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Doujin bundle photo
Doujin bundle

Humble Weekly brings back the Japanese indies

Good variety
Nov 21
// Jordan Devore
The doujin scene isn't my usual beat, but Astebreed is cool as hell and I like sharing deals whenever possible. As such, hey, you may want to take a look at this Japan-centric Humble Weekly Bundle. No rush! You've got several...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Doujin mecha shooter Steel Strider out now

Available for $6 via Steam
Nov 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Steel Strider, the sequel to Gigantic Army, is now available on Steam, Nyu Media has announced. The new shooter comes from Astro Port, the Japanese indie team behind this summer's Tokusatsu-inspired STG Supercharge...

La-Mulana 2 will probably break me

Sep 05 // Zack Furniss
Since the interface and overall graphical style of La-Mulana 2 looks almost identical to the original, it's appreciated that the new character is distinctive enough that you'll know which game you're playing. Instead of inhabiting the Indiana Jones-alike Lemeza Kosugi, you'll be playing his (maybe) daughter Lumisa. Skill-wise, the only major change I noticed is Lumisa seems to have slightly more air control; instead of being locked into a forward jump, you can ease off a bit. Though I eventually acclimated to the strict leaping rules in the first game, I immediately felt more comfortable exploring the ruins in this demo. That comfort was obliterated in approximately one minute. While a jovial PR rep was telling me that puzzles aren't necessarily easier, so much as they have better signposting, I stumbled through trap after trap and wandered up to a boss. I was supposed to whack him in the face, but he kept charging through and knocking me down, killing me in a few quick blows. This happened about four times, until I gave up and went in a different direction. Another change is that there's a more noticeable sense of depth (at least in the stage that I played). La-Mulana 2 is built in 3D in the Unity engine, as seen above. Though this first area didn't play with this too much, I imagine the late-game ruins will use this newfound depth to their advantage. I'll be damned if clues to certain puzzles won't be hidden in the background. With such limited time and access to the demo, it's hard to get a sense of whether the signposting has actually been improved. The first game played a sound effect when you had advanced a step in a puzzle, but there was often no clear way to figure out what exactly had changed. The platforming and bosses still feel as tough as ever, but a series like La-Mulana really demands at least a few hours to see just how inextricable the labyrinthine ruins will end up being.  The PR rep ended our meeting by saying that when they polled players about difficulty, Japanese players overwhelmingly wanted the sequel to be easier and the Western players wanted it to be harder. They're trying to strike a middle ground here with tricky riddles that still require a sharp eye, and more forgiving platforming. We'll see how that turns out when it launches early next year.
La-Mulana 2 photo
And I look forward to it
I only recently finished La-Mulana, Nigoro's "archaeological ruin exploration action game." It tried its damnedest to make me quit at every turn; with its obtuse puzzles and tricky platforming, I don't feel it's hyperbole to ...

Black Holmes photo
Black Holmes

Hatoful Boyfriend creator reveals Black Holmes

No fun bird dating, just cruel murder
Aug 14
// Joe Parlock
The creator of everyone’s favourite bird dating simulator, Hatoful Boyfriend, has announced its brand new game by the name of Black Holmes. Hato Moa announced the game through the official website for Black Holmes, whic...

Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Steam discounts Japanese indies for Comiket 88

Doujin deals abound
Aug 10
// Kyle MacGregor
Valve is always looking for an excuse to throw a sale, and this week Steam has deep discounts on Japanese indie games. The occasion? This summer's Comiket is taking place over the weekend. Comiket (Comic Market) is a biannual...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Here are all the doujin games from Comiket 88

Over an hour of Japanese indie trailers
Aug 09
// Kyle MacGregor
Comic Market (or Comiket for short) is scheduled to take place this upcoming weekend, starting August 14. There, hundreds of thousands of people will pour into the Tokyo Big Sight exhibition center to get their hands on rare ...

