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Repaint your Captain Titus with this Space Marine mod


Sep 13
// Josh Tolentino
As everyone knows, Adeptus Astartes (read: Space Marines) of Warhammer 40,000 are awesome. They can probably beat up any of your favorite game heroes without so much as a rev of their phallic chainswords. And if there were an...
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The DTOID Show: Our Friday live show happened!


Sep 10
// Tara Long
Hiya, fellas! Sorry I'm late on posting yesterday's episode of The Destructoid Show, but Max and I stayed up all last night playing Dead Island with some of the guys from Bitmob. The things we do for work! Anyway, yesterday'...
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Warhammer 40K: Space Marine disappears from UK Steam


Sep 09
// Jim Sterling
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is on sale in the United Kingdom today, but those looking to get the game on Steam will notice that it's suddenly not on the storefront. The game recently blipped out of existence, and nobody's ...

Review: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine

Sep 08 // Jim Sterling
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Relic EntertainmentPublisher: THQReleased: September 6, 2011MSRP: $59.99 (console), $49.99 (PC) Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine's campaign tells the tale of Captain Titus, a hero of the Ultramarines Space Marine chapter. His squad is sent to a Forge World (essentially a huge, planet-sized factory) in order to deal with an invading mob of Orks and liberate the strategically crucial location. Unfortunately, all is not as it seems. The Chaos Space Marines show up, and Titus is locked in a three-way struggle for the planet, along with the experimental new energy source that it houses. Space Marine's story is not exactly deep, and in fact it only gets interesting at the end, where it is aggravatingly cut short by a sequel hook. That said, it takes the "grimdark" world of Warhammer 40,000 very seriously, and does an excellent job of representing the three races that drive its story. The Space Marines, Orks and Chaos forces look and sound incredibly authentic, presenting perhaps the best representation of 40K forces that I've seen in any entertainment medium.  While the narrative is a little unfulfilling, one cannot say the same for Space Marine's combat. Expertly merging melee hack n' slash violence with ranged warfare, Relic Entertainment has created a surprisingly tight, fluid action experience. I'm rather impressed by how well the sword-swinging and gun-slinging work together, as Titus swiftly moves from one style of play to the other. Using the shoulder buttons for guns and the face buttons for melee weapons, controls are streamlined and intuitive, making for a versatile game in spite of its inherent simplicity.  There's also a solid range of weapons to choose from, all lovingly taken from the tabletop experience. Ranged weapons include the standard rapid-fire Bolter and sniper-esque Lascannon, as well as more exotic weapons such as the Melta Gun -- which essentially fires an all-encompassing mass of energy at anything stood within ten feet ahead of the player, reducing enemies to paste. Players use the left trigger to aim and the right to fire, as one would in a standard third-person shooter, although some weapons are best suited to hip-firing, "spray and pray" tactics, especially when foes get close. Melee weapons come in four varieties -- the weak combat sword, the one-handed chainsword and force axe, and the two-handed thunder hammer. Titus performs standard melee attacks with one button and stun attacks with the other, while incredibly simplistic combos (hit, hit, stun and hit, hit, hit, stun) are used to create more effective stun blows. If an enemy is stunned enough to become dazed, Titus can perform a brutal finishing move. Executions are used to replenish health, and look ridiculously cool, with finishers determined by the enemy being fought and the weapon used -- for example, fighting a Bloodletter Daemon with a chainsword will see Titus grab it from behind and pull the chainsword through its throat. Yes, it's very pleasant. Titus has a regenerating shield, but once it's depleted, he loses health, which can only be recovered using executions or activating Fury. The Fury meter grows with each successful attack, and once activated, Titus regains HP while also dealing more damage. As the campaign progresses, he unlocks the ability to slow-down time while aiming his ranged weapons, too. Throughout the game, various upgrades are unlocked, although there are no real "RPG" elements to the game -- Titus gains upgrades at predetermined points, and they're only light enhancements at best.  Space Marine does a commendable job of throwing one into the thick of battle. Thinning an encroaching horde with gunfire before diving in with a chainsword makes for some engaging combat, and things can get quite challenging. Prioritizing targets is essential, as knowing when to take out the ranged opponents and when to deal with the melee troops is often the key to surviving. Tougher enemies, such as shielded Ork 'Ardboys and Chaos Space Marines, need to be dealt with above all else.  The combat system certainly has a few issues, though. For one thing, the deliberate lack of a cover system might be authentic when dealing with fearless Space Marines, but it can make for some frustrating fights. The game often places ranged enemies far beyond reach, and firefights become pretty tricky when all you have is a weak dodge roll to avoid machine gun sprays and viciously efficient explosives. Likewise, the lack of appreciable defenses in melee combat means that Titus takes huge amounts of damage when fighting even a small group of enemies -- a problem made worse by the lengthy execution animations and the fact that he'll still lose health while performing them.  