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Watch Dogs' many bonuses photo
Watch Dogs' many bonuses

All the Watch Dogs collector's editions are the wrong versions


Wikipedia table doesn't help make that purchasing decision any easier
May 12
// Brett Zeidler
Earlier today, Cheap Ass Gamer's Robert Goode pointed out on Twitter that Watch Dogs' Wikipedia page listed out every single various edition of the game you could possibly purchase in a handy table that also detailed what pie...
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Evan Amos is gaming's most popular photographer


But you've probably never heard of him
Nov 03
// Dale North
We'll spoil Evan Amos' awesome story, found here on Gamasutra. Wikipedia is what makes him the most popular gaming photographer. If you've ever looked up any gaming related hardware on Wikipedia, there's a good chance you've ...

Founder Andrew Tsai on the future of PCGamingWiki

Apr 29 // Alasdair Duncan
Seeing as how we're in the transition period between new consoles, has there really been a change in attitudes by developers as to making the PC version of their games an afterthought? "I can see that game developers are taking PC gamers more and more seriously," says Andrew. "Back when Borderlands 2 was announced, they paraded their PC-centric features in Claptrap's love letter to PC gamers. Ken Levine made similar promises for BioShock Infinite, saying that PC gamers would 'feel at home' with the PC-centric customizations and features." While developers make promises and concessions with the best intentions, a videogame's PC release might still be problematic. Andrew continues, "However, even games as big as BioShock Infinite still had a lot of PC problems on release: an FOV slider which you could only adjust 15 degrees, a mouse sensitivity slider range that was far too wide, the ability to only load one savegame at a time, autoaim which you couldn't disable, as well as an entire set of performance, texture loading and microstuttering issues. All of these issues were fixed by the community and written up on our BioShock Infinite article literally hours after the release of the game." Ah, the tireless work of the people that don't put up with a temperamental game. These folks are the backbone of PCGamingWiki, as Andrew mentioned fixes for a variety of BioShock Infinite problems were posted within days of the game's release and that's not the only title. When the PC version of Dark Souls was released last year, it was a less that stellar port. Developer From Software candidly admitted at the time that their lack of experience on the PC was to blame for a myriad of issues (Director Yui Tanimura later admitted the port was "half assed") but the fixes came thick and fast. One modder managed to find a way to adjust the locked screen resolution within half an hour of release and the fixes are still coming even in 2013 with mods to address co-op and the PvP elements of the game. Considering unpaid programmers are happy with spending their time fixing or improving parts of a game, is there a danger some developers abusing this hard work? "Yes, I do think that developers rely on the community for fixes when they launch incomplete games, Andrew says. "All these fixes (for Dark Souls) reduce From Software's development time and the post-launch support required, and they also have a huge positive impact on sales. I think it's fair to say that developers are taking the fixing communities for granted!" Although it's hard to think a developer would intentionally not fix issues affecting a game, it's heartening to know people will put in the leg-work to make fixes that can make a poor game better and sometimes even better than in its original state. PC modding is also essential for keeping older games available and running on newer versions of windows and more modern hardware. GOG.com does some great work in selling older games that come with built-in emulators, making it a cinch to run on a new PC -- but there's still room for modders to get involved. "The size of the PC gaming back catalog is enormous -- it stretches back more than 25 years and includes tens of thousands of games. It seems a terrible waste that a whole body of games becomes incompatible every time we install a newer version of Windows. This is especially true when all it takes is a few simple tweaks and fixes to get older games working on modern systems." As someone who spent a long time trying to get System Shock 2 to work on a modern PC, the efforts made by fans to make fixes and patches are invaluable to keep older games accessible for those wanting to play them now. Andrew told me "the System Shock 2 (on GOG.com) release actually comes bundled with a version of SS2Tool, a community fix pack for the game. And KOTOR 2's Restored Content Mod and widescreen fix must be responsible for nearly all of the sales of that game on Steam." So what does the future hold for the site in the coming years? "PCGamingWiki has gone from strength to strength since the site was founded in early last year," Andrew tells me. "The amount of interest we now get is staggering -- our March 2013 visitor numbers are seven times higher than they were in March 2012, and we are continually growing." The idea of collecting all this knowledge from so many disparate sources seems like such an obvious one that it's hard to figure out why it took so long for such a site to exist. Collecting all these tweaks and guides is one thing but designing a site so people are able to actually go in and share their knowledge is just as important.  "I think people are really drawn to the main concept of the site -- one page for every PC game containing all the fixes and workarounds you'll ever need. No more hunting around Google or through pages of forums and broken links -- if we have instructions which are wrong or need updating, you can go ahead and edit the page yourself, no account is required." It's this ease of use that's making the wiki such an important part of PC gaming. Even when you're not having an issue with a particular game, it's great to get performance tips and tweaks that will improve your experience in even the smallest ways. What's more important is that the knowledge contained in the wiki will help keep older PC games playable on current and future hardware; unlike a console, you're very rarely able to dig out your old system to play older games that won't play ball on your current rig. Andrew says this is the big goal for the team: "My ambition is that PCGamingWiki will have an up-to-date page of tweaks and fixes for every single PC game that has ever been made, providing a way of dipping back into the past quickly and easily. The size of the PC gaming back-catalog is enormous, it stretches back more than 25 years and includes tens of thousands of games. It seems a terrible waste that a whole body of games becomes incompatible every time we install a newer version of Windows." If PCGamingWiki can even achieve 10% of that goal, then it will be truly invaluable.  [Image source]
PCGamingWiki photo
How the wiki aims to keep PC gaming alive and vital
When it launched last year, the PCGamingWiki attempted to solve those technical headaches that can still blight some PC releases. As the current console generation grew longer and longer, the PC had a resurgence as a gaming p...

