felt to play. The biggest one is the entire thing felt kind of floaty. Jumps lasted longer, climbing over fences took longer, and a lot of your movements are based around getting higher in the space. For example, in the original game if you hit an object like a fence or a vent at the right height, you would quickly vault over it to maintain your momentum. In Catalyst, the vault is still there, but holding down the jump button (like I was used to in the original game) made me climb up onto the object and jump off of it to get a bit of extra height. It was a change that took a lot of getting used to, but once I had it opened up plenty of new routes for me. The cost of this new maneuverability is Catalyst doesn’t feel as grounded as Mirror’s Edge did. There was originally a lot of weight to Faith’s movements, and you couldn’t build up that much height without using bars or ledge, but in Catalyst it sometimes felt like gravity didn’t really matter to Faith, and that she’d float off away from Glass at the first chance she was given. Another major difference to Catalyst is the massive changes to combat. The new combat is built around maintaining flow and momentum, rather than having to stop and do a lot of punching like it was in the first game. It all seems to be context-sensitive as well; when I was nowhere near any guards, pressing the attack buttons would do absolutely nothing. So does this new system actually let you incorporate combat into your flow? Not really. It feels so much better than the first game, for sure. I wasn’t pissed off when I had to fight, and it was incredibly cool pulling off the cinematic takedowns. It’s fun, but it still has the problem of stopping you dead in your tracks. One positive thing is triggering attack animations extended my jumps too, and even saved me from one point where I was certainly about to die. Picture it as a less extravagant version of the homing attack in modern Sonic the Hedgehog games, and it’s easy to imagine where the uses for combat would come in. It’s worth keeping in mind the original game is absolutely ingrained into my muscle memory at this point. On the whole, it plays just like the first game: once you’ve got flow built up, traversing this open world feels fantastic, and the new skills Faith has really add to the experience. Swinging around vertical pipes, leaping off of chain-link fences, and incorporating some combat into my run were a lot of fun. Catalyst more than feels like a decent successor to Mirror’s Edge. The plot elements from the first game are taken and expanded to make Glass an interesting world to explore, and the most obvious parts of the movement in the first game are still there and have been refined. The combat is better (though not as improved as I was hoping), and the controls definitely feel less awkward. I genuinely did enjoy my time with Catalyst a lot more than I was expecting to. There’s just a few changes to it that make Catalyst feel like a simplification of the original game's systems. People who have played the original once or twice will certainly appreciate those simplifications, but for me it felt like the potential skill ceiling was a fair bit lower than the original game. I can't see myself pulling off the same sort of stuff I can in the original, because of the very small ways freedom is taken away from you. We will see whether I’m right when Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst releases on February 23, 2016. It's still definitely one of my most anticipated games, that's for sure.
Mirror's Edge: Catalyst photo
I've played 250+ hours of the original
When Mirror’s Edge came out in 2008, nobody really knew what to make of it. The game was a valiant effort at doing first-person parkour well, but a lot of people were put off by some awkward controls, bad combat, and pe...

Mass Effect photo
Mass Effect

BioWare announces new Mass Effect theme park ride

'Entertainment innovation" coming 2016
Sep 30
// Vikki Blake
A gaming franchise isn't a gaming franchise these days unless it has its own theme park ride. Nintendo, Ubisoft... they're all at it. And now, BioWare is too. The developer has announced that a new "3D adventure" Ma...
EA photo

Maxis lead Lucy Bradshaw is leaving the company after 23 years

Oh, Maxis
Sep 25
// Chris Carter
It's sad to see how Maxis has changed slowly over time ever since its acquisition by EA in 1997. The company once provided me with hours of entertainment with classics such as SimCity and SimAnt, and it seemed like its s...
Battlefront photo

Star Wars Battlefront has a beta in two weeks, and it's easy to get into

That's nice, for a change
Sep 24
// Brett Makedonski
In recent years, betas have largely been used as a means of driving pre-orders. "Pre-order the game today and get into the multiplayer beta!" Ubisoft's running this promotion with Rainbow Six Siege as we speak (at least ...
EA Access photo
EA Access

EA is asking about an EA Access-style service for PC, with other publishers involved

Bethesda, Ubisoft, and more to join in?
Sep 24
// Joe Parlock
It looks like EA might be looking to expand EA Access (its subscription service on Xbox One that gives access to a whole host of EA games) to PC, and to include other publishers, if a survey sent out by market research compan...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

What a shock, Dragon Age: Inquisition - Game of the Year Edition is coming

All DLC, not all of the platforms
Sep 23
// Joe Parlock
Trespasser, the final DLC for Dragon Age: Inquisition, has been out for just over a month now. Fans have played through it, and are left in the limbo of not knowing what to do without Varric’s tender embrace. So I&rsqu...
Deals photo

Year's worth of EA Access included in new FIFA 16 Xbox One bundle

Also a roundup on all FIFA 16 deals
Sep 18
// Dealzon
It feels like every game is getting its own Xbox One Bundle this fall with the glut this September. The latest of the bunch is the above-pictured FIFA 16 bundle, which launched on Tuesday this week (the game comes out next we...
FIFA 16 photo