Despite these annoyances, Relic has built a fighting system that's far more elegant than I expected it to be, and for that it deserves praise. There's a satisfying barbarity to the combat, with bolter fire tearing enemies to shreds and thunder hammers crushing Chaos Marines in their armor with beautiful severity. What I truly love is just how much like a genetically enhanced superhuman the game makes one feel. The screen shakes as Titus runs (an effect thankfully toned down from earlier builds), melee blows feel heavy and commanding, while the huge, audacious guns are a pleasure to use. Titus even enjoys a few levels with an Assault Jump Pack, allowing him to leap high into the air and then smash back down, devastatingwhole crowds caught in the blast. The biggest downside to the campaign is that it is a very short affair. A player storming through the game will likely be done within six hours, and while I found the gameplay fun enough to want to play it again, others will likely feel a little unsatisfied by the game's sudden conclusion and rather cheap cliffhanger.  Fortunately, there is a robust multiplayer mode to keep things spicy, and it's shockingly good. Two traditional game modes -- team deathmatch and capture point -- pit Space Marines and Chaos Marines against each other across a modest selection of maps. There are three classes to choose from -- the jack-of-all trades Tactical/Chaos class, the melee-based, speedy Assault/Raptor and the ranged Devastator/Havoc troop. Players can switch classes between deaths, and some maps are more advantageous to certain characters, encouraging players to swap out characters rather than stick with a single type.  Each class has a range of unique weapons and perks (earned with level increases) that enhance their combat prowess. Personally, I love the Devastator/Havoc, who can roll into battle with a heavy bolter (a machine gun the size of a motorcycle) and take a stationary braced stance to chew up the opposition. That said, the Tactical class' flexibility and the Assault's jump pack make them equally effective choices, and I've noted that players seem to be using a healthy variety of characters, rather than forcing games to become huge jump pack contests.  Classes are mostly well balanced, but I do think the Assault/Raptor class is a little overpowered and could possibly do with a reduced health meter to offset its huge close-quarter advantage. That said, no one class has a supreme advantage over another, and the maps are also really well designed, with sensible spawn points and excellent killzones that often house dramatic back-and-forth battles. I'd certainly have liked a few extras classes, too. Chaplains/Dark Apostles could have been cool healing/buff classes, and I'd love a Librarian/Sorcerer class as well. Perhaps something to think about for the future. Players get to fully customize their characters using almost every available paint color that Games Workshop produces. Each armor piece has a range of unlockable variants that players can use to create their perfect Space or Chaos Marine, and daub them in whatever color they wish. Relic has also gone to the trouble of including a huge range of pre-set, canonical Marine Chapter and Chaos Warband color schemes, so if you want to represent the Space Marine Salamanders or Chaos Alpha Legion, their schemes are readily included. I'm just a little disappointed that I had to cobble together my own Thousand Sons warrior, but that's just me being pedantic. Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is a wonderfully tight production that brings an authenticity and intensity befitting Games Workshop's beloved universe. While there are some vexing design decisions and the campaign is disappointingly brief, there's nevertheless plenty of content to get stuck into and exquisitely savage combat on offer. With its bloodthirsty gameplay, heartfelt atmosphere, and expectantly flowing mixture of ranged and brawling warfare, Space Marine is an exemplary entry into the action genre that will satisfy fans of the source material, and possibly make new fans of those less familiar.
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Warhammer 40,000, the tabletop game in which sci-fi depictions of fantasy creatures battle it out in a grim, perpetually violent future, lends itself well to the world of videogames. In fact, one can be quite certain it's ins...

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With Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine's release having crept up on people, it would be easy to forget that the game actually had a Collector's Edition release. It boasts quite a cool selection of goodies, and we got our paws o...

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[Contest is CLOSED. Winner will be notified via Dtoid Private Message!] We got a Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine chainsword in the mail. It's life-sized and designed for a ten-foot-tall Space Marine, so it's absolutely bloody...

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Live show: Mash Tactics plays Space Marine early


Sep 05
// Bill Zoeker
[Not sure what Mash Tactics is? I've included a clip from the most recent episode to show you just a glimpse of what you've been missing, you daft fool! You can see all of Destructoid's previously-aired live shows in our arc...
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The DTOID Show: Serious Sam, Skyrim Bugs, and CoD: XP


Sep 02
// Max Scoville
Good evening, Destuctikids! As it's a Friday, we shot today's Destructoid Show in front of a LIVE internet audience. In case you missed it, here it is. Today, in addition to giving away some Assassin's Creed Revelations...