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PC Gaming Wiki 2.0 aims to help fix every PC game


Feb 25
// Alasdair Duncan
One of the complaints commonly leveled against PC gaming is that because of it's open-platform nature, it can feel like a gamble if a game you bought will actually work, especially if you're a novice user. Steam has simplifie...

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Mega Man Legends 3 Wikipedia edits are amazing


Jul 20
// Jim Sterling
There's been quite a bit of fallout following the news of Mega Man Legends 3's cancellation, but if you want to find some of the best, look no further than the game's Wikipedia page. The page has had to be locked after fans b...
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WikipediaGame will kill your day entirely


Jun 10
// Conrad Zimmerman
How dense am I? It never once occurred to me to apply degrees of separation to Wikipedia articles and make a game of it. We've all played Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon before, so this should have been obvious.  People have ...
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Muscle March coming this Monday for just five bucks


Jan 17
// Jonathan Holmes
Did you know that the initial trailer for Muscle March was one of the most viewed video posts on Destructoid in 2009? It got nearly half a million hits last year. Not bad for a game we all thought would never leave Japan. In...
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Sony is a dirty Wikipedia troll, edits Halo 3 article, loves online vandalism


Sep 04
// Jim Sterling
It's not just Electronic Arts getting in on the Wikipedia editing shenanigans, it seems. One of our top  tipsters, Action Bastard, has informed us of a certain edit on Halo 3's Wikipedia page informing us, in biased glor...
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EA to the Internets: 'What's a Wikipedia?'


Aug 17
// Jim Sterling
While it's debatable that Electronic Arts is, in fact, De Debilz, there's no denying that the locust-esque company swallower is, like most corporations, a big fat pile of PR and sleaze. The news should have come as no shocker...
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EA alters Wikipedia, monkeys destroy Statue of Liberty


Aug 15
// Earnest Cavalli
According to a report at Shacknews, it appears that a staff member at Electronic Arts has been playing fast and loose with the company's Wikipedia page. The staffer, using an IP address registered to EA's Redwood City offices...
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World Famous Portmanteau: Beta Edition


May 23
// William Haley
If you're anything like the millions of other people surfing the Web right now, then you're probably always on the lookout for new and interesting ways to waste your life away behind a keyboard. As always, Destructoid is here...
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More Wikipedia vandalism for Sony


Nov 21
// Dyson
As an online, user created encyclopedia, Wikipedia can be a great resource, but in the hands of fanboys, it becomes pure comedy. Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo have recently had their respective console entries locked, due to u...

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