You aren't the hero in this RPG

Aug 02 // Kyle MacGregor
A Healer Only Lives Twice isn't a typical RPG by any means. Instead of putting the player in control of the prototypical hero, they actually have to defend him. After a light introduction, a warrior and the eponymous healer venture into a dungeon teeming with all sorts of dangerous monsters. The goblins, slimes, and other beasts advance toward the duo in rows, the leaders of which attack the "tank," while the rest wait their turn until a gap opens in the ranks. The only power players have over the tank is suggestion, telling him which row to attack while you see to his defense. The tank, despite his name, might as well be made out of glass and relies on the healer to vigilantly mend his wounds and cast various sorts of defensive buffs to reduce the effectiveness of oncoming attacks. You'll also be crafting items and learning skills on the fly to make your party more effective, which means you'll never be without something to do in the heat of battle. If the tank and healer don't succumb to their enemies, the healer's torch will eventually go out, at which point the journey will begin anew after allowing you to spend the experience you just earned on a myriad of different upgradeable attributes. This makes your quest easier at the outset, allowing you to go progressively further each time, as you learn more and become increasingly powerful. It's a really enjoyable little game that I'm glad I managed to pick up before it disappeared with scores of others when Sony turned off PSM's taps last month. Thankfully, A Healer Only Lives Twice is aptly named and won't be gone forever. Its creator has plans for the game in a post-PSM world. A Healer Only Lives Twice is primed for a Windows PC release sometime this summer, ensuring that a larger audience will have an opportunity to play this cute roguelike RPG if they so choose.
Doujin Dojo photo
But playing second fiddle isn't half bad
Doujin Dojo is a sporadic column dedicated to spotlighting independent games from Japan and the people that make them. Every time I talk about PlayStation Mobile, someone inevitably mentions it's the first time they...

Steel Strider photo
Steel Strider

Doujin spin on Turrican, Contra coming to Steam

Steel Strider blasts off this fall
Aug 01
// Kyle MacGregor
Chances are you're unfamiliar with Astro Port, which is equal parts understandable and unfortunate. Japanese independent studios don't get lavished with attention (something we're trying to change), and Astro Port's wares are...

Sights from Japanese indie festival BitSummit

Jul 12 // Kyle MacGregor
BitSummit takes place at Miyako Messe, located in Kyoto's museum district. Thousands of people attend annually. Here, the crowds pour into the show day one. [Image: Indie Megabooth] Koji Igarashi, Inti Creates CEO Takuya Aizu, and Keiji Inafune among a star-studded panel lineup. [Image: Shuhei Yoshida] Kyoto's mascot Mayumaro poses with D4 director Hidetaka "Swery" Suehiro and Playism staff. [Image: Kyoto Prefecture PR] Pixeljunk Eden composer Baiyon performs for a live crowd. [Image: James Mielke] Western-developed projects Octodad and Fez on display at the PlayStation booth. [Image: Shuhei Yoshida] Any Japanese video game expo worth its salt has at least a samurai or two. [Image: Inside Games] Tetsuya Mizuguchi (Lumines, Rez, Space Channel 5) and Kazutoshi Iida (Doshin the Giant). [Image: James Mielke] Please remember to take your shoes off before entering the Unity game space. [Image: Playism] Mayumaro finds Chulip and Little King's Story director Yoshiro Kimura's new crew Onion Games. [Image: Kyoto Prefecture PR] More crowds! [Image: James Mielke] Sony Worldwide Studios boss Shuhei Yoshida with La-Mulana 2 designer Takumi Naramura. [Image: Shuhei Yoshida] BitSummit founder James Mielke enjoying the show with his daughter. [Image: James Mielke] *** P.S. This past week, Yatagarasu Attack on Catacylsm, a doujin fighting game developed by a trio of former King of Fighters veterans, launched on Steam. If you're interested in checking out some of the latest and greatest indie games from Japan, this would be a good place to start.
BitSummit photo
Snapshots from Kyoto
Doujin Dojo is a sporadic column dedicated to spotlighting independent games from Japan and the people that make them. This weekend, Kyoto played host to BitSummit, Japan's top independent games festival. Now in its...