Hands-on: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine 'Exterminatus'

Sep 02 // Jim Sterling
As you already know, Exterminatus is a four-player co-op mode featuring wave-based combat. Fans of such modes will already know the basics at play -- each wave gets harder and harder until you either win or get brutally slaughtered. At its most difficult, Exterminatus will start throwing Chaos Space Marines (or regular Marines, if players are using Chaos) at the team, and trust me when I say that those guys do not go down easy. The three classes from the competitive multiplayer mode are present, along with any unlocked perks, weapons, and ranking. Players can choose the flexible Tactical class, the melee-based Assault class, or the brutally ranged Devastator (my personal favorite). As with versus mode, experience points are earned with kills and accomplishments, which level up the player and provide further character bonuses.  Unfortunately (and quite possibly thanks to the fact we were using developer kits), my online experience was rather laggy, but I was able to play enough to get a good feel of what Exterminatus was like, and I quite enjoyed it. Rather than each player having a limited number of respawns, the entire team shares one pool of lives, and the game ends if everybody is down before a new one has been earned. After a certain score is reached, another life is earned. Points are earned with kills, but are also won by completing challenges that intermittently appear. These challenges include taking capture points on the map or scoring a certain amount of melee kills within a time limit. Despite their simplicity, some of these challenges can be tricky and the point bonuses are crucial, especially when lives are thin on the ground.  Although it's not deep and engaging enough to sustain an entire game by itself, Exterminatus is perfect as an addition to a title that's already looking satisfying. As I said, I adore wave-based challenge modes, and marrying the concept to Warhammer 40,000 is a terrific idea. The ability to take your multiplayer character, complete with weaponry and perks, is a nice addition, and the level of challenge presented feels just right.  It's just a shame to me that the mode is, indeed, coming a month after launch. THQ must be confident that a lot of people will still be playing the game thirty days later, but I can't say I share that assurance. I certainly hope they are, but I'm worried nobody will be around to play it when it finally appears. I guess we'll have to wait and see on that count.  I shall certainly keep my fingers crossed, because I want to play Exterminatus some more.
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Last night, THQ announced a new co-op mode for Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine. Exterminatus pits a squad of four Space Marines against increasingly intense waves of screaming Orks on a variety of maps. It's scheduled to arriv...

A Space Marine could beat up your favorite game hero

Sep 01 // Jim Sterling
Think of your favorite videogame protagonist. A Space Marine could beat it up. Not even a particularly powerful Space Marine, like Captain Titus in Relic's upcoming game. I'm talking about Novices, the ones fresh out of training and ready for battle. A new Space Marine recruit has cooler armor than Master Chief, features more muscles than Marcus Fenix, and has been augmented more times than Adam Jensen before he's even had his first real fight.  Space Marines are selected from across the universe, which, in Warhammer 40,000's depiction, contains hundreds of human-populated worlds with a wide variety of harsh environments. Billions upon billions of humans are considered for recruitment, and of those, only a handful actually get chosen. Before they're subjected to genetic enhancement and brutal training, they're already ridiculously outstanding examples of human accomplishment.  One selected, the recruits are then physically altered and brutally trained. Genetic alterations include a second heart and a pair of backup lungs. They get nineteen new organs in total, and a number of their bones are fused together to provide greater protection to the insides. They can survive and recover from the kind of wounds that reduce DOOM's so-called "Space Marine" to bloody gibs in seconds. They can breathe underwater and inhale toxic gas, because why not? They can also hibernate if they like.  Then, of course, we get the Power Armor. It's cooler than Master Chief's glorified bicycle helmet and makes what is already a twelve-foot-tall, bone-fused genetic freak considerably bigger and more intimidating. They have mechanical muscles inside that, once bonded to the Marine, feel as light and natural as normal flesh.  In short, a Space Marine is basically fan fiction that human beings have written about themselves. The ultimate Mary Sues, Space Marines are so perfect it makes you want to throw up. Granted, they're also massive dicks who think a half-dead guy glued to a chair is some sort of god, but they're pretty damn good at what they do. They also have swords with chainsaw blades on it, which is cooler than the chainsaw bayonet of Gears of War because it's even more ridiculously redundant.  As said earlier, this is all before a Space Marine gets anywhere close to being experienced. They've already suffered more physical trauma than most videogame protagonists put together before they're even given a bolt pistol, but the ones that actually live long enough to become veterans (and Space Marines can live for at least 500 years) are the really scary ones. They fight Orks, slavering daemons, undead metal skeletons, and even other Space Marines -- the Chaos-tainted ones that are a million years old and backed up by reality-shifting Gods. Unlike most videogame heroes, who go up against a single villain, the Space Marines are beset on all sides by aliens, monsters, and space elves. Compared to that, Mario looks like a pussy for having so much trouble with a shitty little turtle.  That's pretty much why it's awesome that we're finally getting an action videogame starring the Space Marines. They're basically better than you and everybody you've ever looked up to. If they punched Nathan Drake in the face, his face would become a rich, warm soup as eyeballs, hair and skull disintegrated into screaming paste. If a Space Marine kicked him in the bollocks, he'd suffer total body disruption and paint the walls as little more than squirming, gibbering ketchup.  Basically, my videogame hero could beat up your videogame hero, and if you disagree, you're horrible.
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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is almost upon us, and it's looking set to be quite good indeed. I've long been enthralled by Games Workshop's expansive universe, and have thirsted for more videogames over the years.  Whi...