13 female footballers removed from FIFA 16 following NCAA warning

EA disagrees
Sep 18
// Vikki Blake
Thirteen female football players have been removed from FIFA 16 following NCAA concerns that being in the game may jeopardise the athletes' eligibility for "collegiate athletics". North America’s National Collegiate Ath...
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants vs. Zombies

Meet the six new Garden Warfare 2 characters

Three plants, three zombies
Sep 17
// Jordan Devore
A part of me doesn't want to hear any more about Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare 2 knowing full well that it's not releasing until spring 2016. I was way into the original. I'll be way into this. The cast includes six new ...
Need for Speed photo
Need for Speed

'No plans' for paid DLC for new Need for Speed, no split-screen

All cars unlocked at start as well
Sep 16
// Chris Carter
Although the PC version of the new Need for Speed was recently delayed (good, don't rush it out like other publishers have been doing en masse lately), we now have some concrete info on the game. For starters there are "no pl...
Star Wars fridge photo
Star Wars fridge

There's a Star Wars Battlefront mini-fridge, too

$130 with the game
Sep 15
// Jordan Devore
Walmart is selling Star Wars Battlefront with a Han Solo mini-fridge (PS4, Xbox One). It's not as good as the collector's edition Call of Duty: Black Ops III mini-fridge. It's not even as good as this other Han Solo mini-fridge. Dear future generations: sorry about wasting the planet's resources on this crap. [Via reddit]
Need for Speed delayed photo
Need for Speed delayed

Need for Speed PC launch delayed into 2016

Slow and steady wins the race
Sep 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Need for Speed's PC launch has been delayed until next spring, Ghost Games announced today, saying PC gamers' desire for an unlocked frame rate was the driving force behind the move. "This decision on PC gives us the necessar...
Need for Speed photo
Need for Speed

Sign up for EA's Need for Speed beta

Or don't
Sep 13
// Kyle MacGregor
The new Need for Speed reboot is one of those always-online abominations, so you can bet your sweet ass there is going to be a beta. Gotta stress test those severs/promote that product. If you'd like to take th...
Electronic Arts photo
Electronic Arts

EA silently kills a bundle of nice mobile games

Many older titles pulled from app stores
Sep 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Earlier this month, Electronic Arts removed over a dozen of its older mobile titles from the iOS and Android app stores with essentially no notice. The blow came on September 1, when the publisher whispered via its support site that the following games would be disappearing that very same day:
Darth Vader PS4 photo
Darth Vader PS4

That Darth Vader PS4 with the remastered Star Wars games is available to pre-order now

It runs $450
Sep 11
// Brett Makedonski
Remember Disney's D23 Expo? It seems like it was a long time ago, but it's really just a month in the past. Also, it wasn't in a galaxy far, far away; it was in California -- the land of almonds which require a gallon of wate...
Mirror's Edge Catalyst photo
Mirror's Edge Catalyst

GAME UK gets that expensive Mirror's Edge Collector's Edition

A whopping 160 quid to purchase
Sep 11
// Laura Kate Dale
Hey, do you like Mirror's Edge? Do you have a mighty £159.99 lying around your house with which to buy some video game tat? Well, it looks like GAME UK has an exclusive box of stuff in addition to the actual game to sel...
FIFA 16 photo

Here's the full FIFA 16 soundtrack

Forty-two tracks
Sep 11
// Vikki Blake
EA has unveiled the full soundtrack that will accompany FIFA 16. This year's track listing features 42 artists from the likes of Bastille, Beck, Foals, and John Newman. Here's the full list:
Deals photo

60% off Dragon Age: Inquisition, Battlefield 4, and Hardline in Origin "Action Sale"

Last hurrah and all that
Sep 09
// Dealzon
Origin is clearing out digital inventory (because it takes up so many 1s and 0s) and taking 60% off Dragon Age: Inquisition along with Battlefield 4 Premium Edition. If you don't have either of these games, they're both ...
Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

Drop Zone will be Star Wars Battlefront's take on King of the Hill

Campers beware
Sep 09
// Vikki Blake
Star Wars Battlefront's equivalent to King of the Hill will be a game mode called Drop Zone. The mode -- which can be played on planets such as Endor, Hoth, Sullust and Tatooine -- will feature eight vs. eight PvP combat, whe...
Battlefront photo

Star Wars Battlefront won't have a server browser

Because matchmaking always works...
Sep 02
// Joe Parlock
DICE has a history of controversy when it comes to server browsers in its games. Before release, there was a lot of criticism of Battlelog in Battlefield 3, which saw the server list removed from the game and shoved into your...
Star Wars: Battlefront photo
Star Wars: Battlefront

EA provides details for Star Wars Battlefront October beta

Coming to PC, PS4, and Xbox One
Sep 01
// Chris Carter
EA  has spilled some details for the upcoming Star Wars Battlefront beta. It'll be available in early October on the PC, PS4, and Xbox One platforms, and is a technical test that will feature 40-person battles on Hoth, p...
Star Wars Battlefront photo
Star Wars Battlefront

EA shares first details for Star Wars Battlefront's new planet

Battle of Jakku
Aug 27
// Chris Carter
The desert planet of Jakku is set to make its film debut in Star Wars: The Force Awakens later this year. But it's also making its game debut earlier in December, once Star Wars: Battlefront hits. EA has shared some news rega...