Review: Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm

Jul 07 // Kyle MacGregor
Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm (Windows PC)Developer: PDW: HotapenPublisher: Nyu MediaMSRP: $14.99Released: July 7, 2015 Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm often draws comparisons to Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike, and for good reason. It was a major influence for designer Ume-Zono, who was an active competitor in tournaments, and has its fingerprints all over the place -- from the visuals to the parry system. In terms of the basic controls, there are four main attack buttons (split between light and heavy punches and kicks), plus two others that allow players to parry high and low attacks. Of course, there are combos and supers, though most of them are fairly simple and easy to pull off. That goes a long way in making the game feel accessible to newcomers. While there certainly are deeper systems to be explored, I felt comfortable with Yatagarasu in minutes, quickly picking up a Shoto-style character (there are two) and was throwing fireballs and dragon punches in no time. True to its inspiration, Yatagarasu is all about controlling space on the ground, and there are some interesting wrinkles in terms of movement to help you do so. There's a quick forward jump similar to King of Fighters' hyper hop, which is useful for closing distance or avoiding projectiles while mitigating your susceptibility to anti-air attacks -- which can't be blocked. Meanwhile, dashing is nice for backing up quickly, but still leaves you vulnerable to strikes.  The roster includes a diverse group of eleven fighters, all of whom are unlocked from the get-go. In addition to Shoto guys, the cast features a grappler, a pair of sword-swinging ladies that look nearly identical but play very differently, a Dudley clone boxer, and teleporting ninja. This version of the game adds three new characters, Kotaro (a technical fighter mid-air specialist), Azure (who makes use of a Reppuken à la King of Fighters' Geese), and Aja (a slow and heavy sword user). While there aren't a ton of characters, it still has a nice variety and the limited number of options means it probably won't take you too long to decide which ones fit your preferred styles of play. After selecting a fighter, you will have to make a couple decisions that add a bit of color to the experience. The game will prompt you to power up one of your two supers, which will make that one more powerful for that battle. Yatagarasu also has a commentary system, which features prominent faces from the fighting game community, including Jchensor, UltraDavid, and Maximilian. The commentary is a cute idea, but it can be distracting. And while there are a number of voices to choose from, after spending a while with the game I'd heard just about everything they'd had to offer and opted to switch them off entirely. There aren't a lot of other extras to be found, though. The package is about spartan as it gets, coming with a pair of arcade modes, versus, network play, and surprisingly robust training mode. Of course, the quality of the online experience is of the utmost importance. Or at least you'd think so. Despite GGPO support being promised in the project's crowdfunding campaign, the lag-reducing middleware has not yet been implemented, which is a huge disappointment. The development team still plans to include GGPO eventually, but it will not be there at launch. Since I've been playing Yatagarasu pre-release, I wasn't spoiled for choice in terms of competition, leading me to reluctantly take on a number of opponents with less than stellar ping.  I've experienced a lot of that in my time with Yatagarasu thus far, pushing past a string of minor headaches to enjoy the combat. Everything outside of battle -- from the way the game launches to the austere menus and 4:3 resolution that doesn't take into account widescreen -- it all could have been handled so much better. Even just getting my controllers and fight pad to work properly was a constant source of frustration. Without rhyme or apparent reason, something always seemed to be going wrong, putting a damper on an otherwise great experience. That's really a pity too, because when you're in a match and everything's working properly this game is an absolute dream. I enjoy the minimalist visuals and emphasis on mind games and feeling out your opponent, rather than pulling off technical combos. In a lot of ways, it's refreshing how stripped down Yatagarasu is, but it would have been nice to see more attention around the periphery.  Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm is wonderful, except when it isn't. From first blood to knockout this is an exceptional fighting game. I just wish the rest of it was held to that same standard.  [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Yatagarasu review photo
A strong contender
[Disclosure: The reviewer supported Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm's Indiegogo campaign.] Yatagarasu has taken a long and winding road to get where it is today. The doujin fighting game has existed in one form or an...