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Warhammer helps sexify your Xbox avatar


Aug 16
// Liam Fisher
We know you all love that spiffy avatar gear, and THQ's got your back this time out with an assortment of Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine apparel and pets for your Xbox Live avatar. Seriously, get excited. Do it. For 80 points...

Not another Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine preview!

Aug 16 // Jim Sterling
THINGS THAT ARE AWESOME: Space Marine Meatiness: The game does a great job of making you feel like a genetically engineered super soldier. Regular humans are tiny in comparison, and constantly look up to you, cheering for your arrival. Every time you stumble upon am embattled squad of Imperial Guard, you really feel like a hero who's arrived in the nick on time. Ranged/Melee Attack Fluidity: Automatically switching between guns and melee weaponry is as simple as pressing two alternate buttons. The triggers are for shooting, the face buttons are for hack n' slashing, and both methods work pretty well. Neither side is really nerfed, either. You'll need to use both bullets and chainswords in order to deal with enemies, usually requiring the gun to thin the herd before the survivors surround you.  Jump Packs: These are, to be blunt, freakin' awesome. I was expecting them to be quite sloppily implemented, but they work really well. You press a button to boost into the air, then a target reticule appears on the ground. If you hit the melee button, you'll whizz down toward the target and deal huge damage to anything caught in the impact zone. It's incredibly fun, and very tightly controlled.  THINGS THAT NEED WORK: Movement Controls: Strangely, the gimmicky jump packs control really well, but general movement isn't so hot. Captain Titus is rather hard to steer left and right, and I noticed he had a tendency to clip on bits of scenery. It's nothing that makes the game unbearable, but it can be annoying.  Rocket Launchers: It took less than twenty minutes to determine that rocket launchers are the worst. Be it Orks or Chaos Marines, anything that explodes will deal huge damage to Titus, and things that explode are everywhere. Missile troops are great shots, too, so they'll nearly always hit their target if you're in range. They're everywhere, too. It's hard to feel like a badass when you're afraid of charging into combat before of all the rockets.  Camera Shake: The camera shakes when the player sprints. While it's a cool effect in limited doses, having it happen every time makes for some headache-inducing visuals. I can see it getting quite annoying over the course of a full game.  These are a few quick mental notes I took away from the preview build. Right now, it's looking like a very solid game, albeit one with a few issues. We will have a full review coming in the near future (probably!) and I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the full experience holds up.
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Both the single-player and multiplayer of Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine has been previewed multiple times. We're less than a month away from release and THQ wants another! I've been playing a preview build of the game this p...

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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine getting a demo


Aug 15
// Jim Sterling
If you're undecided on whether you want to curbstomp Orks and melt Chaos Space Marines to slag, then you'll be glad to know that THQ is setting you up with a demo of Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine ahead of time. The taster is...
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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine getting co-op


Aug 10
// Jim Sterling
THQ has confirmed that Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is getting a co-op mode. The feature will be patched into the game thirty days after launch, and will be a free addition. It's been mentioned that it will only be free to ...
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Holy crap, Warhammer 40K: Space Marine customization!