Review: Madden 16

Aug 25 // Steven Hansen
Madden NFL 16 (PlayStation 4 [reviewed], Xbox One, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)Developer: EA TiburonPublisher: EA SportsReleased: August 25, 2015MSRP: $59.99 Madden 16 makes an interesting opening gambit, once again going right into a game, this time a fabricated Super Bowl 50 starring the Cardinals and Steelers. No one wanted to watch that match up seven years ago (except me because of the Kurt Warner), but EA insists on framing this nostalgia-less, fake match up with Any Given Sunday editing, close ups on players, and even tepid, badly-acted football dialogue, the kind of jawing written by someone who has not played sport.  Fuck, is it boring. It introduces new (very simple) catching mechanics in painful slow motion setting up situations (oh, one of the teams is trailing!) we're supposed to have emotions in, like I have any stake in Fake Super Bowl 50, like I'm supposed to feel something when alleged rapist Ben Roethlisberger (who narrates later tutorials) tells his mates, "It's time to be the team we're supposed to be right now. Believe in the man to your left and to your right. It's our time right now" like he's reading commercial cue cards. At least the San Jose 49ers' digital Levi's Stadium field hasn't turned to pudding like the real one. This is what Madden is, though. In past years I have creatively ripped on the series for aggressive advertisements of real-world products, which this one seems to have toned down significantly (unless they're coming dynamically as updates post launch). But! Madden is a yearly advertisement for the NFL. From the start menu it encouraged me to share my information with the NFL, promising digital playing cards as a reward. This is what it means to have exclusivity rights to the only meaningful football league (because no one internationally gives a shit), the commodification of players. It is cool to see the increased likeness of Arizona's head coach whose fascinating neck folds and face-scanned pores have him looking like a corrugated version of Dana Carvey's turtliest member of the turtle club. [embed]307755:60128:0[/embed] In 2006 (that would make it Madden 07) I distinctly remember when I fell into the habit of abusing slot receivers instead of number one and number two wide receivers. This meant a lot of balls to the perfectly serviceable Kevin Curtis instead of two of the greats, Isaac Bruce and Torry Holt. The worst thing about those slot receiver posts, or crossing routes over the middle, has always been linebackers undercutting the passes for picks. Here is the scenario: a player looks reasonably open for a pass. It is a pass any NFL quarterback could make. It is a pass I, an idiot with bad knees, could make. You throw it with a nice arc over the front defensive layer and before the safeties. Madden has never wanted to give you that pass and it has taken near 10 years for the series to introduce "touch passing," a double tap that lets you drop balls into open zones. Ten years. Low and high throws are executed by holding L1 (high) or L2 (low) while passing. The passing game has seen the most new features added this year. Aside from the aforementioned quarterback stuff, there are three types of catches, done by holding one of three buttons while the ball is in the air en route to the receiver. The Aggressive catch (triangle) is for leaping catches and bodying cornerbacks. RAC (square) encourages the player to make a catch in motion and continue running up field, provided they're not about to be clocked. Possession catches (x) are for keeping feet in-bounds or making sure the receiver hangs on to a first down. These useful buttons encourage more user interaction during catches and also speak to a refined interplay between defensive backs and receivers. On the other side of the ball, you can have defenders play the ball (hold triangle) to go for an interception or deflection, or more conservatively play the receiver (hold x) to ensure you make a tackle and possibly knock the ball from them. There is much more realistic jockeying for body position and faithful physics so long as you don't stare too closely at the instant replays. Eventually you'll notice some similar, more dramatic catch animations (a particular one-handed one stuck out), but it is a plus on the whole for verisimilitude, for giving weight and feeling to awesome athletes interacting in a confined space. That's about it, though. There are some neat presentation additions (statistic graphics overlaid on players) and the menus are well laid out, though they are also pretty slow. Load times, too, are still a bit of a problem (and intrusive presentation elements are bothersome when running a hurry up offense). The insistence towards microtransaction-laden Ultimate Team and the new fantasy football-cribbed Draft Champions modes is useless. Throwing, catching, and defending throws have seen some welcomed, long-ignored additions that get a couple yards closer to faithful simulation. You can decide if that's enough. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Madden reviewed photo
Mildly deflated
I do feel, some, for Electronic Arts and the people responsible for making Madden every year. This is only my 4th year (out of  27 releases) covering it and I fear I may have peaked with last year's review. But like a fr...

Madden 16 photo
Madden 16

EA goes way over the top to promote Madden

We didn't see this coming
Aug 21
// Brett Makedonski
EA Sports' promotion of Madden has largely been the same for years now. Gameplay trailers, new features, interviews with developers -- we've been there and done that. This is different. This is...weird. And, kind of amazing....

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