This Japanese FPS just misses its mark

Jul 04 // Kyle MacGregor
The Legend of Alfur isn't particularly good, but I was more than willing to overlook its rough edges, at least at first. The experience pulled me in from the get-go. It begins when our protagonists, a lass named Shalnawaz and her brother Leon, are taken captive by soldiers from a neighboring kingdom. And to make matters worse, the men openly plan to sell the siblings into slavery.  Things quickly take an unexpected turn, though. One of the soldiers kills his commanding officer, then frames the siblings for the murder, forcing them to escape and fend off their pursuers. It's just a pity that the actual game doesn't back up the intrigue of the premise. Despite being a few years old now (and being created by a small team on a limited budget), this thing was dated when it launched. It isn't pretty. At all. But its graphical shortcomings pale in comparison with the gameplay. [embed]295318:59341:0[/embed] While engaging in shootouts, I often found my character clipping through objects and getting caught on scenery. Hiding behind cover isn't always effective, as enemy fire can travel through boulders, hillsides, and trees. And firing back is just as troublesome, thanks to some truly awful iron sights.  Still with me? Despite those many issues, I still somehow managed to glean a bit of enjoyment out of The Legend of Alfur. It is by no means great (or the best use of $10), but the sheer novelty of an anime-style first-person shooter cannot be denied. It's something I'd honestly like to see more of. If you'd like to see more Doujin Dojo, check back with Destructoid every weekend for more (hopefully positive) coverage of Japanese indie games and the people that make and localize them. Want us to report on something in particular? Hit me up ([email protected]) and stay tuned!
Doujin Dojo photo
Alfur isn't so legendary
Welcome to Doujin Dojo, a new column dedicated to the Japanese indie scene. Maybe I should have started this out by gushing about Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale or Astebreed (which is now available on PS4, by the way). Or mus...

Astebreed photo

Doujin shmup Astebreed hits PS4 on June 25

Courtesy of Playism
Jun 11
// Kyle MacGregor
Astebreed is finally warping to PlayStation 4 on June 25, Playism announced today. The shoot-'em-up comes from doujin studio Edelweiss and was actually among my favorite games released last year when it debuted on PC. In addi...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Doujin fighter Yatagarasu finally arrives July 7

At long last!
Jun 08
// Kyle MacGregor
It's taken two years, but the wait is nearly over. Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm, the new fighting game from a small team of former King of Fighters developers, is hitting Steam July 7 for $14.99. Originally planned for a Fe...
Pigeon dating sim 2 photo
Pigeon dating sim 2

Get flirty with Hatoful Boyfriend's sequel this fall

Sexy birds return in Holiday Star
Jun 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Everybirdy's favorite avian dating sim Hatoful Boyfriend is back with a sequel, Holiday Star. Originally released in 2011, the visual novel is now being remastered by Mediatonic and Devolver Digital for PlayStation 4, PC, and...

Review: Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser

Jun 02 // Kyle MacGregor
Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser (PC)Developer: Astro PortPublisher: Nyu MediaReleased: June 4, 2015MSRP: $4.99 The story centers on Takuya Akatsuki, captain of the eponymous Vulkaiser, and his trusty team of VulFighter comrades, who together must defend the planet from an armada of alien invaders. Akatsuki's buds can join him in battle one at a time, fusing their ships with his own. Each augment the Vulkaiser with a wide swathe of munitions ranging from a cannonade of heavy missile fire and a gun that harnesses the power of lightning to a needle blaster and a massive drill. Diffused between the levels are a series of vignettes where the VulFighters that just accompanied the protagonist will have something to say. While it's never explicitly stated, the game encourages players to stick with one squadmate throughout the experience, as the longer they accompany our hero in battle, the more of their personal storylines we see. It's a small lure, but those willing to humor it will discover an added wrinkle to the challenge. Even if you manage to clear the game on its hardest difficulty setting, sticking with a single VulFighter throughout the campaign's duration certainly ups the ante. In addition to particular allies being more useful in certain situations more so than others, they're also limited by their shields. Much like the Vulkaiser itself, the VulFighters only recharge a small amount of health between one battle and the next. Once a ship is gone, it's gone! And there aren't any continues either, so you need to be mindful about weaving through every barrage avoid an untimely and disappointing end. That's how Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser hooked me. Having initially played through the game and thought it enjoyable, if a tad prosaic outside of its charming '70s anime veneer, I began playing the game within the game. I decided to see if I would see new dialogue if kept using the same VulFighter. I soon discovered, yes, that's the case -- though this came with the realization that it might be difficult to keep them alive long enough to see all of it. And challenging it was. Going back to the lede, the moment Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser got under my skin was at its climax. I had nearly completed the entire game with my pal Kimiko in tow, only to see her VulFighter crash and burn mere moments before felling the final boss. I felt crestfallen, despondent, but more than anything imbued with a sense of purpose, an intense desire to forge ahead on this self-imposed quest. I found it remarkable how such a seemingly unexceptional experience could rise to be so much more than the sum of its parts. I can't guarantee Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser will blow you away, but I'm having a blast with it. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Doujin shmup review photo
On target
Amidst a wash of old school mecha anime and Tokusatsu-tinted nostalgia, there was a moment in this otherwise homespun shooter that left me surprised and curiously enamored. Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser doesn't come from a gen...

Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser invades Steam next week

Let's go, giant robot of steel!
May 28
// Kyle MacGregor
A blast of '70s-inspired action is bombarding Steam next week in Supercharged Robot Vulkaiser. Announced for a western release nearly two years ago, the mecha shooter from doujin studio Astro Port (Gigantic Army) is fina...

Review: Touhou 14: Double Dealing Character

May 08 // Chris Carter
Touhou 14: Double Dealing Character (PC)Developer: Team Shanghai AlicePublisher: Team Shanghai Alice (JP) / Playism (US)Released: August 12, 2013 (JP) / May 7, 2015 (US)MSRP: $14.99 There's no Texas two-steppin' around it -- the "Western" release is not a good port. There's very little effort put forth at all, mostly due to the fact that it's relatively untouched from the Japanese version, and it's not translated -- at all. Double Dealing Character's menus were already in English, but extra details and bits of the story are all in Japanese, so you'll have to manually update it with an outside fan patch. When Playism announced that it was "bringing Touhou to the West," I assumed it would be a little more than "we made it slightly easier to buy the original Japanese game." Whether this is Playism's doing or Team Shanghai Alice's request, the result is the same.   The actual game, thankfully, is very good, and I must stress though that with the English menus, it is entirely playable. If you haven't experienced a danmaku (also known as bullet hell or curtain fire) game before, the concept is pretty easy to grasp. Tons of bullets will litter the screen at all times (like a curtain), and it's your job to maneuver around various patterns while firing back at your opponents. As is the case with most Touhou games, Double Dealing Character features a standard shot button in addition to one for specials, and a "slow" ability, which I'll explain in a moment. Where the Touhou team excels is in the presentation of it all. The bullet patterns are varied and constantly keep you on your toes, but they're also coupled with a charming art style and catchy music. Double Dealing Character is no exception. It would be fun to read the various story bits that pop up during boss fights and between levels, but again, you'll need a fan patch for that. Not being able to understand it all doesn't fundamentally ruin the game, but Touhou fans are big on their lore for a reason -- it gives context to the proceedings, and elevates the experience significantly. [embed]291754:58465:0[/embed] You'll have access to three characters, all of which have two different variations in tow. Each "ship" (in this case, a magical girl) has a different rate of fire or type of shot, such as a straight bullet or a spread. Specials add even more variety, like one character who uses a giant broom melee attack, or another who fires a deadly void bomb that slowly creeps up the screen. This is where the lack of a translation comes into play again -- you'll have to experiment with each variant since you can't read what they do on the select screen. Now, about that "slow" function I mentioned earlier -- it's another Touhou staple that spices things up a bit. At any time you can hold a button to make your character's flight more precise, which not only shows your hitbox (a blinking light that displays where bullets can damage you), but changes up your shot type as well. Personally, I always map it to the left trigger, so I can comfortably switch in and out of it at will, and it works like a charm. Thankfully there is plug and play controller support, and it's easy to customize your buttons. Like most shoot-'em-ups, Double Dealing Character will last you roughly an hour your first time around, with six stages and an additional EX level. There's also a few extras like a practice mode, music player, and some secrets that you'll definitely need a guide or translation for. Playism may have made it easier to buy into Touhou, but the actual result isn't anything better than just purchasing the game anywhere else. It you're a shoot-'em-up fan and haven't touched the franchise yet, you owe it to yourself to play at least one game in the series -- so why not start here? [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.]
Touhou review photo
Bad port, great shooter
As I've said in the past, I consider myself lucky when it comes to meeting fellow gamers over the years that have had a positive impact on my life. I was fortunate enough to discover the Touhou series back in 2002 at the...