Aug 08
// Jim Sterling
This video is about a month old but nobody seemed to spot it until it popped up on NeoGAF earlier today. That's a shame because it's pretty damn great. The video takes us through the customization process in Warhammer 40,000...
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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine multiplayer trailer


Aug 03
// Jim Sterling
Here's a trailer for Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine, detailing the class-based multiplayer. As Conrad already told you, there are three classes to choose from, and they can be fully customized with perks, chapter colors, and...
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Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team aiming for PSN next week


Jul 29
// Jordan Devore
On Tuesday of next week, Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team will become available to PlayStation Network users in North America. As was the case with the already out Xbox Live Arcade release, this twin-stick shooter will be $9.99. I...
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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine gets dramatic trailer


Jul 27
// Jim Sterling
There's plenty of drama and muscular male angst in this new cinematic trailer for Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine. This will be a game about huge men, sweating and grunting at each other for hours. Can't wait! The game's out September 6 and I'm pretty pumped, as both a fan of the 40K universe and of excessive violence. It ought to be pretty dang good.
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THQ already discussing Warhammer 40K: Space Marine 2


Jul 22
// Jim Sterling
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine isn't on shelves yet, but THQ and Relic are apparently confident enough to be already discussing the sequel. According marketing manager James McDermott, the talks have just kicked off. "We...

Preview: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine multiplayer

Jul 20 // Conrad Zimmerman
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)Developer: Relic EntertainmentPublisher: THQRelease date: September 6, 2011 The competitive multiplayer offerings in Space Marine consist of 8 vs. 8 team battles in two modes, a deathmatch game called "Annihilation" and the control point-based "Seize Ground." There isn't really a whole lot that distinguishes them from their counterparts in other multiplayer games in terms of rules, but the game does strike a nice balance in its three classes of Space Marines. The Tactical class is your all-rounder, proficient but not exceptional at anything. Devastators carry the big guns, your Heavy Bolters and Plasma Cannons, and do so with tremendous effort as they trudge around the battlefield. Assault Marines fly around on jetpacks and swing Chainswords. Yes, that's a combination chainsaw and sword. You can guess what everybody quickly gravitated towards. The Assault class is stupidly fun. While they have these jetpacks on their backs, they are still covered in bulky armor and drop like a ton of bricks once the brief burst of upward mobility ends. If you're quick, you can even target an enemy on the ground to receive your weight in damage but landing near a target is usually enough as their melee weapons cut through opponents like butter.  Once we saw the clear preference for getting up close and personal, a few of us got smart and switched to the Devastator class. Their Plasma Cannons fire a ball of energy that explodes on impact for a ton of damage. Using one player as a lure, oncoming melee fighters would be pelted with plasma, often resulting in multiple kills of overeager Marines. It all worked so well until the enemy got a sniper on the field, who would later be flanked by Tactical units. The balance is there and it's fun. The feeling of weight does wear thin after a bit however, and I was constantly trudging back to the battlefield to get back in the action. In Seize Ground games, you can choose to spawn at a control point held by your team. But doing that adds a significant delay added to your respawn time almost making it pointless unless you absolutely need to make it to the entire opposite end of the map to hold the point you're spawning at. The three maps we were shown were interesting and more vertical than I would have expected considering how slowly everyone moves. It makes the Assault class all the more appealing and all the stages had plenty of available space for them to rocket off into the air. A ruined bridge stage was particularly neat, with some great choke points at the center and a set of sub-surface paths. They're perfect for 16-player matches with a fair bit of ground to cover without becoming too expansive but, again, the speed of the characters does make finding that action something of a chore on occasion. We were also given the opportunity to tool around with the Customizer which allows you to create the Space Marine you've always wanted. Speaking as a fan of the models, it's a loving nod to the hobbyists who have kept this franchise alive for 25 years. More than thirty chapters of Space Marines are represented as base color sets but you're free to make your unique Marine by swapping out helmets, chests and individual arms and legs. Each component can be painted individually from an impressive range of official colors from Games Workshop's Citadel line of paints and battle details can be switched on or off, allowing you to look like a battle-worn soldier or the crisp, clean fist of the Emperor. The Customizer also allows you to create custom loadouts. Each class has its own selection of weapons they can wield, along with a range of class and weapon-specific perks. There is plenty of variety among the perks, of which you can select two. Weapons and perks are unlocked through an experience progression system with over forty levels. I was thoroughly impressed with the customization options. Failing to provide enough choice for fans of 40k would have been met with torches and pitchforks, most likely. But Relic has hit the mark wonderfully here and making a Space Marine with the Customizer brings a little touch of the creativity inherent in the title's forebears. I had a lot of fun playing Space Marine in multiplayer. The battles are intense and the three classes provide for heated and strategic conflicts which should make for a solid addition to the title when it releases this coming September.
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Last week, I was a press event in Santa Monica to check out Relic Entertainment's new third-person shooter, Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine. I have been a huge fan of the lore of the Warhammer 40,000 setting and even...

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Eldar Ulthw DLC coming to Dawn of War II - Retribution


Jul 19
// Maurice Tan
New DLC has been announced for Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II - Retribution. Just like the previous The Dark Angels DLC, it will give you a bunch of new models for the major units and new color schemes for the others. Excep...

Review: Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team

Jul 18 // Jim Sterling
Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team (PlayStation Network, Xbox Live Arcade [Reviewed])Developer: THQ Digital StudiosPublisher: THQReleased: July 13, 2011MSRP: $9.99, 800 Microsoft Points Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team is a co-op arcade shooter in which two players face off against hordes of Orks from an isometric perspective. There are four character classes to choose from -- the melee-centric Vanguard Veteran, the ranged Sterngard Veteran, the balanced Librarian, and the turret-planting TechMarine -- each with their own set of strengths, weaknesses and unique special abilities. As the game progresses, players can unlock "Perks" that add extra health, damage, or special ability enhancements, as well as class-based weapons that deal more damage. The unlocks are welcome, but they're incredibly straightforward, and the points-based unlock requirements will see you finding all weapons and perks fairly quickly. Kill Team is, above all, an incredibly simple affair, but that's not to say it's bad. The game's sole intention is to drop players into various levels and throw waves of enemies at them, all of which need to be dispatched with stick-based firepower or button-mashing melee attacks. In this regard, it is a success. You can't go too wrong with such a simple idea, and by sticking to a well-worn path, Kill Team provides a satisfying experience. There's just one catch -- it's only really satisfying when played cooperatively. As a single-player game, Kill Team feels weak and dull. It clearly hasn't been balanced for solo play, and as such, it isn't very fun when going alone. In single-player, all enemies will train their projectiles on one target, a target that cannot dodge and that moves so slowly (even while "sprinting") that most attacks will hit their mark. It's not really a hard game so much as it is just annoying. Co-op provides balance by evening out the damage and allowing players to revive each other, making for a far more enjoyable game. When played in co-op, there is quite a bit of fun to be had, but unfortunately, you will need to find a real-life friend. For some unknown reason, there isn't any online functionality aside from leaderboards, so you can't hook up with a friend via Xbox Live. The lack of online play really kills a lot of the game's potential, as it relies so heavily on the co-op experience yet deliberately makes it harder to access. The sad knock-on effect is that Kill Team feels more halfhearted than it actually is. At its core, the game is a solid and fun shooter that is of surprisingly high quality for something that uses unlockable content in Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine as its biggest selling point. The fact that it cannot have its co-op capabilities exploited to the fullest, however, severely damages its potential. I was fortunate enough to play most of the game with my stepson, but those not so fortunate need to have a friend who is a gamer, a fan of arcade shooters, and has a desire to play Kill Team above something else more exciting. That's a list of requirements so specific, only a handful of gamers could meet them.  Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team is a decent little shooter for fans of the franchise, but it's really not fun when played on its own, and the lack of online is a glaring limitation that's difficult to discount. THQ needed to either make the game exciting enough for solo players or include an online option. The fact it did neither means that what could have been a really good game has ended up as a decent but blatantly lacking shooter.  It's a shame that Kill Team does not disprove the preconception that it is a cheap cash-in existing solely to promote Space Marine. It easily could have been more than that.
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THQ is starting a habit of paving the way for retail releases with digital spin-offs. We had Red Faction: Battlegrounds release on XBLA ahead of Red Faction: Armageddon, and now Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team has appeared to pro...

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Dawn of War III to emphasize army customization


Jul 12
// Jordan Devore
When pressed for news on Dawn of War III, Relic marketing manager James McDermott was surprisingly up front about the direction of the new Warhammer 40,000 strategy title. Some of it's been said before by THQ's Danny Bilson, ...
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Relic working on Warhammer 40K: Dawn of War III


Jun 15
// Jim Sterling
THQ core games emperor Danny Bilson has confirmed that Relic Entertainment is working on the next major stage of the Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War series, and that it's looking pretty sweet. "We’re working on the next-g...