Touhou photo

Japan's most popular indie series arrives in the West

Touhou 14 out now on Playism
May 07
// Kyle MacGregor
The Japanese indie sensation Touhou has been around for nearly two decades. Since debuting in 1996, the series has transformed from a collection of obscure shoot-'em-ups into a cultural phenomenon, spawning a myriad of deriva...
Touhou photo

More Touhou is coming to PlayStation 4

Croixleur studio announces STG port
May 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Touhou seems to be everywhere these days. The series is making its western debut tomorrow. A demo for the next mainline entry isn't too far behind. And even some of the fan-made games are on their way to PlayStation 4. The cu...
Touhou 14 photo
Touhou 14

Touhou makes its western debut on May 7

Prolific doujin series finally crosses the Pacific
May 02
// Kyle MacGregor
When it comes to Japanese indie games, there's Touhou and then there's everything else. Over the course of two decades, the property has transformed from an series of obscure bullet hell shooters into a cultural phenomenon. H...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Playism is localizing doujin games for PS4, Vita

Astebreed, Croixleur Sigma, and more coming west in 2015
Apr 21
// Kyle MacGregor
Good news for fans of Japanese indie games: Playism is bringing its wares to consoles.  We've known this was happening for a while, but now it's official. The company has announced plans to localize a number of Japanese ...
Touhou localization photo
Touhou localization

Doujin shooter Touhou 14 targets western release

And Playism aims for our hearts
Apr 07
// Jordan Devore
Japanese indie games distributor Playism scored the rights to one of the Touhou titles last year, putting us one step closer to a possible English-language adaptation of the popular doujin series. That was the speculation, an...
La-Mulana EX photo
La-Mulana EX

La-Mulana EX is nirvana for punishing game enthusiasts

Alternatively, 'Spelunking for Masochists'
Apr 04
// Jason Faulkner
There's a certain thrill to a game that punishes you for attempting to best it, as Bloodborne and Souls series fans can attest to. That's why there happen to be so many of them cropping up here and there, especially over the ...
TyranoBuilder photo

Make your own visual novels with this simple tool

TyranoBuilder coming to Steam this week
Mar 23
// Kyle MacGregor
TyranoBuilder is on its way to Steam this Friday, March 27, Nyu Media has announced. The new program is advertised as "the easiest, fasted way to create multi-platform visual novels," allowing users to create games for compu...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Doujin Deals: Check out this Japanese indie bundle

Feb 27
// Kyle MacGregor
This latest Humble Weekly Bundle is chock-full of awesome Japanese independent games. The new pay what you want promotion includes adventure game Cherry Tree High Comedy Club, its visual novel companion Cherry ...

Hug a pigeon with this Hatoful Boyfriend body pillow

What is life?
Feb 12
// Kyle MacGregor
You can buy a Hatoful Boyfriend dakimakura cover over at Humble Bundle right now. Yes, really. It's all part of a Valentine's Day promotion, which features the pigeon dating sim plus a smattering of other visual novels, incl...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Doujin fighter Dynamite Bomb launches next week

Arrives on Playism next Tuesday, February 17
Feb 09
// Kyle MacGregor
Dynamite Bomb is coming to Playism's western storefront next Tuesday, February 17.   The fighting game, developed by doujin circle Light Green 8, is a combo-heavy experience where standard attacks don...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Yatagarasu AoC hits Japanese arcades this week

The PC version will come out whenever it comes out
Feb 09
// Kyle MacGregor
Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm launches in Japanese arcades Thursday, Taito has announced. Meanwhile, the doujin fighting game's long-awaited PC release still remains a work in progress. "The timing of the NESiCAxLive release...
Croixleur Sigma photo
Croixleur Sigma

Croixleur Sigma PS4 dated in Japan, here are some details

Next month for 1,500 yen
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Croixleur Sigma is coming to PS4 on March 5 for 1,500 yen, and based on the details we have so far, I hope it gets localized. The expansion/update of sorts will have a full visual HD upgrade, as well as more characters, mons...
Touhou x PlayStation photo
Touhou x PlayStation

Touhou games may come to PlayStation this year

But probably not the games you want
Jan 27
// Josh Tolentino
Ah, Touhou Project. The hyper-popular series of bullet-hell shooters has long been a Holy Grail of sorts for non-PC-owning otaku, and the efforts to get games with the Touhou brand on various consoles have been mighty indeed...

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