E3: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine hands on

Jun 08 // Jim Sterling
My hands-on time with Space Marine had me coming away with a very positive feeling. The flow between shooting and slashing really is fluid, as you can instantly switch between gunfire and melee weaponry without any delay in the action. Blast away with a Bolter, run into the action with a huge shoulder charge, grab an Ork and chainsaw it in the guts. One can't say fairer than that! The game does a great job of making the player feel like a superpowered transhuman. The screen shakes as you run, with your power armor thundering on the ground. Attacks are heavy and hit damn hard, and the execution animations are thoroughly brutal. This is a beefy game for people who want to drink the blood of bears and wipe out anything that isn't human with a hearty, manly laugh.  The demo had a range of weapons, from surprisingly effective sniper rifles to the disappointingly ineffective Melta Cannon, which is not half as powerful as its name implies. Standard Bolters and Bolt Pistols are satisfying to use though, and are great for thinning the herd before switching into melee mode.  Although you're a superpowered marine who eschews cover and hacks Orks to pieces in seconds, the game is not a cakewalk. Chaos Space Marines and their aggressive Bloodletter demons are pretty tough opponents, and you'll need to quickly identify powerful ranged opponents and take them out before wading into the fight. These battles in particular are fittingly chaotic and it is very easy to get lost in the unwavering carnage. I had a blast playing the game, and was thrilled to see the seamless blend of ranged and personal combat pulled off with style and efficiency. Space Marine looks like it'll be a terrific experience for fans of the series and a crazed carnival of carvery and chaos for all involved. At the very least, it's a solid dose of antisocial fun, and you can't really ask for more.
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My interest in Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine is well known. I love me some Games Workshop silliness, and I love big, meaty action games. A merger of the two can only be a good thing, right? It's certainly looking good!  

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E3: Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine trailer gets Chaotic


Jun 06
// Jim Sterling
A sexy new E3 trailer for THQ has made its way to the Internet, and it shows off the forces of Chaos in motion for the first time. As usual, you can see loads of blood and grunting manliness in the above video.  THQ is ...
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Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team announced


Jun 02
// Jim Sterling
After being outed by Australia's rating board, Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team has officially been announced. It'll be an XBLA/PSN primer for the retail-bound 40K: Space Marine, a practice that's starting to get quite trendy.&nb...
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Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team outed by rating board


May 31
// Jim Sterling
THQ is hard at work pimping Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine, but according to Australia's OFLC ratings board, there's yet another game brewing -- Warhammer 40,000: Kill Team.  THQ Digital Studios UK is apparently working ...

How many ways can Space Marine NOT rip off Gears of War?

May 28 // Jim Sterling
No Cover System Gears of War is a cover based shooter. What that means is that you don't run-and-gun, not if you want to survive. While there are instant-kill melee attacks, the main objective in any situation is to find something to hide behind and pop out of cover to shoot. This is exactly not what happens in Space Marine which, if anything, is a traditional third person shooter in that a cover system isn't used.  Relic Says: "Everything in Space Marine has been built around delivering the core fantasy of being this powerful hero -- the combat system emphasizes forward momentum and encourages players to throw themselves into the fray confidently, where they can be most effective.  "Space Marines are confident warriors with hundreds of years of training and fighting under their belts, powerful armour, and devastating weaponry at their disposal. They are conspicuous on the battlefield, inspiring fear in the hearts of their enemies, and hope in the hearts of the regular human fighters who pray to live long enough to witness a Space Marine in glorious battle. "They do not take cover, they do not hide behind things to take pot-shots at their enemies. In fact, when the going gets tough and you find yourself in a situation where you’re taking a beating and other games would want you to back away and cower behind something while you recover, we give you tools to become even more aggressive – using vicious execution moves to harvest enemies for health. This way you are never out of the battle; you fight until all your enemies are dead. "By bucking this current convention in 3rd person shooters, we are able to deliver a combat experience that is truly unique, emphasizing a strong sense of forward momentum, and confident mastery of the battlefield." Melee Is Just As Important As Ranged Combat Unlike Gears of War, Space Marine is just as focused on close-quarter combat as firefights. Yes, Space Marine features a Chainsword that resembles the Chainsaw Bayonet from Gears, but even that was invented by Games Workshop's tabletop game first. By using it, Relic isn't copying Gears of War, it's being faithful to the source material. Man, how many ways can Gears of War rip off Warhammer 40,000, am I right? Relic Says: "In addition to having a full 3rd-person shooter combat model that is competitive with any other shooter out there, Space Marine boasts a robust 3rd-person melee combat experience as well. It’s the seamless blending between these two systems that sits at the heart of what makes Space Marine’s combat so unique, so fluid and dynamic, and again, delivering on this sense of powerful momentum. The seamless responsiveness of having these two combat systems at your disposal is a huge part of delivering that core fantasy of being one of the most highly trained, highly capable war machines in humanity’s history. "Combining ranged and melee so seamlessly gives the combat and encounter styling of Space Marine its own flavour as well. Combat tends to happen in short-to-medium range setups, with players having full control over how they want to fight the battle. Melee is as viable as ranged in the vast majority of encounters, and fights tend to get very up close and personal. This adds to the intensity and fast-pace of the combat experience. You are making split-second decisions about which of the many tools in your arsenal, and which combat abilities, you’re going to use to fight the layers of enemies you face at any given point." Hordes Of Enemies From what we've seen of Space Marine, the game has more in common with hack n' slash titles and wave-based shooters than Gears of War and its small-scale, methodical, ranged warfare. Waves of Orks throw themselves at the player, and protagonist Captain Titus needs to keep moving and swinging his Chainsword in order to survive. Relic Says: "Space Marine often surrounds you with hordes of enemies, especially when fighting Orks, our brutal animalistic mob-like enemy. We’ve built our technology so that we can throw over 30 highly-detailed enemies at you at any given time. This is core to our promise of presenting a compelling 'one vs. many' fantasy where you are constantly surrounding on all sides -- just as humanity is constantly surrounded at all sides by the brutal alien hordes -- and you dominate through skill and force of arms." Games Workshop Created 40K In 1987, BITCH! As we already pointed out, Warhammer 40,000 is several decades old. In fact, its dark n' gritty universe is probably responsible for influencing the vast influx of bleak, war-torn shooters we've had this generation, with Gears of War at the forefront. It's almost impossible to make a third-person Space Marine game that doesn't look like Gears, because Gears of War's visual style takes so much from Warhammer 40,000. Relic Says: "The origin of Space Marine as a game, was to take an IP Relic has a great love for, and express it in a completely new way. This was to be from the point of view of one of the most iconic heroes of the IP -- the Space Marine. In 40k, this means something very specific -- it’s not at all a generic label. Delivering the fantasy of being this hero is what has driven all our decisions around combat, the aesthetic of the world and characters, details of how the characters look, move, speak, think, etc. Just like any vast and rich IP -- think of Lord of the Rings, or Star Wars -- there are many ways to express the core pillars of the setting. For the past eight years we’ve focused on delivering 40k from the point of view of the battlefield commander. With Space Marine, we’re giving you 40k from the point of view of having your boots on the ground, and feeling the blood on your face. "Space Marines are 7’ tall superhuman warriors encased in conspicuous sanctified armour and carrying ancient but extremely powerful weaponry. They are masters of sword and gun, and this is what has informed all our decisions about the visual portrayal of the character, and the way our combat system works." Aesthetics As said above, Games Workshop created a visual style that has an undeniable influence on videogames, so to the (very) untrained eye, I can see how some random game calling itself Space Marine may look like a rip-off of Gears of War. Of course, it takes only a very small amount of digging to find out just how likely it is that you accused the wrong side of forgery.  Even outside of that, though, the universe of the 41st Millennium is pretty damn different from Epic's world of Sera.  Relic Says: "Warhammer 40,000 is a nearly 25-year old IP that comes with a very specific aesthetic styling. The architecture is vast and Gothic inspired, there is a techno-medieval aesthetic with technology and speech patterns, there is a sense of the great peril the humanity finds itself in through having billions of alien enemies on its doorstep, trying to snuff it out of existence. "The portrayal of the world -- from our vast structures to epic landscapes, destroyed cities and mysterious research facilities – is all part of the way that we are bringing the rich 40k universe to life in a way it’s never been seen -- or experienced -- before. This is us being inspired by 25 yrs of incredible creativity, and adding our own flavor to bring this amazing and rich universe to a whole new audience, so that they can learn to appreciate it as much as we have." So What Have We Learned? Venture Beat made a mistake and updated the post to address the ton of comments arguing against the original assertion. The problem of such accusatory contrasts is not unique to the otherwise on-the-ball Venture Beat, however.  Accusations of plagiarism and ripping off are pretty common among gamers, and such accusations are nearly always based on ignorance. It's the attitude that sees every first-person-shooter get compared to Halo and every action game compared to God of War.  Sure, many games are inspired by other games. The cover system works, and thus has been incorporated into many shooters. Few action games are as brutal and heavy as God of War, so it's natural that it influenced the development of future titles. Inspired and ripped-off are two different concepts, and if you're going to throw the latter term around, you better treat it with respect and you need to bring more to the table than, "I just think they look a bit similar." Otherwise you will end up writing an update that's longer the original article. 
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Earlier this week, Venture Beat landed itself in hot water with the gamer community after publishing the controversial article, "How Many Ways Can Space Marine Rip Off Gears of War?" The article accused Relic of copying Epic'...

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Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine collector's edition


May 25
// Jim Sterling
I love me some Warhammer 40,000, so the recently announced Space Marine Collector's Edition is a thing that I want. It's lacking a statue or an exclusive 40K miniature (which would have been badass), but it's still ...

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